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Editorial Results (free)

1. Protest for jailed Capitol rioters: Police ready this time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Burned before, Capitol Police say they are taking no chances as they prepare for a Saturday rally at the U.S. Capitol in support of rioters imprisoned after the violent Jan. 6 insurrection.

2. Nashville health group pushes vaccines for all -

The Nashville Health Care Council board of directors has issued a statement urging every person to get vaccinated against COVID-19, and it invited top executives of health care companies nationwide to sign on to the statement.

3. Crushed by pandemic, conventions mount a cautious return -

In pre-COVID times, business events __ from small academic conferences to giant trade shows like CES __ routinely attracted more than 1 billion participants each year. The pandemic brought those global gatherings to a sudden halt, emptying convention centers and shuttering hotels.

4. Spread the word: Party’s winding down for short-term rentals -

News has never traveled faster than it does today, but the latest news concerning the short-term rental situation in Nashville seems to have exited the information highway.

Short-term rentals (STRs) began to boom in Nashville in 2015, some eight years after the company Airbnb was founded and began to gain momentum in the “It City,” which also has become known as “The Bachelorette Party Capital of the World.”

5. How 9/11 changed air travel: more security, less privacy -

DALLAS (AP) — Ask anyone old enough to remember travel before Sept. 11, 2001, and you're likely to get a gauzy recollection of what flying was like.

There was security screening, but it wasn't anywhere near as intrusive. There were no long checkpoint lines. Passengers and their families could walk right to the gate together, postponing goodbye hugs until the last possible moment. Overall, an airport experience meant far less stress.

6. AP sources: Intel shows extremists to attend Capitol rally -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Far right extremist groups like the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers are planning to attend a rally later this month at the U.S. Capitol that is designed to demand "justice" for the hundreds of people who have been charged in connection with January's insurrection, according to three people familiar with intelligence gathered by federal officials.

7. House asks companies to save Jan. 6 phone, computer records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is asking social media and telecommunications companies to preserve phone or computer records for hundreds of people who were potentially involved with efforts to "challenge, delay or interfere" with the certification that day of President Joe Biden's victory or otherwise try to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

8. As Ida leaves Gulf, analysts foresee modest economic damage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With more than 1 million customers in Louisiana and Mississippi having lost power, Hurricane Ida is sure to take a toll on the energy, chemical and shipping industries that have major hubs along the Gulf Coast. But the impact on the overall U.S. economy will likely be modest so long as damage estimates don't rise sharply and refinery shutdowns are not prolonged, economists say.

9. ICU beds full at most metropolitan Tennessee hospitals -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee hospitals warned Thursday that the intensive care units are full in nearly every hospital in the state's major metropolitan areas, pleading with Tennesseans to get vaccinated and wear masks while not going so far as to criticize Gov. Bill Lee's executive order  allowing parents to opt their children out of mask mandates in K-12 schools.

10. How AI-powered tech landed man in jail with scant evidence -

CHICAGO (AP) — Michael Williams' wife pleaded with him to remember their fishing trips with the grandchildren, how he used to braid her hair, anything to jar him back to his world outside the concrete walls of Cook County Jail.

11. Mayor names Jurkovich public affairs senior adviser -

Tom Jurkovich has joined Mayor John Cooper’s administration as senior adviser for public affairs.

Jurkovich will provide strategic leadership in communications, community outreach, issue management, and coalition building as part of the effort to advance the mayor’s priorities on a range of policy areas, including transportation, sustainability, affordable housing and economic development.

12. Heir: Sacklers won't settle unless freed from opioid suits -

Members of the family that owns OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma won't contribute billions of dollars to a legal settlement unless they get off the hook for all current and future lawsuits over the company's activities, one of them told a court Tuesday in a rare public appearance.

13. Census: Tennessee sees big growth in, 20.9% in Nashville area -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Areas in and around Nashville saw a population boom over the last decade, while the greater Memphis region saw low or no growth, or lost people, according to detailed national population data from the U.S. Census Bureau released Thursday that lawmakers in Tennessee will use to redraw state and congressional districts currently dominated by Republicans.

