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Editorial Results (free)

1. Contest winners, health worker orbiting world in SpaceX 1st -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The four people on SpaceX's first private flight are fairly ordinary, down-to-Earth types brought together by chance.

They'll circle Earth for three days at an unusually high altitude — on their own without a professional escort — before splashing down off the Florida coast.

2. SpaceX launches 4 amateurs on private Earth-circling trip -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — SpaceX's first private flight streaked into orbit Wednesday night with two contest winners, a health care worker and their rich sponsor, the most ambitious leap yet in space tourism.

3. YWCA names 2021 Achievement honorees -

YWCA Nashville & Middle Tennessee is recognizing five women and one corporate honoree who have made their mark in Nashville. This group will be officially inducted into the 2021 Academy for Women of Achievement in spring 2022.

4. FDA strikes neutral tone ahead of vaccine booster meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Influential government advisers will debate Friday if there's enough proof that a booster dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective — the first step toward deciding which Americans need one and when.

5. UN urges moratorium on use of AI that imperils human rights -

GENEVA (AP) — The U.N. human rights chief is calling for a moratorium on the use of artificial intelligence technology that poses a serious risk to human rights, including face-scanning systems that track people in public spaces.

6. US-built databases a potential tool of Taliban repression -

BOSTON (AP) — Over two decades, the United States and its allies spent hundreds of millions of dollars building databases for the Afghan people. The nobly stated goal: Promote law and order and government accountability and modernize a war-ravaged land.

7. How 9/11 changed air travel: more security, less privacy -

DALLAS (AP) — Ask anyone old enough to remember travel before Sept. 11, 2001, and you're likely to get a gauzy recollection of what flying was like.

There was security screening, but it wasn't anywhere near as intrusive. There were no long checkpoint lines. Passengers and their families could walk right to the gate together, postponing goodbye hugs until the last possible moment. Overall, an airport experience meant far less stress.

8. Stocks end mostly lower even as tech drives Nasdaq higher -

Major stock indexes on Wall Street closed mostly lower Friday, though a rally in Big Tech companies nudged the Nasdaq to another all-time high.

The S&P 500 fell less than 0.1% a day after notching a record high. The benchmark index still managed its second straight weekly gain. Losses in financial, industrial and utilities companies outweighed gains in technology stocks and other sectors of the S&P 500. Energy prices mostly fell. Gold and silver rose. Treasury yields were mixed.

9. Merkel prepares to step down with legacy of tackling crises -

BERLIN (AP) — Angela Merkel will leave office as one of modern Germany's longest-serving leaders and a global diplomatic heavyweight, with a legacy defined by her management of a succession of crises that shook a fragile Europe rather than any grand visions for her own country.

10. WHO launches hub in Berlin to help prevent future pandemics -

BERLIN (AP) — The World Health Organization on Wednesday inaugurated a new "hub" in Berlin that aims to help prepare the globe better to prevent future pandemics.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and German Chancellor Angela Merkel cut the ribbon to launch the new WHO Hub for Pandemic and Epidemic Intelligence. WHO says Germany is making an initial investment of $100 million in the facility.

11. US intelligence still divided on origins of coronavirus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. intelligence agencies remain divided on the origins of the coronavirus but believe China's leaders did not know about the virus before the start of the global pandemic, according to results released Friday of a review ordered by President Joe Biden.

12. Dilemma for Fed chief: High inflation and a surging virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Not long ago, anticipation was high that Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell might begin to sketch out a plan this week for the Fed to start pulling back on its support for an economy that has been steadily strengthening.

13. Harris' Asia trip carries new urgency after Afghan collapse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Taliban takeover of Afghanistan has given new urgency to Vice President Kamala Harris' tour of southeast Asia, where she will attempt to reassure allies of American resolve following the chaotic end of a two-decade war.

14. How AI-powered tech landed man in jail with scant evidence -

CHICAGO (AP) — Michael Williams' wife pleaded with him to remember their fishing trips with the grandchildren, how he used to braid her hair, anything to jar him back to his world outside the concrete walls of Cook County Jail.

