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Editorial Results (free)

1. Court ruling creates mishmash of transportation mask rules -

A decision by a federal judge in Florida to throw out a national mask mandate for public transportation across the U.S. created a confusing patchwork of rules for passengers as they navigate airports and transit systems.

2. Cheers, fear as judge strikes down U.S. transit mask mandate -

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge's decision to strike down a national mask mandate was met with cheers on some airplanes but also concern about whether it's really time to end one of the most visible vestiges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

3. Yelp to cover travel expenses for workers seeking abortions -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yelp will cover the travel expenses of employees who must travel out of state for abortions, joining the ranks of major employers trying to help workers affected by new restrictions in Texas and other states.

4. Lyft, Spin partner, scoot into Nashville -

Lyft and Spin have announced a partnership to bring Spin scooters to the Lyft app in 60 U.S. markets, including Nashville.

More cities are launching over the coming months.

This integration further positions Lyft as the go-to transportation platform as riders have new, cost-effective and more sustainable ways to get from point A to point B. This exclusive partnership creates a seamless experience: riders can simply rent and pay for Spin scooters in the Lyft app without needing to download another app or add new payment information.

5. Biden's high court choice defies expectations on labor cases -

DETROIT (AP) — Labor unions and worker advocates have applauded President Joe Biden's nomination of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson for the Supreme Court. Yet a look back at Jackson's decisions in cases involving business and labor suggest that she won't always rule as they want or expect her to.

6. Party downtown, shop in Green Hills -

If Lower Broad is the Bourbon Street of Nashville, and Nolensville Road is its United Nations, then Green Hills has looked into the eyes of the beloved and said “I do.” Nashville has ascended to the nation’s No. 2 location for destination weddings behind Las Vegas. And many brides-to-be choose Green Hills for bridal registry and shopping, the perfect dress and guest housing for the big day.

7. Food delivery workers, ride-share drivers demand more rights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Food delivery workers in New York City, fresh off winning rights to transparency in tipping and the use of restaurant bathrooms, joined with ride-share drivers Tuesday in pressing for more protections, including better wages, health care and the right to unionize.

8. Companies rethink return-to-office plans amid omicron cases -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies of all sizes are rethinking their plans to send workers back to the office as the new omicron variant adds another layer of uncertainty.

Alphabet's Google and the nation's second largest automaker Ford Co. are among those once again delaying their return-to-office plans, while other businesses whose employees have already returned are considering adding extra precautions like requiring masks. Officials in the United Kingdom, Denmark, Norway and Sweden also have asked people in recent days to work from home if they can because of concerns about the variant.

9. DoorDash adds safety features to help protect drivers -

DoorDash is adding security features to its app to help protect drivers.

The San Francisco-based delivery company said Wednesday it's partnering with security company ADT on the new features, which will be available to all U.S. DoorDash drivers by the end of this year.

10. Lyft report: Sexual assaults rose sharply in recent years -

Lyft received an increasing number of reports of sexual assault in recent years, including more than 1,800 in 2019, according to a safety report from the ride-hailing company.

More than half of the assaults in 2019 were "non-consensual touching of a sexual body part" and another 156 involved non-consensual sexual penetration, according to the report.

11. Toyota banks on mobility technology for future growth -

TOKYO (AP) — Japanese automaker Toyota is revving up acquisitions in mobility technology, adding Renovo Motors Inc., a Silicon Valley software developer, to its Woven Planet team, which is working on automated driving.

12. Amazon pushes back return to office to January due to COVID -

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon has pushed back its return-to-office date for tech and corporate workers until January as COVID-19 cases surge nationally due to the more contagious delta variant.

Unlike its Seattle-area rival Microsoft and other tech giants, Amazon will not mandate employees receive the COVID-19 vaccine before they return to the office. Instead, the company said Thursday that unvaccinated employees will be required to wear masks in the office.

13. Ford, Argo AI to deploy autonomous vehicles on Lyft network -

DETROIT (AP) — Ford Motor Co. and a self-driving vehicle company it partly owns will join with the Lyft ride-hailing service to offer autonomous rides on the Lyft network.