14. Gresham Smith announces executive team expansion -

Gresham Smith, a national architecture and engineering firm based in Nashville, has expanded its executive management team, with Peter Oram, market vice president for the firm’s Transportation and Water + Environment businesses, being named chief operating officer, and Kelly Knight Hodges, market vice president for the firm’s Corporate + Urban Design business, selected as chief development and engagement officer, a new role that expands Gresham Smith’s executive management team from four to five members.

15. Tokyo logs record 5,042 cases as infections surge amid Games -

TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo reported 5,042 new daily coronavirus cases on Thursday, hitting a record since the pandemic began as the infections surge in the Japanese capital hosting the Olympics.

The additional cases brought the total for Tokyo to 236,138, about a quarter of the national total. Japan reported more than 14,000 cases on Wednesday for a total of 970,000.

16. Marchetti receives national recognition -

L. Gino Marchetti, Jr., managing partner of Taylor, Pigue, Marchetti and Blair PLLC, was recently presented the Richard Boyette Award from the National Foundation for Judicial Excellence for outstanding contributions to the foundation.

17. Japan expands virus emergency after record spikes amid Games -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan expanded a coronavirus state of emergency to four more areas in addition to Tokyo on Friday following record spikes in infections as the capital hosts the Olympics.

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga declared an emergency in Saitama, Kanagawa and Chiba, near Tokyo, as well as in the western city of Osaka, effective Monday until Aug. 31. Emergency measures already in place in Tokyo and the southern island of Okinawa will be extended until the end of August, after the Olympics and well into the Paralympics which start Aug. 24.

18. 'This is how I'm going to die': Officers tell Jan. 6 stories -

WASHINGTON (AP) — "This is how I'm going to die, defending this entrance," Capitol Police Sergeant Aquilino Gonell recalled thinking, testifying Tuesday at the emotional opening hearing of the congressional panel investigating the violent Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

19. MacNeill Pride Group buys outdoor gear maker -

Nashville-based MacNeill Pride Group, a designer and manufacturer of outdoor products and sporting goods, has acquired Klymit, a leading outdoor gear designer.

Terms of the transaction were not disclosed. MPG is a portfolio company of Centre Partners.

20. Top Davidson County commercial sales for June 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, June 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

21. We have a winner! -

The first Tennessee State Fair was held at the Walnut Race Course in North Nashville in 1855. It was the same year poet Walt Whitman first published “Leaves of Grass,” Isaac Singer patented the sewing machine motor and Congress approved $30,000 to test camels for military use (clearly, that didn’t work out well).

22. Police testimony will lead off panel's first Jan. 6 hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol is expected to hold its first public hearing this month with police officers who responded to the attack and custodial staff who cleaned up afterward, chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson said Friday.

23. House to probe Capitol riot despite Republican opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sharply split along party lines, the House launched a new investigation of the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection on Wednesday, approving a special committee to probe the violent attack as police officers who were injured fighting Donald Trump's supporters watched from the gallery above.

24. Baker Donelson hires for real estate practice -

N. Courtney Hollins has joined Baker Donelson as a shareholder in the firm’s Nashville office and a member of the Real Estate Practice Group.

Hollins represents buyers, sellers, developers, investors, landlords, tenants, lenders and borrowers in commercial real estate acquisition, disposition, construction, development, leasing and finance transactions, workouts and restructuring.

25. House poised to launch new probe of Jan. 6 insurrection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Split along party lines, the House launched a new investigation of the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection on Wednesday, approving a special committee to probe the violent attack as police officers who were injured fighting former President Donald Trump's supporters watched from the gallery above.

26. No. 2 Republican won't say if GOP will support Jan. 6 probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The No. 2 House Republican won't say whether members of his caucus will support — or even participate in — a proposed select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol.

27. House to vote on bill launching probe of Jan. 6 insurrection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new committee to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol would have 13 members and the power to subpoena witnesses, according to legislation released by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. The House is expected to vote on the bill this week.

28. House GOP leader to meet with Capitol officer hurt on Jan. 6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A police officer who was injured in the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection and has pushed for an independent commission to investigate the attack will meet with House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy on Friday, according to two people familiar with the meeting.