15. Metro Council approves grants to 21 nonprofits -

Metro Council has approved 21 Opportunity Grants to nonprofits working to enhance community safety and reduce violence in Nashville-Davidson County. This is the first round of funding from the $2 million Community Safety Partnership Fund, which Metro Nashville created with Governor’s Grant dollars earlier this year.

16. Rescuing ‘Someone like me’ -

Margie Quin recalls the breakthrough with a bit of wonder lingering as she shared the memory: A handful of special agents listening intently to a newly rescued sex trafficking survivor who had just turned 18.

17. Samsung slashes prices in bid to boost foldable phone sales -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Samsung is hoping cheaper but more durable versions of its foldable phones will broaden the appeal of a high-concept design that's so far fizzled with consumers.

The electronics giant on Wednesday launched its effort to turn things around with two new products designed to function as both a phone and, when unfolded outward on a hinge, a tablet.

18. EXPLAINER: How cryptocurrency fits into infrastructure bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — What does Bitcoin have to do with roads and bridges?

A lot right now in the U.S. Congress. One way lawmakers propose to pay for the $1 trillion infrastructure bill the Senate approved Tuesday is by imposing tax-reporting requirements for cryptocurrency brokers, the way stockbrokers report their customers' sales to the IRS. It could open the way for tighter regulation of cryptocurrency — something the Biden administration is moving toward as it also pushes for tax compliance.

19. US hiring surges in July, unemployment rate drops to 5.4% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring surged in July as American employers added 943,000 jobs and the unemployment rate dropped to 5.4%, another sign that the U.S. economy continues to bounce back with surprising vigor from last year's shutdown.

20. Once fading, mask sales starting to rebound -

NEW YORK (AP) — Masks, which had started to disappear from store shelves, may be front and center again.

A spot check of businesses and other data sources are showing that mask sales have been rising in recent weeks as Americans worry about the surging cases of the delta variant of the coronavirus. Retail analysts expect mask sales will get another jolt after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention late Tuesday changed course on some masking guidelines, recommending that even vaccinated people return to wearing masks indoors in parts of the U.S. where the cases are surging.

21. Integrated Biometric to create 142 jobs in Franklin -

Integrated Biometric Technology, LLC officials announced today that the company will establish new operations and locate its corporate headquarters in Franklin.

IBT, which specializes in biometric technologies for identity authentication, identity management and criminal history background checks through the FBI, will create 142 new jobs and invest $2.3 million in Williamson County, the company says.

22. Study: Only half of American households donate to charity -

For the first time in nearly two decades, only half of U.S. households donated to a charity, according to a study released Tuesday. The findings confirm a trend worrying experts: Donations to charitable causes are reaching record highs, but the giving is done by a smaller and smaller slice of the population.

23. Europe's summer tourism outlook dimmed by variants, rules -

LONDON (AP) — Chaos and confusion over travel rules and measures to contain new virus outbreaks are contributing to another cruel summer for Europe's battered tourism industry.

Popular destination countries are grappling with surging COVID-19 variants, but the patchwork and last-minute nature of the efforts as the peak season gets underway threatens to derail another summer.

24. Top Davidson County commercial sales for June 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, June 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

25. Biden's 3rd trip to reddish Ohio pushes his economic agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden just can't quit Ohio — even if it rejected him in last year's election.

The Democrat travels to Cincinnati on Wednesday to push his economic policies. It's the third visit of his presidency to Ohio, the only state he lost that he has visited multiple times.

26. UN rights chief alarmed by reported use of powerful spyware -

BERLIN (AP) — The United Nations' human rights chief voiced alarm Monday over the reported use of military-grade malware from Israel-based NSO Group to spy on journalists, human rights activists and political dissidents.

27. UK daily infections top 50,000 days before virus rules eased -

LONDON (AP) — The U.K. recorded more than 50,000 new coronavirus cases in one day Friday for the first time in six months, as the British government's top medical adviser warned that the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 could hit "quite scary" levels within weeks.

28. Latest hack to test Biden's vow for consequences for Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said he would "deliver" a message to Russian President Vladimir Putin about the latest ransomware attacks targeting American businesses, setting up a test of Biden's ability to balance his pledge to respond firmly to cyber breaches with his goal of developing a stable relationship with Russia.

29. China tries to quell investor fears about internet companies -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government tried Thursday to quell investor fears about tighter controls on internet companies that caused share prices to plunge, saying Beijing supports their growth.