14. Toyota revs up its digital mapping subsidiary Woven Planet -

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota plans to hire more people and invest heavily in its subsidiary Woven Planet to work on mobility technology so the Japanese automaker stays competitive amid the global shift to using artificial intelligence and robotics in everyday driving.

15. How Big Tech created a data 'treasure trove' for police -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — When U.S. law enforcement officials need to cast a wide net for information, they're increasingly turning to the vast digital ponds of personal data created by Big Tech companies via the devices and online services that have hooked billions of people around the world.

16. A new reason to swipe right? Dating apps adding vax badges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is pushing a new reason to swipe right: vaccination badges and "super swipes" for people who've gotten their coronavirus shots.

The Biden administration said Friday it's teaming up with dating apps to showcase the benefits of getting a shot.

17. Cool tech, crazy turns: A reporter's take on driverless cars -

CHANDLER, Ariz. (AP) — The annoyed shopper paced around and knocked on the windows of a minivan blocking him from leaving his Costco parking spot. He didn't seem to notice, or care, that there was no one inside.

18. Biden announces Uber, Lyft rides amid July 4 vaccine push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is highlighting new programs from ride-sharing companies Uber and Lyft to provide free rides to and from vaccination sites, as the pace of shots nationally declines and he looks to meet his July Fourth inoculation targets.

19. Uber demand jumps as delivery grows, ride-hailing recovers -

Uber saw record demand in the first quarter as its food delivery business grew while lockdowns ended and more customers hailed rides

The San Francisco-based company said Wednesday that its bookings jumped 24% to $19.5 billion __ an all-time high __ in the January-March period. That was far ahead of the $18 billion Wall Street was anticipating, according to analysts polled by FactSet.

20. Public transit hopes to win back riders after crushing year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Taking the Los Angeles Metro for his first trip in months, Brad Hudson felt a moment of normalcy when the train rolled into the station in South Pasadena, California, harkening back to his daily commute into LA before the coronavirus pandemic.

21. Toyota acquires Lyft's self-driving unit for $550 million -

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota Motor Corp. has acquired the self-driving division of American ride-hailing company Lyft for $550 million, in a move that highlights the Japanese automaker's ambitions in that technology.

22. Drivers wanted: Record demand at Uber as vaccinations rise -

Uber is offering sign-up bonuses and other incentives for drivers as it faces record demand for rides and meal delivery.

The San Francisco ride-hailing company said Monday that total monthly bookings, including food delivery and passenger service, reached an all-time high in March.

23. Three things you must know if you’re new to gig work -

Shutdowns, layoffs and salary cuts brought on by the coronavirus pandemic have left millions of Americans searching for new sources of income. Those who’ve recently turned to gig work may be weeks away from a financial surprise in the form of unexpected tax bills and insurance coverage fine print.

24. From Zoom to Quibi, the tech winners and losers of 2020 -

We streamed, we Zoomed, we ordered groceries and houseplants online, we created virtual villages while navigating laptop shortages to work and learn from home. When it comes to technology, 2020 was a year like no other.

25. With winter at hand, the virus whips up winds of uncertainty -

Coronavirus cases spiking nationwide. A chill, existential and literal, setting in once more. And now: a winter likely to be streaked by a soundtrack of sirens instead of silver bells.

It was winter when the pandemic began, and it will be winter long before it's over. Weary and traumatized from months of death and confinement, Americans are being handed mixed messages, from governments to their own internal clocks running haywire on flattened time.

26. Fears and tension mount for commuters still heading to work -

NEW YORK (AP) — One by one, the fears creep in as Aura Morales rides the bus to her job at CVS in Los Angeles. A passenger boards without a mask but she doesn't dare confront him. More riders board and it's impossible to stay six feet apart. Driving to work isn't an option; Morales can't afford a car, especially after her work hours were cut.

27. Fears and tension mount for commuters still heading to work -

NEW YORK (AP) — One by one, the fears creep in as Aura Morales rides the bus to her job at CVS in Los Angeles. A passenger boards without a mask but she doesn't dare confront him. More riders board and it's impossible to stay six feet apart. Driving to work isn't an option; Morales can't afford a car, especially after her work hours were cut.

