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Editorial Results (free)

1. Science report: US should make less plastic to save oceans -

America needs to rethink and reduce the way it generates plastics because so much of the material is littering the oceans and other waters, the National Academy of Sciences says in a new report.

The United States, the world's top plastics waste producer, generates more than 46 million tons (42 million metric tons) a year, and about 2.2 billion pounds (1 million metric tons) ends up in the world's oceans, according to the academy's report.

2. EXPLAINER: What is the Strategic Petroleum Reserve? -

NEW YORK (AP) — When President Joe Biden ordered the release of 50 million barrels of oil from America's strategic reserve to help reduce energy costs, he was taking aim at a growing burden for millions of Americans embarking on Thanksgiving travel.

3. Japan Cabinet OKs record stimulus package to fix economy -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's Cabinet approved on Friday a record 56 trillion yen ($490 billion) stimulus package, including cash handouts and aid to ailing businesses, to help the economy out of the doldrums worsened by the coronavirus pandemic.

4. EXPLAINER: Europe lacks natural gas. Is it Russia's fault? -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe is short of natural gas — dangerously short. A cold winter could mean a severe crunch, and utility bills are headed higher, burdening ordinary people and weighing on the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

5. Japan, US set framework for talks on trade, broader ties -

TOKYO (AP) — U.S. Trade Representative Katharine Tai and Japan's trade and industry minister agreed Wednesday to work to resolve a dispute over American tariffs on steel and aluminum as part of a framework for cooperation in wider areas.

6. German agency suspends approval process for Russia pipeline -

BERLIN (AP) — Germany's network regulator said Tuesday that it has suspended its procedure to certify the operator of a new pipeline that would bring Russian gas to the country under the Baltic Sea because of an issue with the company's status under German law.

7. Key reason for supply shortages: Americans keep spending -

DETROIT (AP) — Take a step back from the picked-over store shelves, the stalled container ships and the empty auto showrooms, and you'll find a root cause of the shortages of just about everything.

8. Biden: Infrastructure bill will ease economy woes, just wait -

BALTIMORE (AP) — President Joe Biden touted his $1 trillion infrastructure plan Wednesday as an eventual fix for the nation's inflation and supply chain woes — if Americans just have the patience to wait for the construction to begin.

9. China's exports stay strong, trade surplus tops $80 billion -

BEIJING (AP) — China's exports remained strong in October, a positive sign for an economy trying to weather power shortages and COVID-19 outbreaks.

The country's customs agency said Sunday that exports totaled $300.2 billion, up 27.1% from a year ago. That was down from a 28.1% increase in September but still healthy. Imports came in at $215.7 billion, a 20.6% rise.

10. US trade deficit hits record of $80.9 billion in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit hit an all-time high of $80.9 billion in September as American exports fell sharply while imports, even with supply chain problems at American ports, continue to climb.

11. Supply chain delays disrupt California agriculture exports -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Amid an historic drought posing threats to future harvests, California farmers now say they have no way to export the crops they do have because of a kink in the global supply chain that has left container ships lined up off the Southern California coast with nowhere to deliver their goods.

12. US says oil, gas sales damage climate — won't stop them -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Biden administration is planning to sell oil and gas leases on huge tracts of public land in the U.S. West, despite the Interior Department's conclusion that doing so could cost society billions of dollars in climate change impacts.

13. US economy slowed to a 2% rate last quarter in face of COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hampered by rising COVID-19 cases and persistent supply shortages, the U.S. economy slowed sharply to a 2% annual growth rate in the July-September period, the weakest quarterly expansion since the recovery from the pandemic recession began last year.

14. US blocks tomato imports from Mexican farm over labor abuses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States ordered a halt Thursday to imports of tomatoes from a Mexican farming company and its subsidiaries for what officials said was abusive treatment of workers that amounts to forced labor.

15. EU chief says key to energy crisis is pushing Green Deal -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union's top official on Wednesday exhorted the 27 member nations to wean themselves off natural gas not only to speed the transition to clean energy but also to make the bloc a more independent player in the world.

16. Energy crunch hits global recovery as winter approaches -

Power shortages are turning out streetlights and shutting down factories in China. The poor in Brazil are choosing between paying for food or electricity. German corn and wheat farmers can't find fertilizer, made using natural gas. And fears are rising that Europe will have to ration electricity if it's a cold winter.

17. Colin Powell: A trailblazing legacy, blotted by Iraq war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A child of working-class Jamaican immigrants in the Bronx, Colin Powell rose from neighborhood store clerk to warehouse floor-mopper to the highest echelons of the U.S. government. It was a trailblazing American dream journey that won him international acclaim and trust.