Regulators are reviewing data security "in accordance with the law, with the aim of preventing national security risks," said a foreign ministry spokesman, Wang Wenbin.

30. Tennessee’s sports betting in decline -

Tennessee’s sports betting volume declined to its lowest level since the first month of legalized wagering in the state.

May’s modest month-over-month drop in wagering from April is an expected result during what is the traditional offseason for sports betting, and the decline is in line with a nationwide trend of declining revenue over the last two months, according to PlayTenn analysts, which tracks the Tennessee gaming market.

31. As Tokyo Olympics approach, virus worries rise in Japan -

TOKYO (AP) — The pressure of hosting an Olympics during a still-active pandemic is beginning to show in Japan.

The games begin July 23, with organizers determined they will go on, even with a reduced number of spectators or possibly none at all. While Japan has made remarkable progress to vaccinate its population against COVID-19, the drive is losing steam because of supply shortages.

32. OPEC oil alliance at impasse between Saudi Arabia, UAE -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Talks among members of the OPEC cartel and allied oil producing countries broke off Monday in the midst of a standoff with the United Arab Emirates over production levels.

33. Southwest, American delays hint at hard summer for travelers -

This summer is already shaping up to be a difficult one for air travelers.

Southwest Airlines customers have struggled with thousands of delays and hundreds of canceled flights this month because of computer problems, staffing shortages and bad weather.

34. As variant rises, vaccine plan targets 'movable middle' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thrown off-stride to reach its COVID-19 vaccination goal, the Biden administration is sending A-list officials across the country, devising ads for niche markets and enlisting community organizers to persuade unvaccinated people to get a shot.

35. Is Japan's remarkable vaccine drive in time for Olympics? -

TOKYO (AP) — After months of frustration and delay, Japan has hit the remarkable benchmark of 1 million vaccines a day. But with the Olympics set to start in less than a month, and only a small portion of the country vaccinated, a question lingers: Is it enough?

36. As pandemic restrictions wane, hopes rise for Europe travel -

SWANSEA, Wales (AP) — When Sierra Schade booked a trip from Atlanta to Greece, she hoped more European countries would follow Greece's lead and open to U.S. travelers.

She's now been able to add Italy and France to the itinerary for her trip next month after the 27-nation European Union recommended last week that restrictions be lifted for American tourists.

37. Runaway market slows, still ahead of record 2020 pace -

Middle Tennessee real estate unit sales increased 24% in May compared to May 2020, Greater Nashville Realtors figures show. With inventory as low as it is, there are those who might wonder how these sales could occur.

38. Charitable giving in the U.S. reaches all-time high in 2020 -

Galvanized by the racial justice protests and the coronavirus pandemic, charitable giving in the United States reached a record $471 billion in 2020, according to a report released Tuesday that offers a comprehensive look at American philanthropy.

39. China's children may be next in line for COVID-19 vaccines -

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — If China is to meet its tentative goal of vaccinating 80% of its population against the coronavirus by the end of the year, tens of millions of children may have to start rolling up their sleeves.

40. Asia welcomes US vaccine donations amid cold storage worries -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Health officials and experts in Asia have welcomed U.S. plans to share 500 million more doses of the Pfizer vaccine with the developing world, but some say it would take more than donations alone to address huge vaccination gaps that threaten to prolong the pandemic.

41. US drops Trump order targeting TikTok, plans its own review -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House dropped Trump-era executive orders that attempted to ban the popular apps TikTok and WeChat and will conduct its own review aimed at identifying national security risks with software applications tied to China, officials said Wednesday.

42. Vatican's financial crimes prosecution hurt by inexperience -

ROME (AP) — European evaluators warned Wednesday that the Vatican's efforts to investigate and prosecute financial crimes were suffering from understaffing and inexperience, as well as the mistaken belief that its own cardinals and bishops were immune to criminal conduct.

43. Fed chief Powell: Climate policy is for elected officials -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell says the central bank can help assess risks to banks from climate change but that addressing the broader issue is up to private companies and elected officials, underlining that U.S. central bankers are not climate policy makers.

