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Editorial Results (free)

1. WHO chief to be confirmed for 2nd term after no opposition -

LONDON (AP) — WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus is expected to be confirmed by the U.N. health agency's member countries for a second five-year term on Tuesday.

No other candidate challenged Tedros for the post amid the ongoing difficulties of responding to the devastating coronavirus pandemic.

2. DOJ: 21 people charged nationwide with $150M in COVID fraud -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Twenty-one people have been charged in the past nine days as part of a nationwide enforcement push to root out those who exploit the pandemic through health care fraud schemes, the Justice Department announced Wednesday.

3. Marijuana, hemp and what’s legal in Tennessee -

It’s legal, it’s sold everywhere in Tennessee, but purveyors can’t tell anyone why it might help your insomnia, diabetes, anxiety or chronic pain. Federal law prohibits vendors from telling consumers why they’d actually want to buy it.

4. Energy shift creates opening for 'world's largest batteries' -

LUDINGTON, Mich. (AP) — Sprawled like a gigantic swimming pool atop a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan is an asphalt-and-clay pond holding enough water to produce electricity for 1.6 million households.

5. E-cigs using synthetic nicotine come under FDA oversight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators will soon begin cracking down on vaping companies using a now-closed loophole, including a line of fruit-flavored e-cigarettes that have become teenagers' top choice.

6. Polish, Baltic presidents visit Ukraine in show of support -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — The presidents of four countries on Russia's doorstep visited Ukraine on Wednesday in a show of support for the embattled country, after Russian President Vladimir Putin vowed to continue his bloody offensive until its "full completion."

7. Lyft, Spin partner, scoot into Nashville -

Lyft and Spin have announced a partnership to bring Spin scooters to the Lyft app in 60 U.S. markets, including Nashville.

More cities are launching over the coming months.

This integration further positions Lyft as the go-to transportation platform as riders have new, cost-effective and more sustainable ways to get from point A to point B. This exclusive partnership creates a seamless experience: riders can simply rent and pay for Spin scooters in the Lyft app without needing to download another app or add new payment information.

8. Judge acquits man of misdemeanors in Capitol riot trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday acquitted a New Mexico man of misdemeanor charges that he illegally entered the U.S. Capitol and engaged in disorderly conduct after he walked into the building during last year's riot.

9. US pulls GSK's COVID drug as omicron sibling dominates cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — GlaxoSmithKline's IV drug for COVID-19 should no longer be used because it is likely ineffective against the omicron subvariant that now accounts for most U.S. cases, federal health regulators said Tuesday.

10. Ex-police officer faces jury trial on Capitol riot charges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Over a year ago, two off-duty police officers from a small town in Virginia were charged with storming the U.S. Capitol together. One of them is heading to trial and faced a courtroom full of potential jurors on Monday. The other could be a key prosecution witness.

11. Billions, and growing, for lawmakers' projects in big bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home-district projects for members of Congress are back, sprinkled across the government-wide $1.5 trillion bill President Joe Biden signed recently. The official tally shows amounts modest by past standards yet spread widely around the country — and that understate what lawmakers are claiming credit for.

12. Russian war in Ukraine marks 1 month with no end in sight -

Russia's war in Ukraine has killed thousands of people, reduced entire cities to rubble and forced millions to flee their homes. The largest military conflict in Europe since World War II has also upset the international security order and sent dangerous ripples through the global economy.

13. EXPLAINER: Why South gets more killer tornadoes at night -

Forget "The Wizard of Oz." Tornadoes are causing far more deaths and destruction east and south of Kansas these days. And they're often doing it in the dark of night.

Tuesday night's deadly tornado that struck the New Orleans area is the ideal example of what experts say is the 21st century problem with twisters: Killer tornadoes have shifted a bit out of the vast emptiness of the Great Plains, more into the Southeast where there are more people to hit, poorer populations and more trees to obscure twisters from view.

14. China amplifies unsupported Russian claim of Ukraine biolabs -

BANGKOK (AP) — As Russia intensifies its assault on Ukraine, it is getting a helping hand from China in spreading inflammatory and unsubstantiated claims that the U.S. is financing biological weapons labs in Ukraine.

