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Editorial Results (free)

1. Axios Media is sold to Cox Enterprises -

NEW YORK (AP) — Axios Media is being acquired by Cox Enterprises, which said Monday that it plans to push the online news provider into new markets while broadening its coverage.

Axios, citing sources, reported that the deal is worth $525 million.

2. White House insiders to talk about Trump's actions on Jan. 6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Matt Pottinger was a journalist in China, concerned about the country's drift toward authoritarianism, when he decided — at age 31 — to enlist in the U.S. Marines after the invasion of Iraq.

3. 40 years after the Knoxville World’s Fair -

In 1982, the “scruffy little city” did it. Despite some near-death experiences, what is billed by some as the last successful world’s fair to date was held in Knoxville from May to October that year.

4. Weatherly & Dixon merges with Lewis Thomason -

The law firm of Weatherly & Dixon PLLC and its partners, James L. Weatherly and Jacqueline B. Dixon, have merged their practices with Lewis Thomason, P.C., says Lisa Ramsay Cole, president and managing shareholder for the statewide firm.

5. Waller adds to real estate, government relations practices -

Doug Sloan, Jon Cooper and Quan Poole have joined Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP’s Nashville office. The three attorneys join Waller with nearly 45 years of combined experience in legal and leadership roles in the government of Nashville and Davidson County.

6. Bass, Berry & Sims boosts data privacy roster -

Bass, Berry & Sims has added Roy Wyman as a member and Colton Driver and Wesley McCulloch as associates in the Nashville office. Each attorney focuses his practice on complex data privacy and cybersecurity matters, bolstering the firm’s privacy and data security offerings within its Intellectual Property and Technology Practice Group.

7. Neal & Harwell elects 3 new partners -

William “Jay” J. Harbison II, Erik C. Lybeck and Mozianio “Trey” S. Reliford III have been elected partners at Neal & Harwell, PLC.

Harbison joined the firm in 2015, and his practice focuses on business and civil litigation. He is a graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Law.

8. Study says tech firms underreport their carbon footprint -

BERLIN (AP) — Large technology companies such as SAP, IBM and Google are underreporting their greenhouse gas emissions at a time of heightened scrutiny over the role of corporations in driving climate change, a study released Friday claimed.

9. Evidence presented to grand jury in Durham's Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — John Durham, the federal prosecutor tapped to investigate the origins of the Russia investigation, has been presenting evidence before a grand jury as part of his probe, a person familiar with the matter said Friday.

10. Marchetti receives national recognition -

L. Gino Marchetti, Jr., managing partner of Taylor, Pigue, Marchetti and Blair PLLC, was recently presented the Richard Boyette Award from the National Foundation for Judicial Excellence for outstanding contributions to the foundation.

11. VUMC’s Wilkins lands major national award -

Consuelo Wilkins, M.D., MSCI, is the 2021 recipient of the Marion Spencer Fay Award from Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia.

The national award recognizes women physicians and/or scientists who have made “an exceptionally significant contribution to health care.” Previous recipients include the late Bernadine Healy, M.D., the first female director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and pioneering breast cancer geneticist Mary-Claire King, Ph.D.

12. Pandemic garbage boom ignites debate over waste as energy -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — America remains awash in refuse as new cases of the coronavirus decline — and that has reignited a debate about the sustainability of burning more trash to create energy.

Waste-to-energy plants, which produce most of their power by incinerating trash, make up only about half a percent of the electricity generation in the U.S. But the plants have long aroused considerable opposition from environmentalists and local residents who decry the facilities as polluters, eyesores and generators of foul odor.

13. Engel & Völkers partners with Pareto -

Engel & Völkers Nashville has partnered with Pareto Realty and will collectively do business under the Engel & Völkers name. Led by license partner Neal Clayton, this announcement adds 18 real estate advisers to Engel & Völkers Nashville, expanding its real estate service into Williamson County.

14. Kennedy to lead new Sherrard group -

Nashville law firm Sherrard Roe Voigt & Harbison has launched a new health care services group focused on dentists, optometrists and veterinarians.

Cornell Kennedy, a partner at the firm, will head the group. Kennedy specializes in representing specialty health care providers by counseling them on various transactional matters that arise with running a practice. Some of those services include navigating providers through the process of startups, practice acquisitions, commercial lease review, drafting partnership agreements, employment agreements and negotiating equity buy-ins.

