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Editorial Results (free)

1. Events -

Williamson Inc. Policy Talks. Williamson, Inc. Policy Talks is a monthly community forum featuring elected officials centered on the issues being discussed in the Tennessee Legislature and in Williamson County. Representatives are given a platform to discuss the issues in greater depth with their constituents. Columbia State Community College, Community Room – Building A, 1228 Liberty Pike, Franklin. Friday, 7:30-8:30 a.m. No charge for Williamson Inc. Business Partners and Guests. Information

2. Rapper Young Dolph fatally shot at Memphis cookie shop -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Rapper Young Dolph, widely admired in the hip-hop community for his authenticity and fierce independence, was shot and killed Wednesday inside a beloved local cookie shop in his hometown of Memphis, Tennessee, authorities said.

3. Events -

Hospitality Link. Industry Update and Networking Happy Hour presented by Infinity Hospitality. Panel discussion on the state of Nashville’s hospitality industry. Networking mixer including complimentary beverages and light bites to follow the presentation. Complimentary event, but pre-registration is required. Mask wearing is requested when not eating or drinking. Panelists include Adam Mansell, Tennessee Department of Travel and Tourism; Beth Morrow, Lipscomb University Hospitality and Entertainment; Nathaniel Beaver, Infinity Hospitality. Moderator: Sherry Franklin, Renaissance Nashville Hotel. The Bell Tower, 400 4th Ave. S., Nashville. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m.

4. Loop hopes to go mainstream with reusable packaging -

Reusable packaging – from stainless steel ice cream containers to glass jars of soap – is about to become more common at groceries and restaurants worldwide.

Loop, a two-year-old company that collects and sanitizes reusable containers, said Wednesday it's expanding after successful trials at groceries in France and Japan. Kroger and Walgreens in the U.S., Tesco in the United Kingdom and Woolworths in Australia are among the chains partnering with Loop to sell household staples in reusable packages. McDonald's, Burger King and Tim Hortons have also signed on.

5. Biden bets on rapid COVID tests that can be hard to find -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is betting on millions more rapid, at-home tests to help curb the latest deadly wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is overloading hospitals and threatening to shutter classrooms around the country.

6. Amazon eyes 125K more hires, $18+ per hour average salary -

Amazon wants to hire 125,000 delivery and warehouse workers and said Tuesday that it is paying new hires an average of $18 an hour in a tight job market as more people shop online.

Competition for hourly workers has become fierce, and many companies are offering higher pay, sign-on bonuses and other incentives. Last week, package delivery company UPS promised to handout job offers in 30 minutes after candidates apply for many of the 100,000 holiday workers it plans to hire.

7. Biden: GOP governors 'cavalier' for resisting vaccine rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden called some Republican governors "cavalier" on Friday for resisting his call for far-reaching new federal coronavirus vaccine requirements he hopes will curb the surging delta variant.

8. Key parts of Biden's plan to confront delta variant surge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has unveiled a new "action plan" plan to confront the COVID-19 surge that's being driven by the spread of the delta variant. It mandates vaccines for federal workers and contractors and certain health care workers, requires employees at companies with 100 or more workers to be vaccinated or tested weekly, lays the groundwork for a booster shot campaign and recommends that large venues require proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test. The plan also makes recommendations on keeping schools open.

9. Sweeping new vaccine mandates for 100 million Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday is announcing sweeping new federal vaccine requirements affecting as many as 100 million Americans in an all-out effort to increase COVID-19 vaccinations and curb the surging delta variant that is killing thousands each week and jeopardizing the nation's economic recovery.

10. Dollar General thrives despite ‘retail apocalypse' -

Don’t blink! You might miss the grand opening of another Dollar General store. OK, that’s an exaggeration. But not by much.

In the 14 years since an investment group purchased the family owned business and took it public again two years later, the Goodlettsville-based chain has added nearly 10,000 stores to boast more retail locations than any other company in the United States – quickly closing on 18,000 stores in 46 states.

11. Buffett's firm ups Kroger stake while trimming drug holdings -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Billionaire Warren Buffett's company has again increased the size of its bet on grocery giant Kroger, while scaling back several of its health care industry investments.

Berkshire Hathaway Inc. said in a quarterly update with regulators Monday that it picked up nearly 11 million shares of Kroger stock during the second quarter, raising its holdings to 61.8 million shares. Buffett's company has been steadily adding to its Kroger holdings in recent quarters.