28. GM's Cruise to deploy fully driverless cars in San Francisco -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — General Motors' self-driving car company is sending vehicles without anybody behind the wheel in San Francisco as it navigates its way toward launching a robotic taxi service that would compete against Uber and Lyft in the hometown of the leading ride-hailing services.

29. Uber's food delivery business outshines core rides service -

Uber's food delivery business brought in more money during the third quarter than its signature rides business , showing just how much consumer behavior has changed — and how far the company has adapted — since the pandemic struck.

30. Tech leads Wall Street rally, shrugging off election limbo -

Technology and health care companies led a stock market rally Wednesday, as Wall Street embraced the upside of more gridlock in Washington.

The S&P 500 rose 2.2% for its best day in five months. The benchmark index had been up 3.5% before the market lost some of its momentum toward the end of the day. That pullback wiped out more than 450 points from the Dow Jones Industrial Average, though the blue-chip index still closed more than 360 points higher.

31. Uber, Lyft spend big, win in California vote about drivers -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Uber, Lyft and other app-based ride-hailing and delivery services spent $200 million in a winning bet to circumvent California lawmakers and the courts to preserve their business model by keeping drivers from becoming employees eligible for benefits and job protections.

32. Picking pandemic side gig takes some hustle, thought -

Side gig. Side job. Side hustle. It goes by many names and serves many purposes. For some, it’s a way to keep the lights on. For others, it’s an opportunity to save for a goal or follow a passion.

33. Tesla 'full self-driving' vehicles can't drive themselves -

DETROIT (AP) — Earlier this week, Tesla sent out its "full self-driving" software to a small group of owners who will test it on public roads. But buried on its website is a disclaimer that the $8,000 system doesn't make the vehicles autonomous and drivers still have to supervise it.

34. California court says Uber, Lyft drivers are employees -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A California appeals court on Thursday upheld an order requiring Uber and Lyft to treat their California drivers as employees instead of independent contractors, less than two weeks before voters will be asked to exempt the ride-hailing giants from the state's gig economy law.

35. Michelle Obama, LeBron James team to help boost early voting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A voter initiative led by Michelle Obama is partnering with a similar group founded by NBA star LeBron James and other prominent Black athletes and entertainers to sponsor events in major U.S. cities starting next week to generate excitement about voting early for the Nov. 3 election.

36. Uber, Lyft look to kill California law on app-based drivers -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Californians are being asked decide if Uber, Lyft and other app-based drivers should remain independent contractors or be eligible for the benefits that come with being company employees.

37. More companies pledge to give workers time to vote -

A growing number of U.S. companies are pledging to give workers time off to vote in the presidential election this November, an effort that's gaining steam despite the government's reluctance to make Election Day a federal holiday.

38. More companies pledge to give workers time to vote -

A growing number of U.S. companies are pledging to give workers time off to vote in the presidential election this November, an effort that's gaining steam despite the government's reluctance to make Election Day a federal holiday.

39. Tech gains send indexes higher even as most other stocks fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major indexes managed to eke out gains on Wall Street even as most stocks fell following more discouraging data on the economy.

The government reported that slightly more than 1.1 million workers applied for unemployment benefits last week.

40. Uber, Lyft threaten California shutdown over driver status -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft are saying they will shut down their California operations if a new law goes into effect overnight that would force both companies to classify their drivers as employees.

41. Poll: Pandemic shifts how consumers use gig companies -

NEW YORK (AP) — When ride-hailing heavyweights Uber and Lyft and delivery giants Grubhub and Instacart began making shared rides and meals available with a few taps on a smartphone, they transformed the way people work, travel and get food delivered to their homes.

42. Lyft's 2Q loss $437M as virus spread and riders stayed home -

NEW YORK (AP) — Lyft on Wednesday posted a loss of $437.1 million for the second quarter, when the coronavirus outbreak meant few people were looking to use its ride-hailing service.

The San Francisco-based company's revenue slumped to $339.3 million in the April-June quarter, down 61% from the same period last year.

43. California judge rules Uber, Lyft drivers are employees -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A judge on Monday ordered ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft to treat their California drivers as employees instead of independent contractors, a shift that would guarantee benefits like overtime, sick leave and expense reimbursement for workers who make up much of the freewheeling gig economy.

