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Editorial Results (free)

1. Hong Kong loses shine amid tough coronavirus restrictions -

HONG KONG (AP) — The bustling, cosmopolitan business hub of Hong Kong may be losing its shine among foreign companies and expatriates with its stringent anti-pandemic rules requiring up to 21 days of quarantine for new arrivals.

2. 'Buy now, pay later' catches on just in time for holidays -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — As Americans shop for the holidays, they will likely see a swarm of offers to get their gifts now but pay for them later in fixed monthly installments.

Fueled by several hot Silicon Valley startups as well as a push by the big credit card companies, "buy now, pay later" is now available for purchasing a $1,500 Peloton exercise bicycle as well as a $60 floral bouquet. Thousands of retailers, big and small, often have an option on their websites to pay for a purchase in installments at checkout. In the case of credit cards, customers are being allowed to create fixed payment plans days or even a few weeks after the purchase.

3. Stocks edge higher after another choppy day on Wall Street -

Wall Street capped another wobbly day of trading Wednesday with an uneven finish for the major stock indexes ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after wavering between small gains and losses most of the morning. The benchmark index regained its footing in the final hour of trading.

4. Stocks end mostly lower, but tech gains push Nasdaq higher -

Wall Street closed out a week of choppy trading with stocks mostly lower Friday, though gains for several tech companies pushed the Nasdaq composite to another record high and its first close over 16,000 points.

5. Treasury Department names first counselor for racial equity -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Treasury Department has hired a former JPMorgan Chase executive to head a new government program aimed at combatting racial inequality issues in banking and other financial-services industries.

6. Where are the workers? Cutoff of jobless aid spurs no influx -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Earlier this year, an insistent cry arose from business leaders and Republican governors: Cut off a $300-a-week federal supplement for unemployed Americans. Many people, they argued, would then come off the sidelines and take the millions of jobs that employers were desperate to fill.

7. Goldman Sachs' profits jump 60% helped by deal-making frenzy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs' profits jumped 60% in the third quarter, as the deal-making bonanza that dominated financial markets this summer brought in hundreds of millions of dollars in fee revenue for the investment bank.

8. Bank profits soar, helped by merger frenzy, fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's good to be a bank right now.

Four of the largest U.S. banks said their profits grew by double-digits last quarter, as a healthier U.S. economy has helped reduce the number of loans in default or that the bank won't likely recoup. The results for Citigroup, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Morgan Stanley also show that all four benefitted from various one-time boosts to their profits.

9. Modest gain breaks a 3-day losing streak for S&P 500 index -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Thursday, snapping a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 despite another choppy day of trading.

The benchmark index rose 0.3% after having been down 0.5% in the early going. It's still on pace for a 0.6% weekly loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ended flat, while the Nasdaq rose 0.7%.

10. JPMorgan's 3Q profits rise, but low rates weigh on revenue -

NEW YORK (AP) — JPMorgan Chase posted a 24% jump in third-quarter profits on Wednesday, largely driven by one-time items that boosted its results, as the bank struggled to grow revenues with interest rates at near-zero levels.

11. Stocks give up an early gain, end lower on Wall Street -

Stocks gave up an early gain and ended lower on Wall Street Monday.

Most sectors ended in the red, led by technology companies and banks.

The S&P 500 lost 0.7%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also fell 0.7% and the Nasdaq fell 0.6%.

12. Fed likely to signal a coming pullback in economic support -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is expected this week to send its clearest signal yet that it will start reining in its ultra-low-interest rate policies later this year, a first step toward unwinding the extraordinary support it's given the economy since the pandemic struck 18 months ago.

13. US stocks close mostly lower, but Nasdaq still inches higher -

Stocks closed mostly lower on Wall Street Tuesday as traders returned from the Labor Day holiday, even as gains for some Big Tech companies nudged the Nasdaq composite barely higher.

The benchmark S&P 500 slipped 0.3%. Meanwhile gains for Apple, Facebook and a few other tech heavyweights nudged the Nasdaq up just under 0.1%, enough for another record high.

14. PNC to raise base wages to $18 an hour, latest bank to do so -

NEW YORK (AP) — PNC Bank is the latest large U.S. financial services company to increase wages in a bid to keep and attract employees, raising its minimum wage to $18 an hour while also giving higher-paid workers a bump in pay.

