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Editorial Results (free)

1. Nonprofits launch $100M plan to support local health workers -

A new philanthropic project hopes to invest $100 million in 10 countries, mostly in Africa, by 2030 to support 200,000 community health workers, who serve as a critical bridge to treatment for people with limited access to medical care.

2. Dolly Parton among Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy winners -

NEW YORK (AP) — Country superstar Dolly Parton, who made a big donation to help fund coronavirus vaccine research in 2020, is among this year's Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy recipients.

Also being honored are Dallas entrepreneur Lyda Hill, Kenyan industrialist Manu Chandaria, and Lynn and Stacy Schusterman, from the Oklahoma investment family.

3. Oil-funded Rockefeller Foundation centers fight for climate -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Rockefeller Foundation, created with wealth generated from the oil industry more than a century ago, plans to make the fight against climate change central to all of its work, including its operations and investments.

4. Presbyterians agree to divest from fossil fuel companies -

The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) has opted to pull investments from five energy corporations, joining other faith-based groups in targeting fossil-fuel companies over what they say are failures to address climate change.

5. It's a new era for funding on both sides of abortion debate -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade has ushered in a new era of funding on both sides of the abortion debate.

With the legality of abortion now up to individual states to determine, an issue long debated by legislators and philanthropists — when it was largely theoretical because only the Supreme Court could change it — suddenly has real-world ramifications for people across the country. And donors on both sides will now be expected to put money behind their words.

6. New SBC President commits to move sex abuse reforms forward -

ANAHEIM, California (AP) — The new president of the Southern Baptist Convention said Wednesday he will accelerate sex abuse reforms in the nation's largest Protestant denomination.

Texas pastor Bart Barber's first priority: to assemble a panel of people -- Southern Baptist leaders and experts -- to shepherd this work for the whole convention as mandated by thousands of representatives from local SBC churches.

7. Southern Baptists agree to keep list of accused sex abusers -

ANAHEIM, California (AP) — The Southern Baptist Convention voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to create a way to track pastors and other church workers credibly accused of sex abuse and launch a new task force to oversee further reforms in the nation's largest Protestant denomination.

8. Texas pastor Bart Barber elected Southern Baptist president -

ANAHEIM, California (AP) — Bart Barber is a staunch Southern Baptist conservative who would welcome bans on abortion, opposes critical race theory and believes only men should serve as pastors.

Yet Barber, elected Tuesday as the new president of the Southern Baptist Convention, says he has a track record of dialogue with those who disagree on those and other issues. He has called for an "army of peacemakers" amid bitter political battles in the nation's largest Protestant denomination.

9. Southern Baptists who backed open abuse review win key roles -

ANAHEIM, California (AP) — The newly elected leaders of a top Southern Baptist Convention committee had all supported a more transparent investigation into allegations the denomination mishandled sex abuse reports and mistreated survivors. They defeated candidates who had opposed that move.

10. Southern Baptist leaders release secret accused abuser list -

In response to an explosive investigation, top Southern Baptists have released a previously secret list of hundreds of pastors and other church-affiliated personnel accused of sexual abuse.

The 205-page database was made public late Thursday. It includes more than 700 entries from cases that largely span from 2000 to 2019.

11. Top Southern Baptists plan to release secret list of abusers -

Top administrative leaders for the Southern Baptist Convention, the largest Protestant denomination in America, said Tuesday that they will release a secret list of hundreds of pastors and other church-affiliated personnel accused of sexual abuse.

12. Global Citizen NOW summit seeks solutions for global issues -

NEW YORK (AP) — The statistics discussed at the inaugural Global Citizen NOW conference were bleak.

The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed 100 million people back into lives of extreme poverty. Up to 243 million people could face food insecurity between now and November due to the war in Ukraine. In Afghanistan, 24 million people depend on charitable donations for food.

13. Southern Baptists face push for public list of sex abusers -

A blistering report on the Southern Baptist Convention's mishandling of sex abuse allegations is raising the prospect that the denomination, for the first time, will create a publicly accessible database of pastors and other church personnel known to be abusers.

14. Report: Top Southern Baptists stonewalled sex abuse victims -

The Southern Baptist Convention's Executive Committee — and thousands of its rank-and-file members — now have opportunities to address a scathing investigative report that says top SBC leaders stonewalled and denigrated survivors of clergy sex abuse over two decades while seeking to protect their own reputations.