44. Uber lost $1.8B in 2Q as riders stayed home, ordered in -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber lost $1.78 billion in the second quarter as the pandemic carved a gaping hole in its ride-hailing business, with millions of people staying home to reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

45. Tornado, virus, protests rattle Nashville rideshare economy -

NASHVILLE (AP) — After driving for Lyft for six years, Joni Bicknese decided to invest in a minivan at the beginning of 2020, reasoning that she could make more money if she could transport more riders. Then came what she calls Nashville's quadruple-whammy: a tornado, coronavirus closures, protests that rocked downtown, then more closures.

46. More U.S. workers getting Juneteenth off as awareness grows -

NEW YORK (AP) — A unprecedented number of U.S. companies are giving employees off for Juneteenth on Friday, raising hopes that the day commemorating the end of slavery could someday become a true national celebration.

47. Study: Autonomous vehicles won't make roads completely safe -

DETROIT (AP) — A new study says that while autonomous vehicle technology has great promise to reduce crashes, it may not be able to prevent all mishaps caused by human error.

Auto safety experts say humans cause about 94% of U.S. crashes, but the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety study says computer-controlled robocars will only stop about one-third of them.

48. Uber cuts 3,000 jobs as pandemic slashes demand for rides -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber has cut 3,000 jobs from its workforce, its second major wave of layoffs in two weeks as the coronavirus slashed demand for rides.

The San Francisco company has cut a quarter of its workforce since the year began, eliminating 3,700 people from the payroll earlier this month.

49. Face mask rules grow but enforcement proves a challenge -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft are requiring drivers and passengers to wear masks while using their services, joining a growing list of transportation companies hoping to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 as some cities emerge from lockdown.

50. Stocks rise on hope that worst of economic plunge has passed -

Even with the economy still in miserable shape, some investors are finding reasons to hope the worst of the plunge may have passed, and Wall Street rallied to its biggest gain in a week on Thursday.

51. Uber loses $2.9 billion, offloads bike and scooter business -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber lost $2.9 billion in the first quarter as its overseas investments were hammered by the coronavirus pandemic, but the company is looking to its growing food delivery business as well as aggressive cost-cutting to ease the pain.

52. California sues Uber, Lyft over alleged labor law violations -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California is suing ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft, alleging they misclassified their drivers as independent contractors under the state's new labor law.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the lawsuit Tuesday during a news conference. The labor law, known as AB5 and considered the nation's strictest test, took effect Jan. 1 and makes it harder for companies to classify workers as independent contractors instead of employees who are entitled to minimum wage and benefits such as workers compensation.

53. 30.3M have sought US unemployment aid since virus hit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 3.8 million laid-off workers applied for unemployment benefits last week as the U.S. economy slid further into a crisis that is becoming the most devastating since the 1930s.

54. What to know about applying for gig work during the pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — A leap in U.S. unemployment has thrown a spotlight on one type of work in high demand during the coronavirus pandemic: Gig work delivering groceries, meals and packages.

Some app-based delivery companies have announced hiring sprees to cope with a surge in online shopping. That comes as 16.8 million Americans have filed for unemployment aid in just the past three weeks.

55. Record 16.8 million have sought US jobless aid in 3 weeks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With a startling 6.6 million people seeking jobless benefits last week, the United States has reached a grim landmark: More than one in 10 workers have lost their jobs in just the past three weeks to the coronavirus outbreak.

56. Record 16.8 million have sought US jobless aid in 3 weeks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With a startling 6.6 million people seeking jobless benefits last week, the United States has reached a grim landmark: More than one in 10 workers have lost their jobs in just the past three weeks to the coronavirus outbreak.

57. Virus outbreak delivers tech darlings a harsh reality check -

Just as the coronavirus outbreak has boxed in society, it's also squeezed high-flying tech companies reliant on people's freedom to move around and get together.

