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Editorial Results (free)

1. American, JetBlue ask court to toss US lawsuit against deal -

BOSTON (AP) — American Airlines and JetBlue Airways asked a federal judge Monday to dismiss a government lawsuit aimed at blocking a deal that lets the two airlines cooperate on service in the Northeast.

2. How vaccine passports for global travel would work -

LONDON (AP) — Boarding pass, suitcase, passport and ... digital vaccination certificate?

Keen to avoid losing another summer of holiday revenue to the coronavirus pandemic, the European Union, some Asian governments and the airline industry are scrambling to develop so-called COVID-19 vaccine passports to help kickstart international travel.

3. FAA aims to fine disruptive air passengers up to $31,750 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Aviation Administration said Tuesday that it is seeking fines of up to $31,750 for three more passengers who allegedly disrupted flights by disobeying or interfering with flight attendants.

4. 2 new airlines await Americans looking to fly somewhere -

Americans are traveling in the greatest numbers in more than a year, and soon they will have two new leisure-oriented airlines to consider for those trips.

Both hope to draw passengers by filling in smaller strands on the spider web of airline routes crisscrossing the United States.

5. Frontier Airlines hopes IPO rides wave of travel recovery -

Frontier Airlines is betting that the budding recovery in leisure travel is for real.

Shares of the discount carrier began public trading Thursday, edging lower in midday trading. The Denver-based airline and its private owners sought to raise $570 million before costs from the IPO after pricing 30 million shares at $19, the low end of a $19 to $21 target. The stock opened at $18.61, then bumped up to $19.06 before dipping back down to $18.54.

6. FAA: Airlines have reported more than 500 unruly passengers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airlines have reported more than 500 cases involving unruly passengers since late December, and most started with passengers who refused to wear a face mask, federal officials said Wednesday.

7. Stocks extend gains for fifth day, led by technology shares -

Stocks shook off an early stumble and closed broadly higher Monday, nudging some of the major U.S. indexes to more all-time highs as the market added to its recent string of gains.

The S&P 500 rose 0.7% after having been down 0.5% in the early going, extending its winning streak to a fifth day. Technology stocks, airlines, cruise operators and other companies that rely on consumer spending helped lift the market. Banks and energy stocks were the only laggards.

8. Maskless, boozing JetBlue passenger faces $14,500 FAA fine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An airline passenger could wind up paying $14,500 for refusing to wear a face mask and drinking alcohol that he had brought on board.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Friday it proposed the civil penalty against a passenger on a Dec. 23 JetBlue Airways flight that left New York's John F. Kennedy Airport bound for the Dominican Republic, but turned back to JFK because of the man's behavior.

9. US approves new airline from JetBlue founder -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Transportation Department has granted approval for a new airline led by David Neeleman, who started JetBlue Airways two decades ago.

Breeze Aviation Group has up to one year to begin flights using up to 22 planes, the company said Wednesday.

10. Airlines close books on rotten 2020 and, so far, 2021 is grim -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines lost $3.1 billion last year, its first full-year loss since Richard Nixon was president and gasoline sold for about 36 cents a gallon with no extra charge for the attendant who cleaned your windshield.

11. Holiday air travel surges despite dire health warnings -

Nearly 1.2 million people passed through U.S. airports Sunday, the greatest number since the pandemic gripped the country in March, despite pleas from health experts for Americans to stay home over Thanksgiving.

12. Congress takes another run at airline bailout; fate unclear -

House Democrats on Friday proposed a new $28.8 billion bailout for the airline industry after the carriers began furloughs of more than 32,000 workers to cut costs during a pandemic that has devastated air travel.

13. Strong demand for virus testing services; snacking surges -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

14. Travel crushed by virus; mortgage availability worsens -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

15. Virus concerns: What to know if you're planning a trip -

The fast-spreading coronavirus is forcing travelers to reconsider their trips.

As of Wednesday, the virus has sickened more than 94,000 people and 3,200 have died. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding all nonessential travel to China, Iran, South Korea and Italy, and says older adults or those with chronic medical conditions should postpone travel to Japan.

16. Companies adjust policies as virus scrambles travel plans -

The fast-spreading coronavirus is forcing travelers to reconsider their trips.

As of Tuesday, the virus has sickened more than 92,000 people and 3,100 have died. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding all nonessential travel to China, Iran, South Korea and Italy, and says older adults or those with chronic medical conditions should postpone travel to Japan.