12. Walmart mandates vaccines for workers at headquarters -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is requiring that all workers at its headquarters as well as managers who travel within the U.S. be vaccinated against COVID-19 by Oct. 4.

The Bentonville, Arkansas-based retailer is also reversing its mask policy for its employees, including vaccinated ones, who work in stores, clubs, distribution facilities and warehouses. Going forward, they will be required to wear masks in areas with high infection rates.

13. Beer is latest vaccine incentive for Biden 'month of action' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is announcing a "month of action" Wednesday to urge more Americans to get vaccinated for COVID-19 before the July 4 holiday, with an early summer sprint of incentives, including free beer, childcare and sports tickets to convince Americans to roll up their sleeves.

14. Genetically modified salmon head to US dinner plates -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The inaugural harvest of genetically modified salmon began this week after the pandemic delayed the sale of the first such altered animal to be cleared for human consumption in the United States, company officials said.

15. Nervous workers struggle to adjust to new mask policies -

NEW YORK (AP) — An abrupt relaxation of mask policies has left workers at some retail and grocery stores reeling as they try to sort out what the new environment means for their own safety and relationship with customers.

16. Buffett's firm sells off financials, halves Chevron stake -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Investor Warren Buffett's company pared back its holdings in financial firms further during the first quarter and also halved its new investment in Chevron.

Berkshire Hathaway Inc. provided an update on its U.S. stock holdings in a filing with regulators Monday. Many investors follow Berkshire's holdings closely because of Buffett's remarkably successful record.

17. TDEC honors 10 parks for ‘Go Green’ projects -

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation has recognized 10 of the 56 Tennessee State Parks with platinum level status for their performance in environmental sustainability in the state’s Go Green With Us program.

18. From local farms to many tables -

Eric Wooldridge, a manager at Bells Bend Farms in the Scottsboro/Bells Bend community, plants spinach throughout the fall and winter season. Several varieties – arrowhead leaf and savoy – do particularly well and remain tender and sweet during the cold months.

19. Kroger: Some pharmacy customer data impacted in vendor hack -

BOSTON (AP) — Kroger Co. says personal data, including Social Security numbers of some of its pharmacy and clinic customers, may have been stolen in the hack of a third-party vendor's file-transfer service.

20. Buffett's firm reveals new investments in Verizon, Chevron -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Warren Buffett's company made major new investments in Verizon and Chevron and again trimmed its huge stake in Apple while making several other adjustments to its stock portfolio last year.

21. Vaccine delays leave grocery workers feeling expendable -

As panicked Americans cleared supermarkets of toilet paper and food last spring, grocery employees gained recognition as among the most indispensable of the pandemic's front-line workers.

A year later, most of those workers are waiting their turn to receive COVID-19 vaccines, with little clarity about when that might happen.

22. ‘What happens when we’re gone?’ -

The question settled with a disturbing whisper in Pat and Charlie Cooper’s hearts once the emergency medical treatment was concluded and their 5-year-old daughter, Susan, was diagnosed with encephalitis, a swelling of her brain.

23. Carrying grandma’s legacy to new height -

North Nashville has always held a special place in Jason Word’s heart, and now his journey truly has come full circle. Word, 49, the new owner of Nashville’s four Save A Lot discount grocery stores, recalls many good times in the Brooklyn Heights area – between Trinity Lane and the Cumberland River – where his late grandmother, Ethel Watkins, ran the family grocery store, Watkins and Sons, following the death of her husband.

24. Thanksgiving dinner: Is it worth the risk? -

The 20-pound turkey comes out of the oven, its skin perfectly browned and crisp. The sideboard is lined with bounteous platters of dressing, macaroni and cheese, sweet potato casserole and creamed onions. The pies – apple, pecan and pumpkin – rest on the dessert table nearby. A houseful of family and friends head to the table to give thanks and dig in.

25. Scaled-back Thanksgiving plans leave turkey farmers in limbo -

For the turkey industry, this Thanksgiving is a guessing game.

Millions of Americans are expected to have scaled-down celebrations amid the pandemic, heeding official warnings against travel and large indoor gatherings. That leaves anxious turkey farmers and grocers scrambling to predict what people will want on their holiday tables.