29. Pelosi creates panel to `seek the truth' on Capitol attack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi made it official Thursday that she is creating a special committee to investigate the attack on the Capitol, saying it is "imperative that we seek the truth."

30. Pelosi signals new panel to investigate Jan. 6 Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is signaling that she is poised to create a new committee to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol, pushing closer to a partisan investigation of the attack after Senate Republicans blocked the creation of an independent probe.

31. Judge tosses most claims over clearing protesters in DC park -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge dismissed most claims filed by activists and civil liberties groups who accused the Trump administration of violating the civil rights of protesters who were forcefully removed by police before then-President Donald Trump walked to a church near the White House for a photo op.

32. Tokyo Olympics to allow local fans — but with strict limits -

TOKYO (AP) — A limited number of local fans will be allowed to attend the Tokyo Olympics, organizers announced Monday as they tried to save some of the spirit of the Games where even cheering has been banned.

33. Japan announces easing of virus emergency ahead of Olympics -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan on Thursday announced the easing of a coronavirus state of emergency in Tokyo and six other areas from next week, with new daily cases falling just as the country begins final preparations for the Olympics starting in just over a month.

34. Millions fear eviction as housing crisis worsens -

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 4 million people say they fear being evicted or foreclosed upon in the coming months just as two studies released Wednesday found that the nation's housing availability and affordability crisis is expected to worsen significantly following the pandemic.

35. Amazon allots $300 million for housing near mass transit -

ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Amazon is providing $300 million in low-interest loans to support housing located near mass transit in the Washington, D.C., area and the Seattle and Nashville, Tennessee, regions.

36. SVP-Singer purchased by Platinum Equity -

SVP-Singer Holdings, Inc., with corporate headquarters in La Vergne, has reached a definitive agreement for Platinum Equity to acquire a controlling stake in the company along with its wholly owned subsidiaries.

37. Many Americans moved to less pricey housing markets in 2020 -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Many Americans who moved last year relocated to areas where homes were, on average, bigger and less expensive.

On average, people who moved to a different city in 2020 ended up in a ZIP code where average home values were nearly $27,000 lower than in their previous ZIP code, according to Zillow.

38. Bass names Blackshear to executive committee -

Bass, Berry & Sims has appointed Lillian M. Blackshear from the firm’s Nashville office to its executive committee.

The seven-member committee includes attorneys from the firm’s Memphis, Nashville and Washington, D.C., offices. Members oversee strategic priorities of the firm, including client service, diversity and inclusion, growth and pro bono initiatives.

39. Tennessee to funnel $52M more into Memphis megasite -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee announced Tuesday that the state will pour $52 million into building a complicated wastewater discharge pipeline into a sprawling site that has failed to land potential tenants due to a lack of infrastructure buildout.

40. GOP blocks bipartisan probe of deadly Jan. 6 riot at Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans on Friday blocked creation of a bipartisan panel to study the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol in a show of party loyalty to former President Donald Trump, aiming to shift the political focus away from the violent insurrection by his GOP supporters.

41. US homebuyers increasingly willing to pay above asking price -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The red-hot U.S. housing market is widening the gap between what a home is objectively worth and what eager buyers are willing to pay for it.

Fierce competition amid an ultra-low inventory of homes on the market is fueling bidding wars, prompting a growing share of would-be buyers to sweeten offers well above what sellers are asking. Home prices have rocketed to new highs and many homes are selling for more than their appraised value.

42. Study: COVID kept Metro grads from college -

The 2021 Bridge to Completion report from the Nashville Public Education Foundation and the Tennessee College Access and Success Network finds unique challenges and inequities for Nashville public school graduates due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

43. Study: Residents left big metros during pandemic for family -

Cece Linder was living in a 770-square-foot apartment outside Washington, D.C., last spring when the area went into lockdown because of the coronavirus pandemic.

In May 2020, after a few months of both living and working in the small space, Linder decided to leave the capital area and move into the 2,000-square-foot (186-square-meter) beachside home she jointly owns with her parents in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Now she gets to see the sunrise over the water each morning before work.

44. HCA honored by LinkedIn as top company -

Nashville’s HCA Healthcare has been recognized on the 2021 LinkedIn Top Companies ranking, an annual guide that identifies the best places for professionals to grow their careers and develop skills.