18. Russia hits another record of daily coronavirus deaths -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia registered another daily record of coronavirus deaths Tuesday as rapidly surging infection rates raised pressure on the country's health care system and prompted the government to suggest declaring a nonworking week.

19. Russia says it could boost supplies to ease Europe gas costs -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia has the potential to boost natural gas supplies to Europe, where surging gas prices have ramped up pressure on consumers, the Kremlin said Thursday.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said existing gas transit routes allow for bolstering supplies before the new Nord Stream 2 pipeline that will carry Russian gas to Germany begins operating.

20. California oil spill renews calls to ban offshore drilling -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California has been a leader in restricting offshore oil drilling since the infamous 1969 Santa Barbara spill that sparked the modern environmental movement, and the latest spill off Huntington Beach is prompting fresh calls for an end to such drilling.

21. EU calls for relief funds to help energy price hit consumers -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union on Wednesday urged member countries to provide relief funds to consumers and small businesses hit hardest by rising gas and electricity prices, as criticism mounts that the bloc's climate change fighting policies are fueling the problem.

22. US trade deficit hits record $73.3 billion in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit increased to a record $73.3 billion in August as a small gain in exports was swamped by a much larger increase in imports.

The Commerce Department reported Tuesday that the monthly trade deficit increased 4.2% in August, rising to an all-time high, surpassing the previous record of $73.2 billion set in June. The trade deficit represents the gap between what the country exports to the rest of the world and the imports it purchases from other countries.

23. US slightly revises up its GDP estimate for Q2 to 6.7% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy expanded at a 6.7% annual pace from April through June, the Commerce Department said Thursday, slightly upgrading its estimate of last quarter's growth in the face of a resurgence of COVID-19 in the form of the delta variant.

24. US, EU agree to further trade and technology talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and the European Union agreed Wednesday to carry on the work of 10 expert-level panels to explore and recommend solutions to a variety of trade disputes and challenges.

25. Trade, tech talks between US and EU open in Pittsburgh -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Antony Blinken and a number of other senior Biden administration officials are kicking off two days of trade and technology talks with European Union counterparts in Pittsburgh.

26. EPA completes rule to phase out gases used as refrigerants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In what officials call a key step to combat climate change, the Environmental Protection Agency is sharply limiting domestic production and use of hydrofluorocarbons, highly potent greenhouse gases commonly used in refrigerators and air conditioners.

27. UK's Johnson concedes US trade deal not in the offing -

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson conceded Wednesday that a post-Brexit trade deal with the U.S. was not imminent as he voiced confidence that the decades-long U.S. ban on imports of British lamb would be lifted.

28. China applies to join Pacific trade pact abandoned by Trump -

BEIJING (AP) — China has applied to join an 11-nation Asia-Pacific free trade group in an effort to increase its influence over international policies.

Commerce Minister Wang Wentao submitted an application to the trade minister of New Zealand as a representative of the Comprehensive and Progress Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Commerce Ministry announced Thursday.

29. Japan exports slow as supply chain hiccups hit factories -

Japan's exports rose 26% in August from a year earlier, preliminary data released Thursday showed, below analysts' forecasts, as supply chain disruptions hit manufacturers.

The 6.6 trillion yen ($60 billion) in exports compared with 5.2 trillion yen a year earlier, when the economy was just beginning to recover from the initial impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

30. US trade deficit narrows slightly to $70.1 billion in July -

The U.S. trade deficit narrowed slightly to $70.1 billion in July as economic recovery overseas helped boost American exports while imports declined.

The Commerce Department reported Thursday that the trade deficit fell 4.3% in July after surging to a record $73.2 billion in June. The trade deficit represents the gap between what the country exports to the rest of the world and the imports it purchases from other countries.

31. Taliban took Afghanistan but face cash squeeze -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Taliban face a frontal challenge in cementing control of Afghanistan: Money.

Despite their dominant military blitz over the past week, the Taliban lack access to billions of dollars from their central bank and the International Monetary Fund that would keep the country running during a turbulent shakeup. Those funds are largely controlled by the U.S. and international institutions, a possible leverage point as tense evacuations proceed from the airport in the capital of Kabul. Tens of thousands of people remain to be evacuated ahead of the United States' Aug. 31 deadline to withdraw its troops from the country.

32. Japan's imports, exports grow on overseas economic rebound -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's exports in July jumped 37% from a year ago, the government said Wednesday, highlighting an overseas recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

Imports also grew, rising 28.5%, according to Finance Ministry data, for the second straight month of a trade surplus for the world's third largest economy.