26. Comfort food for 5K global gastronomists -

It was March 15, and Cindy Wall had a dilemma. The fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic had just sidelined her and the entire staff of the Belcourt Theatre, which officially closed temporarily the next day, and she was already missing not only the work environment but also the daily conversations she enjoyed with her co-workers about what they were cooking and eating.

27. Coin shortage hits retailers, laundromats, tooth fairy -

The national coin shortage has been an unusual side effect of the pandemic. Among its victims? Retailers, laundromats and even the tooth fairy.

The Federal Reserve announced in June that the supply system for coins had been severely disrupted by the pandemic. While there are still enough coins out there, they aren't circulating as freely because many businesses have been closed and consumers aren't out spending as usual.

28. Target, CVS join growing list of retailers requiring masks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target, CVS Health and Publix Super Markets on Thursday joined the growing list of national chains that will require customers to wear face masks regardless of where cities or states stand on the issue.

29. Walmart latest retailer to require customers to wear masks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart will require customers to wear face coverings at all of its namesake and Sam's Club stores, making it the largest retailer to introduce such a policy that has otherwise proven difficult to enforce without state and federal requirements.

30. Fragile food supply chain bounces back -

With a little luck – and weather permitting – many local families will fire up their backyard grills next week for a traditional July 4 cookout. Along with burgers and hot dogs, home chefs might be cooking up the kinds of meats they used to order in restaurants, thanks in part to market disruptions from the coronavirus.

31. Target permanently raises starting hourly pay to $15 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target Corp. says it's permanently increasing starting hourly wages for its workers to $15 beginning July 5, several months ahead of schedule.

32. CVS Health tests self-driving vehicle prescription delivery -

CVS Health will try delivering prescriptions with self-driving vehicles in a test that begins next month.

The drugstore chain said Thursday that it will partner with the Silicon Valley robotics company Nuro to deliver medicines and other products to customers near a Houston-area store.

33. Seniors jump back into the job market despite risks -

Being a member of the 60-plus age group, Carolyn Northup is considered a high risk for COVID-19. So the veteran auto sale representative has spent the last six weeks working from home, connecting with longtime customers and following new leads.

34. Ford temporarily halts work at 2 plants; Rolls cuts jobs -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

35. TSU president 'thrilled' by Oprah Winfrey gift -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover said she was "thrilled" to receive a call from Oprah Winfrey asking what she could do to help Nashville residents suffering from the economic turmoil caused by the coronavirus.

36. Kroger says isn't pulling back bonuses; airlines see uptick -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

37. Vast cutbacks in jobs and spending before any summer rebound -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

38. Production shutdowns shrink meat supplies at stores -

U.S. meat supplies are dwindling due to coronavirus-related production shutdowns. As a result, some stores like Costco and restaurants like Wendy's are limiting sales.

As of Monday, U.S. beef and pork processing capacity was down 40% from last year, according to Jayson Lusk, head of the department of agricultural economics at Purdue University. Multiple U.S. meatpacking facilities have closed in the last two weeks due to coronavirus outbreaks among workers.

39. Doubts about testing remain in spite of Trump's assurances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House released new guidelines aimed at answering criticism that America's coronavirus testing has been too slow, and President Donald Trump tried to pivot toward a focus on "reopening" the nation.

40. Wiped out of toilet paper? Here's why -

What does toilet paper have to do with a global pandemic?

Nothing.

Yet millions of people have been panicking about their household supply. Stores shelves have been emptied. Amazon is often out of stock. And social media is bursting with jokes and pleas for a roll or two.

41. Online grocery services struggle to meet spike in demand -

LONDON (AP) — A pandemic forcing everyone to stay home could be the perfect moment for online grocery services. In practice, they've been struggling to keep up with a surge in orders, highlighting their limited ability to respond to an unprecedented onslaught of demand.

42. Business fallout: National bills coming due, with risk; consumers see it -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

43. Publix stores to have barriers for cashiers as virus spreads -

MIAMI (AP) — Florida-based grocery chain Publix announced it will install plexiglass barriers to protect its cashiers, joining other retailers that are installing the shields to protect employees and customers from a coronavirus infection.

