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Editorial Results (free)

1. GM cites improved chip supply in raising financial guidance -

DETROIT (AP) — Citing an improved supply of automotive computer chips, General Motors raised its financial guidance on Wednesday and said it expects to return to a normal production rate by the end of next year.

2. GM venture to build North American battery chemical plant -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors is forming a joint venture with Posco Chemical of South Korea to build a North American battery materials plant as it brings more steps in the electric vehicle supply chain under its umbrella.

3. Biden, Xi try to tamp down tension in long virtual meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and China's Xi Jinping's more than three-hour virtual talk concluded with the leaders of the superpowers agreeing they need to tread carefully as their nations find themselves in an increasingly fraught competition.

4. US: More threats, more desperate refugees as climate warms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Earth's warming and resulting natural disasters are creating a more dangerous world of desperate leaders and peoples, the Biden administration said Thursday in the federal government's starkest assessments yet of security and migration challenges facing the United States as the climate worsens.

5. CIA creates working group on China as threats keep rising -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CIA said Thursday it will create a top-level working group on China as part of a broad U.S. government effort focused on countering Beijing's influence.

The group will become one of fewer than a dozen mission centers operated by the CIA, with weekly director-level meetings intended to drive the agency's strategy toward China. The CIA also announced that it would ramp up efforts to recruit Chinese speakers and create another mission center focusing on emerging technologies and global issues such as climate change and global health.

6. Beshear: Kentucky to become electric vehicle leader -

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Ford's selection of Kentucky to build twin battery plants will vault the state into a global leadership role in the electric vehicle market, Gov. Andy Beshear said Tuesday in celebrating the state's single largest-ever economic development project.

7. Green energy takes hold in unlikely places with Ford project -

GLENDALE, Ky. (AP) — When Ford revealed plans to ramp up its commitment to the fledgling electric vehicle sector, the automaker chose to create thousands of jobs and pump billions in investments into two states where Republican leaders have vilified the push for green energy and defended fossil fuels.

8. Ford to add 10,800 jobs in Tennessee, Kentucky for electrics -

GLENDALE, Ky. (AP) — Ford and a partner company say they plan to build three major electric-vehicle battery factories and an auto assembly plant by 2025 — a dramatic investment in the future of EV technology that will create an estimated 10,800 jobs and shift the automaker's future manufacturing footprint toward the South.

9. Edwards takes office as TBA president -

Brentwood attorney Sherie Edwards has taken office as president of the Tennessee Bar Association, taking the oath of office from Tennessee Supreme Court Chief Justice Jeff Bivins during the group’s annual convention in Memphis.

10. US will boost global vaccine-sharing, Biden announces -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden announced Thursday the U.S. will donate 75% of its unused COVID-19 vaccines to the U.N.-backed COVAX global vaccine sharing program, acting as more Americans have been vaccinated and global inequities have become more glaring.

11. Who benefits? US debates fairest way to share spare vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In April, the Biden administration announced plans to share millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses with the world by the end of June. Five weeks later, nations around the globe are still waiting — with growing impatience — to learn where the vaccines will go and how they will be distributed.

12. Ford: Electric vehicles to be 40% of global sales by 2030 -

DETROIT (AP) — Ford expects 40% of its global sales to be battery-electric vehicles by 2030 as it adds billions to what it's spending to develop them.

The automaker says in a presentation for investors Wednesday that it will add about $8 billion to its EV development spending from this year to 2025. That would bring the total to nearly $20 billion as Ford begins to develop and build batteries in a joint venture with SK Innovation of Korea.

13. Biden's solar ambitions collide with China labor complaints -

BEIJING (AP) — The Biden administration's solar power ambitions are colliding with complaints the global industry depends on Chinese raw materials that might be produced by forced labor.

A big hurdle is polysilicon, used to make photovoltaic cells for solar panels. The global industry gets 45% of its supply from Xinjiang, the northwestern region where the ruling Communist Party is accused of mass incarceration of minorities and other abuses. Other parts of China supply 35%. Only 20% comes from U.S. and other producers.