15. Biden to tackle cybersecurity with tech, finance leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is meeting Wednesday with top executives from some of the country's leading technology companies and financial institutions as the White House urges the private sector to help toughen cybersecurity defenses against increasingly sophisticated attacks.

16. US jobless claims near pandemic low as economy strengthens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell for a third straight time last week, the latest sign that employers are laying off fewer people as they struggle to fill a record number of open jobs and meet a surge in consumer demand.

17. Citigroup profits soar due to fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup profits jumped more than five fold from a year earlier, helped by an improving economy that resulted in fewer bad loans on the bank's balance sheet.

Citi is the latest big bank to see profits soar this quarter, along with JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Goldman Sachs. All of them got a one-time boost to their bottom lines because they were able to reverse some of the billions of dollars set aside last year to guard against customer defaults.

18. Bank of America's 2Q profit jumps, helped by fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America's second quarter profit more than doubled from a year earlier, as the consumer banking giant was able to move more loans onto the "good" side of its balance sheet as the pandemic wanes.

19. Stocks ease below recent records as earnings reports roll in -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street Tuesday, bringing major indexes slightly below the record highs they set a day earlier.

The S&P 500 fell 0.4%. Investors were weighing the latest quarterly earnings reports from big U.S. companies and concerns about inflation.

20. JPMorgan's 2Q profits more than double, beating expectations -

NEW YORK (AP) — JPMorgan Chase said its second quarter profits more than doubled from a year ago — a reflection of the improving global economy and fewer bad loans on its balance sheet. But the bank's revenues fell noticeably in the quarter, due partially to the fact that interest rates have fallen sharply the last three months.

21. Stock indexes notch more records ahead of earnings reports -

Banks led stocks to modest gains on Wall Street Monday, nudging the major stock indexes to more record highs ahead of a busy week of corporate earnings reports from big U.S. companies.

The S&P 500 gained 0.3% after bouncing back from an early stumble. The benchmark index, which has notched three straight weekly gains, hit a new high, as did the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite. The indexes have managed multiple new highs despite choppy trading in recent weeks.

22. Stocks close higher, capping a 3rd consecutive week of gains -

Stocks closed with solid gains on Wall Street Friday, ending a holiday-shortened week with their third straight weekly gain.

The S&P 500 rose 1.1% to another record high, led by banks and technology stocks.

23. Freed from COVID restrictions, big US banks hike dividends -

NEW YORK (AP) — Recently freed from regulators' coronavirus restrictions, the largest U.S. banks on Monday announced plans to return tens of billions of dollars to their shareholders over the next year in the form of dividends and stock buybacks.

24. All big banks pass latest Federal Reserve 'stress tests' -

NEW YORK (AP) — All 23 of the nation's biggest banks are healthy enough to withstand a sudden economic catastrophe, the Federal Reserve said Thursday as it released the results from its latest "stress tests," giving the banks the green light to resume paying out dividends to investors and buying back stock.

25. Big US banks to employees: Return to the office vaccinated -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's big investment banks are sending a message to their employees this summer: Get back into the office and bring your vaccination card.

New York-based Morgan Stanley said this week that all employees will be required to attest to their vaccination status. Those who are not vaccinated will be required to work remotely, which could potentially put their jobs at risk, since the bank's top executives have said they want everyone back in the office by September.

26. Wall Street snaps back following worst week since February -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rebounded on Wall Street Monday and clawed back most of their sharp loss from last week. The S&P 500 snapped 1.4% higher as the initial jolt passed from the Federal Reserve's reminder that it will eventually offer less help for markets. Oil producers, banks and other companies that were hit particularly hard last week made the biggest gains. High-growth tech stocks lagged. Shorter-term yields fell, and longer-term yields rose in another reversal from last week's initial reaction to the Fed's saying it may raise rates twice by late 2023.

27. US stocks slump; S&P 500 has its worst week since February -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks sank again on Wall Street Friday, knocking the S&P 500 to its worst weekly loss since February, as more steam comes out of banks and other stocks that soared earlier this year with expectations for the economy and inflation.

28. Female CEOs saw ranks dwindle in 2020; median pay fell 2% -

Most of the women running the biggest U.S. companies saw their pay increase last year, even as the pandemic hammered the economy and many of their businesses.