Since the beginning of March, for instance, Uber shares have lost a quarter of their value. Rival Lyft is down 28 percent. Over the same period, the S&P 500 has fallen just 10 percent, even with wild swings along the way. The picture is even less clear for other, still-private "unicorn" companies once valued at more than $1 billion, such as Airbnb and WeWork.

58. A record 10 million sought US jobless aid in past 2 weeks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 6.6 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week — doubling a record high set just one week earlier — a sign that layoffs are accelerating in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak.

59. US unemployment claims hit 6.6 million – another record high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 6.6 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week — doubling a record high set just one week earlier — a sign that layoffs are accelerating in the midst of the coronavirus.

60. Events -

ServerlessDays Cloud Conference. Speakers include James Beswick, AWS; Linda Nichols, Microsoft; Michah Hodge, Asurion; Danielle Heberling, Stackery. Thursday, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Renaissance Nashville Hotel, 611 Commerce Street. $25 includes breakfast and lunch. and others. Information

61. Lyft annual loss more than doubles, but revenue keeps rising -

Ride-hailing service Lyft's annual loss more than doubled last year to over $2.6 billion, but the company claimed progress as revenue jumped 68% and ridership grew.

The San Francisco company is predicting another big revenue gain for this year, with a narrower pretax loss of $450 million to $490 million.

62. House passes bill easing bids by workers to form unions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a move that supporters said would help working families, the Democratic-controlled House has approved a bill that would make it easier for workers to form unions and bargain for higher wages, better benefits and improved working conditions.

63. Online mattress pioneer Casper soars in debut trading -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shares of online mattress pioneer Casper Sleep Inc. popped in their debut trading on the New York Stock Exchange Thursday.

64. Companies offer rebuke of Tennessee's anti-LGBT adoption law -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Almost three dozen big companies and more than 100 small businesses in Tennessee on Wednesday predicted economic backlash from a newly enacted state adoption law and other proposals that target LGBT people, with one company saying plans to add jobs in Nashville are "in doubt" over the legislation.

65. GM churns out profit in 2019 despite strike, slumping sales -

DETROIT (AP) — Despite a 40-day strike by factory workers and slumping sales in the U.S. and China, General Motors still made money last year.

The company posted a $6.58 billion profit for the year, but that was down almost 17% from 2018.

66. Victims of our own success -

It’s been nearly 20 years since the Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp. brought together more than 100 community leaders from many industries, including health care, arts and music, to decide the best way to market the city.

67. GM's Cruise heads down new road with new robotaxi concept -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — General Motors' self-driving car company will attempt to deliver on its long-running promise to provide a more environmentally friendly ride-hailing service in an unorthodox vehicle designed to eliminate the need for human operators to transport people around crowded cities.

68. Uber to let riders use pin codes to help identify right car -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber is offering riders a four-digit pin code to help ensure they're getting into the right car.

The ride-hailing company rolled out the new feature across the U.S. and Canada Tuesday and said all riders in those two countries will be able to use pin codes by the end of the week.

69. Lyft's good-guy image tainted by sexual assault lawsuits -

NEW YORK (AP) — For years, Lyft has been the good guy of ride-hailing. In early days, its cars were adorned with whimsical pink mustaches. Its founders talked about improving peoples' lives by reducing individual car ownership. And while Uber drivers grabbed headlines for assaulting passengers, somehow — despite many drivers working for both companies — Lyft remained unscathed.

70. 2020 brings higher labor costs for small businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners have plenty of changes to deal with as 2020 begins — higher labor costs for many companies, and some owners will discover that they have to comply with new laws that aren't on the books in their own states.

71. Uber reports more than 3,000 sexual assaults on 2018 rides -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Uber, as part of a long anticipated safety report, revealed that more than 3,000 sexual assaults were reported during its U.S. rides in 2018.

That figure includes 235 rapes across the company's 1.3 billion rides last year. The ride-hailing company noted that drivers and riders were both attacked and that some assaults occurred between riders.

72. Lyft will end scooter operations in Nashville -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The ride-sharing company Lyft says it’s removing its scooters from Nashville, Tennessee by the end of the month.

News outlets report Lyft confirmed Thursday that the company will end scooter operations in Nashville on Nov. 22.