15. Obama, Airbnb's Chesky launch $100M in scholarships -

NEW YORK (AP) — The co-founder and CEO of Airbnb, Brian Chesky, has donated $100 million to the Obama Foundation to fund scholarships for students pursuing careers in public service and includes multiple stipends for travel.

16. High inflation leaves food banks struggling to meet needs -

Kendall Nunamaker and her family of five in Kennewick, Washington, faced impossible math this month: How to pay for gas, groceries and the mortgage with inflation driving up prices?

Like many other working families, the Nunamakers are grappling with the 8.3% inflation in the consumer price index in April announced Wednesday — slowing slightly from the March figure which was the largest year-over-year increase since 1981, according to the Labor Department. The national average gas price reached a record high Wednesday of $4.40 a gallon. And global food prices are climbing after shortages caused by Russia's war against Ukraine and other supply chain problems.

17. Stanford gets $1B for climate change school from Doerr -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stanford University will launch a new school focusing on climate change thanks to a $1.1 billion gift from billionaire venture capitalist John Doerr and his wife, Ann, the university announced Tuesday.

18. Instagram adds fundraising to Reels to help nonprofits -

NEW YORK (AP) — Meta Platforms Inc., the social media giant formerly known as Facebook, plans to celebrate Earth Day by expanding its offering of fundraising tools and making them more easily available to 1.5 million nonprofits on its Facebook and Instagram platforms, including those involved in fighting climate change.

19. Billions, and growing, for lawmakers' projects in big bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home-district projects for members of Congress are back, sprinkled across the government-wide $1.5 trillion bill President Joe Biden signed recently. The official tally shows amounts modest by past standards yet spread widely around the country — and that understate what lawmakers are claiming credit for.

20. MacKenzie Scott donates $436 million to Habitat for Humanity -

MacKenzie Scott has donated $436 million to Habitat for Humanity International and 84 of its U.S. affiliates — the largest publicly disclosed donation from the billionaire philanthropist since she pledged in 2019 to give away the majority of her wealth.

21. Ballmer crafts new funding strategy to confront gun violence -

Gun violence in America is a public health crisis that is worsening with pandemic-like speed. So says Steve Ballmer, the billionaire philanthropist whose nonprofit is devising a new remedy to address it.

22. How to help Ukrainians affected by Russian invasion -

More than 1 million people have fled Ukraine, and at least 160,000 have been displaced inside the country as fighting continues between Russian and Ukrainian forces in Europe's largest ground war since World War II.

23. Southern Baptist Convention president won't seek 2nd term -

Ed Litton, president of the Southern Baptist Convention, the largest Protestant denomination in the United States, announced Tuesday he will break with tradition and not seek a second term in the top convention role.

24. Southern Baptist leaders apologize to sex abuse survivor -

The Southern Baptist Convention's Executive Committee has offered a public apology and a confidential monetary settlement to sexual abuse survivor Jennifer Lyell, who was mischaracterized by the denomination's in-house news service when she decided to go public with her story in March 2019.

25. Abortion rights funds brace for impact ahead of court ruling -

In the past few months, the number of women who call Fund Texas Choice has doubled to more than 100 per week. The demand, driven by a state law banning abortions at roughly six weeks of pregnancy, has forced the abortion rights fund to hire more people. But it's still been difficult to keep up with the avalanche of requests.

26. Billionaire's space trip brought $125M to St. Jude hospital -

The charitable sector should hope that billionaire Jared Isaacman keeps seeking new adventures.

Isaacman, who turned a payments-processing firm he started as a teenager into a multibillion-dollar company, periodically indulges his passion for aviation with head-turning flights. Each time, a prominent charity has joined the ride — and the stakes keep getting bigger.

27. Tennessee pastor, first African American, named to key SBC post -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee pastor Willie McLaurin has been named interim president and CEO of the Southern Baptist Convention's Executive Committee, becoming the first African American to lead one of the denomination's ministry entities in its more than 175-year history.

28. Rihanna's foundation donates $15 million to climate justice -

Rihanna is backing her belief that climate change is a social-justice issue by pledging $15 million to the movement through her Clara Lionel Foundation.

The "We Found Love" singer on Tuesday announced the donation to 18 climate justice organizations doing work in seven Caribbean nations and the United States. They include the Climate Justice Alliance, the Indigenous Environmental Network, and the Movement for Black Lives.