15. Pentagon reconsidering huge JEDI cloud-computing contract -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon is reconsidering how to make a massive shift to cloud computing, officials said Monday, suggesting it could scrap the so-called JEDI contract potentially worth $10 billion that was awarded to Microsoft Corp. but is mired in legal challenges.

16. Gresham Smith names new owners in Nashville -

Gresham Smith has named 14 new firm owners, including six from Nashville. Nashvillians selected are:

• Andy Aparicio is director of corporate communications and has joined the firm in 2020. He has since developed an extensive internal and external communications strategy to support the firm’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. He also has led his team to deliver several other high-profile initiatives, including the firm’s first virtual Celebration and the communication of the firm’s Diversity, Equity & Inclusion program.

17. Feds search Rudy Giuliani's NYC home, office -

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal agents on Wednesday raided Rudy Giuliani's Manhattan home and office, seizing computers and cell phones in a major escalation of the Justice Department's investigation into the business dealings of former President Donald Trump's personal lawyer.

18. Next slide, please: Inside wonky White House virus briefings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — No matter how encouraging Andy Slavitt's news is at the government's coronavirus briefings, he can always count on next-up Dr. Rochelle Walensky to deliver a downbeat.

After the tumultuous briefings of the Trump era — when top doctors would troop to the podium in the White House press room only to be upstaged by spurious pronouncements from Donald Trump himself — the thrice-weekly virtual sessions of 2021 have taken on a more restrained and predictable rhythm.

19. Saint Thomas opens hospital in MetroCenter -

Ascension Saint Thomas Behavioral Health Hospital is now offering inpatient care for adults age 18 and older at 300 Great Circle Road.

Features of inpatient treatment at Ascension Saint Thomas Behavioral Health Hospital include thorough intake assessments, personalized treatment plans, multiple forms of evidence-based therapeutic interventions, teams of experienced professionals, access to 24-hour nursing care and detailed discharge planning to promote sustained progress.

20. EXPLAINER: What's up between Google, Facebook and Australia? -

BEIJING (AP) — For two decades, global news outlets have complained internet companies are getting rich at their expense, selling advertising linked to their reports without sharing revenue.

Now, Australia is joining France and other governments in pushing Google, Facebook and other internet giants to pay. That might channel more money to a news industry that is cutting coverage as revenue shrinks. But it also sets up a clash with some of the tech industry's biggest names.

21. Retailers urge shoppers to buy early amid shipping crunch -

NEW YORK (AP) — A number of retailers, including J.C. Penney, Lowe's and Kohl's, are telling shoppers they need to place their online orders soon or else pay expedited shipping fees if they want to get their packages delivered in time for the holidays.

22. Birthday time: Biden turns 78, will be oldest U.S. president -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden turned 78 on Friday. In two months, he'll take the reins of a politically fractured nation facing the worst public health crisis in a century, high unemployment and a reckoning on racial injustice.

23. Money to support Trump court fight could flow instead to president -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Donald Trump's chances of reelection dwindled last week, his campaign began blasting out a nonstop stream of emails and text messages that led to a website raising money for an "election defense fund" to contest the outcome.

24. McWhorter rejoins FB Financial board -

Nashville entrepreneur and executive leader Stuart McWhorter is rejoining the board of FB Financial Corporation after leaving the Lee administration in May to return to the private sector.

After serving as a director for more than 12 years, McWhorter resigned from the company’s board in January 2018 when he became Gov. Bill Lee’s commissioner of Finance and Administration.

25. Allen honored again by Raymond James -

Wealth Strategies Partners founder Paul Allen, CFP, MS, has been named a member of the Raymond James Financial Services’ 2021 Chairman’s Council, a distinction given to those financial advisers who have demonstrated an unparalleled commitment to personal service and lead the largest revenue-producing branches. This marks the second year that he has received this prestigious recognition.

26. Democrats to probe whether officials meddled with virus data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House subcommittee is launching an investigation into whether political appointees have meddled with routine government scientific data to better align with President Donald Trump's public statements about the coronavirus pandemic, following a report that one such appointee claimed scientists were trying to undermine Trump.

