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Editorial Results (free)

1. Global Citizen NOW summit seeks solutions for global issues -

NEW YORK (AP) — The statistics discussed at the inaugural Global Citizen NOW conference were bleak.

The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed 100 million people back into lives of extreme poverty. Up to 243 million people could face food insecurity between now and November due to the war in Ukraine. In Afghanistan, 24 million people depend on charitable donations for food.

2. Get the latest COVID booster? It’s hard to know what to do -

Except for the anti-vax crowd – a self-thinning Darwinian herd – it’s time for some of us to consider another COVID shot. Turns out it’s more complicated than I had hoped.

Deciding on the first shots was a no-brainer. As soon as they were authorized for my age group, Geezer II, I made arrangements and twice stood in a substantial line at a Walmart to get jabbed. Other than some surprisingly potent soreness in the receiving arm after the first shot, there were no negative repercussions. And I felt bulletproof.

3. US pulls GSK's COVID drug as omicron sibling dominates cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — GlaxoSmithKline's IV drug for COVID-19 should no longer be used because it is likely ineffective against the omicron subvariant that now accounts for most U.S. cases, federal health regulators said Tuesday.

4. More than 30 companies to start making Pfizer's COVID pill -

GENEVA (AP) — Nearly three dozen companies worldwide will soon start making generic versions of Pfizer's coronavirus pill, the U.N.-backed Medicines Patent Pool that negotiated the deal said Thursday.

5. US inflation soared 7.9% in past year, a fresh 40-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Propelled by surging costs for gas, food and housing, consumer inflation jumped 7.9% over the past year, the sharpest spike since 1982 and likely only a harbinger of even higher prices to come.

6. EXPLAINER: Why Pfizer needs time to make COVID-19 treatment -

Pfizer's new COVID-19 treatment came with a catch when it debuted late last year: Supplies were limited, and it can take months to make the tablets.

Company leaders say they are expanding production and expect big gains in the next several months. That could help if another wave of cases develops.

7. FDA halts use of antibody drugs that don't work vs. omicron -

WASHINGTON (AP) — COVID-19 antibody drugs from Regeneron and Eli Lilly should no longer be used because they don't work against the omicron variant that now accounts for nearly all U.S. infections, U.S. health regulators said Monday.

8. More than 2 dozen drugmakers to make Merck's COVID-19 pill -

GENEVA (AP) — A U.N.-backed organization announced Thursday that it has signed agreements with more than two dozen generic drug makers to produce versions of Merck's COVID-19 pill to supply 105 developing countries.

9. COVID-19 pill rollout stymied by shortages as omicron rages -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two brand-new COVID-19 pills that were supposed to be an important weapon against the pandemic in the U.S. are in short supply and have played little role in the fight against the omicron wave of infections.

10. Tennessee gets first shipment of oral antiviral COVID drugs -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee has received its first shipments of oral antiviral treatments for COVID-19, the Tennessee Department of Health said on Thursday.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued an emergency use authorization for two oral COVID-19 treatments: Paxlovid by Pfizer and molnupiravir by Merck.

11. US adds Merck pill as 2nd easy-to-use drug against COVID-19 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Thursday authorized the second pill against COVID-19, providing another easy-to-use medication to battle the rising tide of omicron infections.

The Food and Drug Administration authorization of Merck's molnupiravir comes one day after the agency cleared a competing drug from Pfizer.

12. Pfizer pill becomes 1st US-authorized home COVID treatment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Wednesday authorized the first pill against COVID-19, a Pfizer drug that Americans will be able to take at home to head off the worst effects of the virus.

13. Pfizer confirms COVID pill's results, potency versus omicron -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pfizer said Tuesday that its experimental pill to treat COVID-19 appears effective against the omicron variant.

The company also said full results of its 2,250-person study confirmed the pill's promising early results against the virus: The drug reduced combined hospitalizations and deaths by about 89% among high-risk adults when taken shortly after initial COVID-19 symptoms.

14. Panel weighs safety, effectiveness of Merck's COVID-19 pill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Government health advisers on Tuesday weighed the benefits and risks of a closely watched drug from Merck that could soon become the first U.S.-authorized pill for patients to take at home to treat COVID-19.