29. Donors to launch Houston newsroom with $20M in seed funding -

Five philanthropies plan to spend more than $20 million to bolster news coverage in Houston and create what they say will be one of the largest local nonprofit news organizations in the country.

The newsroom is anticipated to launch later this year or early 2023 on multiple platforms, the donors said Wednesday in a news release. The goal, they said, is to "elevate the voices of Houstonians" and address information needs identified through focus groups, community listening sessions and multi-language surveys conducted with local residents.

30. GoFundMe acquires nonprofit fundraising platform Classy -

The crowdfunding platform GoFundMe announced Thursday that it has signed a deal to acquire the nonprofit fundraising company Classy, a move that will help the largest crowdfunding site further increase its influence in the philanthropic sector.

31. Charities wade into NFT craze with mixed financial results -

On GivingTuesday, officials at New Jersey-based health care charity Sostento learned they would receive a donation of roughly $58,000 by the end of the week.

The donation was unlike any the nonprofit had received before. It was derived from the proceeds of the sale of a nonfungible token, or NFT, for a digital artwork called "The NFT Guild Philanthropist — Healthcare Heroes."

32. GivingTuesday: Record $2.7B raised during day of generosity -

Black Friday and Cyber Monday may have seen slight declines this year, but GivingTuesday generated a new record for giving.

Donations on GivingTuesday, the annual campaign that encourages generosity on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving, rose by 9% this year, totaling $2.7 billion in the United States alone, according to organizers.

33. Gates, French Gates offer post-divorce philanthropic plans -

Bill Gates and Melinda French Gates say they will still work with the Giving Pledge, the campaign they co-founded with Warren Buffett in 2010 to encourage billionaires to donate the majority of their wealth through philanthropy.

34. Bezos makes gifts to Obama foundation, NYU medical center -

Former President Barack Obama's foundation announced Monday that it has received a $100 million donation from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, which it says is the largest individual contribution it has received to date.

35. Education, religious groups gain most from giving strategy -

The somewhat mysterious charitable giving strategy known as donor-advised funds is a point of contention in the philanthropic community, but a new report released Thursday is shedding light on what types of organizations benefited most from it in the past few years.

36. Bloomberg pledges $120 million to curb drug overdose deaths -

Michael Bloomberg will spend $120 million in an effort to reduce the soaring numbers of deaths from drug overdoses, he announced today at a healthcare summit he organized. The pledge more than doubles the $50-million philanthropic commitment he made toward the same goal in 2018.

37. Philanthropies planning a nonprofit newsroom in Cleveland -

A coalition of philanthropies announced plans Tuesday to launch a nonprofit newsroom that will provide coverage of Cleveland, kicking off an effort to help fill a void left by the shrinking of news organizations in Ohio.

38. Giving to top charities rose 3.7% in 2020, driven by wealthy -

In the wake of the most devastating public-health emergency in a century and the resulting economic uncertainty, Americans provided more charitable dollars to United Way Worldwide than any other nonprofit focused on direct aid, followed by the Salvation Army and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, according to new rankings by the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

39. Fossil fuel divestment gains momentum in philanthropy -

A movement to divest from fossil fuel is gaining support among foundations as activists push for funding to be shifted away from coal, oil and natural gas.

The call from activists to the charitable world is simple: Ditch fossil fuels and direct your investments into climate-friendly companies and funds.

40. 'Stupid' and 'insane': Some billionaires vent over tax plan -

Elon Musk isn't happy. With a personal fortune that is flirting with $300 billion, the Tesla CEO — the richest person on earth — has been attacking a Democratic proposal to tax the assets of billionaires like him.

41. Who will get Powell Jobs' $3.5B gift for climate work? -

Philanthropist Laurene Powell Jobs is gearing up to invest $3.5 billion into climate-focused initiatives in the next 10 years. But if the donation patterns of her foundation continue, the public might never know where that money is going.

42. Ford Foundation to divest millions from fossil fuels -

The Ford Foundation, one of the largest private foundations in the United States, announced Monday that it will divest millions from fossil fuels, following similar investment decisions made by other sizable foundations in recent years.