14. G-7 ministers to hold first in-person talks in 2 years -

LONDON (AP) — Foreign and development ministers from the Group of Seven leading industrial nations will be meeting in London this week in their first face-to-face discussions in two years, with U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken holding talks with British host Dominic Raab later Monday.

15. Go forth and spend: Call for action closes US climate summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — World leaders shared tales of climate-friendly breakthroughs — and feverish quests for more — to close President Joe Biden's virtual global climate summit on Friday, from Kenyans abandoning kerosene lanterns for solar to Israeli start-ups straining for more efficient storage batteries.

16. Equal pay bill nears approval in House, long odds in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats were poised to pass legislation Thursday that they say would help close the gap between what men and women are paid in the workplace, though the measure faces little chance of overcoming Republican opposition in the Senate.

17. LG to add shift with 334 more jobs at Clarksville factory -

CLARKSVILLE (AP) — LG Electronics is planning to add a new shift to its washing machine factory in Tennessee, spurring an anticipated 334 new jobs.

The state Department of Economic and Community Development says the company is planning a $20.5 million expansion at its facility in Clarksville that will bring its total employment to 1,000 this year.

18. Biden sees `win' for US in electric vehicle battery deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two big South Korean electric vehicle battery makers said Sunday they have settled a long-running trade dispute that will allow one company to move ahead with plans to manufacture batteries in Georgia. President Joe Biden called it "a win for American workers and the American auto industry."

19. NEC announces Amazon as supporting partner -

The Nashville Entrepreneur Center, a nonprofit dedicated to supporting entrepreneurs and business leaders, has announced Amazon as a new supporting partner.

Amazon will provide philanthropic support that fuels the EC’s work of equipping entrepreneurs and innovators, at all stages of the business lifecycle, with the critical resources they need to create, launch and grow businesses.

20. Overstimulated? Stocks soar 75% in historic 12-month run -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was one year ago that the terrifying free fall for the stock market suddenly ended, ushering in one of its greatest runs.

On March 23, 2020, the S&P 500 fell 2.9%. In all, the index dropped nearly 34% in about a month, wiping out three years' worth of gains for the market.

21. US sanctions 24 China and Hong Kong officials ahead of talks -

HONG KONG (AP) — The U.S. sanctioned an additional 24 Chinese and Hong Kong officials over Beijing's ongoing crackdown on political freedoms in the semi-autonomous city, just ahead of the Biden administration's first face-to-face talks with China.

22. Nokia to cut up to 10,000 jobs to ramp up R&D in 5G race -

HELSINKI (AP) — Wireless network maker Nokia says it is planning to cut up to 10,000 jobs, or over 10% of its staff, to reduce costs as it invests in research and development and tries to cement its role as a key supplier of 5G technology.

23. Why the pandemic left long-term scars on global job market -

Esther Montanez's housecleaning job at the Hilton Back Bay in Boston was a lifeline for her, a 31-year-old single mother with a 5-year-old son.

The pay was steady and solid — enough to pay her bills and still have money left over to sock away for a savings account for her child. Montanez liked her co-workers and felt pride in her work.

24. US and South Korea agree on new cost-sharing deal for troops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and South Korea have reached agreement in principle on a new arrangement for sharing the cost of the American troop presence, which is intended as a bulwark against the threat of North Korean aggression, both countries announced.

25. Biden attempt to resurrect Iran nuke deal off to bumpy start -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration's early efforts to resurrect the 2015 Iran nuclear deal are getting a chilly early response from Tehran. Though few expected a breakthrough in the first month of the new administration, Iran's tough line suggests a difficult road ahead.

26. Autoworkers face uncertain future in an era of electric cars -

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — When General Motors boldly announced its goal last month to make only battery-powered vehicles by 2035, it didn't just mark a break with more than a century of making internal combustion engines. It also clouded the future for 50,000 GM workers whose skills — and jobs — could become obsolete far sooner than they knew.

27. S&P 500 closes at another record high as tumultuous 2020 ends -

Wall Street closed out a tumultuous year for stocks with more record highs Thursday, a fitting coda to the market's stunning comeback from its historic plunge in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic.

28. Phishing ploy targets COVID-19 vaccine distribution effort -

BOSTON (AP) — IBM security researchers say they have detected a cyberespionage effort using targeted phishing emails to try to collect vital information on the World Health Organization's initiative for distributing COVID-19 vaccine to developing countries.