15. Pfizer, US ink $5.29B deal for possible COVID-19 treatment -

The U.S. government will pay drugmaker Pfizer $5.29 billion for 10 million treatment courses of its potential COVID-19 treatment if regulators authorize it, the nation's largest purchase agreement yet for a coronavirus therapy.

16. Pfizer asks US officials to OK promising COVID-19 pill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pfizer asked U.S. regulators Tuesday to authorize its experimental pill for COVID-19, setting the stage for a likely launch this winter of a promising treatment that can be taken at home.

17. Buffett's firm trims drugmaker stakes, buys 2 new stocks -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Investor Warren Buffett's company made two new investments during the third quarter while trimming its holdings in several drugmakers and financial firms.

Berkshire Hathaway Inc. updated its stock holdings in a quarterly filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday. The reports are closely watched by many investors because of Buffett's successful track record over the decades.

18. Pfizer agrees to let other companies make its COVID-19 pill -

LONDON (AP) — Drugmaker Pfizer Inc. has signed a deal with a U.N.-backed group to allow other manufacturers to make its experimental COVID-19 pill, a move that could make the treatment available to more than half of the world's population.

19. Johnson & Johnson to split into 2, aim for faster growth -

Johnson & Johnson is peeling off a consumer health business that helped it become the world's biggest health care products maker.

The company said Friday that it will separate its segment that sells Band-Aids, Listerine and over-the-counter medicines like Tylenol from its pharmaceutical and medical device business.

20. Pfizer says COVID-19 pill cut hospital, death risk by 90% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pfizer Inc. said Friday that its experimental antiviral pill for COVID-19 cut rates of hospitalization and death by nearly 90% in high-risk adults, as the drugmaker joined the race for an easy-to-use medication to treat the coronavirus.

21. UK authorizes Merck antiviral pill, 1st shown to treat COVID -

LONDON (AP) — Britain granted conditional authorization on Thursday to the only pill shown to successfully treat COVID-19 so far. It is the first country to OK the treatment from drugmaker Merck, although it wasn't immediately clear how quickly the pill would be available.

22. Cheap antidepressant shows promise treating early COVID-19 -

A cheap antidepressant reduced the need for hospitalization among high-risk adults with COVID-19 in a study hunting for existing drugs that could be repurposed to treat coronavirus.

Researchers tested the pill used for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder because it was known to reduce inflammation and looked promising in smaller studies.

23. Merck agrees to let other drug makers make its COVID pill -

LONDON (AP) — Pharmaceutical company Merck agreed to allow other drug makers worldwide to produce its COVID-19 pill, in a move aimed at helping millions of people in poorer countries get access to the potentially life-saving drug, a United Nations-backed public health organization said on Wednesday.

24. Merck asks EU regulator to authorize pill that treats COVID -

AMSTERDAM (AP) — The pharmaceutical company Merck says it has asked the European Medicines Agency to authorize its COVID-19 antiviral treatment, the first pill that has been shown to treat the disease.

25. FDA unlikely to rule on Merck's COVID pill before December -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday it will ask its outside experts to meet in late November to scrutinize Merck's pill to treat COVID-19.

The Nov. 30 meeting means U.S. regulators almost certainly won't issue a decision on the drug until December, signaling that the agency will conduct a detailed review of the experimental treatment's safety and effectiveness. The panelists are likely to vote on whether Merck's drug should be approved, though the FDA is not required to follow their advice.

26. Merck asks US FDA to authorize promising anti-COVID pill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Drugmaker Merck asked U.S. regulators Monday to authorize its pill for treating COVID-19 in what would add an entirely new and easy-to-use weapon to the world's arsenal against the pandemic.

27. VUMC helps develop first COVID-19 pill -

U.S.-based pharmaceutical giant Merck& Co. is seeking authorization for the first oral antiviral pill to treat COVID-19, after a Vanderbilt University Medical Center clinical trial showed it cut the risk of hospitalization or death in half when given to high-risk people during infection.

28. Stocks end higher, but not by enough to erase weekly losses -

Stocks rebounded on Wall Street Friday but still ended with their worst weekly decline since February.

The S&P 500 added 1.1%, led by companies that would benefit the most from a healthier economy.

29. Merck says COVID-19 pill cuts risk of death, hospitalization -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a potential leap forward in the global fight against the pandemic, drugmaker Merck said Friday that its experimental pill for people sick with COVID-19 reduced hospitalizations and deaths by half.