43. Southern Baptist leader resigns amid abuse review division -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A top Southern Baptist Convention administrator is resigning amid internal rifts over how to handle an investigation into the SBC's response to sexual abuse, a decision that underscores the broader ongoing turmoil in the nation's largest Protestant denomination.

44. GOP stalls pick who'd be government's highest-ranking Muslim -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nomination of a Pakistani-born businessman who would be the highest-ranking Muslim in the U.S. government is in jeopardy because Senate Republicans have repeatedly blocked his confirmation. The stalemate has led to Democratic charges of anti-Muslim bias and galvanized some Muslim and Jewish organizations to condemn the delay.

45. Donors pledge $223M aimed at reducing methane emissions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A coalition of philanthropic donors said Monday they will spend more than $220 million to reduce global methane emissions, the largest private commitment ever toward this effort.

Methane, the main component of natural gas, is one of the most potent agents of climate damage, gushing up by the ton from countless uncapped oil and gas rigs, leaky natural gas pipelines and other oil and gas facilities.

46. Southern Baptist panel to open legal records for abuse probe -

A top committee of the Southern Baptist Convention agreed Tuesday to open up legally protected records to investigators who will look into how it handled, or mishandled, cases of sexual abuse within the nation's largest Protestant denomination over the past two decades.

47. Southern Baptists press for sex abuse review to advance -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A top Southern Baptist Convention committee is facing mounting pressure from within the denomination to move forward without further delay an investigation into how it handled sexual abuse allegations.

48. Foundations aim to persuade Americans to get vaccinated -

For months, Maria Cristina was hesitant about getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Her fears came from social media, where she heard ample amounts of misinformation about what was in the vaccine and what it could do to her.

49. Laurene Powell Jobs to invest $3.5B in climate group -

Philanthropist Laurene Powell Jobs, the widow of Apple founder Steve Jobs, will invest $3.5 billion within the next 10 years to address the climate crisis, a spokesperson for Emerson Collective, Jobs' organization, said on Monday.

50. Boy Scouts' bankruptcy creates rift with religious partners -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amid the Boy Scouts of America's complex bankruptcy case, there is worsening friction between the BSA and the major religious groups that help it run thousands of scout units. At issue: the churches' fears that an eventual settlement — while protecting the BSA from future sex-abuse lawsuits — could leave many churches unprotected.

51. Probe of Southern Baptist sex abuse response moves forward -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Rev. Marshall Blalock feels the weight of his new responsibility.

The South Carolina pastor serves as vice chair of a recently formed Southern Baptist Convention task force charged with overseeing an investigation into how a top denominational committee handled sex abuse allegations, a review that comes years into the SBC's public reckoning with the scandal.

52. Gates, Rockefeller warn leaders about pandemic's impact -

Just ahead of the annual meeting of the U.N. General Assembly that opens on Tuesday, leaders of the Gates and Rockefeller Foundations — grant makers that have committed billions of dollars to fight the coronavirus — are warning that without larger government and philanthropic investments in the manufacture and delivery of vaccines to people in poor nations, the pandemic could set back global progress on education, public health, and gender equality for years.

53. Many Bible Belt preachers silent on shots as COVID-19 surges -

Dr. Danny Avula, the head of Virginia's COVID-19 vaccination effort, suspected he might have a problem getting pastors to publicly advocate for the shots when some members of his own church referred to them as "the mark of the beast," a biblical reference to allegiance to the devil, and the minister wasn't sure how to respond.

54. MacKenzie Scott, French Gates join to fund gender equality -

An initiative from philanthropists Melinda French Gates, MacKenzie Scott and the family foundation of billionaire Lynn Schusterman awarded $40 million Thursday to four promoting gender equality projects in tech, higher education, caregiving and minority communities.

55. Study: Only half of American households donate to charity -

For the first time in nearly two decades, only half of U.S. households donated to a charity, according to a study released Tuesday. The findings confirm a trend worrying experts: Donations to charitable causes are reaching record highs, but the giving is done by a smaller and smaller slice of the population.

56. Effort to fund racially diverse climate groups gets momentum -

Efforts to increase how much philanthropic funding goes to minority-led environmental organizations are gaining momentum, with one group's push for transparency from the nation's top climate donors drawing big-name support.