45. Public transit hopes to win back riders after crushing year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Taking the Los Angeles Metro for his first trip in months, Brad Hudson felt a moment of normalcy when the train rolled into the station in South Pasadena, California, harkening back to his daily commute into LA before the coronavirus pandemic.

46. Tokyo under 'emergency orders' with Olympics 3 months away -

TOKYO (AP) — Only three months before the postponed Olympics are set to open, Tokyo and Japan's second largest metropolitan area of Osaka have been placed under emergency orders aimed at stemming surging cases of the coronavirus.

47. Senior community coming to Green Hills -

Bridgewood Property Company, a Texas-based developer of high-end senior living properties, has acquired property at 3808 Cleghorn Avenue in Green Hills for the development of a mid-rise, luxury retirement community.

48. Ready to buy a home? The trick is finding or affording one -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Nathan Long and Lili Chin have struck out so far in their four-month search to find an affordable home in the Los Angeles area — a cold streak that threatens to mess up their anniversary plans.

49. Delta cancels about 100 flights, opens some middle seats -

DETROIT (AP) — Delta Air Lines canceled about 100 flights Sunday due to staff shortages, and it opened up middle seats a month earlier than expected in order to carry more passengers.

The airline says it had over 1 million passengers during the past few days, the highest number since before the coronavirus pandemic began last year.

50. Man rams car into 2 Capitol police; 1 officer, driver killed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Capitol Police officer was killed Friday after a man rammed a car into two officers at a barricade outside the U.S. Capitol and then emerged wielding a knife. It was the second line-of-duty death this year for a department still struggling to heal from the Jan. 6 insurrection.

51. CEO of Google's self-driving car spinoff steps down from job -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — The executive who steered the transformation of Google's self-driving car project into a separate company worth billions of dollars is stepping down after more than five years on the job.

52. Open your door and say ‘Ahhhh’ -

Jacob Melnychuk grew up in San Jose, California, where he occasionally skipped science class at Leland High School to surf.

“I was a terrible high school student,” he admits.

But he also had a genuine sense of community, which rallied around the family of Pat Tillman, a fellow Leland graduate, after the Army Ranger was killed in Afghanistan in 2004. Tillman’s family was a staple in their community, and it was upsetting to Melnychuk to see how the military handled his death.

53. Nashville launches diversionary eviction court program -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A new diversionary court program in Tennessee's capital city is aiming to help keep tenants at risk of eviction from facing harsh legal consequences and charges on their records.

Nashville Judge Rachel Bell worked with the Metropolitan Action Commission to launch the Housing Resource Diversionary Court late last month, The Tennessean reported. The program comes as the Biden administration announced Monday that a nationwide eviction moratorium — which helps keep tenants who have fallen behind on rent in their homes during the pandemic — has been extended through the end of June.

54. Passenger vehicle travel rebounding to pre-pandemic levels -

Americans may be rounding a corner — literally — in their response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The number of daily passenger vehicle trips has hit a major milestone, reaching pre-pandemic levels for the first time in a year, according to data provided to The Associated Press by the transportation analytics firm Inrix, with Americans driving more often and farther than at any time since pandemic lockdowns were invoked.

55. Happy Monday? England embarks on major easing of lockdown -

LONDON (AP) — It's being dubbed Happy Monday, with open-air swimmers donning their wetsuits for the first time in months and rusty golfers doing their best to get their drives down the middle of the fairway.

56. Pelosi taps DC National Guard head to lead House security -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Friday that she had tapped Maj. Gen. William Walker, commanding general of the District of Columbia National Guard, to be the House's first African American sergeant-at-arms.

57. Democrats seek government records in Capitol riot probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are asking 10 federal agencies for documents and communications from the government as part of a wide-ranging investigation into the attack on the Capitol and how it happened.

58. Tennessee to expand vaccine eligibility to younger residents -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee will soon allow all residents 16 and older to receive the coronavirus vaccine, Gov. Bill Lee announced Monday.

Tennessee had been distributing the vaccine to health care workers, first responders, senior citizens and people 16 and older who have high-risk health conditions — including cancer, hypertension, obesity and pregnancy — as well as caregivers and household residents of medically fragile children.