17. Markets down, Facebook cancels show: Virus hits businesses -

The spread of the new coronavirus around the world is hitting companies hard as they suspend production, meetings, events and business travel. Here's a look at the latest developments:

MARKETS: Markets are down sharply again. The Dow and S&P were down over 2.5% in afternoon trading and Treasury yields dropped to record lows, a sign of caution among traders. After a mixed day in Asia, investors sold off shares more aggressively in Europe, where indexes were down over 3%. Shares in airlines were down as much as 10%.

18. Grounded Boeing jet holds back profits, growth at airlines -

DALLAS (AP) — The three big U.S. airlines that own Boeing 737 Max jets don't expect the grounded plane back in their fleets until after the peak summer travel season, and that promises to lead to thousands more canceled flights and higher costs well into another year.

19. Stocks climb for 2nd straight day on US-China trade optimism -

Stocks closed broadly higher on Wall Street for the second straight day Thursday as the U.S. and China kicked off a new round of negotiations in their long-running trade war.

Technology companies and banks led the rally as investors turned hopeful that the 13th round of trade talks will bring both sides closer to ending the costly conflict between the world's two biggest economies.

20. Delta tops long-running ranking of US airlines -

Delta Air Lines comes in first in a long-running study that ranks U.S. airlines by how often flights arrive on time and other statistical measures.

Researchers who crunch the numbers also say that as a whole, U.S. airlines are getting better at handling baggage and overcrowded flights and are getting fewer complaints.

21. Will American Airlines bar customers from changing a ticket? -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines is threatening to prohibit customers from making changes to nonrefundable tickets if Congress makes good on a proposal to crack down on unreasonable airline fees.

22. Surge in airline hiring boosts interest in aspiring pilots -

DALLAS (AP) — Major U.S. airlines are hiring pilots at a rate not seen since before 9/11, and that is encouraging more young people to consider a career in the cockpit.

Hiring is likely to remain brisk for years. Smaller airlines in the U.S. are struggling with a shortage that will continue as they lose pilots to the bigger carriers, which in turn will need to replace thousands of retiring pilots over the next few years.

23. Airline 'bumping' of passengers falls to lowest rate ever -

Airlines bumped passengers off flights at the lowest rate on record last year after United Airlines was pilloried when a passenger was dragged off a full plane.

The Transportation Department said Thursday that airlines bumped about one passenger in every 29,000 in 2017, roughly half the rate of the year before.

24. Airlines bump fewer passengers off oversold flights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airlines are bumping fewer passengers off oversold planes after taking to heart the public anger over a man being violently dragged from his seat earlier this year.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that airlines bumped 2,745 passengers between July and September.

25. JetBlue to stop selling tickets on a dozen travel websites -

NEW YORK (AP) — JetBlue will stop selling tickets on a dozen discount travel websites in hopes of driving customers to the airline's site and reducing the company's costs.

JetBlue Airways Corp. said Thursday that the change was the first step in revamping its system of selling tickets online.

26. JetBlue to stop selling tickets on a dozen travel websites -

NEW YORK (AP) — JetBlue will stop selling tickets on a dozen discount travel websites in hopes of driving customers to the airline's site and reducing the company's costs.

JetBlue Airways Corp. said Thursday that the change was the first step in revamping its system of selling tickets online.

27. Flight cancellations mount as Irma pushes north from Florida -

Big airports in Florida remained closed Monday, and flight cancellations were spreading north along the track of Tropical Storm Irma.

American Airlines said it won't resume flights in Miami until at least Tuesday, revising its plans to restart late Monday.

28. Video of passenger getting dragged off flight sparks uproar -

CHICAGO (AP) — Video of police officers dragging a passenger from an overbooked United Airlines flight sparked an uproar Monday on social media, and a spokesman for the airline insisted that employees had no choice but to contact authorities to remove the man.

29. Airline cancellations pile up as storm disrupts travel plans -

U.S. airlines have already canceled more than 6,000 flights Monday and Tuesday as a late-winter storm is expected to dump enough snow to disrupt travel in the Northeast.

Southwest Airlines, which carries more domestic passengers than any other airline, doesn't expect to operate any flights Tuesday at 14 airports stretching from Washington to Portland, Maine.

30. Travelers in US change plans ahead of Hurricane Matthew -

NEW YORK (AP) — Travelers along the East Coast are preparing for delays and cancelations as Hurricane Matthew heads toward the U.S.

Some airlines have already canceled flights Thursday and Friday in parts of Florida and are weighing suspensions up through Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina, depending on where the hurricane strikes. Cruise lines are shuffling ship itineraries and many frantic vacationers are looking at insurance policies to see if they are covered.