33. Japan ekes out economic growth in recovery from pandemic -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's economy grew at an annual rate of 1.3% in the last quarter, raising hopes for a gradual recovery from the painful impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Cabinet Office reported Monday seasonally adjusted gross domestic product, or GDP, the sum of the value of a nation's products and services, grew 0.3% in April-June, marking a reversal from the 0.9% contraction in the previous quarter for the world's third-largest economy.

34. Shipping snags prompt US firms to mull retreat from China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Game maker Eric Poses last year created The Worst-Case Scenario Card Game, making a wry reference to the way the coronavirus had upended normal life.

He had no idea.

In a twist that Poses never could have predicted, his game itself would become caught up in the latest fallout from the health crisis: a backlogged global supply chain that has delayed shipments around the world and sent freight costs rocketing.

35. US trade deficit hits record $75.7 billion in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit increased to a record $75.7 billion in June as a rebounding American economy sent demand for imports surging.

The Commerce Department reported Thursday that the deficit rose 6.7% from a revised May deficit of $71 billion. The June deficit set a record, topping the old mark of $75 billion set in March. The trade deficit represents the gap between what the country exports to the rest of the world and what it purchases from other countries.

36. Worst-Case Scenario: Firms wrestle with supply bottlenecks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Toy maker Eric Poses created a card game last year he called The Worst-Case Scenario, a wry reference to the way the coronavirus had upended normal life.

He had no idea.

In a twist that Poses never could have predicted, his game itself would become caught up in the latest fallout from the health crisis: a backlogged global supply chain that means shipping delays and rocketing freight costs.

37. Japan's exports, imports zoom amid world pandemic recovery -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's exports in June jumped 48.6% from the year before, marking the fourth straight month of growth, the Finance Ministry said Wednesday.

Imports for the month grew 32.7%, totaling 6.83 trillion yen ($62 billion). Exports for the month totaled 7.2 trillion yen ($66 billion), according to government data.

38. China says US measures on Xinjiang threaten global trade -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government rejected U.S. accusations of forced labor in Xinjiang and accused Washington on Thursday of hurting global trade after lawmakers endorsed import curbs and American companies were warned they face legal risks if they do business with the region.

39. China's June exports surge 32%, import growth slows -

BEIJING (AP) — China's exports surged in June while import growth slowed to a still-robust level as its economic rebound from the coronavirus leveled off.

Exports rose 32.2% from a year earlier to $281.4 billion, accelerating from May's 28% growth, customs data showed Tuesday. Imports grew 36.7% to $229.9 billion, but that was down from the previous month's explosive 51% rise.

40. As Tokyo Olympics approach, virus worries rise in Japan -

TOKYO (AP) — The pressure of hosting an Olympics during a still-active pandemic is beginning to show in Japan.

The games begin July 23, with organizers determined they will go on, even with a reduced number of spectators or possibly none at all. While Japan has made remarkable progress to vaccinate its population against COVID-19, the drive is losing steam because of supply shortages.

41. US trade deficit increases to $71.2 billion in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit widened in May as $71.2 billion as a small increase in exports was offset by a bigger rise in imports.

The Commerce Department reported Friday that the deficit rose 3.1% from the revised April deficit of $69.1 billion The U.S. trade deficit had hit a monthly record of $75 billion in March.

42. Is Japan's remarkable vaccine drive in time for Olympics? -

TOKYO (AP) — After months of frustration and delay, Japan has hit the remarkable benchmark of 1 million vaccines a day. But with the Olympics set to start in less than a month, and only a small portion of the country vaccinated, a question lingers: Is it enough?

43. China slams US curbs on solar materials as economic attack -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government on Friday criticized U.S. curbs on imports of solar panel materials that might be made with forced labor as an attack on its development and said Beijing will protect Chinese companies, but gave no details of possible retaliation.

44. US blocks solar components from China over labor abuses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A major Chinese producer of material used to make solar panels will be barred from the U.S. market as part of a broader effort to halt commerce tied to China's repressive campaign against Uyghurs and other minorities, the Biden administration said Thursday.

45. EU vows a firm response as Brexit tensions rise anew -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Top European Union officials vowed Thursday to use all measures available to ensure that the United Kingdom respects the terms of its Brexit agreement with the bloc as tensions rise over trade involving Northern Ireland.

46. US trade deficit dips to $68.9 billion with exports up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit narrowed in April to $68.9 billion as an improving global economy boosted sales of American exports.

The April deficit, the gap between what America buys from abroad and what it sells to other countries, was down 8.2% from a record March deficit of $75 billion.