29. Phishing ploy targets COVID-19 vaccine distribution effort -

BOSTON (AP) — IBM security researchers say they have detected a cyberespionage effort using targeted phishing emails to try to collect vital information on the World Health Organization's initiative for distributing COVID-19 vaccine to developing countries.

30. International flyers may soon need to get virus vaccinations -

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — International air travel could come booming back next year but with a new rule: Travelers to certain countries must be vaccinated against the coronavirus before they can fly.

31. APEC leaders, including Trump, begin virtual meeting -

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Leaders from the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum began a virtual meeting on Friday to seek ways to revive their coronavirus-battered economies, with U.S. President Donald Trump participating for the first time since 2017.

32. Japan, New Zealand press for open markets to boost recovery -

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Leaders from Japan and New Zealand on Friday warned countries against the temptation of retreating into trade protectionism, saying that keeping markets open is the way to restore a global economy battered by the COVID-19 pandemic.

33. GM: New batteries cut electric car costs, increase range -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors says a pending breakthrough in battery chemistry will cut the price of its electric vehicles so they equal those powered by gasoline within five years. The technology also will increase the range per charge to as much as 450 miles.

34. Stocks pull further below record highs as infections spread -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks pulled back on Thursday, amid increasing worries about worsening coronavirus counts across the country.

Markets around the world have taken a pause after galloping higher this month, at first on expectations that Washington will continue several pro-business policies following last week's U.S. elections. More recently, encouraging early results for a potential COVID-19 vaccine have investors envisioning a global economy returning to normal.

35. Post-Abe agenda: Suga says Japan to go carbon-free by 2050 -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan will achieve zero carbon emissions by 2050, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga declared Monday, outlining an ambitious agenda as the country struggles to balance economic and pandemic concerns.

36. Trump vs. Biden: Where they stand on health, economy, more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid the tumult of the 2020 presidential campaign, one dynamic has remained constant: The Nov. 3 election offers voters a choice between substantially different policy paths.

President Donald Trump, like many fellow Republicans, holds out tax reductions and regulatory cuts as economic imperatives and frames himself as a conservative champion in the culture wars. The president has offered few details about how he would pull the levers of government in a second term. His most consistent argument focuses on stopping Democratic opponent Joe Biden and his party from pushing U.S. policy leftward.

37. Fauci: Public health safeguards slow virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Anthony Fauci says even if the coronavirus is around for decades, public health safeguards and an eventual vaccine will allow the world to successfully adapt.

The government's leading infectious disease expert was asked about whether the coronavirus could become a fact of life for generations.

38. Trump vs. Biden: Where they stand on health, economy, more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, both promise sweeping progress over the next four years –- via starkly different paths.

Trump, like many fellow Republicans, holds out tax reductions and regulatory cuts as economic cure-alls and frames himself as a conservative champion in seemingly endless culture wars. But the president, still trying to fashion himself as an outsider, offers little detail about how he'd pull the levers of government in a second term.

39. US-China spats rattle world, prompting calls for unity -

BEIJING (AP) — Antagonisms between the United States and China are rattling governments around the world, prompting a German official to warn of "Cold War 2.0" and Kenya's president to appeal for unity to fight the coronavirus pandemic.

40. China announces $2 billion in virus help at WHO assembly -

GENEVA (AP) — China will provide $2 billion over two years to fight the coronavirus pandemic and the economic fallout from it, President Xi Jinping said Monday, rallying around the World Health Organization even as the United States has slashed funding for the U.N. health agency and sought to undermine its credibility.

41. European virus tracing apps highlight battle for privacy -

LONDON (AP) — Goodbye lockdown, hello smartphone.

As governments race to develop mobile tracing apps to help contain infections, attention is turning to how officials will ensure users' privacy. The debate is especially urgent in Europe, which has been one of the hardest-hit regions in the world, with nearly 140,000 people killed by COVID-19.