15. Oak Ridge, TVA to partner on decarbonization technologies -

OAK RIDGE (AP) — The Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Tennessee Valley Authority announced on Tuesday they have signed a new memorandum of understanding to work together on decarbonization technologies.

16. California adopts nation's 1st 'endemic' virus policy -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California became the first state to formally shift to an "endemic" approach to the coronavirus with Gov. Gavin Newsom's announcement Thursday of a plan that emphasizes prevention and quick reaction to outbreaks over mandated masking and business shutdowns.

17. S. Korean COVID deaths rise, hope rests on high booster rate -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea reported its highest number of COVID-19 deaths in a month Tuesday as U.S. health authorities advised Americans to avoid traveling to the country grappling with a fast-developing omicron surge.

18. Novavax says protein vaccine works for kids as young as 12 -

Novavax announced Thursday that its COVID-19 vaccine proved safe and effective in a study of 12- to 17-year-olds.

Novavax makes a protein-based vaccine -- a different type than the most widely used shots -- that's a late arrival to the COVID-19 arsenal.

19. Highly vaccinated Sweden ends COVID-19 testing -

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Sweden has halted wide-scale testing for COVID-19 even among people showing symptoms of an infection, putting an end to the mobile city-square tent sites, drive-in swab centers and home-delivered tests that became ubiquitous during the pandemic and provided essential data for tracking its spread.

20. FDA halts use of antibody drugs that don't work vs. omicron -

WASHINGTON (AP) — COVID-19 antibody drugs from Regeneron and Eli Lilly should no longer be used because they don't work against the omicron variant that now accounts for nearly all U.S. infections, U.S. health regulators said Monday.

21. US begins offering 1B free COVID tests, but many more needed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first time, people across the U.S. can log on to a government website and order free, at-home COVID-19 tests. But the White House push may do little to ease the omicron surge, and experts say Washington will have to do a lot more to fix the country's long-troubled testing system.

22. COVID case counts may be losing importance amid omicron -

The explosive increase in U.S. coronavirus case counts is raising alarm, but some experts believe the focus should instead be on COVID-19 hospital admissions. And those aren't climbing as fast.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, for one, said Sunday on ABC that with many infections causing few or no symptoms, "it is much more relevant to focus on the hospitalizations as opposed to the total number of cases." Other experts argue that case counts still have value.

23. Elizabeth Holmes jury split on three of 11 fraud charges -

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — The jury weighing fraud charges against former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes on Monday said it is deadlocked on three of the 11 felony counts against her. Holmes is accused of duping investors and patients about a blood-testing technology that she hailed as a medical breakthrough.

24. Fauci: CDC mulling COVID test requirement for asymptomatic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the COVID-19 omicron variant surges across the United States, top federal health officials are looking to add a negative test along with its five-day isolation restrictions for asymptomatic Americans who catch the coronavirus, the White House's top medical adviser said Sunday.

25. TN-based addiction treatment chain settles billing fraud allegations -

A company that operates a network of addiction treatment centers has agreed to pay $4.5 million to settle allegations that it charged the Massachusetts Medicaid program for unnecessary urine drug testing that was illegally performed at the company's own lab, officials said Thursday.

26. Nashville attorneys named Super Lawyers, Rising Stars -

The 2021 edition of Mid-South Super Lawyers recently honored several attorneys in the Nashville area as Super Lawyers or Rising Stars.

Super Lawyers is a Thomson Reuters rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The annual selections are made using a rigorous process, including a statewide survey of lawyers, an independent research evaluation of candidates and peer reviews by practice area.

27. Pfizer pill becomes 1st US-authorized home COVID treatment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Wednesday authorized the first pill against COVID-19, a Pfizer drug that Americans will be able to take at home to head off the worst effects of the virus.

28. Moderna: Initial booster data shows good results on omicron -

Moderna said Monday that a booster dose of its COVID-19 vaccine should offer protection against the rapidly spreading omicron variant.

Moderna said lab tests showed the half-dose booster shot increased by 37 times the level of so-called neutralizing antibodies able to fight omicron.

29. Labor board certifies first union at a US Starbucks store -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — The National Labor Relations Board confirmed a vote Friday to form a union at a Starbucks store in Buffalo, meaning the coffee retailer, for the first time, will have to bargain with organized labor at a company-owned U.S. store.