Despite those gains, however, the median pay for female chief executives actually fell in 2020. Already a small group, they saw several high-profile women leave their ranks last year. That means changes in pay for only a few helped skew the overall figures, highlighting just how slow diversity has been to catch on in Corporate America's corner offices.

29. Bank CEOs tell Congress they'll work to avoid foreclosures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chief executives of the nation's largest banks went in front of Congress for a second day Thursday, facing questions ranging from bitcoin to their efforts to keep Americans in their homes after government aid to pandemic-hit mortgage holders expires this summer.

30. Bank CEOs return to Congress at time of deep partisan divide -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEOs of the biggest banks went before Congress on Wednesday with plans to discuss how helpful Wall Street was for borrowers and businesses during the pandemic. Senators, reflecting the deep partisan divide between Democrats and Republicans, spent much of the hearing wanting to talk about political hot button issues like climate change, guns and voting rights.

31. Stocks climb after three days of losses, led by Big Tech -

Wall Street put the brakes on a three-day losing streak with a broad stock market rally Thursday powered by Big Tech companies and banks.

The S&P 500 notched a 1.2% gain, clawing back almost half of its loss from a day earlier, when it had its biggest one-day drop since February. Even so, the benchmark index is on track for a 2.8% weekly decline, which would be its largest since January. The other major indexes were also on pace for sharp weekly declines, despite recouping some of their losses.

32. US stock indexes mixed as tech rebound fades; Peloton drops -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mixed Wednesday after an early technology company rebound faded, tempering the market's recovery from a sell-off a day earlier.

The S&P 500 eked out a 0.1% gain after having been up 0.7% in the early going. The Dow Jones Industrial Average managed a 0.3% gain, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq slid 0.4%.

33. Citigroup profit triples in 1Q, tops estimates; revenue down -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's profits more than tripled in the first quarter, the banking conglomerate said Thursday, helped by the release of billions of dollars from its loan-loss reserves.

The New York-based company said it earned a profit of $7.94 billion, or $3.62 per share, compared to a profit of $2.54 billion, or $1.06 a share, in the same period a year earlier. The bank's profits were well above the $2.60 per share that analysts had been looking for, according to FactSet.

34. Bank of America profit doubles in 1Q to $8.1 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America's profits doubled in the first quarter, the bank said Thursday, as the improving economy allowed it to release billions from its loan-loss reserves that it originally set aside in the early days of the pandemic.

35. Most US stocks rise, indexes end mixed as earnings kick off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most U.S. stocks rose on Wednesday, but indexes petered out to a mixed finish as momentum weakened following an encouraging start to what's expected to be a thunderous earnings reporting season.

36. Wells Fargo earned $4.74 billion in Q1, topping estimates -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wells Fargo had its best quarter in a year and a half, posting a profit of $4.74 billion and freeing up more than a billion dollars that had been set aside for potential loan defaults at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

37. JPMorgan 1Q profit up sharply, helped by improving economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — JPMorgan Chase saw its first-quarter profit jump nearly five fold from a year earlier, as the improving economy allowed the bank to release roughly $5 billion from its loan-loss reserves that it had stored away in the early weeks of the pandemic.

38. Stocks end slightly below latest record highs as tech slips -

Stocks ended just below the latest record highs they hit last week as technology companies slipped.

The S&P 500 edged down less than 0.1% Monday and the tech-heavy Nasdaq gave up 0.4%.

Investors are continuing to focus on the economic recovery as well as concerns about inflation and rising bond yields.

39. US jobless claims drop to 684K, fewest since pandemic erupted -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people seeking unemployment benefits fell sharply last week to 684,000, the fewest since the pandemic erupted a year ago and a sign that the economy is improving.

40. A late slide, led by Big Tech, leaves US stock indexes lower -

A late-afternoon burst of selling on Wall Street erased an early gain for stocks Wednesday, pulling the market further below the all-time high it reached just a week ago.

The S&P 500 dropped 0.5% after having been up 0.8% in the early going. Technology and communication services companies accounted for the heaviest selling, outweighing gains in financial, energy and industrial stocks. Bond yields mostly fell after rising earlier this week.