57. Bill, Melinda Gates to run foundation jointly after divorce -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bill Gates and Melinda French Gates will continue to work together as co-chairs of their foundation even after their planned divorce. However, if after two years Gates and French Gates decide they cannot continue in their roles, French Gates will resign her positions as co-chair and trustee, The Bill and Gates Melinda Foundation announced Wednesday.

58. $40B pledged for gender equality, with $2B from Gates group -

The U.N.-sponsored global gathering for gender equality generated about $40 billion in pledges towards aiding women and girls on Wednesday, partly fueled by a significant $2.1 billion contribution from Bill and Melinda Gates' namesake foundation.

59. Millions skipped church during pandemic. Will they return? -

WALDOBORO, Maine (AP) — With millions of people having stayed home from places of worship during the coronavirus pandemic, struggling congregations have one key question: How many of them will return?

60. Habitat for Humanity struggles with high construction costs -

Reeling from massive cutbacks in volunteers during the COVID-19 pandemic, and grappling with high construction costs, Habitat for Humanity leaders would be the first to admit they're struggling.

The past year has felt like one punch after the other, they say. First hit: Habitat's local affiliates had to limit volunteers over virus concerns, forcing them to fork over more money to hire contractors. Second hit: Revenue was dented by temporary closures of ReStores, the reuse stores operated by local Habitat organizations. The third: Construction delays caused by pandemic-induced kinks in the supply chain, which make affiliates wait longer for supplies.

61. Buffett resigns from Gates Foundation -

NEW YORK (AP) — Warren Buffett resigned Wednesday as trustee of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which says it will announce plans in July to answer questions raised about its leadership structure as it deals with the divorce of its two founders.

62. Southern Baptists vote to probe leaders' sex abuse response -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Delegates at the Southern Baptist Convention's annual meeting voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to create a task force to oversee an independent investigation into the denomination's handling of sexual abuse.

63. Southern Baptists vote to debate sex abuse investigation -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Delegates at the Southern Baptist Convention's annual meeting voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to have a floor debate on a proposed investigation into the denomination's handling of sexual abuse.

64. New Southern Baptist leader has long career as bridge builder -

As ideological divisions wracked the Southern Baptist Convention this year ahead of a pivotal national meeting, one of the leading candidates for its presidency, Ed Litton, embraced a role as the man best equipped to build bridges and promote unity.

65. Southern Baptists pick president who worked for racial unity -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Southern Baptist Convention tamped down a push from the right at its largest meeting in decades on Tuesday, electing a new president who has worked to bridge racial divides in the church and defeating an effort to make an issue of critical race theory.

66. Charitable giving in the U.S. reaches all-time high in 2020 -

Galvanized by the racial justice protests and the coronavirus pandemic, charitable giving in the United States reached a record $471 billion in 2020, according to a report released Tuesday that offers a comprehensive look at American philanthropy.

67. Southern Baptists hold annual meeting amid push from right -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Southern Baptist Convention held its largest gathering in decades Tuesday amid debates over race and sexual abuse, a concerted effort to push the conservative denomination even further to the right and a bellwether election to pick its next president.

68. Southern Baptists meet amid controversy over leaked letters -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As Southern Baptists prepare for their biggest annual meeting in more than a quarter-century, accusations that leaders have shielded churches from claims of sexual abuse and simmering tensions around race threaten to once again mire the nation's largest Protestant denomination in a conflict that can look more political than theological.

69. Racial tensions simmer as Southern Baptists hold key meeting -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Race-related tensions within the Southern Baptist Convention are high heading into a national meeting next week. The election of a new SBC president and debate over the concept of systemic racism may prove pivotal for some Black pastors as they decide whether to stay in the denomination or leave.

70. Secret recordings show Southern Baptist dispute on sex abuse -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Releases of leaked letters and secret recordings from within the Southern Baptist Convention intensified Thursday as critics sought to show top leaders were slow to address sexual abuse in the nation's largest Protestant denomination and worried more about its reputation and donations than about victims.

71. Goodwill stores have a message: Please stop donating trash -

Broken furniture. Flashlights with leaking batteries. Disfigured Barbie dolls.

Across the country, thrift stores have been flooded by household items, the offerings of people who have been homebound for months and are eager to clear out some of their possessions.

72. Shelton joins drive to help feed out-of-work musicians -

For more than a year now, the state of America's live music industry has been a grim one.

The COVID-19 pandemic threw hundreds of thousands of musicians, roadies and other touring industry professionals out of work, according to the Country Music Association. In Tennessee alone, the industry's unemployed number around 50,000.