30. Buffett's firm ups Kroger stake while trimming drug holdings -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Billionaire Warren Buffett's company has again increased the size of its bet on grocery giant Kroger, while scaling back several of its health care industry investments.

Berkshire Hathaway Inc. said in a quarterly update with regulators Monday that it picked up nearly 11 million shares of Kroger stock during the second quarter, raising its holdings to 61.8 million shares. Buffett's company has been steadily adding to its Kroger holdings in recent quarters.

31. As pandemic spread pain and panic, congressman chased profit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the early days of the pandemic, New Jersey Rep. Tom Malinowski scolded those looking to capitalize on the once-in-a-century health crisis.

"This is not the time for anybody to be profiting off of selling ventilators, vaccines, drugs, treatments, PPE (personal protective equipment), anywhere in the world," the two-term Democrat and former assistant secretary of state told MSNBC in April 2020.

32. Buffett's firm sells off financials, halves Chevron stake -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Investor Warren Buffett's company pared back its holdings in financial firms further during the first quarter and also halved its new investment in Chevron.

Berkshire Hathaway Inc. provided an update on its U.S. stock holdings in a filing with regulators Monday. Many investors follow Berkshire's holdings closely because of Buffett's remarkably successful record.

33. Wall Street logs gains Monday on strong earnings -

Health care and energy companies helped push stocks higher Monday, as Wall Street kicked off the first trading day in May with more gains after a four-month winning streak.

The S&P 500 rose 0.3%. Industrial and financial stocks also helped lift the market. Falling technology and communication stocks, and companies that rely on consumer spending, kept the market's gains in check. Treasury yields were mixed.

34. Indians turn to black market, unproven drugs as virus surges -

NEW DELHI (AP) — Ashish Poddar kept an ice pack on hand as he waited outside a New Delhi hospital for a black market dealer to deliver two drugs for his father, who was gasping for breath inside with COVID-19.

35. CEOs gather to speak out against voting law changes -

More than a hundred top executives and corporate leaders gathered online this weekend to discuss their response to restrictive voting laws under consideration in several states and already enacted in Georgia, according to a statement from organizers of the meeting.

36. Biden intent on selling benefits of virus aid plan to public -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Final congressional approval of the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill Wednesday represents an undeniable victory for President Joe Biden -- and one the White House knows it needs to sell to the public.

37. Biden stands by May timeline for vaccines for all US adults -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said the U.S. expects to take delivery of enough coronavirus vaccine for all adults by the end of May — two months earlier than anticipated — and he pushed states to get at least one shot into the arms of teachers by the end of March to hasten school reopenings.

38. Analysis: Biden aims to manage expectations with pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden doesn't just have to manage the coronavirus pandemic — he also has to manage people's expectations for how soon the country will come out of it.

And on the latter task, projecting too much optimism can be as risky as offering too little, requiring what one public health expert calls a "necessarily mixed message."

39. Biden vows enough vaccine for all US adults by end of May -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Tuesday that the U.S. expects to take delivery of enough coronavirus vaccines for all adult Americans by the end of May, two months earlier than anticipated, as his administration announced that drugmaker Merck & Co. will help produce rival Johnson & Johnson's newly approved shot.

40. White House: Merck to help produce rival J&J's vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Drugmaker Merck & Co. will help produce rival Johnson & Johnson's newly approved coronavirus vaccine in an effort to expand supply more quickly, the White House said Tuesday.

41. Buffett's firm reveals new investments in Verizon, Chevron -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Warren Buffett's company made major new investments in Verizon and Chevron and again trimmed its huge stake in Apple while making several other adjustments to its stock portfolio last year.

42. COVID-19 shots might be tweaked if variants get worse -

The makers of COVID-19 vaccines are figuring out how to tweak their recipes against worrisome virus mutations — and regulators are looking to flu as a blueprint if and when the shots need an update.

43. Merck ends development of two potential COVID-19 vaccines -

Merck is giving up on two potential COVID-19 vaccines following poor results in early-stage studies.

The drugmaker said Monday that it will focus instead on studying two possible treatments for the virus that also have yet to be approved by regulators. The company said its potential vaccines were well tolerated by patients, but they generated an inferior immune system response compared with other vaccines.

44. Neil Young becomes latest artist to sell stake in his songs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Neil Young has become the latest musician to strike gold with his song catalogue, selling a 50 percent stake in his music to a British investment company in a deal announced on Wednesday.