42. Oil price goes negative as demand collapses; Dow drops 592 pts. -

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil futures plunged below zero on Monday, the latest never-before-seen number to come out of the economic coma caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Stocks and Treasury yields also dropped on Wall Street, with the S&P 500 down 1.8%, but the market's most dramatic action by far was in oil, where the cost to have a barrel of U.S. crude delivered in May plummeted to negative $37.63. It was at roughly $60 at the start of the year.

43. Outbreak: bankruptcies, layoffs and quiet skies -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments on Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

44. Virus takes toll on US military as it tries to aid civilians -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus is taking a growing toll on the U.S. military, and commanders and senior officials are bracing for worse. From nuclear missile fields at home to war zones abroad, from flight lines to ships at sea, the Pentagon is striving to shield vital missions even as it faces urgent calls for help on the civilian front.

45. World leaders vow to coordinate virus response in video call -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The head of the United Nations told leaders of the world's 20 major industrialized nations during an emergency virtual summit Thursday that "we are at war with a virus – and not winning it" despite dramatic measures by countries to seal their borders, shutter businesses and enforce home isolation for well over a quarter of the world's population.

46. Testing blunders crippled US response as coronavirus spread -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A series of missteps at the nation's top public health agency caused a critical shortage of reliable laboratory tests for the coronavirus, hobbling the federal response as the pandemic spread across the country like wildfire, an Associated Press review found.

47. Dow drops 7.8%, 2,013 points as free-fall slams markets -

Stocks took their worst one-day beating on Wall Street since the global financial crisis of 2008 as a collapse in oil prices Monday combined with mounting alarm over what the coronavirus could do to the world economy.

48. Behind the scenes, scientists prep for COVID-19 vaccine test -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A team of scientists jostled for a view of the lab dish, staring impatiently for the first clue that an experimental vaccine against the new coronavirus just might work.

After weeks of round-the-clock research at the National Institutes of Health, it was time for a key test. If the vaccine revs up the immune system, the samples in that dish -- blood drawn from immunized mice -- would change color.

49. Bond yields sink, stocks fall as investors demand safety -

NEW YORK (AP) — A dizzying, brutal week of trading dropped one last round of harrowing swings on investors Friday.

After skidding sharply through the day as fear pounded markets, steep drops for stocks and bond yields suddenly eased up in the last hour of trading amid hints from Federal Reserve officials that they may offer more support to the economy.

50. Trump urges calm even as US reports worrisome new virus case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared that a widespread U.S. outbreak of the new respiratory virus sweeping the globe isn't inevitable even as top health authorities at his side warned Americans that more infections are coming.

51. Officials: Chinese industry recovering, more aid coming -

BEIJING (AP) — Small, mostly private companies that are the engine of China's economy are back to operating at one-third of normal levels after anti-virus controls shut factories, shops and restaurants, regulators said Thursday, and they promised more low-cost loans and other aid.

52. Trump urges calm even as US reports worrisome new virus case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared that a widespread U.S. outbreak of the new respiratory virus sweeping the globe isn't inevitable even as top health authorities at his side warned Americans that more infections are coming.

53. GOP and Dem senators voice concerns about US virus readiness -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators of both political parties questioned Tuesday whether the White House's request for $2.5 billion is enough to prepare the United States for a possible coronavirus outbreak, even as President Donald Trump said the virus is "very well under control" here.

54. Trump defends $2.5B coronavirus request; Dems say it's low -

NEW DELHI (AP) — President Donald Trump said Tuesday that the urgent $2.5 billion plan for coronavirus he sent to lawmakers will prepare the nation in case of an outbreak in the U.S. and help other nations unprepared to handle the threat.

55. White House readying emergency coronavirus budget request -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is readying an urgent budget request to address the deadly coronavirus outbreak  whose rapid spread is spooking financial markets and restricting international travel.

56. China promises companies aid, global virus cases rise -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government promised tax cuts and other aid Monday to help companies recover from its virus outbreak while a spike in new cases in Iran, Italy and South Korea raised the prospect of wider disruption to tourism and other global industries.

57. Full text of Gov. Bill Lee's State of the State address -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Lee's second annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday:

Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speaker Sexton, Speaker Pro Tem Haile, Speaker Pro Tem Dunn, Members of the 111th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, fellow Tennesseans:

58. US stocks pull back from records following jobs report -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks fell from their record heights on Friday after a report showed hiring was a touch weaker than expected last month.