44. Business Fallout: Airlines fear failure, delivery in demand -

Business Fallout: Airlines fear failure, delivery in demand

It was less than 11 weeks ago that the first cases of pneumonia were detected in Wuhan, China. The speed at which what would soon be named COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, knocked the global economy askew is unparalleled in our lifetimes.

45. Travel grinds to a halt, plants close as virus takes hold -

The number of confirmed cases of the new coronavirus worldwide surpassed 200,000 for the first time Wednesday and the damage being seeded in the global economy is growing more clear by the day. Furloughs and job cuts, from dog walkers to oilfield workers, have begun. Governments around the world are pushing drastic countermeasures to help workers, particularly those who live paycheck to paycheck.

46. Business Fallout: Walmart limits hours, airlines cut flying -

WASHINGTON (AP) — United Airlines will slash 50% of its flying capacity in April and May and warns the cuts could extend into the peak summer travel season as the impact of the new coronavirus on airlines grows more dire.

47. How to help with tornado recovery -

Nashvillians are generous and have poured both time and money into helping tornado relief and recovery efforts.

Remember that it will be months, and even years, before everyone is back on their feet. Continued support will be appreciated, particularly as time goes along. Also, if you are donating items to a charity for tornado victims, be sure you would be proud to have those donations in your own home. New is best.

48. With spreading virus comes fears -- and lots of stockpiling -

NEW YORK (AP) — As an Arizonan, Gregory Cohen has never had to stock up ahead of a hurricane or other natural disaster.

49. Looking for hand sanitizer? Good luck -

NEW YORK (AP) — The hand sanitizers on Amazon were overpriced. A Walmart this weekend was completely sold out. Only on his third try was Ken Smith able to find the clear gel — at a Walgreens, where three bottles of Purell were left. He bought two.

50. Companies trim outlooks, travel and staff as virus spreads -

ALTERED EXPECTATIONS: General Electric Co. General Electric believes the viral outbreak could have a negative impact of about $300 million to $500 million on its first-quarter industrial free cash flow. Operating profit for the period could be hurt by about $200 million to $300 million. GE said that the expectations are incorporated into its full-year 2020 outlook.

51. Stocks end wobbly day with slight gains ahead of jobs report -

Wall Street capped a wobbly day of trading Thursday with slight gains for the major stock indexes as technology companies and banks outweighed declines elsewhere in the market.

The muted trading came as investors looked ahead to a key government report on jobs and kept an eye on developments in the negotiations to end the trade war between the U.S. and China.

52. Nashville a mural hotbed despite lack of support -

We’re Music City, sure. But Nashville’s increasingly becoming a Mural City, too, with examples splayed all over town.

The most recent has sprung up in walking distance from my house, on the Eastland Avenue side of the Kroger store at 711 Gallatin.

53. Quest for authentic dim sum -

In Chinese, dim sum roughly translates to “lightly touch your heart.” And it does. Eating dim sum around a shared table with everyone taking samples off multiple plates is one of the happiest ways to build community through food.

54. Events -

Music City Turkey Trot. This race will benefit the Salvation Army’s Senior Food Angel Program. Funds will go toward the purchase of $25 Kroger Gift Cards to help fight food insecurity among our senior population in Nashville. Thursday, 8 a.m., Nissan Stadium. $40. Information

55. Events -

Nashville International Airport Open House. Nashville International Airport, which has more than 17 million passengers annually and 540 flights daily, will host an open house to discuss preliminary findings and recommendations from its master plan update and noise exposure map update. Thursday, 5-8 p.m. One Century Place Conference Center, 26 Century Blvd. The public is welcome to come any time to review materials, ask questions and leave comments. Information

56. Walgreens to shutter in-store clinics, add Jenny Craig sites -

Walgreens will shutter nearly 40% of the clinics in its stores as the drugstore chain cuts costs and shifts to other businesses it believes will draw more people through its doors.

The company said Monday that it will close 150 Walgreens-run clinics by the end of the year, but it will keep open more than 200 that are run in partnership with health care providers.

57. CEOs speak out on gun violence, want Congressional action -

The CEOs of more than 100 companies are stepping into the nation's gun debate, imploring Congress to expand background checks and enact a strong "red flag" law.

In a letter sent to the Senate on Thursday, CEOs from businesses including Airbnb, Twitter and Uber asked Congress to pass a bill to require background checks on all gun sales and a strong red flag law that would allow courts to issue life-saving extreme risk protection orders.