44. Russian upper house votes to exit from overflight treaty -

MOSCOW (AP) — The Russian parliament's upper house voted Wednesday to withdraw from an international treaty allowing surveillance flights over military facilities following the U.S. exit from the treaty.

45. Biden orders more intel investigation of COVID-19 origin -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden ordered U.S. intelligence officials to "redouble" their efforts to investigate the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic, including any possibility the trail might lead to a Chinese laboratory.

46. Biden asks US intel officials to investigate COVID-19 origin -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Wednesday asked U.S. intelligence officials to "redouble" their efforts to investigate the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the unlikely possibility that the origins of the virus trace to Chinese lab.

47. How vaccine passports for global travel would work -

LONDON (AP) — Boarding pass, suitcase, passport and ... digital vaccination certificate?

Keen to avoid losing another summer of holiday revenue to the coronavirus pandemic, the European Union, some Asian governments and the airline industry are scrambling to develop so-called COVID-19 vaccine passports to help kickstart international travel.

48. Goodwill stores have a message: Please stop donating trash -

Broken furniture. Flashlights with leaking batteries. Disfigured Barbie dolls.

Across the country, thrift stores have been flooded by household items, the offerings of people who have been homebound for months and are eager to clear out some of their possessions.

49. Ransomware attack hits 4 Asian countries of AXA subsidiary -

PARIS (AP) — A targeted ransomware attack hit four countries among the Asian operations of Axa Partners, the international subsidiary of Axa insurance group, with some data in Thailand accessed, Axa Partners said.

50. US stocks close higher as banks, technology lead broad rally -

A choppy day of trading on Wall Street ended Thursday with stocks broadly higher and another all-time high for the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

Banks and technology companies led a late-afternoon turnaround that pushed the S&P 500 to a 0.8% gain, reversing the benchmark index's losses for the week. Gains in most Dow companies, including Goldman Sachs, IBM and Cisco Systems, nudged the blue chip index to a new high for the second straight day.

51. Study: Residents left big metros during pandemic for family -

Cece Linder was living in a 770-square-foot apartment outside Washington, D.C., last spring when the area went into lockdown because of the coronavirus pandemic.

In May 2020, after a few months of both living and working in the small space, Linder decided to leave the capital area and move into the 2,000-square-foot (186-square-meter) beachside home she jointly owns with her parents in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Now she gets to see the sunrise over the water each morning before work.

52. Events -

IBC Insider Series: Support for TN Exporters and using Hong Kong as a Gateway to Asia. The Nashville Chamber’s International Business Council in partnership with Baker Donelson hosts the IBC Insider Series. Learn more about the support offered to Tennessee exporters and ways to enter the Asia market via Hong Kong. Panelists include: Leslee Alexander, Tennessee International Trade Center; Brie Knox, U.S. Commercial Service, U.S. Department of Commerce; Bridget Lee, Hong Kong Trade and Development Council; and John Scannapieco, Baker Donelson (moderator). Join online or by phone. Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. Information

53. How companies rip off poor employees — and get away with it -

Already battered by long shifts and high infection rates, essential workers struggling through the pandemic face another hazard of hard times: employers who steal their wages.

When a recession hits, U.S. companies are more likely to stiff their lowest-wage workers. These businesses often pay less than the minimum wage, make employees work off the clock, or refuse to pay overtime rates. In the most egregious cases, bosses don't pay their employees at all.

54. UN program inks Moderna deal on 500M doses, starting in Q4 -

GENEVA (AP) — U.S. biotech company Moderna will provide up to 500 million doses for the U.N.-backed program to ship coronavirus vaccines to needy people in low- and middle-income countries, but shipments won't begin until the fourth quarter, the company and program leaders said Monday.

55. Russia, facing lags, turns to China to produce Sputnik shots -

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Russia is turning to multiple Chinese firms to manufacture the Sputnik V coronavirus vaccine in an effort to speed up production as demand soars for its shot.

Russia has announced three deals totaling 260 million doses with Chinese vaccine companies in recent weeks. It's a decision that could mean quicker access to a shot for countries in Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa that have ordered Russia's vaccine, as the U.S. and the European Union focus mainly on domestic vaccination needs.