Employers added 145,000 jobs across the country in December, short of the 160,000 that economists forecast. But the growth was solid enough to bolster Wall Street's view that the job market is holding up and households can continue to spend, preserving the largest part of the economy. The bond market also rallied after the report showed workers' wages aren't rising much, which lessens the threat of inflation.

59. Rust Belt region banks on becoming hub for electric vehicles -

The day Youngstown's steel mills began shutting down 40 years ago remains fresh in the minds of those who live in the blue-collar corner of Ohio. Community leaders don't want the recent closing of General Motors' massive assembly plant to leave that same lingering gloom.

60. Rust Belt region banks on becoming hub for electric vehicles -

The day Youngstown's steel mills began shutting down 40 years ago remains fresh in the minds of those who live in the blue-collar corner of Ohio. Community leaders don't want the recent closing of General Motors' massive assembly plant to leave that same lingering gloom.

61. South Korean firm to set up Tennessee facility with 410 jobs -

A South Korean manufacturer of electric power equipment plans to set up its first U.S. production operations in Memphis, Tennessee, where the company aims to invest $86.9 million and create 410 jobs over seven years.

62. Nashville among top 20 Places to Go in the World -

Travel publication Condé Nast Traveler has designated Nashville as one of the 20 best places to go in the world in 2020.

This is the eighth consecutive year Nashville has been named a top destination by national and/or international publications.

63. China's electric car sales slump, squeezing automakers -

BEIJING (AP) — Looking for a new car, Yang Zhibo considered an electric but balked at prices that are thousands of dollars higher after Beijing wound down multibillion-dollar subsidies that made China the biggest market for the technology.

64. GM, Korea's LG Chem in venture to build factory in Ohio -

WARREN, Mich. (AP) — General Motors and Korea's LG Chem have formed a joint venture to build an electric vehicle battery cell factory near Lordstown, Ohio, east of Cleveland.

The companies also will work together on battery technology to bring down the cost for future GM electric vehicles.

65. China's climate paradox: A leader in coal and clean energy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As world leaders gather in Spain to discuss how to slow the warming of the planet, a spotlight falls on China — the top emitter of greenhouse gases.

China burns about half the coal used globally each year. Between 2000 and 2018, its annual carbon emissions nearly tripled, and it now accounts for about 30% of the world's total. Yet it's also the leading market for solar panels, wind turbines and electric vehicles, and it manufactures about two-thirds of solar cells installed worldwide.

66. Why Trump tariffs haven't revitalized American steelmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's move last year to tax imported steel triggered jeers but also cheers. Its goal — to raise steel prices — threatened to hurt the legions of U.S. manufacturers that depend on steel.

67. Senate candidate Hagerty heaps praise on Trump at conference -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Republican U.S. Senate candidate Bill Hagerty on Tuesday touted his staunch support of President Donald Trump, defending him from Democrats' impeachment efforts while heaping praise on the president for his handling of the economy and the killing of IS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

68. China releases stockpiled pork to cool price surge -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government is releasing pork from stockpiles to help cool surging prices ahead of Oct. 1 celebrations of the Communist Party's 70th anniversary in power.

The price of pork, China's staple meat, has soared almost 50% from a year ago due to a devastating outbreak of African swine fever that killed or prompted authorities to destroy pigs. That has pushed up global pork prices as importers buy foreign supplies.

69. US, Chinese envoys to meet in October for tariff war talks -

BEIJING (AP) — U.S. and Chinese envoys will meet in early October for more talks aimed at ending a tariff war that threatens global economic growth.

Stock markets rose on Thursday's announcement but there has been no sign of progress since Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping agreed in June to resume deadlocked negotiations about trade and technology.

70. China says trade talks with US to take place in October -

BEIJING (AP) — U.S. and Chinese envoys will meet in early October for more talks aimed at ending a tariff war that threatens global economic growth.

Stock markets rose on Thursday's announcement but there has been no sign of progress since Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping agreed in June to resume deadlocked negotiations about trade and technology.

