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Editorial Results (free)

1. US stocks recover from a slump the day before -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks ended higher Wednesday, recovering the most of their losses from the day before, as Greece appeared closer to resolving its latest debt issues.

However, the overall market remains directionless as most investors are focused on figuring out when the Federal Reserve's long-awaited interest rate increase may come.

2. 4 members of FDA tobacco panel leave after court ruling -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration says four members from its tobacco advisory panel, among them its chairman, have left after a court ruled some of its members had conflicts of interest.

3. Tobacco companies fighting over claims on smoking's effects -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's biggest tobacco companies say they are ready and willing to pass along factual public health information about cigarettes.

But they say they will not go along with being forced to underwrite an ad campaign that would have the companies brand themselves as liars.

4. E-cigarette tech takes off as regulation looms -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Just a few years ago, early adopters of e-cigarettes got their fix by clumsily screwing together a small battery and a plastic cartridge containing cotton soaked with nicotine.

5. CEOs in 10 big mergers to get $430M: Equilar study -

NEW YORK (AP) — This year's flurry of corporate mergers may not pay off for shareholders in the long run, but one thing is for sure: The bosses who are selling their companies will do just fine.

The CEOs who've decided to sell in the 10 biggest U.S. deals this year are set to rake in an estimated $430 million in "golden parachute" payments, according to a study done by pay-tracking firm Equilar at the request of The Associated Press. Translation: It would take the typical American household 847 years of work to get what the average CEO will receive in one fell swoop.

6. Reynolds' net rises on higher cigarette prices -

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP) — Higher cigarette prices helped Camel cigarette maker Reynolds American Inc.'s net income rise 2.2 percent in its third quarter.

The higher prices helped offset continued decline in cigarettes sold.

7. US stocks mostly down as investors digest earnings -

The Federal Reserve's latest take on the U.S. economy put many investors into sell mode Tuesday, sending stocks mostly lower after a brief upward turn early in the day.

Fed Chair Janet Yellen, speaking before Congress, said the U.S. economy has yet to recover fully, but raised the possibility the central bank could raise its key short-term interest rate sooner than currently projected.

8. Tobacco firm Reynolds American to buy Lorillard -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Cigarette maker Reynolds American Inc. is planning to buy rival Lorillard Inc. for about $25 billion in a deal to combine two of the nation's oldest and biggest tobacco companies.

9. US stocks drift as investors digest earnings -

Stocks were little changed in early trading Tuesday as investors sized up corporate earnings and new government data showing that retail sales inched up last month. Earnings from JPMorgan Chase and Goldman Sachs trumped Wall Street's expectations. Tobacco companies fell as investors got a look at the details of Reynolds American's takeover of rival Lorillard.

10. Tobacco firms Reynolds, Lorillard in merger talks -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Cigarette makers Reynolds American Inc. and Lorillard Inc. on Friday said they are in talks of a possible merger that would combine two of the nation's oldest and biggest tobacco companies.

11. Stocks little changed, on track for weekly loss -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market rose slightly Friday but was still headed for its biggest weekly loss since April as investors assessed corporate news. The market ended the previous week at a record high.

12. Supreme Court lets stand $70M in awards to smokers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has turned away appeals from cigarette manufacturers of more than $70 million in court judgments to Florida smokers.

The justices did not comment Monday in rejecting the companies' complaints.

13. US stocks edge higher in afternoon trading -

Stocks held on to modest gains in afternoon trading Thursday, building on the prior day's rebound. Investors were encouraged by reports on Chinese manufacturing, U.S. home sales and some positive earnings from Best Buy, Dollar Tree and other retailers.

14. FDA proposes first regulations for e-cigarettes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government wants to ban sales of electronic cigarettes to minors and require approval for new products and health warning labels.

While the proposal being issued Thursday by the Food and Drug Administration won't immediately mean changes for the popular devices, the move is aimed at eventually taming the fast-growing e-cigarette industry.

15. Global stocks slide as tensions build in Ukraine -

NEW YORK (AP) — Russia's military advance into Ukraine rattled global markets Monday.

U.S. stocks fell the most in a month and the price of crude oil rose sharply as traders feared Russian exports could be affected by sanctions. Gold and bond prices rose as investors sought safety.

16. US stock market indexes drift mostly lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major U.S. stock indexes are ending mostly lower as a four-day rally peters out.

The market started the day higher Wednesday, then moved between small gains and losses in midday and afternoon trading.

17. Bars, stores cater to e-cigarette army -

With online sales booming and brick-and-mortar e-cigarette retail stores popping up in Middle Tennessee, Russell Cunningham wanted a slice of the business - despite never vaping or smoking.

The Michigan native opened Smoke Powered Electronic Cigarettes two years ago as a side business. The retail store on Nolensville Road is opened seven days a week, and Cunningham is in the market for a larger, traffic-heavy storefront. He is now a regular vaper, but still chooses to vape without nicotine.

18. Court leaves ruling against big tobacco intact -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court on Friday left intact a court judgment that ordered tobacco companies to do corrective advertising about the dangers of smoking.

The companies sought to overturn a federal judge's order on grounds that the order had been superceded by a 2009 law that gave the Food and Drug Administration authority over the industry, including power to require graphic cigarette warnings.

19. Apple's blowout quarter propels Nasdaq to big gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Nasdaq composite index shot 2 percent higher Wednesday, powered by a surge in Apple. The iPhone maker's stock climbed $50 after the company once again blew past Wall Street's profit forecasts.

20. Obama scolds tobacco firms for fighting new labels -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama — pronounced tobacco-free in his latest medical checkup — has tough words for cigarette makers.

Some tobacco companies, he says in a new White House web video, are fighting new cigarette warning labels because "they don't want to be honest about the consequences."

21. US tobacco crop rises, but down from a decade ago -

SHELBYVILLE, Ky. (AP) — It's harvest time in much of the nation's tobacco patches and this year's harvest is expected to be among the smallest in at least a decade.

Farmers are expected to produce 726 million pounds of tobacco, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said. That's up 1 percent from 2010, but down nearly 28 percent from a decade ago when more than 991 million pounds made its way into cigarettes and other products.

22. High court undoes Scalia's pro-tobacco order -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia exercised a rarely used power last fall to let Philip Morris USA and three other big tobacco companies delay making multimillion-dollar payments for a program to help people quit smoking.