45. The Dylan catalog, a 60-year rock 'n' roll odyssey, is sold -

NEW YORK (AP) — To many music lovers, Bob Dylan's songbook is priceless. Well, now he's put a price on it.

The Nobel Prize-winning songwriter has sold publishing rights to his catalog of more than 600 songs, one of the greatest treasures in popular music, to the Universal Music Publishing Group, it was announced on Monday.

46. Stocks end another wobbly day lower as virus cases rise -

Wall Street's losses mounted for the second straight day Tuesday as momentum slows on worries about rising virus counts and Washington's inability to deliver more aid to the economy.

The S&P 500 fell 0.3% after spending much of the day swinging between small gains and losses. Most of the stocks in the index fell, particularly banks, oil producers and other companies whose profits tend to track the strength of the economy. Those losses outweighed gains in technology stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. Traders also welcomed news that AMD has agreed to buy fellow chipmaker Xilinx for $35 billion.

47. Secretive, never profitable Palantir makes its market debut -

BOSTON (AP) — Seventeen years after it was born with the help of CIA seed money, the data-mining outfit Palantir Technologies is finally going public in the biggest Wall Street tech offering since last year's debut of Slack and Uber.

48. Companies testing vaccines pledge safety, high standards -

The top executives of nine drugmakers likely to produce the first vaccines against the new coronavirus signed an unprecedented pledge meant to boost public confidence in any approved vaccines.

The companies said Tuesday that they will stick to the highest ethical and scientific standards in testing and manufacturing and will make the well-being of those getting vaccinated their top priority.

49. White House faces skepticism over prospects for a vaccine -

Could the U.S. really see a coronavirus vaccine before Election Day? A letter from federal health officials instructing states to be ready to begin distributing a vaccine by Nov. 1 — two days before the election — has been met, not with exhilaration, but with suspicion among some public health experts, who wonder whether the Trump administration is hyping the possibility or intends to rush approval for political gain.

50. Secretive Palantir lifts veil before Wall Street stock sale -

BOSTON (AP) — Palantir Technologies Inc., a data-mining company with deep ties to U.S. intelligence and military agencies, has shed a good deal of its trademark secrecy about its business in filing for a Wall Street stock offering.

51. New drugs make headway against lung, prostate, colon cancers -

Doctors are reporting success with newer drugs that control certain types of cancer better, reduce the risk it will come back and make treatment simpler and easier to bear.

Gentler drugs would be a relief to patients like Jenn Carroll, a 57-year-old human resources director from New Hartford, Connecticut, who had traditional IV chemotherapy after lung cancer surgery in 2018.

52. Earnings season is in full swing and uncertainty is certain -

The most active week of the earnings season is on and the rush of quarterly reports Tuesday, 39 in all, captured the maneuvering of companies from almost every sector as they feel their way through an unprecedented economic shockwave.

53. US stocks extend rally; S&P 500, Nasdaq at all-time highs -

Health care and financial stocks led another milestone-setting rally on Wall Street Wednesday, extending the market's gains for the week.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed more than 480 points and the S&P 500 index and Nasdaq composite each hit an all-time high.

54. Stocks close broadly lower on Wall Street; trade in focus -

Stocks closed modestly lower on Wall Street Monday as losses in technology, health care and financial companies outweighed gains elsewhere in the market.

The selling snapped a three-day winning streak for the S&P 500 and wiped out the index's 0.2% gain last week.

55. US stocks cap wobbly day of trading with modest losses -

Technology companies led stocks lower on Wall Street Tuesday as a wobbly day of trading ended with modest losses for the market.

Health care stocks jumped on stronger-than-expected reports from drugmakers, but losses by internet and media companies held the market in check following a mixed report from Google's parent.

56. Stocks post gains on solid earnings, US-China trade optimism -

The S&P 500 closed just short of an all-time high Friday as investors welcomed solid company earnings reports and an encouraging update on trade talks between the U.S. and China.

Technology, communications services and financial stocks powered the rally. The index ended within 0.1% of its record set July 26. It also notched its third straight weekly gain.

57. Major US stock indexes veer broadly lower in choppy trading -

A day of choppy trading on Wall Street ended Monday with stocks broadly lower as the market extended its losing streak into a fourth week.