73. Truckers file 1st suit contesting California gig economy law -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Trucking Association on Tuesday filed what appears to be the first lawsuit challenging a sweeping new labor law that seeks to give wage and benefit protections to workers in the so-called gig economy, including rideshare drivers at companies such as Uber and Lyft.

74. Got a weird text? A telecom vendor says it's to blame -

If you woke up to a weird text that seemed totally out of place, you aren't alone. A mysterious wave of missives swept America's phones overnight, delivering confusing messages from friends, family and the occasional ex.

75. Uber's revenue grows but its losses mount in third quarter -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber picked up the pace of its revenue growth in the third quarter, but the ride-hailing heavyweight is still losing vast sums of money.

The San Francisco company said Monday it racked up revenue of $3.81 billion in the third quarter, 30% more than the same time last year.

76. Traditional versus gig: What’s the better deal for seasonal workers? -

Want to work a second job or grab a temporary gig from mid-November through early January?

What’s the better deal, working behind the counter at a department store or grabbing a spot in an e-commence fulfillment center? Or driving for Lyft or Uber? Or plugging into some other type of gig economy slot that lets you pick and choose?

77. Airbnb says it will go public in 2020 -

Airbnb Inc. said Thursday it plans to go public in 2020, a long-awaited move by the home-sharing company that is both loved and reviled for its disruption of the hotel business.

Airbnb disclosed the news in a brief statement. It didn't give a target date for the initial public offering or say why it thinks the timing is right. Airbnb was valued at $31 billion last year, according to Renaissance Capital, which researches IPOs.

78. US economy could shrug off oil prices if disruption is brief -

DALLAS (AP) — The price of gasoline crept higher after a weekend attack devastated Saudi Arabian oil output, but if the disruption to global supplies is short-lived, the impact on the U.S. economy will probably be modest.

79. California Senate approves bill regulating gig economy -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Senate has passed a bill that would give new wage and benefit protections to workers at so-called gig economy companies like Uber and Lyft.

The 29-11 vote late Tuesday sends the bill back to the state Assembly for final approval over strident Republican opposition. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom has said he supports it.

80. Stocks stumble on trade-war worries, capping wild week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks stumbled on Wall Street Friday, veering between modest and sharp losses, as worries flashed yet again about President Donald Trump's trade war with China. The declines bookend a wild week where markets zoomed down, up and down again as investors struggled to make sense of a trade dispute whose resolution suddenly seems much more uncertain.

81. Technology companies power broad rally for US stocks -

Technology companies powered stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday, driving the S&P 500 to its best day in more than two months and erasing its losses for the week.

The rally, which pushed the Dow Jones Industrial Average up by more than 370 points, followed an early rise in bonds yields after a weekly government report on unemployment claims came in better than economists had expected.

82. What’s the secret to negotiating Nashville traffic? -

It was a stupid, rookie mistake. I was downtown and decided to go somewhere. In a vehicle. At, roughly, 4:45 p.m.

I can sense your eyes rolling. What an idiot, you’re probably thinking.

83. Appeals court: NYC can ban ads in Uber and Lyft cars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Drivers for companies like Uber and Lyft in New York City can be banned from displaying advertisements in their vehicles, a federal appeals court said Tuesday.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the ban does not violate the First Amendment as it reversed a February 2018 lower-court decision that concluded the city could not justify its regulations.

84. S&P 500 index closes at record high as stock rally continues -

Wall Street capped a broad rally for stocks Thursday by driving the S&P 500 index to an all-time high.

The milestone, which eclipsed the benchmark index's last record close on April 30, underscores a swift rebound for the market in June that has erased the losses from a 6.6% dive in May. The major U.S. stock indexes are up more than 7% so far this month.

85. Slack is latest tech company to go public, with a twist -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shares of work messaging platform Slack are expected to start trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker "WORK."

The San Francisco company is set to start trading Thursday in what's known as a direct listing.

86. Uber, Lyft suggest changes but want drivers as contractors -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft say they are willing to change the way they treat drivers in California as long as state lawmakers don't require them to classify drivers as employees, a move that would entitle them to a wide range of benefits.

87. Briley threatens electric scooter ban after user's death -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Nashville's mayor is threatening to ban electric scooters unless the companies that own them immediately address problems.