41. Wall Street closing lower; bank stocks fall -

Wall Street closed out a choppy week of trading Friday with major stock indexes mostly lower and all finishing in the red for the week.

The S&P 500 ended 0.1% lower after reversing a small gain. The benchmark index, which hit an all-time high on Wednesday, posted its first weekly decline in three weeks. Losses by banks, industrial companies and technology stocks weighed on the market. They offset gains in companies that rely on consumer spending, health care and other sectors.

42. Fed to end relaxed capital requirements for large banks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve says it will restore capital requirements for large banks that were relaxed as part of the Fed's efforts to shore up the financial system during the early days of the pandemic.

43. Wall Street closes lower, pulled down by IT and energy -

Stocks fell broadly on Wall Street Thursday, as rising bond yields once again pulled down shares of technology companies and the energy sector sold off on a sharp drop in oil prices.

The S&P 500 index fell 1.5%, on track for its first weekly loss in three weeks. Technology companies accounted for a big swath of the sell-off, which contributed to the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite dropping 3%, its second-worst loss of the year.

44. Corporations become unlikely financiers of racial equity -

In the months since the police killing of George Floyd sparked a racial reckoning in the United States, American corpo-rations have emerged as an unexpected leading source of funding for social justice.

45. February retail sales fall 3% after soaring in January -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans spent less last month, partly due to bad weather in parts of the country that kept shoppers away from stores.

Retail sales fell a seasonally adjusted 3% in February from the month before, the U.S. Commerce Department said Tuesday. The drop comes after retail sales soared in January as people spent the $600 stimulus checks sent at the end of last year. In fact, the Commerce Department revised its January number up to 7.6% from it's previously reported rise of 5.3%.

46. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

47. Gains for bank stocks help lead major US indexes higher -

Stocks shook off a weak start and closed broadly higher Wednesday, nudging the Dow Jones Industrial Average to another all-time high.

The S&P 500 rose 1.1% after having been down 0.6% in the early going. Gains in financial, technology and industrial stocks powered the comeback. Utilities fell.

48. Biden's $15 wage proposal: Job killer or a boon for workers? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's effort to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour could provide a welcome opportunity for someone like Cristian Cardona, a 21-year-old fast food worker. Cardona would love to earn enough to afford to move out of his parents' house in Orlando, Florida, and maybe scrape together money for college.

49. Stocks end wobbly day mostly lower; natural gas prices surge -

U.S. stock indexes closed mostly lower Tuesday as losses in health care and technology companies kept gains in energy and other sectors of the market in check.

The S&P 500 ended down less than 0.1% after giving up a modest early gain. Energy companies that stand to benefit from record electricity prices due to the frigid cold impacting much of the country surged. Marathon Oil and Apache Corp. were among the biggest gainers.

50. Sign of inequality: US salaries recover even as jobs haven't -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a stark sign of the economic inequality that has marked the pandemic recession and recovery, Americans as a whole are now earning the same amount in wages and salaries that they did before the virus struck — even with nearly 9 million fewer people working.

51. Dems attempt to push through school funding, wage increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats muscled past Republicans on portions of President Joe Biden's pandemic plan, including a proposed $130 billion in additional relief to help the nation's schools reopen and a gradual increase of the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour.

52. Zuckerberg part of $100M 'California Black Freedom Fund' -

More than two dozen philanthropic organizations and corporations on Thursday launched the California Black Freedom Fund, a $100 million, five-year initiative that they say will provide resources to Black-led organizations in the state that are seeking to eradicate systemic racism.

53. Your tax refund is likely shrinking this year unless you know about this fix -

Families battered by the pandemic recession might soon discover the tax refunds they’re counting on are dramatically smaller – or that they actually owe income tax.

Congress offered a partial solution, but the fix hasn’t been widely publicized, consumer advocates say.

54. Goldman Sachs' profits more than double, despite pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs said its profits more than doubled from a year earlier thanks to a surge in both trading and advising revenue.

The New York-based investment bank said it earned a profit of $4.36 billion, or $12.08 per share, up from a profit of $1.72 billion, or $4.69 a share, in the same period a year earlier. The earnings were significantly better than the $7.45-per-share profit that analysts were expecting.