30. Waverly hospital to join Ascension Saint Thomas -

Ascension Saint Thomas and Three Rivers Hospital have signed a definitive agreement for the Waverly facility to become part of Ascension Saint Thomas. The transaction is expected to be completed in spring 2022.

31. Pfizer confirms COVID pill's results, potency versus omicron -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pfizer said Tuesday that its experimental pill to treat COVID-19 appears effective against the omicron variant.

The company also said full results of its 2,250-person study confirmed the pill's promising early results against the virus: The drug reduced combined hospitalizations and deaths by about 89% among high-risk adults when taken shortly after initial COVID-19 symptoms.

32. EXPLAINER: Was tornado outbreak related to climate change? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The calendar said December but the warm moist air screamed of springtime. Add an eastbound storm front guided by a La Nina weather pattern into that mismatch and it spawned tornadoes that killed dozens over five U.S. states.

33. Pfizer says COVID booster offers protection against omicron -

Pfizer said Wednesday that a booster dose of its COVID-19 vaccine may protect against the new omicron variant even though the initial two doses appear significantly less effective.

Pfizer and its partner BioNTech said lab tests showed a booster dose increased by 25-fold the level of so-called neutralizing antibodies against omicron.

34. Tennessee halts exemptions to COVID law after court rulings -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee on Wednesday halted dozens of exemptions that allowed businesses and public entities to require people to take COVID-19 preventive measures in spite of a state law severely limiting them, citing court rulings that blocked some of President Joe Biden's vaccine mandates.

35. NASA launches spacecraft to test asteroid defense concept -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — NASA launched a spacecraft Tuesday night on a mission to smash into an asteroid and test whether it would be possible to knock a speeding space rock off course if one were to threaten Earth.

36. GOP embraces natural immunity as substitute for vaccines -

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Republicans fighting President Joe Biden's coronavirus vaccine mandates are wielding a new weapon against the White House rules: natural immunity.

They contend that people who have recovered from the virus have enough immunity and antibodies to not need COVID-19 vaccines, and the concept has been invoked by Republicans as a sort of stand-in for vaccines.

37. FDA official explains decision on 'simplified' booster shots -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government's booster campaign got a lot simpler Friday after Food and Drug Administration officials authorized extra shots of Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines for all adults.

38. Universities to buses: Tennessee COVID law exemptions sought -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Universities, transportation agencies and the operator of a national laboratory are among those landing exemptions to a new Tennessee law that strictly limits or prohibits most government entities and businesses from implementing COVID-19 prevention mandates. For some, approval was almost immediate.

39. Women seldom get credit – or credit – for inventions -

Well, this is not working. You can clearly see a problem, and everyone online agrees with you. It’s not working and the fix, duh!, is painfully obvious. So, now where do you take this idea of yours? To a network TV show or a corporation, a laboratory or a bank? Or, as Katrine Marçal explains in her new book, “Mother of Invention,” it might depend on your gender.

40. Bradley adds East to real estate group -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has hired Van P. East III to the firm’s real estate practice group as a partner in the Nashville office.

East has extensive experience in commercial real estate, representing clients in purchasing, financing, leasing and selling commercial properties ranging from shopping centers to vacant land. He also works with clients on matters involving closely held business entities, including formations, conversions, mergers, acquisitions and dispositions, as well as restructuring ownership and control.

41. Judge limits unpaid leave for unvaccinated workers at US lab -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A federal judge has limited the ability for now for the nonprofit running Oak Ridge National Laboratory to place employees on unpaid leave who receive exemptions to a COVID-19 vaccine requirement.

42. UK: 43,000 may have received false negative COVID results -

LONDON (AP) — British health officials said Friday that 43,000 people may have been wrongly told they don't have the coronavirus because of problems at a private laboratory.

The U.K. Health Security Agency said the Immensa Health Clinic Ltd. lab in the central England city of Wolverhampton has been suspended from processing swabs after the false negatives.

43. Tennessee proposes health, industry help with pandemic aid -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee panel is proposing to use untapped federal COVID-19 stimulus money for new health investments, industry and tourism aid, and reserves for future projects.