Technology stocks, consumer goods makers, health care companies and banks accounted for much of the selling, which accelerated in the last hour of trading, erasing modest gains from midday. Communication services stocks eked out a slight gain, bucking the broader market slide. Crude oil prices edged lower and bond yields rose.

58. Stocks little changed after rally wanes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are sputtering at the close on Wall Street Thursday after an early rally fizzled.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 52 points, or 0.2%, to 27,094, while the S&P 500 was essentially flat at 3,006.

59. S&P 500 finishes flat; smaller company stocks notch gains -

Major U.S. stock indexes ended mixed Monday as large companies gave up early gains and smaller companies closed broadly higher.

The S&P 500 ended virtually flat as losses in technology and health care stocks outweighed gains in financials and other sectors. The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks, which has lagged the S&P 500 this year, outpaced the rest of the market.

60. Casada says he can't afford alimony -

FRANKLIN (AP) — Weeks before he's expected to resign, Tennessee House Speaker Glen Casada has asked a judge to relieve him of paying alimony because he says he can no longer afford the approximately $4,000 monthly payments.

61. Stocks climb to records on hopes for lower interest rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — The major U.S. stock indexes closed at record highs on Friday, with the S&P 500 ending above 3,000 for the first time. The market was driven higher by technology, consumer discretionary and industrial company stocks, which more than offset the drop in drugmakers.

62. Dow Jones industrials cross 27,000 points for first time -

A turbulent day on Wall Street ended in the record books Thursday as the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed above 27,000 for the first time and the S&P 500 index hit another all-time high.

The milestones came on a day when the S&P 500 briefly moved above 3,000 for the second straight day before an early rally lost some of its momentum.

63. Setbacks for Trump's drive to lower prescription drug costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After two setbacks this week, President Donald Trump is now focusing his drive to curb drug costs on congressional efforts aimed at helping people on Medicare and younger generations covered by workplace plans.

64. Judge strikes down rule requiring drug ads to reveal prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge Monday blocked a major White House initiative on prescription drug costs, saying the Trump administration lacked the legal authority to require drugmakers to disclose their prices in TV ads.

65. Stocks drop on shifting odds for rate cut -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing lower for a second straight day as investors try to gauge the Federal Reserve's next move on interest rates.

A strong U.S. jobs report Friday dimmed investors' expectations that the Fed would cut its benchmark interest rate by as much as half a percentage point later this month. Many investors still expect a quarter-point cut.

66. S&P 500, Dow industrials and Nasdaq close at record highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investors extended a rally through a holiday-shortened day and pushed the S&P 500 index to its third straight record high close on Wednesday. Other major indexes also closed at record highs.

67. HCA's Johnson the highest-paid CEOs in Tennessee -

Here are the top paid CEOs by state for 2018, as calculated by The Associated Press and Equilar, an executive data firm.

The survey considered only publicly traded companies with more than $1 billion in revenue that filed their proxy statements with federal regulators between Jan. 1 and April 30. Not every state has such a company headquartered there. The survey includes only CEOs who have been in place for at least two years, but it does not limit the survey to companies in the S&P 500, as the AP's general compensation study does. That's why it includes such CEOs as Tesla's Elon Musk.

68. Supreme Court sends dispute over Fosamax back to lower court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Monday that a judge must decide whether a dispute between drugmaker Merck and patients who alleged they were injured by its bone-strengthening drug Fosamax can go forward.

69. US stocks rise for the 3rd day -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks marched higher on Wall Street for the third straight day, erasing most of the plunge they took at the start of the week on worries about the worsening trade fight between China and the U.S.

70. Senators draw on own experiences to chastise drug companies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Channeling the ire of constituents and drawing from personal experience, senators chastised drug company executives Tuesday over the high cost of prescription medications, while the CEOs warned that government price controls could stifle breakthroughs on diseases like Alzheimer's.

71. Another sign of weakness in China weighs on US stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks took small losses Monday after China reported a drop in exports in December, but the market didn't come close to matching the plunges it took in the last few months.

Indexes in Europe and Asia headed slightly lower after the latest report added more evidence that China's economy is weakening. Major U.S. indexes fell about 1 percent at the start of trading, but soon recovered much of what they'd lost. Technology companies slumped.

72. Smell a rat? If you live in a city, you’re probably right -

With all the growing pains that Nashville is experiencing, there is one plague that has eluded the area – Nashville has not fallen prey to the rat infestation that is plaguing cities with similar populations.