27. Facebook may have to stop moving EU user data to US -

LONDON (AP) — Facebook may be forced to stop sending data about its European users to the U.S., in the first major fallout from a recent court ruling that found some trans-Atlantic data transfers don't protect users from American government snooping.

28. 4 Big Tech CEOs getting heat from Congress on competition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four Big Tech CEOs — Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Sundar Pichai of Google and Tim Cook of Apple — are set to answer for their companies' practices before Congress as a House panel caps its yearlong investigation of market dominance in the industry.

29. Watchdog group: Trump campaign improperly masking payments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's reelection effort allegedly hid nearly $170 million in spending from mandatory public disclosure by routing payments through companies tied to his former campaign manager, a government oversight group said Tuesday.

30. Seniors jump back into the job market despite risks -

Being a member of the 60-plus age group, Carolyn Northup is considered a high risk for COVID-19. So the veteran auto sale representative has spent the last six weeks working from home, connecting with longtime customers and following new leads.

31. White House claims Huawei equipment has backdoor for spying -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Chinese company Huawei can secretly tap into communications through the networking equipment it sells globally, a U.S. official charged as the White House stepped up efforts to persuade allies to ban the gear from next-generation cellular networks.

32. Baker selected president of Nashville Bar Association -

Laura Baker, a shareholder at the Law Offices of John Day, has been named 2020 president of the Nashville Bar Association.

She has spent more than 12 years representing clients in personal injury, wrongful death and tort litigation across the state, and has successfully represented clients in hundreds of injury cases including motor vehicle, wrongful death, and slip and fall accidents, as well as medical negligence and products liability cases.

33. Butler Snow hires 4 attorneys in Nashville -

James H. Maners, Jianne D. McDonald, Wilson Roe Moore and Alexandra M. Ortiz have joined Butler Snow’s Nashville office. Maners and Ortiz will practice with the firm’s commercial litigation group, McDonald will practice with the firm’s health law group and Moore will practice with the firm’s business services group.

34. Trial Lawyers name Welborn to state committee -

Butler Snow attorney Joseph F. Welborn III has been named to the American College of Trial Lawyers’ Tennessee State Committee.

Welborn has more than 28 years of trial experience in business and commercial litigation including shareholder, corporate merger and acquisition, banking, contractual, real estate, intellectual property and business tort disputes. He also is experienced in representing individuals and businesses in civil rights litigation, as well as catastrophic personal injury and wrongful death cases.

35. Study triples population at risk of climate-triggered floods -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water.

It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday.

36. Records detail frenetic effort to bury stories about Trump -

NEW YORK (AP) — Court records released Thursday show that President Donald Trump took part in a flurry of phone calls in the weeks before the 2016 election as his close aides and allies scrambled to pay porn star Stormy Daniels to keep quiet about an alleged affair.

37. AP FACT CHECK: Trump wrong about Dems, census, citizenship -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is spreading falsehoods on issues of race, immigration and American-ness, exhorting four non-white female lawmakers to "go back" to where they came from and crying foul over his failed bid to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

38. Amazon, Microsoft wage war over the Pentagon's 'war cloud' -

Amazon and Microsoft are battling it out over a $10 billion opportunity to build the U.S. military its first "war cloud" computing system. But Amazon's early hopes of a shock-and-awe victory may be slipping away.

39. Harris named to lead Lipscomb nursing school -

Chelsia Harris, associate director of nursing for degree development in the Lipscomb College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, has been named executive director of the university’s School of Nursing.

40. Spragens launches plaintiffs’ law firm -

Class action plaintiffs’ attorney John Spragens has launched a new plaintiffs’ law firm representing consumers, whistleblowers and victims of abuse, discrimination, medical malpractice, serious injury and wrongful death.

41. Congress launches Big Tech antitrust probe -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The federal government may be warming up its antitrust enforcement machine and pointing it at Big Tech.

On Monday, the House Judiciary Committee announced a sweeping antitrust probe of unspecified technology companies . In a statement, it promised "a top-to-bottom review of the market power held by giant tech platforms," which would be the first such Congress has ever undertaken.

42. FirstBank's Ayers receives 2019 Horatio Alger Award -

FirstBank Executive Chairman of the Board Jim Ayers was formally inducted into the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans during recent ceremonies honoring the achievements of 13 prominent Americans.