The Financial Stimulus Accountability Group released a proposal Wednesday for American Recovery Plan money with $200 million to replace the State Public Health Laboratory and $129 million to improve local health departments. Another $110 million would continue staffing assistance aid at hospitals, skilled nursing facilities and long-term care facilities stretched thin by the pandemic.

44. VUMC helps develop first COVID-19 pill -

U.S.-based pharmaceutical giant Merck& Co. is seeking authorization for the first oral antiviral pill to treat COVID-19, after a Vanderbilt University Medical Center clinical trial showed it cut the risk of hospitalization or death in half when given to high-risk people during infection.

45. AstraZeneca asks FDA to authorize COVID antibody treatment -

LONDON (AP) — AstraZeneca, the Anglo-Swedish drugmaker that developed one of the first COVID-19 vaccines, has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to authorize the emergency use of an antibody treatment to prevent the disease.

46. Biden bets on rapid COVID tests that can be hard to find -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is betting on millions more rapid, at-home tests to help curb the latest deadly wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is overloading hospitals and threatening to shutter classrooms around the country.

47. Tesla builds 1st store on tribal land, dodges state car laws -

NAMBÉ, N.M. (AP) — Carmaker Tesla has opened a store and repair shop on Native American land for the first time, marking a new approach to its yearslong fight to sell cars directly to consumers and cut car dealerships out of the process.

48. Nashville health group pushes vaccines for all -

The Nashville Health Care Council board of directors has issued a statement urging every person to get vaccinated against COVID-19, and it invited top executives of health care companies nationwide to sign on to the statement.

49. California Gov. Newsom crushes Republican-led recall effort -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Despite warnings the race would be close, California Gov. Gavin Newsom decisively defeated efforts to kick him out of office, a win the Democrat cast as an endorsement of his handling of the coronavirus pandemic and his party's liberal values.

50. Report: Solar could power 40% of US electricity by 2035 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Solar energy has the potential to supply up to 40% of the nation's electricity within 15 years — a 10-fold increase over current solar output, but one that would require massive changes in U.S. policy and billions of dollars in federal investment to modernize the nation's electric grid, a new federal report says.

51. Amazon Air cargo comes to Nashville -

The first Amazon Air cargo aircraft arrived at Nashville International Airport last week, beginning daily flights to the airport and adding to the company’s presence in the region.

“This operation reinforces Amazon’s investment in the region and BNA’s vital role in the economic development of the area,” says Doug Kreulen, BNA president and CEO. “We value their commitment and look forward to a strong partnership.”

52. Kepro to buy eQHealthSolutions -

Kepro, a health management and technology solutions company with offices in Nashville, has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire eQHealth Solutions, LLC.

“Facilitating care for priority populations is core to our work,” says Dr. Susan Weaver, president and chief executive officer. “The acquisition of eQHealth Solutions will enhance our ability to partner with government and commercial clients to improve health care quality, maximize efficiency and better leverage technology and analytics. I am excited about bringing the combined capabilities of Kepro and eQHealth to our clients.”

53. Harris' Asia trip carries new urgency after Afghan collapse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Taliban takeover of Afghanistan has given new urgency to Vice President Kamala Harris' tour of southeast Asia, where she will attempt to reassure allies of American resolve following the chaotic end of a two-decade war.

54. US health officials call for booster shots against COVID-19 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials Wednesday announced plans to dispense COVID-19 booster shots to all Americans to shore up their protection amid the surging delta variant and signs that the vaccines' effectiveness is falling.

55. EXPLAINER: What do we know about booster shots for COVID-19? -

U.S. health officials may soon recommend COVID-19 booster shots for fully vaccinated Americans. A look at what we know about boosters and how they could help fight the coronavirus:

WHY MIGHT WE NEED BOOSTERS?

56. Pfizer to discuss COVID-19 vaccine booster with US officials -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pfizer says it plans to meet with top U.S. health officials Monday to discuss the drugmaker's request for federal authorization of a third dose of its COVID-19 vaccine as President Joe Biden's chief medical adviser acknowledged that "it is entirely conceivable, maybe likely" that booster shots will be needed.