31. Historic commercial flight from US lands in Cuba -

SANTA CLARA, Cuba (AP) — The first commercial flight between the United States and Cuba in more than a half century landed in the central city of Santa Clara on Wednesday morning, re-establishing regular air service severed at the height of the Cold War.

32. US gives tentative OK to flights to Cuba from 10 US cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scheduled commercial airline service to Havana from 10 American cities won tentative government approval Thursday, advancing President Barack Obama's effort to normalize relations with Cuba.

33. US airlines to start scheduled flights to Cuba -

HAVANA (AP) — Six airlines won permission Friday to resume scheduled commercial air service from the U.S. to Cuba for the first time in more than five decades, another milestone in President Barack Obama's campaign to normalize relations between the Cold War foes.

34. American will reward fliers based on dollars, not miles -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is following other airlines by basing perks like free flights on how much passengers spend on tickets, not how many miles they fly.

The change, which matches those at Delta Air Lines and United Airlines, starts with flights on Aug. 1 and rewards American's highest-paying passengers.

35. Alaska, JetBlue top annual survey of North American airlines -

Alaska Airlines and JetBlue Airways still rank highest in the annual J.D. Power survey of passengers on the nine largest North American airlines, and the firm says overall traveler satisfaction with the industry is at a 10-year high.

36. Alaska Air buys Virgin America to expand West Coast flights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Alaska Air Group Inc. is buying Virgin America in a deal worth $2.6 billion, making Alaska the biggest carrier on the West Coast and reigniting the debate over airline consolidation.

37. US, Cuba sign deal on commercial flights -

HAVANA (AP) — The United States and Cuba signed an agreement on Tuesday morning to resume commercial air traffic for the first time in five decades, starting the clock on dozens of new flights operating daily by next fall.

38. Energy companies lead a decline in US stocks as crude slumps -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are dropping in late afternoon trading Monday as investors dump energy companies. Benchmark U.S. crude is trading at its lowest level in nearly seven years following a decision by OPEC last week not to cut production. Airline stocks rose on the prospect of lower fuel costs.

39. Oil price drops to lowest since 2009, sinking energy stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Energy companies are closing sharply lower, leading a broad decline on the stock market, after the price of oil dropped to its lowest point in nearly seven years.

40. More Thanksgiving travelers; don't get stuck at the airport -

NEW YORK (AP) — A stronger economy and lower gas prices mean Thanksgiving travelers can expect more congested highways this year.

During the long holiday weekend, 46.9 million Americans are expected to go 50 miles or more from home, the highest number since 2007, according to travel agency and car lobbying group AAA. That would be a 0.6 percent increase over last year and the seventh straight year of growth.

41. Airlines post better on-time rate but get more complaints -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More flights are arriving on time but consumer complaints about the airlines have risen sharply.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that the nation's leading carriers posted an on-time rate of 80.3 percent in August. That was better than the 78.1 percent mark in July and 77.7 percent the previous August.

42. Stocks close out best week of the year with a small gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market closed out its best week this year with a modest gain on Friday, helped by airlines and industrial companies.

Investors now turn their focus to corporate earnings, which will start to pick up next week.

43. JetBlue plants a seed with farm-to-tray-table concept -

NEW YORK (AP) — JetBlue Airways is trying to bring a little bit of country to the city — opening its own "farm" at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport.

The 24,000 square-foot space — less than half the size of a football field — outside JFK's Terminal 5 is meant to educate travelers more than actually feed them. Although eventually JetBlue would like to serve items grown there in terminal restaurants and even make some blue potato Terra Chips that are served on flights.

44. Carnival aims to launch Miami to Cuba cruises in May -

The world's largest cruise company could be heading to Cuba. Starting in May, Carnival Corp. plans to offer trips from Miami to the Caribbean island nation, the company announced Tuesday.

Carnival says it would become the first American cruise company to visit Cuba since the 1960 trade embargo. The trips will be through its new brand, fathom, which focuses on trips where passengers sail to a destination in order to volunteer there.

45. US stocks end lower, pushing Dow into the red for the year -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones industrial average slipped into the red for the year on Monday as stocks extended their slump.

Airlines were among the biggest losers amid concern that capacity growth in the industry may curb profitability. JetBlue Airways, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines were among the carriers that declined.

46. US stock market slips in light trading -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investors sent stocks slightly lower Monday ahead of a busy week for company earnings.