43. Government strategist named VU vice chancellor -

Daniel Culbreath, a government strategist and policy expert who previously worked for the Tennessee General Assembly’s senior leadership, has been named assistant vice chancellor for state government relations at Vanderbilt University.

44. AP Source: Justice Dept. probing development of Boeing jets -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. prosecutors are looking into the development of Boeing's 737 Max jets, a person briefed on the matter revealed Monday, the same day French aviation investigators concluded there were "clear similarities" in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 last week and a Lion Air jet in October.

45. Reliford joins Neal & Harwell -

Attorney Mozianio “Trey” S. Reliford has joined Neal & Harwell, PLC, as an associate. He has experience in the areas of complex white collar and regulatory defense, securities, antitrust, employment and intellectual property law.

46. Shellaway named VU vice chancellor, general counsel -

Ruby Z. Shellaway, an attorney who has held key roles in higher education, federal government and in the private sector, has been named vice chancellor, general counsel and university secretary at Vanderbilt University.

47. Stocks climb on report US may pare back tariffs on China -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed Thursday after the Wall Street Journal reported that U.S. officials could reduce the new tariffs on Chinese imports as part of trade negotiations between the two countries. It was the latest in a series of potentially conflicting updates on the trade dispute.

48. Bid for Gannett latest challenge for newspaper industry -

NEW YORK (AP) — A hedge-fund-backed bid to buy Gannett Co., the publisher of USA Today and several other major dailies across the U.S., is renewing fears of consolidation and job losses — as well as a decline in the quantity and quality of news coverage — in the already battered newspaper industry.

49. Waller elects 5 partners in 3 practice areas -

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP has elected five partners from the firm’s Healthcare Compliance and Operations, Finance and Restructuring Corporate, and Litigation & Dispute Resolution practices.

50. US stock indexes edge higher a day after a big gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks wobbled Tuesday as large high-dividend stocks rose and smaller companies sank. Major indexes were coming off big gains the day before.

Big health care companies including Johnson & Johnson rallied, as did telecommunications and household goods makers. Steel and other materials makers skidded, and a steep loss for United Technologies pulled defense contractors lower.

51. Tesla without Musk at the wheel? It's what the SEC now wants -

DETROIT (AP) — Tesla without Elon Musk at the wheel? To many of the electric car maker's customers and investors that would be unthinkable. But that's what government securities regulators now want to see.

52. Blackburn unanimously elected presiding judge -

Davidson County General Sessions judges have unanimously elected Judge Melissa Blackburn to serve as presiding judge through Sept. 2019.

Blackburn has been serving as presiding judge since Dec. 2017 when Judge Angelita Blackshear Dalton was elevated to the 20th District Criminal Court by Gov. Bill Haslam. She was elected to serve as judge of the Division II General Sessions Court in 2014.

53. Stocks fall as crude oil prices drop 4 percent; banks climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major U.S. indexes closed mostly lower Monday as investors bought banks but sold most other types of stocks, including health care and technology companies. Energy stocks sank along with oil prices.

54. Green & Little selects Green as vice president -

Green & Little, L.P., real estate investment and development firm based in Gallatin, has named Anderson Green as vice president. Green oversees day-to-day business operations at the asset management level and will be more involved in the overall strategic direction for Green & Little. He has been with the company since 2014.

55. Adams and Reese adds pair of litigators -

TaKeena Thompson Sandifer has joined Adams and Reese’s Nashville office and litigation practice group as special counsel, and Jacob “Jake” L. Perry has joined as an associate.

Sandifer has a diverse practice in which she represents clients in medical malpractice, insurance bad faith litigation and products liability litigation, including pharmaceutical drug and medical device litigation. Her products liability experience has involved oral contraceptives, transvaginal mesh, inferior vena cava (IVC) filters, metal-on-metal hip replacements, hormone therapy and pain pump devices.