56. Europe's economy shrinks in first quarter as US rolls ahead -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe's economy shrank 0.6% in the first three months of the year as slow vaccine rollouts and extended lockdowns delayed a hoped-for recovery - and underlined how the region is lagging other major economies in rebounding from the coronavirus pandemic.

57. US jobless claims fall to 547,000, another pandemic low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment aid fell last week to 547,000, the lowest point since the pandemic struck and an encouraging sign that layoffs are slowing on the strength of an improving job market.

58. US airline bailout helps Southwest post $116 million profit -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines is the first major U.S. airline to report a profit since the pandemic started, as federal payroll aid helped boost the company to net income of $116 million in the first quarter.

59. US takes new aim at ransomware after most costly year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is taking new aim at ransomware after a year that officials say was the most costly on record for the crippling cyberattacks.

Formation of a task force of FBI agents and Justice Department prosecutors is an acknowledgment of the growing threat posed by ransomware attacks, in which hackers lock up computer data and demand ransom payments in order to give it back. The force is part of a broader government effort to combat cyberattacks that target vital infrastructure, including a 100-day Biden administration initiative to bolster the digital security of electricity in the nation.

60. China's growth surges to 18.3% but rebound leveling off -

BEIJING (AP) — China's economy grew by double digits in the latest quarter but an explosive rebound from the coronavirus pandemic is slowing abruptly as manufacturing and consumer spending return to normal.

61. Equal pay bill nears approval in House, long odds in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats were poised to pass legislation Thursday that they say would help close the gap between what men and women are paid in the workplace, though the measure faces little chance of overcoming Republican opposition in the Senate.

62. Beautiful house, but how fast is the internet? -

Rachel Pinkstaff left California looking for a place with more affordable home prices and less government intrusion. She found what she was looking for in fast-growing Thompson’s Station in southern Williamson County.

63. Pandemic impact might weigh on CRE recovery -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The distribution of COVID-19 vaccines is fueling optimism that Americans will increasingly return to the ways they used to shop, travel and work before the pandemic.

That would be a welcome change for companies that own office buildings and hotels, or those that lease space to restaurants, bars, department stores and other retailers. These have been the hardest-hit areas of commercial real estate over the past year as the pandemic forced many businesses to shut down temporarily or operate on a limited basis.

64. US jobless claims up to 744K as virus still forces layoffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits rose last week to 744,000, signaling that many employers are still cutting jobs even as more people are vaccinated against COVID-19, consumers gain confidence and the government distributes aid throughout the economy.

65. Are some COVID-19 vaccines more effective than others? -

Are some COVID-19 vaccines more effective than others? It's hard to tell since they weren't directly compared in studies. But experts say the vaccines are alike on what matters most: preventing hospitalizations and deaths.

66. Biden tightens some gun controls, says much more needed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, in his first gun control measures since taking office, announced a half-dozen executive actions Thursday aimed at addressing a proliferation of gun violence across the nation that he called an "epidemic and an international embarrassment."

67. Some medical experts unconvinced about holding Tokyo Games -

TOKYO (AP) — The Tokyo Olympics open in under four months, and the torch relay has begun to crisscross Japan with 10,000 runners. Organizers say they are mitigating the risks, but some medical experts aren't convinced.

68. World leaders' call for pandemic treaty short on details -

LONDON (AP) — More than 20 heads of government and global agencies called in a commentary published Tuesday for an international treaty for pandemic preparedness that they say will protect future generations in the wake of COVID-19.

69. Alternative bidders emerge for newspaper chain Tribune -

A group of alternative bidders is emerging for newspaper chain Tribune Publishing, which had agreed to a $630 million acquisition by hedge fund Alden Global Capital.

Over the weekend, The New York Times reported that a billionaire who lives in Wyoming, Hansjörg Wyss, was joining a bid for Tribune with Maryland hotel mogul Stewart Bainum. The Times reported that both would commit up to $100 million to the $650 million bid. The Wall Street Journal reported Monday that Mason Slaine, a Tribune investor who has previously said he wanted to buy the Tribune's Florida papers, is also willing to commit $100 million in financing. In an email, Slaine confirmed his interest in joining the bid and owning the papers but said it depended on "diligence and terms."