58. Publix: Only officers should openly carry guns in its stores -

LAKELAND, Fla. (AP) — If you're carrying a gun, the Publix supermarket chain doesn't want to see it.

There are 46 Publix stores throughout Middle and East Tennessee.

Publix is joining a growing number of retailers in asking customers not to openly carry firearms in its stores, even if state laws allow it.

59. Bowden joins Stites & Harbison Nashville -

Elizabeth Anne Bowden has joined the Nashville office of Stites & Harbison, PLLC.

She is an attorney in the Creditors’ Rights & Bankruptcy Service Group. Her practice focuses on commercial transactions, litigation, banking, and bankruptcy and creditors’ rights.

60. What’s the secret to negotiating Nashville traffic? -

It was a stupid, rookie mistake. I was downtown and decided to go somewhere. In a vehicle. At, roughly, 4:45 p.m.

I can sense your eyes rolling. What an idiot, you’re probably thinking.

61. Blue Apron latest to suffer in tough meal kit market -

Meal kit companies face an ultimatum: Adapt or die.

The business is still in its infancy, with the biggest players — Blue Apron and HelloFresh — less than a decade old. But they're facing serious challenges from restaurant and grocery delivery services, smaller niche players and even home chefs.

62. Beyond Meat goes public as sales of plant-based meats rise -

Beyond Meat is ready for more. The El Segundo, California-based maker of plant-based burgers and sausages will make its debut on the Nasdaq stock exchange Thursday. It's the first pure-play maker of vegan "meat" to go public, according to Renaissance Capital, which researches and tracks IPOs.

63. As cashless stores grow, so does the backlash -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hembert Figueroa just wanted a taco. So he was surprised to learn the dollar bills in his pocket were no good at Dos Toros Taqueria in Manhattan, one of a small but growing number of establishments across the U.S. where customers can only pay by card or smartphone.

64. Sounds look to build on solid attendance stats -

The ever-increasing numbers indicate the Nashville Sounds must be doing something right.

The Sounds, entering their fifth season at First Tennessee Park in Germantown, are one of four minor league baseball teams to draw more than 600,000 fans to its home games last season.

65. Stocks slump again on Wall Street, extending weekly losses -

Technology and financial companies helped pull U.S. stocks broadly lower Thursday, marking the fourth straight loss for the S&P 500. The benchmark index is now on track for its first weekly drop since January.

66. Kroger shares plummet on weak Q4 sales, profits -

CINCINNATI (AP) — Shares of Kroger are falling sharply after the grocer's costly modernization plan dragged down profits during the fourth quarter.

The Cincinnati chain posted net income of $259 million, or 48 cents per share. That's down from last year's $854 million and per-share earnings were four cents short of Wall Street expectations, according to a survey by FactSet.

67. S&P 500 snaps 3-day losing streak as US stocks close higher -

Health care and technology companies helped lift U.S. stocks higher Friday, breaking a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 and giving the benchmark index its fifth consecutive weekly gain.

Renewed optimism for a potential resolution to the U.S.-China trade conflict helped put investors in a buying mood following a Bloomberg story saying U.S. officials are preparing a deal that could be signed within a month.

68. Kroger, Nuro bringing unmanned delivery to customers -

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Deliveries from an Arizona grocery store will soon be arriving with no one behind the wheel.

A fully autonomous vehicle is about to pilot public roads Tuesday with no back up driver, though it will be monitored by humans in another automobile.

69. Best thing about Amazon news? We finished 3rd -

We’re No. 3! Hey! We’re No. 3! As a boast, it lacks oomph. It does not indicate superior status. We’re not No. 1, is the clear message. We’re not even No. 2.

And yet that’s the position Nashville finds itself in with Amazon, having lost out to Long Island City, New York, and Crystal City, Virginia, as sites for the online retail behemoth’s new headquarters.

70. StarKist admits fixing tuna prices, faces $100 million fine -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — StarKist Co. agreed to plead guilty to a felony price fixing charge as part of a broad collusion investigation of the canned tuna industry, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

71. Can Tennessee history spur neighborhood renaissance? -

Leaving the new Tennessee State Museum in the rearview mirror for a few minutes, I decide to dodge off Jefferson Street and try to catch up with the pedestrian who I later discover is a retired chief petty officer. “We ran the Navy,” he tells me, proudly.

72. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for August 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, August 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

73. US stocks jump as inflation slows; tech rebounds -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are climbing Thursday morning after the Labor Department said inflation slowed a bit in August. Technology companies like Apple and Microsoft made some of the largest gains after a recent bout of uncertainty, and chipmaker Qualcomm jumped after it announced a big stock repurchase.

74. 4 reasons why shoppers are in the mood to spend -

NEW YORK (AP) — The store isn't dead for Home Depot, Kohl's, Best Buy or Target. Many traditional chains have posted strong sales, both online and at stores, as people are in a mood to spend.

What's driving it? A booming economy and companies' own efforts to try to Amazon-proof their businesses. That means making their stores more pleasant, updating their websites and speeding up delivery.

75. Kroger to phase out plastic bags at all stores -

CINCINNATI (AP) — The nation's largest grocery chain has begun to phase out the use of plastic bags as more Americans grow uncomfortable with their impact on the environment.

Kroger Co. will start Thursday at its QFC stores in and around Seattle, with the goal of using no plastic bags at those stores at some point next year. The company said it will be plastic-bag free at all of its nearly 2,800 stores by 2025.

76. Kroger to phase out plastic bags at all stores -

CINCINNATI (AP) — The nation's largest grocery chain will be plastic-bag free at all of its nearly 2,800 stores by 2025.

Kroger Co., which orders about 6 billion bags each year, will begin phasing out their use immediately at one of its chains based in Seattle, a city that has been proactive on reducing plastic use.

77. Kroger begins testing driverless grocery deliveries -

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — At a time when big-box retailers are trying to offer the same conveniences as their online competitors, the biggest U.S. grocery chain is testing the use of driverless cars to deliver groceries in a Phoenix suburb.

78. Kroger begins testing driverless grocery deliveries -

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Kroger will begin testing grocery deliveries using driverless cars outside of Phoenix.

The biggest U.S. grocery chain said the project will begin Thursday in Scottsdale at a Fry's supermarket, which is owned by Kroger.

79. Kroger to sell its goods to Chinese shoppers through Tmall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Kroger will start to sell some of its products to Chinese shoppers through a website owned by internet giant Alibaba, the latest move by the supermarket chain to boost its digital business.

80. Park, load, go: Amazon brings grocery pickup to Whole Foods -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon, known for bringing items to shoppers' homes, is adding a curbside pickup option at Whole Foods for Prime members.

Shoppers will be able to order eggs, milk and other groceries on the Prime Now app and park in reserved spaces for workers will place the items in their cars.

81. Affinion Insurance Solutions set to be sold -

Mill Point Capital has reached an agreement to acquire Franklin-based Affinion Insurance Solutions.

Mill Point is a middle-market private equity firm. Affinion Insurance is a business services platform, distributing, marketing and administering insurance products.

82. Faster delivery of nearly everything is the next big thing -

NEW YORK (AP) — As shoppers increasingly demand that everything from hot meals and groceries to dresses, bedding and electronics be dropped off at their doorsteps, retailers are betting big on delivery services that will get them there faster.

83. Kroger to test grocery deliveries with driverless cars -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Kroger Co. is about to test whether it can steer supermarket customers away from crowded grocery aisles with a fleet of diminutive driverless cars designed to lower delivery costs.

84. Kroger to test grocery deliveries with driverless cars -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Kroger Co. is about to test whether it can steer supermarket customers away from crowded grocery aisles with a fleet of diminutive driverless cars designed to lower delivery costs.

85. Stock indexes edge mostly higher in early morning trading -

Stock indexes are edging mostly higher in morning trading Thursday, shaking off an early stumble. Energy and industrial companies climbed, offsetting losses in technology and health care stocks. The price of crude oil rose.

86. New psychiatric hospital planned for Nashville -

Saint Thomas Health and Acadia Healthcare are partnering to create a new 76-bed psychiatric inpatient hospital at Metro Center in Nashville.

The state-of-the-art behavioral health hospital is planned for 300 Great Circle Road. Pending certificate of need approvals, construction would begin in early 2019.

87. Bible provides political cover for 7-day liquor sales passage -

Buoyed by Bible verses and compromise giving liquor stores a head start on Sunday sales, legislation allowing grocery stores to sell wine on Sundays has passed the Senate on a 17-11 vote.