56. Trump's bid to help Chinese firm draws fire but raises hopes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A long-running dispute between American regulators and Chinese telecom company ZTE may have handed President Donald Trump some unexpected leverage in avoiding a trade war with Beijing.
Trump's tweet Sunday that he was working with President Xi Jinping of China to put ZTE "back into business, fast" after U.S. sanctions threatened ZTE's existence and 70,000 Chinese jobs caught many trade-watchers by surprise.
"Too many jobs in China lost," Trump tweeted. "Commerce Department has been instructed to get it done!"
The overture came just as Vice Premier Liu He is flying to Washington for talks aimed at heading off a mutually harmful battle between the world's two biggest economies and just before U.S. companies plan to plead during three days of hearings for a resolution to the dispute.
Trade analysts say it is highly unusual for a president to intercede in a case brought by the Commerce Department and to mix regulatory sanctions with trade negotiations. But they also note that Trump's offer to rescue ZTE, which makes cellphones and other telecommunications equipment, has the potential to clear the way for progress.
"It's a way to unlock negotiations," said Wendy Cutler, a former U.S. trade negotiator specializing in Asia and now vice president at the Asia Society Policy Institute.
The United States has proposed imposing tariffs on up to $150 billion in Chinese products to punish Beijing for forcing American companies to hand over technology in exchange for access to the Chinese markets. In retaliation, Beijing is threatening tariffs on $50 billion in U.S. products.
"Trump's tweet creates an atmosphere where there's more hope for reaching an agreement on trade," said David Dollar, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a former official at the World Bank and the U.S. Treasury Department.
The United States also needs China's support as it prepares for talks with North Korea that are intended to persuade the Pyongyang regime to abandon nuclear weapons.
Commerce and ZTE last year settled charges that the Chinese company sold sensitive telecommunications equipment to Iran and North Korea in violation of U.S. sanctions. ZTE agreed to plead guilty and pay about $1 billion in fines.
Last month, Commerce accused ZTE of violating the agreement and blocked ZTE from importing American components for seven years. The department said ZTE had misled regulators: Instead of disciplining all employees involved in the sanctions violations, Commerce said, ZTE paid some of them full bonuses and then lied about it.
The seven-year ban was tantamount to a death sentence for ZTE.
"It was basically going to put them out of business," Dollar said. "They rely on American technology."
Last week, the company announced that it was halting operations.
Early this month, a high-level U.S. delegation — including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, top American trade negotiator Robert Lighthizer and White House adviser Peter Navarro — traveled to Beijing to address the trade dispute. There, they heard an outcry about U.S. regulators putting ZTE out of business.
"They were a little bit blindsided," said Paul Triolo, a technology specialist at the Eurasia Group consultancy. "The Chinese reaction was pretty vociferous. ... The U.S. government shooting down the No. 2 telecommunications supplier in China at this sensitive time — it didn't look good."
Now, analysts see the outlines of a potential deal: In return for Trump's lifeline to ZTE, Beijing might agree to buy more U.S. products or take other steps to shrink America's gaping trade deficit with China — $337 billion last year.
The Wall Street Journal reported Monday that the two countries were in talks about such a potential swap: The U.S. would spare ZTE, and Beijing would drop plans to impose tariffs on U.S. farm products. Neither the White House nor the Commerce Department would comment.
The ZTE case also drives home how entwined the U.S. and Chinese economies are. The Commerce sanctions didn't just imperil ZTE; they also hurt the American companies that sell components to the Chinese company.
And so investors breathed a sigh of relief after Trump's tweet, buying stock Monday in Maynard, Massachusetts-based optical components maker Acacia Communications, which last year collected 30 percent of its revenue from ZTE; San Jose-based optical communications company Oclaro; and Sunnyvale, California-based fiber optic cable manufacturer Finisar.
Still, critics charged that Trump shouldn't have intervened in the legal case against ZTE.
"This would be a truly awful deal for the U.S," Derek Scissors, a China specialist at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, wrote in a blog post. "If the accusations last year and last month are accurate, ZTE violated Iran sanctions, then further attempted to deceive the U.S. government."
Xi "would be using barriers against American agriculture to blackmail the Trump administration into accepting ZTE's behavior," Scissors said.
Trump has thrust trade policy to the center of his agenda. In addition to sparring with China, his team is in talks to rewrite the North America Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada.
The timing of the NAFTA negotiations is tight: House Speaker Paul Ryan has said Congress must have an agreement by Thursday to have any hope of approving it this year.
___
Follow Paul Wiseman on Twitter at https://twitter.com/PaulWisemanAP

...