57. Experts question if WHO should lead pandemic origins probe -

BEIJING (AP) — As the World Health Organization draws up plans for the next phase of its probe of how the coronavirus pandemic started, an increasing number of scientists say the U.N. agency it isn't up to the task and shouldn't be the one to investigate.

58. Nashville’s July 4 event to be nation’s largest -

This year’s free Let Freedom Sing! Music City July 4th event is projected to draw record crowds to Downtown Nashville.

“Following conversations with other cities regarding major July 4th events across the U.S., it’s safe to say that Nashville will have the largest live Independence Day celebration in the country this year,” says Julie Heckman, executive director of the American Pyrotechnics Association.

59. Professor charged with hiding China ties claims innocence -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — A University of Tennessee professor charged with hiding his relationship with a Chinese university while receiving research grants from the federal government is innocent of the federal charges, his attorney said during a trial in Knoxville.

60. Accelerator aims to grow tech companies in East Tennessee -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — The Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of Tennessee System are partnering with Techstars to launch a startup accelerator that aims to grow 30 technology companies over three years.

61. Biden orders more intel investigation of COVID-19 origin -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden ordered U.S. intelligence officials to "redouble" their efforts to investigate the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic, including any possibility the trail might lead to a Chinese laboratory.

62. Biden asks US intel officials to investigate COVID-19 origin -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Wednesday asked U.S. intelligence officials to "redouble" their efforts to investigate the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the unlikely possibility that the origins of the virus trace to Chinese lab.

63. Japan opens mass vaccine centers 2 months before Olympics -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan mobilized military doctors and nurses to give shots to elderly people in Tokyo and Osaka on Monday as the government desperately tries to accelerate its vaccination rollout and curb coronavirus infections just two months before hosting the Olympics.

64. America's gas-fueled vehicles imperil Biden's climate goals -

DETROIT (AP) — For President Joe Biden to reach his ambitious goal of slashing America's greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030, huge reductions would have to come from somewhere other than one of the worst culprits: Auto tailpipes.

65. Testing casts doubts on Teslas’ EPA range estimates -

Edmunds’ test team recently published the results of its real-world range testing for electric vehicles. Notably, every Tesla the team tested in 2020 came up short of matching the EPA’s range estimate. Almost all other EVs Edmunds tested met or exceeded those estimates.

66. COVID testing blitz undermined screening, fight against STDs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After an unprecedented push to test and track COVID-19, public health workers are grappling with a worrisome side effect: a collapse in screening for sexually transmitted diseases that have been on the rise for years.

67. Company at heart of J&J vaccine woes has series of citations -

The company at the center of quality problems that led Johnson & Johnson to discard an unknown amount of its coronavirus vaccine has a string of citations from U.S. health officials for quality control problems.

68. WHO report: COVID likely 1st jumped into humans from animals -

GENEVA (AP) — A joint World Health Organization-China study on the origins of COVID-19 says that transmission of the virus from bats to humans through another animal is the most likely scenario and that a lab leak is "extremely unlikely," according to a draft copy obtained by The Associated Press.

69. Founders of California fecal matter-testing company indicted -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Two Silicon Valley entrepreneurs who founded a biotech company that tested fecal matter are accused of bilking their investors and health insurance providers, federal prosecutors said Thursday.

70. Faith leaders get COVID-19 shot to curb vaccine reluctance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than two dozen clergy members from the capital region rolled up their sleeves inside the Washington National Cathedral and got vaccinated against the coronavirus Tuesday in a camera-friendly event designed to encourage others to get their own COVID-19 shots.

71. What's inside the $1.9T COVID-19 bill passed by Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The sweeping pandemic relief package awaiting President Joe Biden's signature aims to help the U.S. defeat the virus and nurse the economy back to health. Highlights of the legislation:

72. What's inside the $1.9T COVID-19 bill passed by Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House approved a sweeping pandemic relief package over Republican opposition on Wednesday, sending it to President Joe Biden to be signed into law. The milestone political victory would provide $1,400 checks for most Americans and direct billions of dollars to schools, state and local governments, and businesses.

73. Highlights of the COVID-19 relief bill advancing in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House is expected to pass a $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package late Friday that includes $1,400 checks for most Americans and billions of dollars for schools, state and local governments and businesses.