59. Over the Cumberland, around the world -

Josef Newgarden has a very simple explanation for why Nashville seemingly has become the center of the motor sports universe.

Or more fittingly, as Newgarden suggests, on center stage in Music City.

60. News Corp strikes Facebook pay deal for Australian news -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — News Corp and Facebook have reached pay deals for news in Australia three weeks after the government passed laws that would make digital giants help cover the costs of journalism.

61. COVID relief bill could permanently alter social safety net -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package is being hailed by Democrats and progressive policy advocates as a generational expansion of the social safety net, providing food and housing assistance, greater access to health care and direct aid to families in what amounts to a broad-based attack on the cycle of poverty.

62. Is Tennessee ready for the slippery slope of legislating by phone? -

During the pandemic, members of local and state governing bodies have been allowed to conduct meetings electronically per executive order by Gov. Bill Lee.

They have not had to hold physical meetings in a physical place. They can hold meetings on Zoom or even by telephone conference call, as long as they allow the public real-time live audio or video access and follow other rules.

63. General: Pentagon hesitated on sending Guard to Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Department leaders placed unusual restrictions on the National Guard for the day of the Capitol riot and delayed sending help for hours despite an urgent plea from police for reinforcement, according to testimony Wednesday that added to the finger-pointing about the government response.

64. Takeaways: What hearings have revealed about Jan. 6 failures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many questions remain unanswered about the failure to prevent the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. But after six congressional hearings, it's clear that the Capitol Police were unprepared and overwhelmed as hundreds of Donald Trump's supporters laid siege to the building. It's also clear that no one wants to take responsibility for it.

65. McGlinchey welcomes IP, entertainment attorney -

Entertainment and IP attorney Brenner McDonald has joined McGlinchey Stafford as a member of the firm and resident in its Nashville office.

With more than 30 years in the entertainment industry, she brings a wide range of experience in entertainment, sports, corporate, business litigation and transactional law and will expand the firm’s intellectual property practice.

66. General: Pentagon hesitated on sending Guard to Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Department leaders placed unusual restrictions on the National Guard for the day of the Capitol riot and delayed sending help for hours despite an urgent plea from police for reinforcement, according to testimony Wednesday that added to the finger-pointing about the government response.

67. Tennessee to expand vaccine eligibility next week -

NASHVILLE (AP) — More than 1 million Tennesseans will soon become eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine after the Department of Health announced Tuesday it was expecting a large supply of the immunizations.

68. States easing virus restrictions despite experts' warnings -

MISSION, Kan. (AP) — With the U.S. vaccination drive picking up speed and a third formula on the way, states eager to reopen for business are easing coronavirus restrictions despite warnings from health experts that the outbreak is far from over and that moving too quickly could prolong the misery.

69. Capitol defenders cite missed intelligence for deadly breach -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Missed intelligence was to blame for the outmanned Capitol defenders' failure to anticipate the violent mob that invaded the iconic building and halted certification of the presidential election on Jan. 6, the officials who were in charge of security that day said in their first public testimony on the insurrection.

70. Takeaways from Congress' first hearing on Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Security officials testifying at Congress' first hearing on the deadly siege of the Capitol cast blame and pointed fingers on Tuesday but also acknowledged they were woefully unprepared for the violence.

71. Capitol defenders blame bad intelligence for deadly breach -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Faulty intelligence was to blame for the outmanned Capitol defenders' failure to anticipate the violent mob that invaded the iconic building and halted certification of the presidential election on Jan. 6, the officials who were in charge of security declared Tuesday in their first public testimony on the insurrection.

72. Impeachment over, Congress shifts focus to security failures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the still shaken and heavily guarded U.S. Capitol, thousands of National Guard troops still wander the halls. Glass windows remain broken. Doors swing without handles. And in the grand marble hallways, which amplified the shouts of insurrectionists just over a month ago, there is an uncomfortable silence.

73. Senate panels call former Capitol Police chief to testify -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has announced its first hearings to examine the Jan. 6 siege of the Capitol, calling in the former chief of Capitol Police and the former heads of security for the House and Senate, all three of whom resigned immediately after the attack.

74. 'Distressing and emotional': Senators relive horror of riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For 90 tense minutes, members of the Senate relived the horror.