57. $30,000 rumor? Tabloid paid for, spiked, salacious Trump tip -

NEW YORK (AP) — Eight months before the company that owns the National Enquirer paid $150,000 to a former Playboy Playmate who claimed she'd had an affair with Donald Trump, the tabloid's parent made a $30,000 payment to a less famous individual: a former doorman at one of the real estate mogul's New York City buildings.

58. Tech gains but industrials slide, leaving indexes mixed -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks were split Monday as technology companies continued to climb, but Boeing and other industrial companies gave back some of the ground they won on Friday.

Companies like Apple and Alphabet, Google's parent company, and chipmakers including Micron Technology have led the market's recovery in recent weeks. Retailers including Amazon and Starbucks also made headway. The market was coming off its biggest gain in a month following the February jobs report, which showed strong hiring and moderate growth in wages.

59. Trump to herald economic progress in State of the Union -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump will herald a robust economy and push for bipartisan congressional action on immigration in Tuesday's State of the Union address, as he seeks to rally a deeply divided nation and boost his own sagging standing with Americans.

60. South Carolina lands second BMW training center in South -

GREER, S.C. (AP) — BMW of North America plans to open its second training center in the South by the end of this year.

The Spartanburg Herald-Journal reports that the company's head of U.S. corporate communications, Kenn Sparks, said Wednesday that the $12 million BMW Southern Regional Training Center will be located in Spartanburg County. According to plans filed with the county's planning department, it will be built near the company's manufacturing plant.

61. Disney buying large part of 21st Century Fox in $52.4B deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney is buying the Murdoch family's Fox movie and television studios and some cable and international TV businesses for about $52.4 billion, as the home of Mickey Mouse tries to meet competition from technology companies in the entertainment business.

62. Disney buying large part of 21st Century Fox in $52.4B deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney is buying a large part of the Murdoch family's 21st Century Fox for about $52.4 billion in stock, including film and television studios and cable and international TV businesses, as it tries to meet competition from technology companies in the entertainment business.

63. Bradley welcomes 11 new associates in Nashville -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has hired 11 attorneys for the firm’s Nashville office as associates, bringing the total number of Bradley attorneys in Nashville to 137.

The firm’s new Nashville associates are:

64. Stocks rise as oil jumps 2-year high; chipmakers climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks made modest gains and set more records Monday as upheaval in oil-rich Saudi Arabia sent crude prices to two-year highs. Chipmakers and media companies climbed on deal reports while phone and household goods companies sank.

65. US stocks skid as GE tumbles and technology companies fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Industrial and technology companies and retailers all stumbled Monday as U.S. stocks began the week with losses. General Electric suffered its worst one-day loss in six years following downgrades from analysts.

66. Modak-Truran elected president of IP lawyers -

Butler Snow’s Anita Modak-Truran has been elected president of the Tennessee Intellectual Property Lawyers Association. The organization is composed of patent, trademark and copyright attorneys who volunteer to educate others on emerging trends and best practices within the industry.

67. Technology and health care lift stocks to record highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks continued to climb Wednesday, led by technology, health care and energy companies. Media companies also rose as stock indexes set record highs.

The technology part of the Standard & Poor's 500 index finally broke the record it set in March 2000, before the dot-com bubble burst. Energy companies rose with the price of oil as U.S. energy stockpiles continued to shrink. Cable network companies Scripps Networks and Discovery Communications jumped after the Wall Street Journal reported that they are in talks to combine.

68. US stock market makes biggest gain in 2 months -

The U.S. stock market notched its biggest gain in two months Wednesday, bouncing back from losses a day earlier.

Banks and other financial companies led the rally as investors bet on interest rates climbing further. Banks can make more money on lending when rates move higher.

69. Baker Donelson selects new managing shareholder -

Brigid M. Carpenter has been named managing shareholder for the Nashville office of Baker Donelson, making her the first woman to serve in this position. She assumes the role previously held by Scott D. Carey for eight years.

70. Don’t forget to say thank you. It’s free -

How many times have you heard, “Don’t forget to say thank you?” When we were children, adults reiterated it over and over again. Yet, somehow, as adults, we are forgetting this simple lesson.