74. NASA rover lands on Mars to look for signs of ancient life -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A NASA rover streaked through the orange Martian sky and landed on the planet Thursday, accomplishing the riskiest step yet in an epic quest to bring back rocks that could answer whether life ever existed on Mars.

75. California conference in 'immunity bubble' spreads COVID-19 -

CULVER CITY, Calif. (AP) — XPrize founder Peter Diamandis thought he could hold a conference in an "immunity bubble" in the middle of California's COVID-19 surge last month but instead created a superspreader event that infected attendees, staff and himself.

76. Biden says US is securing 600 million vaccine doses by July -

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — President Joe Biden said Thursday that the U.S. will have enough supply of the COVID-19 vaccine by the end of the summer to inoculate 300 million Americans.

Biden made the announcement at the sprawling National Institutes of Health complex just outside Washington as he visited some of the nation's leading scientists on the frontlines of the fight against the disease. He toured the Viral Pathogenesis Laboratory that created the COVID-19 vaccine now manufactured by Moderna and being rolled out in the U.S. and other countries.

77. WHO team: Coronavirus unlikely to have leaked from China lab -

WUHAN, China (AP) — The coronavirus most likely first appeared in humans after jumping from an animal, a team of international and Chinese scientists looking for the origins of COVID-19 said Tuesday, dismissing as unlikely an alternate theory that the virus leaked from a Chinese lab.

78. UK PM Johnson faces criticism over Scotland trip in lockdown -

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson faced accusations Thursday that he is not abiding by the country's lockdown rules as he visited Scotland to laud the rapid rollout of coronavirus vaccines across the United Kingdom.

79. More to creating video games than cool graphics -

You’ve got to clear the path. You know there’s a turret in your way and that could be tricky, but so was the jungle but you survived. Now you’ve got one goal in mind: killing minions.

80. Bradley starts clinic for Black-owned businesses -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP is launching its Black-Owned Small Business and Nonprofit Clinic. The firm has partnered with the Arts& Business Council of Greater Nashville and its Volunteer Lawyers & Professionals for the Arts program to provide accessible and affordable business-oriented legal services to Black-owned small businesses and nonprofits.

81. California becomes first state to top 3 million virus cases -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California on Monday became the first state to record more than 3 million known coronavirus infections.

The grim milestone, as tallied by Johns Hopkins University, wasn't entirely unexpected in a state with 40 million residents but its speed stunning. The state only reached 2 million reported cases on Dec. 24.

82. Patterson names Douglass shareholder in firm -

Patterson Intellectual Property Law has elected Scott M. Douglass to a shareholder of the firm.

Douglass concentrates his practice in the areas of trademarks, copyrights and data privacy. He litigates trademark, trade dress, and copyright claims in federal courts across the country. He represents companies and individuals acting as both rightsholders asserting their rights and defendants accused of infringing others’ rights.

83. Pfizer study suggests vaccine works against virus variant -

New research suggests Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in the two more-contagious variants of the coronavirus that have erupted in Britain and South Africa.

The results are reassuring, albeit preliminary, and not surprising to scientists who didn't expect a single mutation to defeat the shots on which the world has pinned its hopes. But the study marks just the beginning of continual monitoring to make sure that all the vaccines being rolled out around the world continue to work as the coronavirus, like all viruses, evolves.

84. Colorado Guardsman has 1st reported US case of virus variant -

DENVER (AP) — Health officials say a Colorado National Guard member has the first reported U.S. case of COVID-19 variant and a second case is suspected in another Guard member.

Dr. Rachel Herlihy, the state's epidemiologist, said Wednesday that the two were deployed on Dec. 23 to a nursing home with an outbreak of the virus in a small town outside Denver.

85. First reported US case of COVID-19 variant found in Colorado -

DENVER (AP) — The first reported U.S. case of the COVID-19 variant that's been seen in the United Kingdom has been discovered in Colorado, Gov. Jared Polis announced Tuesday.

The coronavirus variant was found in a man in his 20s who is in isolation southeast of Denver and has no travel history, state health officials said.

86. Tennessee developing rapid field test for livestock diseases -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Department of Agriculture announced on Thursday that it has received a $250,000 federal grant to help develop a rapid field test for two highly contagious livestock diseases.