They had seen much of the video of the insurrection before, but not like this — on screens near their desks, screams and anguish echoing across the chamber, with Democratic prosecutors explaining in detail how close they came to danger on Jan. 6 and how much worse it could have been.

75. United: Small electric aircraft will zip people to airports -

CHICAGO (AP) — United Airlines said Wednesday it will buy up to 200 small electric aircraft to help customers in urban areas get to the airport.

The airline said it will help electric-aircraft startup Archer develop an air taxi-type craft capable of helicopter-style, vertical takeoffs and landings. Archer hopes to deliver its first aircraft in 2024, if it wins certification from the Federal Aviation Administration.

76. Sitting on billions, Catholic dioceses amassed taxpayer aid -

When the coronavirus forced churches to close their doors and give up Sunday collections, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charlotte turned to the federal government's signature small business relief program for more than $8 million.

77. Tennessee to offer virus vaccine to those 70 and older -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee health officials announced Monday that the state will soon begin administering COVID-19 vaccinations to residents aged 70 and older.

According to the state Department of Health, Tennesseans on Tuesday can start checking with their counties to learn more about information about eligibility and registration. Furthermore, residents in the state's metropolitan areas may have different instructions.

78. Adams and Reese taps new partner in charge -

Edward H. L. Playfair has been appointed partner in charge of Adams and Reese’s Nashville office.

Playfair, who also serves as the firm’s Intellectual Property Team leader, serves clients’ intellectual property needs across the nation and around the world. He joined Adams and Reese in 2009 and previously practiced international law in the United Kingdom and is admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of England and Wales.

79. Number of guns found in Tennessee airports drops in 2020 -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Security officers at Tennessee's five largest airports found 162 guns in carry-on luggage in 2020, a decrease of only 19 incidents from the year before despite a significant drop-off of airline passengers due to the coronavirus pandemic, officials said.

80. AP source: Lawmakers threatened ahead of impeachment trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal law enforcement officials are examining a number of threats aimed at members of Congress as the second trial of former President Donald Trump nears, including ominous chatter about killing legislators or attacking them outside of the U.S. Capitol, a U.S. official told The Associated Press.

81. Nashville airport authority sues car sharing company -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Nashville International Airport officials have sued a peer-to-peer car sharing company over claims that its offerings at the airport are unauthorized and illegal.

The Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority filed the lawsuit this week against Turo Inc. in Davidson County Chancery Court. The lawsuit says Turo has not applied for a permit, received the authority's approval or paid required fees to offer services at the airport.

82. Nashville history not easily recreated -

After Tim Walker realized no one was killed in the Christmas morning suicide bombing on Second Avenue, his mind turned to the history the city might have lost, a history he has worked decades to preserve amid the cranes and congestion that seem to dominate Downtown Nashville.

83. FBI vetting Guard troops in DC amid fears of insider attack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. defense officials say they are worried about an insider attack or other threat from service members involved in securing President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration, prompting the FBI to vet all of the 25,000 National Guard troops coming into Washington for the event.

84. 'This is not a game': Global virus death toll hits 2 million -

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The global death toll from COVID-19 topped 2 million Friday, crossing the threshold amid a vaccine rollout so immense but so uneven that in some countries there is real hope of vanquishing the outbreak, while in other, less-developed parts of the world, it seems a far-off dream.

85. Delta, United, Alaska: No guns in luggage for DC flights -

Airlines and airports say they are stepping up security before next week's presidential inauguration, with Delta, United and Alaska saying they will prohibit passengers flying to the Washington area from putting guns in checked bags.

86. Risky driving: US traffic deaths up despite virus lockdowns -

DETROIT (AP) — The number of people killed on the nation's highways rose 4.6% in the first nine months of 2020 despite coronavirus lockdowns that curtailed driving early in the year.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that 28,190 people died in traffic crashes from January through September of last year, up from 26,941 in the same period of 2019. Final statistics for the full year won't come out until fall.

87. Packers, Bucs, Browns, Bills should make NFC, AFC title games -

The four downs segment will be a little different this week since the Titans don’t have an opponent to plan for, thanks to their playoff loss to Baltimore. Instead, our focus will shift to the four remaining games in the NFL Divisional Round.