71. Drive-in project is 'bet the farm endeavor' -

Since announcing plans in early February for an indoor, ideal drive-in experience called August Moon, the great imaginer behind it has enjoyed a deluge of media coverage and supportive emails and messages from potential customers and interested investors.

72. 'Net neutrality' foe Ajit Pai is new FCC head -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump has picked a fierce critic of the Obama-era "net neutrality" rules to be chief regulator of the nation's airwaves and internet connections.

In a statement Monday, Ajit Pai said he was grateful to the president for choosing him as the next chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Several reports last week had said he was the pick.

73. Nashville Bar honors Rubenfeld, Harbison -

Abby Rubenfeld and Bill Harbison have been honored by the Nashville Bar Association with the The John C. Tune Public Service Award, the organization’s highest.

The award, which is only given in years when there are deserving nominees, was presented this year for outstanding contributions to the community.

74. Walker to chair Tennessee Economic Partnership -

Clay Walker, CEO of NETWORKS Sullivan Partnership of the Tri-Cities region, has been elected 2017 chair of the board of directors for the Tennessee Economic Partnership (TEP), the statewide public-private partnership that markets the state of Tennessee as a premiere place for business.

75. The world at your doorstep -

There is nothing you can’t get delivered these days. If you can imagine owning it, it’s only a matter of time before it can be in your possession, brought to your front door within minutes, hours or days from the first moment you even conjured the thought of having it.

76. Rowland named judicial clerk to Judge Nixon -

Maggie Rowland, who has served as a staff attorney at Patterson Intellectual Property Law since 2014, has been named a judicial clerk to Senior Judge John Trice Nixon, U.S. District Court, Middle District of Tennessee.

77. Board of Regents hires longtime Statehouse reporter Locker -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The Tennessee Board of Regents has hired longtime Statehouse reporter Richard Locker as the higher education system's spokesman.

Locker succeeds Monica Greppin-Watts, who is joining the communications team at the University of Alabama.

78. Bradley attorneys elected Tennessee Bar Foundation fellows -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP Nashville partners – William L. Norton, III and Todd Presnell – have been elected as fellows of the Tennessee Bar Foundation, an association of 818 attorneys from across the state.

79. I-440: An $8 million ‘cheap fix’ gone bad -

Author and photographer Jerry Park clocked many miles crossing the state in his Ford Flex while working on his book Slow Roads Tennessee: A Photographic Journey Down Timeless Byways.

Some roads were good, filled with charm and beauty. Others, not so much. But no matter how old or unmaintained the road, Park never found one worse to drive on than the bypass near his own Richland neighborhood – I-440.

80. Yahoo mulls shareholder demand to sell Internet business -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo's board is considering an activist shareholder's demand to sell the Internet services the company is best known for, a maneuver that might help the company dodge a tax bill of more than $10 billion looming over its holdings in China's Alibaba Group.

81. Dickinson Wright welcomes associates -

Dickinson Wright PLLC has hired Ariel Mason and Dustin Kovacic as associate attorneys. Mason joins the firm’s downtown Nashville office, and Kovacic joins the office on Music Row.

Mason previously worked for Dickinson Wright as a summer associate in the Nashville office, where she composed arguments for inclusion in trial briefs and motion memoranda. She also conducted extensive research on general litigation issues, including business disputes, employment law, and bankruptcy law.

82. Consolidation of state’s newspapers bad for taxpayers -

The federal government isn’t likely to descend on Tennessee with trust-busting vengeance once three of the state’s four largest newspapers are owned by the same company.

Newspapers are too far down a virtual slippery slope of monopolism to retrieve from the hands of Gannett, which recently announced it plans to pay $280 million for Journal Media Group, the owner of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis and Knoxville News Sentinel.

83. Nashville Public Library selects Meacham for honor -

Acclaimed presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning Nashvillian Jon Meacham will receive the 2015 Nashville Public Library Literary Award and will join Nashville’s own American history buff and country performer Tim McGraw for a free public lecture and conversation on Dec. 7.

84. Gannett Co. acquires Knoxville, Memphis newspapers, others for $280M -

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Gannett Co. has reached an agreement to acquire newspaper company Journal Media Group for $280 million, giving the media giant control of publications in more than 100 local markets in the U.S., company officials announced Wednesday evening.

85. David Smith named Gov. Haslam's communications director -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has named David Smith as his communications director.