87. As US rushes to give shots, Tennessee builds vaccine reserve -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As states rush to inoculate health care workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, only Tennessee has prioritized building its own emergency reserve of the coveted vaccine.

88. As hospitals cope with a COVID-19 surge, cyber threats loom -

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — By late morning on Oct. 28, staff at the University of Vermont Medical Center noticed the hospital's phone system wasn't working.

Then the internet went down, and the Burlington-based center's technical infrastructure with it. Employees lost access to databases, digital health records, scheduling systems and other online tools they rely on for patient care.

89. Wiping down groceries? Experts say keep risk in perspective -

NEW YORK (AP) — Cleaning wipes are harder to find on store shelves, and businesses are reassuring customers with stepped up sanitation measures. In New York, the subway system is shut down nightly for disinfecting.

90. GM to recall 7M vehicles globally to replace Takata air bags -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors will recall about 7 million big pickup trucks and SUVs worldwide to replace potentially dangerous Takata air bag inflators.

The announcement came Monday after the U.S. government told the automaker it had to recall 6 million of the vehicles domestically.

91. Heading into holidays, US COVID-19 testing strained again -

NEW YORK (AP) — With coronavirus cases surging and families hoping to gather safely for Thanksgiving, long lines to get tested have reappeared across the U.S. — a reminder that the nation's strained testing system remains unable to keep pace with the virus.

92. FDA allows 1st rapid virus test that gives results at home -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators on Tuesday allowed emergency use of the first rapid coronavirus test that can be performed entirely at home and delivers results in 30 minutes.

The announcement by the Food and Drug Administration represents an important step in U.S. efforts to expand testing options for COVID-19 beyond health care facilities and testing sites. However, the test will require a prescription, likely limiting its initial use.

93. US allows 1st emergency use of a COVID-19 antibody drug -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials have allowed emergency use of the first antibody drug to help the immune system fight COVID-19, an experimental approach against the virus that has killed more than 238,000 Americans.

94. Stocks end another wobbly day lower as virus cases rise -

Wall Street's losses mounted for the second straight day Tuesday as momentum slows on worries about rising virus counts and Washington's inability to deliver more aid to the economy.

The S&P 500 fell 0.3% after spending much of the day swinging between small gains and losses. Most of the stocks in the index fell, particularly banks, oil producers and other companies whose profits tend to track the strength of the economy. Those losses outweighed gains in technology stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. Traders also welcomed news that AMD has agreed to buy fellow chipmaker Xilinx for $35 billion.

95. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's skewed indictment of wind power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's dismissal of wind power as a glitchy, pricey, bird-slaughtering way to make electricity is out of step with the times.

He slammed the technology in his debate with Democrat Joe Biden on Thursday night, falsely contending wind power is dirtier and far pricier than natural gas. Here's a look at what he said:

96. 6 Russian officers charged in 'destructive' hacking campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department announced charges against Russian intelligence officers in cyberattacks that targeted a French presidential election, the Winter Olympics in South Korea and American businesses. The case implicates the Kremlin unit that interfered in the 2016 U.S. election but is not related to the November vote.

97. Why won't White House say when Trump last tested negative? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It is a basic, crucial question and one the White House refuses to answer: When was President Donald Trump's last negative test for the coronavirus before he tested positive last week?

98. Judge rules for DNA testing in Tennessee death penalty case -

MEMPHIS (AP) — DNA tests on a knife and other evidence must be performed in the case of a Tennessee death row inmate facing execution in December for the stabbing deaths of a woman and her daughter 33 years ago, a judge ruled Wednesday.

99. UK's 'Moonshot' mass virus test plan met with skepticism -

LONDON (AP) — Health experts on Thursday expressed strong skepticism about the British government's ambitious plans to carry out millions of coronavirus tests daily in a bid to help people resume normal lives in the absence of a vaccine.

100. UK's 'Moonshot' mass virus test plan met with skepticism -

LONDON (AP) — Health experts on Thursday expressed strong skepticism about the British government's ambitious plans to carry out millions of coronavirus tests daily in a bid to help people resume normal lives in the absence of a vaccine.