73. Rockefeller heirs launch campaign to curb oil and gas growth -

Two great-great-grandchildren of Standard Oil Co. founder John D. Rockefeller Sr. are pouring millions of dollars into an effort aimed at supporting people on the front lines fighting new oil and gas development.

74. US Catholic bishops may press Biden to stop taking Communion -

When U.S. Catholic bishops hold their next national meeting in June, they'll be deciding whether to send a tougher-than-ever message to President Joe Biden and other Catholic politicians: Don't receive Communion if you persist in public advocacy of abortion rights.

75. Gates helps launch drive for global vaccine distribution -

A new mass fundraising campaign aims to inspire 50 million people around the world to make small donations to Covax, the international effort to push for equitable global distribution of COVID-19 vaccinations.

76. Selena Gomez and J.Lo headline vax concert for poor nations -

NEW YORK (AP) — Backed by an international concert hosted by Selena Gomez and headlined by Jennifer Lopez, Global Citizen is unveiling an ambitious campaign to help medical workers in the world's poorest countries quickly receive COVID-19 vaccines.

77. 'How many of us will be left?' Catholic nuns face loss, pain -

GREENSBURG, Pa. (AP) — The nuns' daily email update was overtaken by news of infections. Ambulances blared into the driveways of their convents. Prayers for the sick went unanswered, prayers for the dead grew monotonous and, their cloistered world suddenly caving in, some of the sisters' thoughts were halting.

78. Businesses, philanthropy unite to fight racial wealth gap -

NEW YORK (AP) — The CEOs of Starbucks and Goldman Sachs will join leaders from philanthropy and academia in a new initiative to address the racial wealth gap in the United States.

The initiative is called NinetyToZero, so named for the roughly 90% wealth gap between white and Black Americans. Its leaders describe the goal as providing a roadmap for organizations to "counteract centuries of discrimination, segregation, and financial exploitation," according to the group's launch plans announced Tuesday.

79. Vaccine skepticism runs deep among white evangelicals in US -

The president of the Southern Baptist Convention, America's largest evangelical denomination, posted a photo on Facebook last week of him getting the COVID-19 vaccine. It drew more than 1,100 comments — many of them voicing admiration for the Rev. J.D. Greear, and many others assailing him.

80. Billionaires John, Laura Arnold to give 5% of wealth yearly -

Billionaire philanthropists John and Laura Arnold have committed to donate 5% of their wealth annually as part of an effort to encourage increased, timelier donations to charities.

The Arnolds, who live in Houston, are the first billionaires to sign on to the advocacy organization Global Citizen's "Give While You Live" campaign, which calls on the world's billionaires to give at least 5% of their wealth every year to a cause. The Arnolds' pledge Monday came as part of an alliance between Global Citizen and the Arnold-led Initiative to Accelerate Charitable Giving — a coalition of donors, experts and nonprofits who want Congress to raise giving requirements.

81. A key to bridging the political divide: Sit down and talk? -

NEW YORK (AP) — A few years ago, Dave Isay started worrying about America as he saw the middle ground between the political parties vanish into what he calls "disconnection and a vast void."

"I am not ever concerned about people arguing with each other, because that's healthy," Isay said. "But I was concerned with people treating one another with contempt."

82. Growing number of Southern Baptist women question roles -

Emily Snook is the daughter of a Southern Baptist pastor. She met her husband, also a pastor, while they attended a Southern Baptist university

Yet the 39-year-old Oklahoma woman now finds herself wondering if it's time to leave the nation's largest Protestant denomination, in part because of practices and attitudes that limit women's roles.

83. Corporations become unlikely financiers of racial equity -

In the months since the police killing of George Floyd sparked a racial reckoning in the United States, American corpo-rations have emerged as an unexpected leading source of funding for social justice.

84. Faith leaders get COVID-19 shot to curb vaccine reluctance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than two dozen clergy members from the capital region rolled up their sleeves inside the Washington National Cathedral and got vaccinated against the coronavirus Tuesday in a camera-friendly event designed to encourage others to get their own COVID-19 shots.

85. Bezos plans to spend $10 billion by 2030 on climate change -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos plans to spend the $10 billion he invested in the Bezos Earth Fund by 2030, the fund's new CEO said Tuesday.