The Wednesday decision comes in the wake of a 55-35 House vote earlier in the week and sends the measure to Gov. Bill Haslam for his signature. The only days stores won’t be allowed to sell alcohol under the legislation will be Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

88. Bible provides political cover for 7-day liquor sales passage -

Buoyed by Bible verses and compromise giving liquor stores a head start on Sunday sales, legislation allowing grocery stores to sell wine on Sundays has passed the Senate on a 17-11 vote.

The Wednesday decision comes in the wake of a 55-35 House vote earlier in the week and sends the measure to Gov. Bill Haslam for his signature. The only days stores won’t be allowed to sell alcohol under the legislation will be Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

89. The next Kirkland? Online retailers create their own brands -

NEW YORK (AP) — In Andrea Bright's home, Kleenex tissues, Charmin toilet paper and Glad trash bags have all been replaced by one brand: Prince & Spring.

90. US stocks open higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are moving higher in early trading as the market claws back some of the ground it lost a day earlier.

Technology companies, retailers and banks rose in early trading Friday, a day after markets were rattled by fears of an escalating trade conflict as the White House announced tariffs on Chinese goods.

91. Metro Schools a prime target for reducing food waste -

Urban Green Lab, a Nashville-based non-profit organization, is at the forefront of issues such as food waste, especially when it comes to the educating the public.

Todd Lawrence, executive director of the 9-year-old group, sees the food-waste issue as a part of the overarching issue of living sustainably in Nashville.

92. Less in landfills, more for hungry Tennesseans -

Tennesseans waste an estimated 40 percent of their food supply yearly, even as people go hungry in the state. It’s a staggering statistic, especially considering that an estimated 1 million Tennesseans – about 315,000 of whom are children – are considered “food insecure” and don’t necessarily know from where their next meal is coming.

93. Industrials, banks weigh on stock prices -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell on Wall Street as banks and industrial companies posted sizable losses.

Citigroup lost 1.9 percent Wednesday and aerospace giant Boeing gave up 2.5 percent.

94. Walmart's online same-day grocery ready for prime-time -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is expanding its same-day online grocery delivery service to more than 40 percent of U.S. households, or 100 metro areas, by year-end as it tries to keep pace with online leader Amazon.com.

95. US stocks edge higher; Express Scripts jumps on deal news -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are rising Thursday morning as they continue a recovery that started late the previous day. Technology companies and retailers are making some of the biggest gains. Industrial companies are rising after the White House said President Donald Trump will announce tariffs on steel and aluminum imports that give exemptions to Canada and Mexico. Pharmacy benefits manager Express Scripts jumped after health insurer Cigna agreed to buy it.

96. Delta CEO insists "we are not taking sides" in US gun debate -

ATLANTA (AP) — Delta Air Lines showed no signs Friday of backing away from a decision to cancel discounts for the National Rifle Association, despite a revenge move by state leaders that deprived the airline of a significant tax break.

97. US companies take a stand, raise age to purchase guns -

NEW YORK (AP) — Kroger and L.L. Bean said Thursday they will no longer sell guns to anyone under 21, becoming the third and fourth major retailers this week to put restrictions in place that are stronger than federal laws. The announcements follow those by Dick's Sporting Goods and Walmart, emphasizing the pressure companies are facing to take a stand.

98. Stores make push in scan and go tech, hope shoppers adopt it -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shoppers at self-checkout lanes scanning all their groceries after they're done shopping? Old school. More stores are letting customer tally their choices with a phone app or store device as they roam the aisles.

99. Kale to go: Amazon to roll out delivery at Whole Foods -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is bringing its speedy delivery to Whole Foods. The online retail giant plans to roll out two-hour delivery at the organic grocer this year to those who pay for Amazon's $99-a-year Prime membership. It is the company's biggest move since it bought the organic grocer last year.

100. State voters have more to fear than Russian meddling -

About 30 years ago, my wife and I were hanging out with another couple and decided to make a big night of it. We’d go out for Mexican food and then rent a movie.

After we had some Mexican grub, we went to Kroger to find a flick. As we perused the selections, my friend said, “What about a Russian spy movie?” To which his girlfriend (future wife, now ex-wife) whined, “John, you know I don’t speak Russian.” (His name is changed to protect the innocent.)