71. Pentagon cancels billion-dollar missile defense project -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon is pulling the plug on a billion-dollar, technically troubled project to build a better weapon to destroy incoming missiles. The move is aimed in part at considering new approaches to missile defense at a time of rapid technological change.

72. Trump wields sanctions hammer; experts wonder to what end -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it the diplomacy of coercion.

The Trump administration is aggressively pursuing economic sanctions as a primary foreign policy tool to an extent unseen in decades, or perhaps ever. Many are questioning the results even as officials insist the penalties are achieving their aims.

73. Colonial-era Korean laborers want Mitsubishi compensation -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Colonial-era Korean forced laborers launched a legal step Tuesday to get court approval for the sale of local assets of their former Japanese employer Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, which has refused to compensate the former workers.

74. Former Mitsubishi workers seek assets sale for forced labor -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Colonial-era Korean workers want a court to allow the South Korean government to sell assets of their former Japanese employer so they can be compensated for forced labor decades ago.

75. China criticizes possible US penalties against banks -

BEIJING (AP) — China on Tuesday criticized Washington's efforts to enforce U.S. law abroad following a news report three Chinese banks might be penalized over dealings with North Korea.

The banks named by The Washington Post as facing possible loss of access to the U.S. financial system denied they were under investigation.

76. Millions of pigs culled as swine fever spreads through Asia -

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Millions of pigs have been culled in China and Vietnam as a U.N. food agency urges Asian governments to make containing virulent African swine fever their top priority.

With an announcement by the U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization that infections have spread to Laos, some experts are saying it is the largest animal disease outbreak in history.

77. China mum on Trump-Xi meeting as Huawei says sales slowing -

SHANGHAI (AP) — Attention is turning to a possible meeting of President Donald Trump with Chinese leader Xi Jinping at a summit in Japan later this month as the next step in the vexing trade standoff between the two biggest economies.

78. North Korea calls Bolton 'war monger' over missile comment -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea on Monday called U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton a "war monger" and "human defect" after he described its recent tests of short-range missiles as a violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions.

79. China cuts taxes to spur chip makers in face of US pressure -

BEIJING (AP) — China is cutting taxes on its fledgling software and integrated circuit industries as U.S. export controls threaten to handicap Chinese tech companies.

The Finance Ministry's announcement Wednesday comes amid a spiraling tariff war with Washington over Chinese technology ambitions.

80. AP FACT CHECK: Trump cries 'treason' over campaign scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is using "treason" rather lightly as he assails unidentified U.S. officials for investigating operatives of his campaign in 2016. There's no allegation or even suggestion that they committed this punishable-by-death crime, if any crime at all.

81. From sports to science, a camp for every interest -

Camp provides children with the opportunity to connect with nature, participate in human-powered activities and benefit from personal and primary relationships. From academics to athletics, there is a camp for children of almost every age or interest. Here are a few to consider when trying to find the best option for your family.

82. North Korea said to be rebuilding structures at rocket site -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea is restoring facilities at a long-range rocket launch site that it dismantled last year as part of disarmament steps, according to foreign experts and a South Korean lawmaker who was briefed by Seoul's spy service.

83. Trump, Kim in Hanoi for second round of nuclear talks -

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — After long journeys to Vietnam, U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are in place for their second summit Wednesday to address perhaps the world's biggest security challenge: Kim's pursuit of a nuclear program that stands on the verge of viably threatening targets around the planet.

84. Stocks slide as slow growth in China weighs on earnings -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes sank Monday after twin announcements highlighted how much China's slowing economic growth is hurting profits for U.S. companies.

Caterpillar, a bellwether for industrial companies, reported fourth-quarter earnings that fell well short of analysts' expectations and said that it expects construction growth in China to be flat in 2019 following years of significant growth. Chipmaker Nvidia, meanwhile, cited slowing demand in China as one of the reasons for slashing its forecast for fourth-quarter revenue.

85. Huawei announces 5G smartphone based on own technology -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei announced plans Wednesday for a next-generation smartphone that will use its own technology instead of U.S. components, maneuvering to gain a competitive edge and sidestep complaints it is a security risk.

86. Trump, North Korean leader to hold 2nd summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump will hold a second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to try to broker a deal to coax the North to give up its nuclear weapons, the White House announced Friday.