55. JPMorgan's profits jump as economy, investment bank recovers -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — JPMorgan Chase & Co., the nation's largest bank by assets, said its fourth quarter profits jumped by 42% from a year earlier, as the firm's investment banking division had a stellar quarter and its balance sheet improved despite the pandemic.

56. Wall Street distances itself from Trump, GOP after riots -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — A growing number of Wall Street banks and businesses have cut ties with President Donald Trump's campaign and financial arms, as well as the broader Republican Party, following last week's riots and insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

57. US loses 140,000 jobs, first monthly drop since spring -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers shed jobs last month for the first time since April, cutting 140,000 positions, clear evidence that the economy is faltering as the viral pandemic tightens its grip on consumers and businesses.

58. US unemployment claims slip to still-high 787,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment aid fell slightly last week to 787,000, a historically high number that points to a weak job market held back by the viral pandemic.

59. Abelow named president of Nashville Bar Association -

Mike Abelow, member at Sherrard Roe Voigt and Harbison, has been named 2021 president of the Nashville Bar Association.

Abelow litigates complex business disputes, with a focus on business disputes that involve either party threatening to or filing for bankruptcy. He was a litigator with the Federal Trade Commission before moving to Nashville in 2007.

60. The holidays could make or break struggling stores -

NEW YORK (AP) — Clothing stores and specialty retailers are offering big discounts and heavily promoting curbside pickup in hopes of rescuing a lackluster holiday shopping season in which surging coronavirus cases have kept many shoppers at home.

61. US jobless claims rise to 885,000 amid resurgence of virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits rose again last week to 885,000, the highest weekly total since September, as a resurgence of coronavirus cases threatens the economy's recovery from its springtime collapse.

62. US jobless claims rise to 885,000 amid resurgence of virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits rose again last week to 885,000, the highest weekly total since September, as a resurgence of coronavirus cases threatens the economy's recovery from its springtime collapse.

63. Americans can pay their credit card bills, but for how long? -

NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic hasn't stopped Americans from keeping up with their credit card payments, thanks in large part to government relief programs passed by Congress earlier this year.

64. Picture of US economy is worrisome as virus inflicts damage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gripped by the accelerating viral outbreak, the U.S. economy is under pressure from persistent layoffs, diminished income and nervous consumers, whose spending is needed to drive a recovery from the pandemic.

65. Unchanged from early estimate, US economy grew 33.1% in Q3 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The second of three estimates on U.S. growth for the July-September quarter was unchanged at a record pace of 33.1%. But a resurgence in the coronavirus is expected to slow growth sharply in the current quarter with some economists even raising the specter of a double-dip recession.

66. Stocks rise on Wall Street on latest hopes for virus vaccine -

More encouraging news on the development of coronavirus vaccines and treatments helped power stocks higher on Wall Street Monday, as the market clawed back most of its losses from last week.

The S&P 500 index rose 0.6%, led by banks, energy and industrial companies, sectors that have been beaten down during the pandemic. Health care and technology stocks, which traders have bid up sharply this year, closed lower. Treasury yields mostly rose, another sign of optimism among investors.

67. US jobless claims rise to 742,000; millions to lose aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment aid rose last week to 742,000, the first increase in five weeks and a sign that the resurgent viral outbreak is likely slowing the economy and forcing more companies to cut jobs.

68. US jobless claims rise to 742,000; millions to lose aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment aid rose last week to 742,000, the first increase in five weeks and a sign that the resurgent viral outbreak is likely slowing the economy and forcing more companies to cut jobs.

69. Here’s how small businesses can help workers save -

Donna Skemp of Bend, Oregon, struggled to save before she signed up for an automatic savings plan offered by her employer’s payroll services company. Now, some of her pay goes into a federally insured, interest-paying savings account that she can access any time with a debit card.

70. Weak 0.3% US October sales gain spreads some holiday unease -

NEW YORK (AP) — Retail sales in the U.S. grew a sluggish 0.3% in October, even as retailers offered early holiday discounts online and in stores.

A surge in coronavirus infections nationwide and the expiration of a $600 weekly boost to unemployment checks over the summer has slowed spending by Americans and contributed to the slowest retail sales growth since this spring, when the pandemic shuttered stores, theaters, restaurants and work places.