88. EXPLAINER: Who's been charged in the deadly Capitol siege? -

Prosecutors have brought dozens of cases after the deadly attack at the U.S. Capitol and more charges are expected in the coming days as investigators identify more members of the pro-Trump mob.

Investigators are collecting tips from the public, interviewing witnesses and going through photos, videos and social media accounts to collect evidence against the attackers who overran the Capitol to stop the certification of Democrat Joe Biden as the next president. And those who've been charged so far could lead investigators to others who joined in the violent siege on Capitol Hill.

89. EXPLAINER: Why National Guard's role was limited during riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the aftermath of the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last week, questions are being raised about why the District of Columbia National Guard played such a limited role as civilian law enforcement officers were outnumbered and overrun.

90. Capitol Police rejected offers of federal help to quell mob -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three days before supporters of President Donald Trump rioted at the Capitol, the Pentagon asked the U.S Capitol Police if it needed National Guard manpower. And as the mob descended on the building Wednesday, Justice Department leaders reached out to offer up FBI agents. The police turned them down both times, according to senior defense officials and two people familiar with the matter.

91. More coronavirus relief on the way for small businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — For Nancy Sinoway, a second coronavirus relief loan would increase the chances that her dressmaking business will survive.

"I could use it for marketing, for new samples. I could use it as a lifeline," says Sinoway, who designs and makes dresses for occasions like weddings and proms. She was flooded with order cancellations starting in early March as the virus spread and large gatherings and events were abandoned.

92. Capitol police chief defends response to 'criminal' rioters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the U.S. Capitol Police defended his department's response to the storming of the Capitol, saying Thursday that officers "acted valiantly when faced with thousands of individuals involved in violent riotous actions." Washington's mayor called the police response "a failure."

93. EXPLAINER: How Democrats won Georgia's 2 Senate runoffs -

The Associated Press on Wednesday declared Democrat Jon Ossoff the winner of his U.S. Senate runoff election, the second such seat captured by the party in twin contests that were held in Georgia on Tuesday.

94. Trump to speak at DC rally as Congress meets on election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump will personally address a gathering of his supporters in Washington Wednesday as he seeks to rally populist support for his last-ditch efforts to overturn his loss to President-elect Joe Biden.

95. Colorado Guardsman has 1st reported US case of virus variant -

DENVER (AP) — Health officials say a Colorado National Guard member has the first reported U.S. case of COVID-19 variant and a second case is suspected in another Guard member.

Dr. Rachel Herlihy, the state's epidemiologist, said Wednesday that the two were deployed on Dec. 23 to a nursing home with an outbreak of the virus in a small town outside Denver.

96. Nashville man's girlfriend warned he was building bombs -

NASHVILLE (AP) — More than a year before Anthony Warner detonated a bomb in downtown Nashville on Christmas, officers visited his home after his girlfriend told police he was building bombs in an RV trailer at his residence, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. But they did not make contact with him, or see inside his RV.

97. With winter at hand, the virus whips up winds of uncertainty -

Coronavirus cases spiking nationwide. A chill, existential and literal, setting in once more. And now: a winter likely to be streaked by a soundtrack of sirens instead of silver bells.

It was winter when the pandemic began, and it will be winter long before it's over. Weary and traumatized from months of death and confinement, Americans are being handed mixed messages, from governments to their own internal clocks running haywire on flattened time.

98. Church vandalism exposes divisions over faith and politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vandalism at four downtown Washington churches after rallies in support of President Donald Trump are exposing rifts among people of faith as the nation confronts bitter post-election political divisions.

99. Biden returns to Georgia as validator for Ossoff, Warnock -

ATLANTA (AP) — Republicans eager to cement GOP control of the U.S. Senate have branded Georgia's Democratic candidates as puppets who would ensure a leftist takeover of the federal government if Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler aren't reelected.

100. Vandals hit Black churches during weekend pro-Trump rallies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vandals tore down a Black Lives Matter banner and sign from two historic Black churches in downtown Washington and set the banner ablaze as nighttime clashes Saturday between pro-Donald Trump supporters and counterdemonstrators erupted into violence and arrests.