87. Huawei calls on US, others to show proof of security risk -

DONGGUAN, China (AP) — The chairman of Huawei challenged the United States and other governments to provide evidence for claims the Chinese tech giant is a security risk as the company launched a public relations effort Tuesday to defuse fears that threaten its role in next-generation communications.

88. 'Little League for esports' hopes to organize youth gaming -

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (AP) — Christian Pineda plays a lot of video games, but he's best at "Minecraft." Hunched over a laptop in the front row of a half-full movie theater last month, the 13-year-old eagerly showed off why.

89. Wall Street ends higher with help from tech and health care -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks couldn't hang on to a big gain Wednesday, but they still finished broadly higher as technology and health care companies rose. That helped reverse some of the market's big losses from the week before.

90. China demands Canada release executive of tech giant Huawei -

BEIJING (AP) — China on Thursday demanded that Canada release an executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei who was arrested in a case that compounds tensions with the U.S. and threatens to complicate trade talks.

91. China demands Canada release Huawei executive -

BEIJING (AP) — China on Thursday demanded Canada release a Huawei Technologies executive who was arrested in a case that adds to technology tensions with Washington and threatens to complicate trade talks.

92. China promises action on US trade deal but gives no details -

BEIJING (AP) — China issued an upbeat but vague promise Wednesday to carry out a tariff cease-fire with Washington but gave no details that might dispel confusion about what Presidents Xi Jinping and Donald Trump agreed to in Argentina.

93. US-China trade truce sends US stocks solidly higher -

A welcome truce in the escalating U.S.-China trade dispute put investors in a buying mood Monday, sending U.S. stocks solidly higher and extending the market's gains from last week.

The broad rally, which lost some of its early morning momentum, followed gains in overseas markets as investors welcomed news of the temporary, 90-day stand-down, which was agreed to over dinner between President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit over the weekend.

94. Stocks open higher on Wall Street after 2 days of big losses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks in the U.S. are higher Wednesday morning after two days of steep losses, and major European indexes are also recovering. Major technology companies including Apple and Microsoft are up after they've tumbled in the last few days. Crude oil prices are up about 2 percent after they sank to a one-year low a day earlier.

95. US reimposes all Iran sanctions lifted under nuclear deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Friday announced the reimposition of all U.S. sanctions on Iran that had been lifted under the 2015 nuclear deal.

The sanctions will take effect Monday and cover Iran's shipping, financial and energy sectors. It's the second batch of penalties that the administration has reimposed since President Donald Trump withdrew from the landmark deal in May.

96. US stocks rally again, but finish October with steep losses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks climbed for the second day in a row Wednesday at the end of a brutal month for the global market. Investors applauded strong quarterly results from companies including Facebook and General Motors, but U.S. stocks still finished with their worst monthly loss in seven years.

97. China, Japan show united front on 'free and fair' trade -

BEIJING (AP) — China and Japan displayed a united front on "free and fair" trade as leaders of Asia's two biggest economies met Friday in Beijing.

The visit by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, along with hundreds of Japanese businessmen, took place against the backdrop of the festering trade dispute between China and the U.S. that has resulted in both sides imposing billions of dollars in tariffs on each other's exports.

98. China says Washington asks to resume talks on tariff fight -

BEIJING (AP) — Washington has invited Beijing to hold new talks on their escalating tariff dispute, the Chinese foreign ministry said Thursday, ahead of a decision by President Donald Trump on whether to raise duties on $200 billion of Chinese imports.

99. Homeless champion chosen for Kraft Award -

Charles Strobel, founding director of Room in the Inn, will be honored with the 25th annual Joe Kraft Humanitarian Award.

Established in 1993, the Joe Kraft Humanitarian Award recognizes community leaders who embody the strength of character and unwavering integrity of the late Joe Kraft.

100. Samsung plans $22 billion for artificial intelligence, autos -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Samsung Electronics plans to spend a whopping $22 billion over the next three years on artificial intelligence, auto components and other future businesses as the company maps out its strategy under the restored leadership of Vice Chairman Lee Jae-yong after he was freed from prison.