With little news to move the market either way, major indexes spent the day wavering between slim gains and losses. Stocks started higher in the morning, turned lower shortly after midday, then drifted downward until the closing bell.

47. Long tarmac delays at US airports spiked in February -

There was a surge in long tarmac delays at the nation's airports in February, including several during a snow storm in Dallas.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that 16 domestic flights were stuck on the ground for more than three hours and eight international flights were delayed more than four hours in February. Federal rules prohibit airlines from holding planes on the tarmac that long, and the department could issue fines.

48. JetBlue computer outage causes delays for passengers -

NEW YORK (AP) — A computer outage that caused delays for thousands of JetBlue Airways passengers early Monday morning has been resolved, the company said.

JetBlue Airways said it had fixed a systemwide computer problem by 6:15 a.m. Eastern that has caused delays because the airline had to manually check in passengers.

49. Q&A: US government eases Cuba travel restrictions -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans are one step closer to being able to vacation in Cuba, but don't pack your bathing suit and sunscreen just yet.

A new set of government regulations takes effect Friday, severely loosening travel and trade restrictions that have been in place for 54 years. The rules follow President Barack Obama's announcement last month of a reestablishment of diplomatic relations with the communist island. Only Congress can fully remove the embargo but it is up to the administration to enforce — or turn a blind eye — to the travel ban.

50. US companies eager to embrace Cuba face hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cargill aims to sell more corn and soybeans. MasterCard covets another site for Americans to swipe credit cards. Marriott sees beachfront property that needs hotels.

And outside Orlando, Florida, Danny Howell just knows there would be demand for his classic Chevrolet parts.

51. JetBlue to add bag fees on cheapest tickets -

It will soon cost you money to check a bag on JetBlue if you buy the cheapest level of tickets.

JetBlue Airways Corp. said Wednesday that it will create three ticket classes beginning in the first half of 2015, and only the top two include at least one free checked bag.

52. Fuel costs ease, US airline profits soar -

DALLAS (AP) — Saving a nickel or a dime per gallon might not seem like much to the average motorist, but for airlines that burn hundreds of millions of gallons of fuel every month, it adds up quickly.

53. Hawaiian Airlines keeps top spot in on-time list -

The Associated Press

Here are the government's rankings of the leading airlines and their on-time performance in May. Some airlines, including Spirit and Allegiant, are not included because they operate fewer flights. The federal government counts a flight as on-time if it arrives within 14 minutes of schedule.

54. For airlines not named United, it was a great 1Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Even with the turbulence of severe winter storms and stubbornly high fuel prices, many of the major airlines are cruising and their stock prices are soaring.

Mergers have reduced competition and made it easier for the airlines to limit the supply of seats and raise average fares. Extra fees bring in billions more each year.

55. JetBlue pilots vote for first time to unionize -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Mediation Board said Tuesday that pilots at JetBlue Airways Corp. voted overwhelmingly to unionize, reversing two earlier votes.

56. Air travel: Late flights are up, complaints down -

DALLAS (AP) — A big drop in customer complaints helped U.S. airlines post their best ratings ever even though more flights were late and more bags were mishandled, according to a report released Monday by university researchers.

57. Airlines cancel nearly 2,300 flights due to weather -

NEW YORK (AP) — Airlines canceled nearly 2,300 flights Monday as the latest winter storm hit the U.S. East Coast.

The hardest hit cities were Washington D.C., Philadelphia, New York and Baltimore. All flights into and out of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport have been halted.

58. Big changes ahead for frequent fliers on Delta -

ATLANTA (AP) — Delta Air Lines is making fundamental changes to its frequent flier program and will reward those who buy its priciest tickets, as opposed to those who fly the most miles.

It will be the first major carrier to make such a change and other airlines will certainly be watching to see how travelers react to the change.

59. FCC: Lift ban on in-flight calls. DOT: Not so fast -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just because it's safe to use cellphones on a plane, it doesn't mean that passengers should call just to say hello.

That argument played out across Washington Thursday as one government agency moved a step closer to removing its prohibition of in-flight calls while another considered a new ban of its own.

60. Poll: Strong opposition to in-flight cellphone calls -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As federal regulators consider removing a decades-old prohibition on making phone calls on planes, a majority of Americans who fly oppose such a change, a new Associated Press-GfK poll finds.

61. Govt in agreement to allow American merger -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and US Airways reached a deal with the government that lets the two form the world's biggest airline and opens up more room at key U.S. airports for low-cost carriers.