70. Giant container ship that blocked Suez Canal is finally free -

SUEZ, Egypt (AP) — Salvage teams on Monday freed a colossal container ship stuck for nearly a week in the Suez Canal, ending a crisis that had clogged one of the world's most vital waterways and halted billions of dollars a day in maritime commerce.

71. WHO report: COVID likely 1st jumped into humans from animals -

GENEVA (AP) — A joint World Health Organization-China study on the origins of COVID-19 says that transmission of the virus from bats to humans through another animal is the most likely scenario and that a lab leak is "extremely unlikely," according to a draft copy obtained by The Associated Press.

72. Egypt races to dislodge giant vessel blocking Suez Canal -

SUEZ, Egypt (AP) — Tugboats and a specialized suction dredger worked Friday to dislodge a giant container ship that has been stuck sideways in Egypt's Suez Canal for the past three days, blocking a crucial waterway for global shipping.

73. Turner Construction honored for Nashville projects -

Turner Construction Company’s work on the ThreeThirtyThree project and Nashville General Hospital COVID-19 Unit project, both in Nashville, have earned the company national Excellence in Construction Eagle Awards, presented during the recent American Builders and Contractors Convention in Grapevine, Texas.

74. Biden says U.S. to hit 100 million virus shots on Friday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the U.S. closing in on President Joe Biden's goal of injecting 100 million coronavirus vaccinations weeks ahead of his target date, officials announced on Thursday the nation is now in position to help supply neighbors Canada and Mexico.

75. China slams US plan to expel phone carriers in tech clash -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government on Thursday called on Washington to drop efforts to expel three state-owned Chinese phone companies from the United States in a new clash over technology and security.

76. Major European nations suspend use of AstraZeneca vaccine -

BERLIN (AP) — A cascading number of European countries — including Germany, France, Italy and Spain — suspended use of AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine Monday over reports of dangerous blood clots in some recipients, though the company and international regulators say there is no evidence the shot is to blame.

77. Labor movement targets Amazon as a foothold in the South -

BESSEMER, Ala. (AP) — The South has never been hospitable to organized labor. But that may be changing, with an important test in Alabama, where thousands of workers at an Amazon campus are deciding whether to form a union.

78. WHO still struggling to manage pandemic response -

GENEVA (AP) — When the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a pandemic one year ago, it did so only after weeks of resisting the term and maintaining the highly infectious virus could still be stopped.

79. Baker Donelson named ABA pro bono leader -

Baker Donelson has been honored by the American Bar Association as a recipient of the ABA Free Legal Answers 2020 Pro Bono Leader Award in recognition of the outstanding contribution of service by the firm’s attorneys to the virtual legal advice clinic.

80. Gibraltar, a vaccine champion, launches 'Operation Freedom' -

GIBRALTAR (AP) — Maskless parents pick up smiling Cinderellas, Harry Potters and hedgehogs from schools that reopened after a two-month hiatus just in time for World Book Day's costume display. Following weeks under lockdown, a soccer team resumes training at the stadium. Coffee shops and pubs have finally raised their blinds, eager to welcome locals and eyeing the return of tourists.

81. $40M gender equality fund by Gates, Scott picks finalists -

A gender equality philanthropic initiative spearheaded by Melinda Gates' investment company, with support from MacKenzie Scott, has announced 10 project finalists for $40 million in funding slated to be awarded this summer.

82. Airline industry pushes US to standardize health papers -

Leading airline and business groups are asking the Biden administration to develop temporary credentials that would let travelers show they have been tested and vaccinated for COVID-19, a step that the airline industry believes will help revive travel.

83. Exam finds multiple cracks in part of United jet's engine -

Microscopic examination supports early suspicions that wear and tear caused a fan blade to snap inside one engine of a United Airlines plane that made an emergency landing shortly after takeoff last month in Denver, federal safety investigators said Friday.

84. EU wants employers to report pay levels to fix gender gap -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union executive wants to force employers to be much more open about how much their staff earn to make it easier for women to challenge wage imbalances and close the gender pay gap.

85. Countries call on drug companies to share vaccine know-how -

PARIS (AP) — In an industrial neighborhood on the outskirts of Bangladesh's largest city lies a factory with gleaming new equipment imported from Germany, its immaculate hallways lined with hermetically sealed rooms. It is operating at just a quarter of its capacity.