73. AP FACT CHECK: Trump overstates his role in black job gains -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is taking unjustified credit for recent job gains by black Americans even as he defends himself against claims of racism.

Trump and his administration argue he's done more to help the economic well-being of minorities than Barack Obama, the country's first and only black president.

74. Lab-grown meat could be in restaurants in 3 years -

BERLIN (AP) — A Dutch company that presented the world's first lab-grown beef burger five years ago said Tuesday it has received funding to pursue its plans to make and sell artificially grown meat to restaurants from 2021.

75. Many breast cancer patients can skip chemo, big study finds -

CHICAGO (AP) — Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient's risk.

76. Health care leads gains for US stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Health care companies led U.S. indexes modestly higher on Wall Street, closing out the market's biggest weekly gain since March.

Drug makers and other health companies ended broadly higher Friday after President Donald Trump announced plans to rein in drug prices that didn't seem to pose immediate threats to health care company profits.

77. Tech companies help pull US stocks lower in morning trade -

U.S. stocks moved lower in morning trading Thursday, weighed down by losses in technology companies and makers of consumer products. Banks bucked the trend, rising along with bond yields. Energy stocks also rose as a rally in oil prices continued, bringing crude to the highest level in more than three years.

78. Procter & Gamble pays $4.2 bln for unit of Germany's Merck -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — German pharmaceutical and chemical company Merck says it has agreed to sell its global consumer health business to Procter & Gamble for 3.4 billion euros ($4.2 billion) in cash.

79. US stock indexes climb higher after two days of losses -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are climbing Thursday as technology, industrial and health care companies lead the way following two days of broad losses. Discount retailer Dollar General is climbing after a strong profit forecast for the year. Toymakers Hasbro and Mattel are down as Toys R Us moves toward shuttering its U.S. stores.

80. Dow industrials recede from 26,000 as early gains fade -

Losses by industrial and technology companies helped pull U.S. stocks lower Tuesday, pulling the market back from its latest record highs.

The slide erased some of the gains from a broad rally earlier in the day that had sent the Dow Jones industrial average past the 26,000-point threshold for the first time.

81. Technology companies, retailers send US stock indexes higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose Monday as a mix of smaller, U.S.-focused companies, technology firms and banks climbed. Drugmakers struggled, which limited those gains.

Retailers and smaller companies rose for the third day in a row as their latest quarterly reports have investors feeling better about the U.S. economy and the amount of shopping people are likely to do over the holidays. Technology companies rose following another deal between chipmakers, and industrial companies also posted gains.

82. Why tax plan might not put US firms' overseas cash to work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Republican tax bill is meant to send trillions in corporate profits overseas pouring back home and, in the process, give the U.S. economy a healthy boost.

It may be more likely to land with an economic thud and provide a windfall to tax attorneys scouring the Byzantine bill for tax breaks on behalf of corporate clients.

83. Stocks around the world take a pause ahead of frenetic week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks retreated from their record highs on Monday, ahead of a frenetic week for markets.

Investors are waiting to learn who the next head of the Federal Reserve will be, what several of the world's biggest central banks will decide on interest rates, and whether Apple and other big U.S. companies can keep piling their profits higher. In the meantime, reports continued to show that the economy is strengthening and negotiations continued in Washington to cut income-tax rates.

84. Tech giants lead rally as stocks near records; Amazon surges -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some of the biggest companies in the world had their best day in years Friday as Microsoft and Alphabet soared following strong third-quarter reports, as did online retail giant Amazon. U.S. stocks set more records as their winning streak extended to a seventh week.

85. Business execs shunned Trump panels before he disbanded them -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump had pushed many of America's top corporate leaders to the breaking point with his inability to decisively condemn white supremacists — so they huddled on an 11:30 a.m. conference call Wednesday.

86. Trump increasingly isolated as business panels dismantled -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With corporate chieftains fleeing, President Donald Trump abruptly abolished two of his White House business councils, an attempt to manage his increasing isolation and the continued fallout from his combative comments on racially charged violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

87. Corporate chiefs flee Trump; he disbands WH advisory panels -

NEW YORK (AP) — With corporate chieftains fleeing, President Donald Trump abruptly abolished their White House business councils on Wednesday — the latest fallout from his combative comments on racially charged violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

88. Walmart CEO criticizes Trump on race response -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Wal-Mart CEO Doug McMillon is criticizing President Donald Trump's initial response to violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, at a white supremacist rally.