Since Bezos announced the fund in February 2020, little has been revealed about how it would be used combat the climate crisis.

86. $40M gender equality fund by Gates, Scott picks finalists -

A gender equality philanthropic initiative spearheaded by Melinda Gates' investment company, with support from MacKenzie Scott, has announced 10 project finalists for $40 million in funding slated to be awarded this summer.

87. LGBTQ rights bill ignites debate over religious liberty -

A sweeping bill that would extend federal civil rights protections to LGBTQ people is a top priority of President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress. Yet as the Equality Act heads to the Senate after winning House approval, its prospects seem bleak — to a large extent because of opposition from conservative religious leaders.

88. United Methodist conservatives detail plans for a breakaway -

Conservative leaders within the United Methodist Church unveiled plans Monday to form a new denomination, the Global Methodist Church, with a doctrine that does not recognize same-sex marriage.

The move could hasten the long-expected breakup of the UMC over differing approaches to LGBTQ inclusion. For now, the UMC is the largest mainline Protestant church in the U.S. and second only to the Southern Baptist Convention, an evangelical denomination, among all U.S. Protestant churches.

89. Bezos, Bloomberg among top 50 US charity donors for 2020 -

As the world grappled with COVID-19, a recession and a racial reckoning, the ultrawealthy gave to a broader set of causes than ever before — bestowing multimillion-dollar gifts on food pantries, historically Black colleges and universities and organizations that serve the poor and the homeless, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy's annual rankings of the 50 Americans who gave the most to charity last year.

90. Zuckerberg part of $100M 'California Black Freedom Fund' -

More than two dozen philanthropic organizations and corporations on Thursday launched the California Black Freedom Fund, a $100 million, five-year initiative that they say will provide resources to Black-led organizations in the state that are seeking to eradicate systemic racism.

91. Biden, at prayer breakfast, calls out 'political extremism' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday called for a confrontation of the "political extremism" that inspired the U.S. Capitol riot and appealed for collective strength during such turbulent times in remarks at the National Prayer Breakfast, a Washington tradition that asks political combatants to set aside their differences for one morning.

92. Christianity on display at Capitol riot sparks new dialogue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Christian imagery and rhetoric on view during this month's Capitol insurrection are sparking renewed debate about the societal effects of melding Christian faith with an exclusionary breed of nationalism.

93. Building on success, nonprofits aim to keep aiding elections -

NEW YORK (AP) — Democracy, as President Joe Biden declared in his inaugural speech, survived a barrage of misinformation and an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol to achieve a peaceful transfer of power.

94. Anti-Semitism seen in Capitol insurrection raises alarms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a mob of supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol last week clamoring to overturn the result of November's presidential election, photographs captured a man in the crowd wearing a shirt emblazoned with "Camp Auschwitz," a reference to the Nazi concentration camp.

95. Warnock, Biden wins give twin thrills to religious liberals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Rev. and Sen.-elect Raphael Warnock shares more than a party with President-elect Joe Biden: Both Democrats made faith a central part of their political identity on the campaign trail — and their victories are emboldening religious liberals.

96. Faith leaders urge Congress to honor election result -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 2,000 faith leaders and religious activists are calling on members of Congress to honor the result of November's election and avoid "a delayed and drawn out objection" this week when President-elect Joe Biden's win is set to be certified.

97. Church vandalism exposes divisions over faith and politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vandalism at four downtown Washington churches after rallies in support of President Donald Trump are exposing rifts among people of faith as the nation confronts bitter post-election political divisions.

98. AP VoteCast: Trump wins white evangelicals, Catholics split -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump won support from about 8 in 10 white evangelical Christian voters in his race for reelection, but Catholic voters split almost evenly between him and Democratic opponent Joe Biden, according to AP VoteCast.

99. 1,000-plus faith leaders call for 'free and fair election' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 1,000 clergy members, religious scholars and other faith-based advocates have signed onto a unique statement that supports a comprehensive path to "a free and fair election" and urges leaders to heed the verdict of "legitimate election results" regardless of who wins in November.

100. Bipartisan Christian group forms super PAC to oppose Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A group of prominent Christians from both sides of the aisle, including a past faith adviser to former President Barack Obama, is forming a political action committee designed to chip away at Christian support for President Donald Trump in the final weeks of the 2020 campaign.