71. Unemployment drops to 6.9%, US adds solid 638,000 jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. job market showed a burst of strength in October, with employers adding 638,000 jobs and the unemployment rate tumbling to 6.9%. Still, the pace of hiring isn't enough to rapidly soak up the millions of Americans who were thrown out of work by the pandemic recession.

72. As virus resurges, so does fear of more economic pain ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With winter looming and confirmed viral cases rising, Bob Szuter's craft brewery and restaurant in Columbus, Ohio, could use another government lifeline to help survive until spring.

73. Standoff in Washington imperils jobless and small businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With winter looming and confirmed viral cases rising, Bob Szuter's craft brewery and restaurant in Columbus, Ohio, could use another government lifeline to help survive until spring.

74. Goldman Sachs profits nearly doubles, helped by trading -

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina (AP) — Goldman Sachs said Wednesday that its profits jumped sharply in the third quarter, helped by a strong performance by its trading desks and less need to set aside funds to cover potentially bad loans.

75. Bank of America profit falls 15.6% in third quarter -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Consumer banking giant Bank of America says third-quarter profit declined 15.6% from a year earlier, but saw less need to put aside money to cover potentially bad loans, citing improvements in the U.S. economy.

76. JPMorgan puts $30B toward fixing banking's 'systemic racism' -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — JPMorgan Chase said Thursday it will extend billions in loans to Black and Latino homebuyers and small business owners in an expanded effort toward fixing what the bank calls "systemic racism" in the country's economic system.

77. JPMorgan to pay $920M for manipulating bond, metals markets -

NEW YORK (AP) — JPMorgan Chase admitted Tuesday to manipulating the markets for precious metals and U.S. Treasuries, agreeing to pay $920 million in fines and penalties for the illegal behavior.

U.S. financial regulators and the Department of Justice said traders at JPMorgan used a tactic known as "spoofing" over an eight-year period. Spoofing is when traders send trading signals into a market, with no intention of buying or selling at those prices, in order to move a market in one direction or another.

78. Jane Fraser to become Citi CEO; 1st woman to lead major bank -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's Jane Fraser will become the first woman to ever lead a Wall Street bank when she succeeds CEO Michael Corbat in February.

79. Jane Fraser to become Citi CEO; 1st woman to lead major bank -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's Jane Fraser will become the first woman to ever lead a Wall Street bank when she succeeds CEO Michael Corbat in February.

80. US consumer spending rose a moderate 1.9% in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumers increased their spending by 1.9% last month, a dose of support for an economy struggling to emerge from the grip of a pandemic that has held back a recovery and kept roughly 27 million people jobless.

81. US consumer spending up 5.6%, but virus could stall gains -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers increased their spending in June by a solid 5.6%, helping regain some of record plunge that occurred after the coronavirus struck hard in March and paralyzed the economy. But the virus' resurgence in much of the country could impede further gains.

82. Wall Street slides, but tech strength helps avert a big loss -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most of Wall Street stumbled Thursday, but yet another rise for big technology stocks helped keep the market's losses in check.

The S&P 500 dropped 12.22 points, or 0.4%, to 3,246.22, with nearly three out of four stocks in the index falling. Among the hardest-hit were oil producers, banks and other companies that most need the economy to pull out of its recession. Treasury yields also sank in a sign of increased pessimism about the economy.

83. Jobless claims rise as cutoff of extra $600 benefit nears -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation got another dose of bad economic news Thursday as the number of laid-off workers seeking jobless benefits rose last week for the first time since late March, intensifying concerns the resurgent coronavirus is stalling or even reversing the economic recovery.

84. 1.4M more seek US jobless aid, first increase since March -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The viral pandemic's resurgence caused the number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits to rise last week for the first time in nearly four months, evidence of the deepening economic pain the outbreak is causing.

85. Size mattered: Big companies got coronavirus loans first -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ever since the U.S. government launched its emergency lending program for small businesses on April 3, there have been complaints that bigger companies had their loans approved and disbursed more quickly.

86. More than 1M Americans seek job aid for 17th consecutive week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than a million Americans sought unemployment benefits for the 17th consecutive week as infections began surging in some of the nation's most populous states. Layoffs in places like Florida, Georgia and California rose by tens of thousands of people.