But McMillon appears willing to stay on a panel of informal corporate advisers for the president.

89. Analysis: Trump's slow walk to condemning white supremacists -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It took President Donald Trump two days to do what both Republicans and Democrats said should have come fast and easy.

In his carefully worded statement Monday, Trump condemned members of the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis and white supremacists as "repugnant." He vowed that his administration would crack down on those who perpetrate "racist violence." He called for national unity.

90. Asked to serve, some CEOs say no more to Trump -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — First it was the leader of a major U.S. pharmaceutical, then the CEO of an athletic gear company, and before the day had ended, the chief executive of a $170 billion tech giant. Three of the nation's top executives resigned from a federal panel created years ago to advise the U.S. president.

91. Trump attacks exec for quitting council over Charlottesville -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump lashed out at the CEO of the nation's third-largest pharmaceutical company after he resigned from a federal advisory council, citing the president's failure to explicitly rebuke the white nationalists who marched in Charlottesville, Virginia.

92. US stocks waver as earnings and central banks dominate -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S stocks are wavering between small gains and losses in early trading on Wall Street Thursday. Energy and health care companies are gaining, but basic materials companies are lower. Investors are focused on second-quarter results from large companies like American Express and Philip Morris as well as the latest commentary from the European Central bank, which left its key interest rate unchanged. Major stock indexes closed at record highs a day earlier.

93. Rex Tillerson in focus as Exxon investigation intensifies -

NEW YORK (AP) — "Wayne Tracker" cannot be forced to testify under oath. He does not exist.

But the man who used the "Tracker" alias, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, can be questioned — and is increasingly expected to be — as New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expands his sweeping probe into whether Tillerson's former employer, ExxonMobil, misled investors about the impact of climate change.

94. Tillerson in focus as Exxon investigation intensifies -

NEW YORK (AP) — "Wayne Tracker" cannot be forced to testify under oath. He does not exist.

But the man who used the "Tracker" alias, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, can be questioned — and is increasingly expected to be — as New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expands his sweeping probe into whether Tillerson's former employer, ExxonMobil, misled investors about the impact of climate change.

95. New cyberattack wallops Europe; spreads more slowly in US -

PARIS (AP) — A new and highly virulent outbreak of data-scrambling software caused disruption across the world Tuesday. Following a similar attack in May , the fresh assault paralyzed some hospitals, government offices and major multinational corporations in a dramatic demonstration of how easily malicious programs can bring daily life to a halt.

96. Stocks scuffle as slowing auto sales worry Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — Despite strong results from industrial companies, U.S. stocks couldn't get any momentum going Tuesday after car makers said their sales are shrinking.

Engine maker Cummins sent manufacturers and other industrial companies higher after reporting solid first-quarter earnings.  A late slump took the price of oil to its lowest price in almost six months. Ford, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler all fell after they said sales declined in April.

97. Losses for finance, health care companies send stocks lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slumped Friday as financial and health care companies moved lower. Industrial companies rose as stocks continued the up-and-down pattern they've been stuck in for the last month.

98. US stock indexes close higher after wavering much of the day -

Energy companies led U.S. stocks modestly higher Wednesday, nudging the Nasdaq composite to its fifth record-high close in a row.

Rising crude oil prices gave energy companies a boost, including oil rig operator Transocean, which rose 4 percent. Traders also bid up shares in utilities.

99. Health care rises as US indexes ring in new year with gains -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks broke a three-day losing streak Tuesday and ushered in the new year with broad gains. Health care stocks, which struggled for most of last year, climbed.

Stocks started the day with a surge as the Dow Jones industrial average rose 175 points in the first hour of trading. Bond yields jumped, which took bank stocks higher. The price of oil also rose early on, but it began slipping after 10 a.m. Investors started buying again late in the day, however, and major indexes closed with a flourish.

100. Not today: Dow still short of 20,000 as health stocks skid -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks finished slightly lower Wednesday as health care companies continued to struggle. Energy companies rose as the price of natural gas surged on the first day of winter.

Some traders aren't sticking around to see if the Dow Jones industrial average reaches the 20,000-point milestone: trading volume has fallen sharply this week as the year-end holidays draw near.