The Tennessean reports Mayor David Briley threatened the ban in a Thursday letter to scooter companies. It comes a week after 26-year-old Brady Gaulke was killed when a car struck him while he was riding a scooter downtown.

88. Uber, Lyft losses keep competitors at bay -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A fare war between Uber and Lyft has led to billions of dollars in losses for both ride-hailing companies as they fight for passengers and drivers.

But in one way it has been good for investors who snatched up the newly public companies' stock: The losses have scared off the competition, giving the leaders a duopoly in almost every American city.

89. San Francisco may ban police, city use of facial recognition -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco is on track to become the first U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition by police and other city agencies, reflecting a growing backlash against a technology that's creeping into airports, motor vehicle departments, stores, stadiums and home security cameras.

90. Uber begins trading nearly 7% below its IPO price -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber began trading as a public company at $42 per share Friday, nearly 7% below its initial public offering price on an already volatile day for the markets.

The ride-hailing giant priced shares in the IPO Thursday at $45 each, raising $8.1 billion and giving the company a valuation of $82 billion.

91. US stocks slide as modest rally fades ahead of trade talks -

A modest rally faded in the last few minutes of trading on Wall Street, leaving stocks slightly lower Wednesday ahead of the latest round of trade talks between the U.S. and China.

The late-afternoon reversal added to the market's losses following a steep sell-off a day earlier as investors worry that the costly trade dispute between the world's two biggest economies will escalate.

92. Uber, Lyft drivers protest across the US, overseas -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some drivers for ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft turned off their apps Wednesday to protest what they say are declining wages at a time when both companies are raking in billions of dollars from investors.

93. Tesla CEO heads down perilous road in pursuit of profit -

Tesla has lost nearly $6 billion since setting out to revolutionize the auto industry 15 years ago, but CEO Elon Musk foresees a profitable future fueled in part by a ride-hailing service made up of electric cars driven by robots.

94. 11 big firms say Tennessee bills discriminate against LGBTQ -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Eleven large companies are urging Tennessee's Republican legislative leaders to oppose bills they say discriminate against LGBTQ people.

The Human Rights Campaign announced Tuesday's letter from Hilton; IKEA North America Services; InterContinental Hotels Group; Lyft; Marriott International; MassMutual; Nike; Replacements Ltd.; Salesforce; Unilever; and Warby Parker. They wrote that bills targeting LGBTQ people are bad for employees and their families, customers and business.

95. Tesla CEO plans to hand the car keys to robots next year -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Tesla CEO Elon Musk expects to start converting the company's electric cars into fully self-driving vehicles next year as part of an audacious plan to create a network of robotic taxis to compete against Uber and other ride-hailing services.

96. US corporations embracing 420 as pot legalization grows -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Potheads have for decades celebrated their love of marijuana on April 20, but the once counter-culture celebration that was all about getting stoned now is so mainstream Corporate America is starting to embrace it.

97. US stocks cap holiday shortened week with modest gains -

The major U.S. stock indexes capped a holiday shortened week with slight gains Thursday, reversing some of the modest losses from a day earlier.

The marginal upward move was not enough to keep the benchmark S&P 500 index from snapping a string of three straight weekly gains.

98. IPO mania: Zoom zooms, Pinterest pins down Wall Street -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — There's some tech jubilance in the air on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley as a pair of newly public companies — Zoom and Pinterest — saw their stocks soar on their first trading day.

99. Pinterest prices public offering at $19 per share -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Pinterest is pricing its shares at $19 for its initial public offering Thursday, putting it on track to raise more than $1.4 billion.

The digital scrapbooking and image search site said last week it expected to sell 75 million shares at a price between $15 and $17 each. The company will begin trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol PINS.

100. Shared electric scooters surge, overtaking docked bikes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Electric scooters are overtaking station-based bicycles as the most popular form of shared transportation outside transit and cars in the U.S.

Riders took 38.5 million trips on shared electric scooters in 2018, eclipsing the 36.5 million trips on shared, docked bicycles, according to a report released Wednesday by the National Association of City Transportation Officials.