Smith has been the Republican governor's press secretary since he took office in 2011, and was Haslam's spokesman during the 2010 governor's race. He succeeds Alexia Poe, who left in August to become a private communications consultant.

86. Construction attorneys move to Dickinson Wright -

Nashville attorneys Rob Dodson and Slade Sevier have joined Dickinson Wright PLLC as members. Both were previously with Adams and Reese.

Dodson focuses his practice on the construction and energy industries. In addition to his primary construction practice, Dodson also has significant experience in general commercial litigation, insurance and products liability litigation.

87. Vanderbilt Hospital CEO named to new position -

David Posch, CEO of Vanderbilt University Adult Hospital and Clinics and executive director for the Vanderbilt Medical Group, has been named to the newly created position of associate vice chancellor for Population Health.

88. Vols, Titans fight to fill empty stadium seats -

When it comes to giving the consumer what it wants, few sports programs can match University of Tennessee football.

Neyland Stadium, which 40 years ago could accommodate only 70,000 fans, has swelled to a capacity of 102,455, fifth largest in college football. It has a $4 million, 4,580-square-foot Jumbotron, W-Fi connections for fans and enough flashing lights around the stadium’s interior to shame the Las Vegas Strip.

89. Deepening dependency on technology raises risk of breakdowns -

Technology has become so indispensable that when it breaks down, people's lives go haywire, too.

Computer outages at United Airlines, the New York Stock Exchange and The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday delivered a reminder about our growing dependence on interconnected networks to get through each day.

90. McWhorter is new president, CEO of NEC -

Stuart McWhorter, chairman and co-founder of Clayton Associates, has been named president & CEO of the Nashville Entrepreneur Center.

The announcement follows a months-long national search, according to John R. Ingram, chairman of the board of directors of the NEC.

91. Obama faces left-right opposition on trade, military force -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Reps. Barbara Lee and John Fleming are highly dubious at best about President Barack Obama's requests for enhanced powers to make trade deals and to deploy the U.S. military. And that's like oil and water mixing easily.

92. Reports: Google planning to sell wireless phone service -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google is planning to sell wireless phone service directly to consumers using the networks of Sprint and T-Mobile, according to reports published Wednesday.

If everything falls into place, Google Inc. could offer discounted wireless data plans that would pressure other major carriers to offer better deals and services or risk losing customers to a powerful rival.

93. Cox to lead Vanderbilt’s trans-institutional genetics -

Nancy J. Cox, Ph.D., professor of medicine and human genetics and chief of the Section of Genetic Medicine at the University of Chicago, has been appointed founding director of a new genetics institute at Vanderbilt University.

94. Behm is campaign chair for Legal Aid Society -

Margaret Behm, principal at Dodson, Parker, Behm and Capparella, P.C., will serve as the 2015 campaign chair of the Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands’ Campaign for Equal Justice.

95. Journal Communications, Scripps Co. announce deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Journal Communications Inc. of Milwaukee and E.W. Scripps Co. of Cincinnati have agreed to combine their broadcasting operations while spinning off newspaper holdings into a separate public entity.

96. Journal Communications, Scripps Co. announce deal -

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Journal Communications Inc. of Milwaukee and E.W. Scripps Co. of Cincinnati have an agreement to merge broadcasting operations while spinning off newspaper holdings into a separate public entity, the companies announced late Wednesday.

97. Onlife Health names Redman vice president -

Onlife Health, Inc., a national wellness company based in Brentwood, has named Matthew Redman vice president of account management. In this position, Redman will be responsible for all facets of sales and account management for current Onlife Health clients.

98. Barge Waggoner’s Higgins honored as top engineer -

Bob Higgins, president and CEO of Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon, Inc., has been named 2014 Engineer of the Year by the Tennessee Society of Professional Engineers.

99. FCC won't appeal ruling on Internet neutrality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Communications Commission says it won't appeal a court decision that struck down rules it designed to ensure that the transmission of all Internet content be treated equally. The agency says it will fashion new rules.

100. New CEO named at TriStar StoneCrest -

Louis F. Caputo, chief executive officer (CEO) of Summerville Medical Center in Summerville, S.C., has been named chief executive officer of HCA’s TriStar StoneCrest Medical Center in Murfreesboro.