87. US retail sales jump 7.5% in June, but economy still ails -

BALTIMORE (AP) — U.S. retail sales climbed a solid 7.5% in June, a sign that the economy was healing right before infections from the coronavirus spiked again and dragged down hopes for a steady recovery.

88. US retail sales jump 7.5% in June, but economy still ails -

BALTIMORE (AP) — U.S. retail sales climbed a solid 7.5% in June, a sign that the economy was healing right before infections from the coronavirus spiked again and dragged down hopes for a steady recovery.

89. Wall Street rebounds after yet another yo-yo day of trading -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rebounded on Tuesday, and the S&P 500 more than made up all its losses from the day before, after stocks pinballed through another day of erratic trading.

The S&P 500 climbed 1.3%, led by energy producers and other companies whose profits would benefit greatly from a strengthening economy. It was a sharp turnaround from the morning, when the index was down 0.9%, and from Monday's last-hour slide after California shut bars and reinstated other restrictions amid a jump in coronavirus counts.

90. Banks set aside billions, bracing for more economic pain -

NEW YORK (AP) — With tens of millions of Americans out of work and many businesses shut down or operating under restrictions due to the coronavirus, three of the nation's biggest banks set aside nearly $30 billion in the second quarter to cover potentially bad loans that were fine only a few months ago.

91. JPMorgan profit hit hard by pandemic, as consumers struggle -

NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic is weighing heavily on the financial health of JPMorgan Chase, as the nation's largest financial company set aside billions in the second quarter to cover potential losses from all the businesses and consumers who are unable to pay their debts due to the slumping economy.

92. Stocks slam into reverse as virus keeps scarring economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street got a painful reminder that the coronavirus pandemic isn't going away, and a big early gain for stocks suddenly flipped to losses after California showed how it's still scarring the economy.

93. Wall Street rallies as optimism returns to cap erratic week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Optimism returned to Wall Street on Friday, and stocks rallied to cap a shaky week dogged by worries that rising coronavirus counts may halt the economy's recent upswing.

The S&P 500 climbed 1%, and the biggest gains came from cruise ship operators, airlines, banks and other companies that most need the economy to continue to reopen and strengthen.

94. Most of Wall Street wilts amid worries on virus, economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most of Wall Street wilted Thursday on worries that the economy's recent improvements may be set to fade as coronavirus cases keep climbing.

The S&P 500 lost 0.6%, with three in four stocks within the index falling. The sharpest drops hit oil companies, airlines and other stocks whose fortunes are most closely tied to a reopening and strengthening economy. Treasury yields also sank in another sign of increased caution.

95. US unemployment falls to 11%, but new shutdowns are underway -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. unemployment fell to 11.1% in June as the economy added a solid 4.8 million jobs, the government reported Thursday. But the job-market recovery may already be faltering because of a new round of closings and layoffs triggered by a resurgence of the coronavirus.

96. A predicted surge in US job growth for June might not last -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers likely rehired several million more workers in June, thereby reducing a Depression-level unemployment rate, but the most up-to-date data suggests that a resurgent coronavirus will limit further gains.

97. Some taxpayers face a desperate wait for refunds -

As a 58-year-old woman on disability, Robin Short of Wallingford, Connecticut, relies on her tax refund to catch up on bills. She filed her return electronically in February, opting for direct deposit so she could get her $773 refund quickly.

98. Wall Street dips as global rally eases off the accelerator -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks mostly fell in another day of wobbly trading on Wall Street Wednesday, as markets eased off the accelerator following their big rally.

The S&P 500 dipped 0.4% to break a three-day winning streak, after bouncing between small gains and losses for much of the day. Stocks in Asia and Europe made modest gains, while Treasury yields edged lower.

99. Wall Street closes higher on economic revival hopes -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street Wednesday, extending the market's gains into a third day on hopes for a coming economic revival as larger swaths of the country relax stay-at-home mandates imposed due to the coronavirus pandemic and clear the way for more businesses to reopen.

100. US retail sales plunged a record 16% in April as virus hit -

BALTIMORE (AP) — U.S. retail sales tumbled by a record 16.4% from March to April as business shutdowns caused by the coronavirus kept shoppers away, threatened the viability of stores across the country and further weighed down a sinking economy.