86. Suspected Russian hack fuels new US action on cybersecurity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jolted by a sweeping hack that may have revealed government and corporate secrets to Russia, U.S. officials are scrambling to reinforce the nation's cyber defenses and recognizing that an agency created two years ago to protect America's networks and infrastructure lacks the money, tools and authority to counter such sophisticated threats.

87. Memphis airport closes terminal due to water pressure issues -

MEMPHIS (AP) — All incoming and outgoing passenger flights at Memphis International Airport were canceled Friday due to terminal closures caused by system-wide water pressure issues, the facility said.

88. Facebook blocks Australians from accessing news on platform -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Facebook announced Thursday it has blocked Australians from viewing and sharing news on the platform because of proposed laws in the country to make digital giants pay for journalism.

89. Openings begin March 4 at Fifth + Broadway -

Brookfield Properties’ mixed-use project Fifth + Broadway in downtown Nashville will begin its first tenant openings March 4.

The event culminates a multiyear effort by the company and local developer Pat Emery on the former site of the Nashville Convention Center.

90. Hospitals still ration medical N95 masks as stockpiles swell -

Mike Bowen's warehouse outside Fort Worth, Texas, was piled high with cases of medical-grade N95 face masks. His company, Prestige Ameritech, can churn out 1 million masks every four days, but he doesn't have orders for nearly that many. So he recently got approval from the government to export them.

91. Japanese economy sees recovery from pandemic slump -

TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese economy grew at an annual rate of 12.7% in October-December, marking the second straight quarter of growth, amid a recovery from the slump caused by the coronavirus pandemic, according to government data released Monday.

92. Digital siege: Internet cuts become favored tool of regimes -

LONDON (AP) — When army generals in Myanmar staged a coup last week, they briefly cut internet access in an apparent attempt to stymie protests. In Uganda, residents couldn't use Facebook, Twitter and other social media for weeks after a recent election. And in Ethiopia's northern Tigray region, the internet has been down for months amid a wider conflict.

93. Is COVID-19 the death of shaking hands? -

On March 8, 2020, the 8:45 morning service at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Franklin was unfolding as it did every Sunday. Just after the Prayers of the People, the rector offered The Peace. “May the peace of the Lord be always with you,” Father Rusty McCown said to the congregation. “And also with you,” they responded.

94. EXPLAINER: What the WHO coronavirus experts learned in Wuhan -

WUHAN, China (AP) — A World Health Organization team is leaving China on Wednesday after gaining some new insights into the origins of the coronavirus pandemic that has now killed more than 2.3 million people worldwide — but with the major questions still unanswered.

95. J&J asks US regulators to OK its one-shot COVID-19 vaccine -

Johnson & Johnson asked U.S. regulators Thursday to clear the world's first single-dose COVID-19 vaccine, an easier-to-use option that could boost scarce supplies.

J&J's vaccine was safe and offered strong protection against moderate to severe COVID-19, according to preliminary results from a massive international study.

96. Why US hiring could rebound faster than expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring has weakened for six straight months. Nearly 10 million jobs remain lost since the coronavirus struck. And this week, the Congressional Budget Office forecast that employment won't regain its pre-pandemic level until 2024.

97. WHO team visits Wuhan virus lab at center of speculation -

WUHAN, China (AP) — World Health Organization investigators on Wednesday visited a research center in the Chinese city of Wuhan that has been the subject of speculation about the origins of the coronavirus, with one member saying they'd intended to meet key staff and press them on critical issues.

98. France: No AstraZeneca vaccine for people older than 65 -

PARIS (AP) — France will only administer the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine to people under age 65, President Emmanuel Macron said Tuesday after the government's health advisory body cited a lack of sufficient data about its effectiveness in older people.

99. Euro economy burdened by pandemic, seen lagging US and China -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European economy shrank 0.7% in the last three months of 2020 as businesses were hit by a new round of lockdowns aimed at containing a resurgence of the coronavirus pandemic.

100. Airlines close books on rotten 2020 and, so far, 2021 is grim -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines lost $3.1 billion last year, its first full-year loss since Richard Nixon was president and gasoline sold for about 36 cents a gallon with no extra charge for the attendant who cleaned your windshield.