62. US stocks edge lower as earnings disappoint -

NEW YORK (AP) — Disappointing company earnings and falling oil prices pulled stocks back from record highs on Tuesday.

NRG Energy slumped after the company lowered its earnings forecast, leading other power companies lower. News Corp. fell after the media company posted an unexpected revenue decline due to weakness at its Australian newspapers. Energy stocks declined after oil dropped to a five-month low.

63. US businesses worry about a prolonged shutdown -

NEW YORK (AP) — As the government's partial shutdown enters a second day, most companies across the country are doing business as usual. Yet concern is rising that a prolonged shutdown would cause some work at private companies to dry up and consumers to lose faith in the U.S. economy.

64. Virgin America best US airline performer in 2012 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. airlines scored their second best performance last year in the more than two decades that researchers have been measuring airline quality, with Virgin America the leader, says an annual report released Monday.

65. Full flights, small seats make passengers grumpy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airline passenger complaints to the Transportation Department surged by one-fifth last year even though other measures such as on-time arrivals and mishandled baggage show airlines are doing a better job, according to a report being released Monday.

66. Health insurers lead stocks higher on Wall Street -

The Dow Jones industrial average closed at a record high Tuesday after reports on auto sales and factory orders provided the latest evidence that the U.S. economy is strengthening. Traders plowed money back into European stocks as the financial situation in Cyprus appeared to stabilize.

67. US airlines to halt Northeast flights -

Most airlines were giving up on flying in and out of New York, Boston and other cities in the Northeast Friday as a massive storm threatened to dump snow by the foot on the region.

Airlines were generally shutting down operations in the afternoon at the three big New York-area airports as well as Boston, Providence, Portland, Maine, and other Northeastern airports. They're hoping to resume flights on Saturday.

68. With new storm pending, airlines take no chances -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major airlines scrapped flights in and out of the New York area Wednesday as the region was socked with the second significant storm in little more than a week.

United and American suspended operations in the region by afternoon, as white-out conditions developed. Other airlines have cancelled flights too. All are encouraging passengers to reschedule are allowing them to do it for free.

69. Hurricane Sandy grounds air travel in Northeast -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hurricane Sandy brought air travel to a halt in the Northeast Monday, grounding thousands of flights and upending travel plans across the globe. Planes and passengers are likely to remain stranded Tuesday and it could be a number of days before airport operations are back to normal.

70. American CEO bashes US Airways; calls it desperate -

BOSTON (AP) — American Airlines CEO Tom Horton wants to set the record straight: It was he who approached US Airways CEO Doug Parker about the possibility of combining the two airlines, not the other way around.

71. More airfare increases on the way -

DALLAS (AP) — Get ready to spend more on travel. Airlines are raising ticket prices again after a long lull that coincided with falling fuel costs.

Over the weekend several big airlines matched United Airlines' increase in base fares of up to $10 per round trip within the U.S.

72. American Airlines CEO says it's time to weigh merger options -

DALLAS (AP) — The head of American Airlines says his company has done so much to fix its problems that it can consider potential mergers, and invitations will be going out soon.

Thomas Horton, the CEO of American and parent AMR Corp., said Tuesday that American has boosted revenue, reached cost-cutting deals with labor unions, and is well on its way to a successful restructuring after seven months under bankruptcy protection.

73. Airlines' treatment of passengers slowly improves -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Flying is getting better. Honest.

For airline passengers grappling with fare increases, canceled routes and a seemingly endless parade of new fees, "better" may not be the first word that comes to mind. But based on more traditional yardsticks — lost bags, delayed flights, lousy service and bumpings from full planes — airlines are doing a better job, say private researchers who have analyzed federal data on airline performance.

74. Airline fined $900,000 for lengthy tarmac delays -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Department of Transportation said Monday it has fined a regional affiliate of American Airlines $900,000 for keeping hundreds of passengers cooped up for hours on planes in Chicago earlier this year, a clear warning to airlines on the eve of the holiday travel season that similar incidents won't be tolerated.

75. Lawmaker: US airports are not secure enough -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite billions of dollars in security enhancements, U.S. airports are still vulnerable to terror attacks, according to a Republican congressman who is probing these deficiencies.

76. JetBlue squeezes out small 1Q profit -

NEW YORK (AP) — JetBlue said Thursday that it squeezed out a small profit in the first quarter as higher fares and improving traffic countered the rising price of jet fuel.

The New York airline earned $3 million or a penny per share in the first three months of the year, compared with a loss of $1 million in the same quarter a year earlier.