47. Chinese exports jump, gap with US grows as tensions persist -

BANGKOK (AP) — China's exports and imports surged in May and its politically sensitive surplus with the U.S. grew as the pandemic was waning in important markets in the West.

Customs data released Monday showed China's exports rose 28% from a year earlier and imports soared 51%, but growth was leveling off after the country's stunning recovery from the slump early in 2020.

48. China trade envoy, US Treasury secretary meet by video -

BEIJING (AP) — China's chief economic envoy and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen held their first meeting by video Wednesday, but the two sides gave no indication when negotiations on ending their tariff war might resume.

49. First quarter GDP unchanged at robust 6.4% annual rate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a robust annual rate of 6.4% in the first three months of this year, unchanged from the government's initial estimate. The recovery from last year's deep recession gained steam at the beginning of this year, helped by vaccines to combat the virus and trillions of dollars in government assistance.

50. US, Chinese trade war envoys talk; no sign of negotiations -

BEIJING (AP) — U.S. and Chinese trade envoys talked by phone Thursday for the first time since President Joe Biden took office, but the two sides gave no sign when negotiations on ending their tariff war might restart.

51. Factory boss defiant as sanctions bite in China's Xinjiang -

AKSU, China (AP) — A backlash against reports of forced labor and other abuses of the largely Muslim Uyghur ethnic group in Xinjiang is taking a toll on China's cotton industry, but it's unclear if the pressure will compel the government or companies to change their ways.

52. Biden's solar ambitions collide with China labor complaints -

BEIJING (AP) — The Biden administration's solar power ambitions are colliding with complaints the global industry depends on Chinese raw materials that might be produced by forced labor.

A big hurdle is polysilicon, used to make photovoltaic cells for solar panels. The global industry gets 45% of its supply from Xinjiang, the northwestern region where the ruling Communist Party is accused of mass incarceration of minorities and other abuses. Other parts of China supply 35%. Only 20% comes from U.S. and other producers.

53. Kerry says US examining carbon border tax, sees risks -

BERLIN (AP) — U.S. special envoy for climate John Kerry said Tuesday that Washington is looking into the possibility of introducing a fee on imports from countries that don't tax heavy polluters, but cautioned that such a move could carry risks "downstream."

54. US trade deficit hits record $74.4 billion in March -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit surged to a record $74.4 billion in March as an improving U.S. economy drove purchases of imported foreign goods.

The deficit, the gap between what America buys from abroad and what it sells to other countries, was 5.6% greater than the February gap of $70.5 billion, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday.

55. EU lawmakers approve post-Brexit trade treaty -

BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union leaders, their British counterparts and European businesses expressed hope Wednesday that the final ratification of the post-Brexit trade deal will open a new, positive era of cooperation despite the many divisive topics remaining between the former partners.

56. China's March exports rise 30.6% as global demand revives -

BEIJING (AP) — China's exports rose 30.6% over a year ago in March as global consumer demand strengthened and traders watched for signs of what President Joe Biden might do about reviving tariff war talks with Beijing.

57. European lawmakers, executives urge US to halve emissions -

BERLIN (AP) — Dozens of European lawmakers, business executives and union leaders on Tuesday urged the United States to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 50% in the coming decade compared with 2005 levels.

58. US trade deficit jumps 4.8% to $71.1 billion in February -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit grew to a record $71.1 billion in February as a decline in exports more than offset a slight dip in imports, with severe weather taking much of the blame from analysts, who were expecting a slightly lower gap.

59. Reacting to bloody coup, US suspends trade deal with Myanmar -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States on Monday suspended a trade deal with Myanmar until a democratic government is brought back to the Southeast Asian country after a bloody Feb. 1 coup.

The military overthrew the elected government, jailed Aung San Suu Kyi and other civilian leaders and killed and imprisoned protesters in the country also known as Burma.

60. Giant container ship that blocked Suez Canal is finally free -

SUEZ, Egypt (AP) — Salvage teams on Monday freed a colossal container ship stuck for nearly a week in the Suez Canal, ending a crisis that had clogged one of the world's most vital waterways and halted billions of dollars a day in maritime commerce.

61. China-Europe sanctions fight shatters image of amicable ties -

BEIJING (AP) — China looked to Europe as an amicable partner as the continent's leaders resisted being drawn into President Donald Trump's conflicts with Beijing over trade, technology and human rights.

62. Japan raises tariffs on US beef after hitting import limit -

TOKYO (AP) — Imported American beef in Japan has proved so popular it's topped the annual limits called "safeguards," and the U.S. Meat Export Federation on Thursday urged Tokyo to raise the threshold.

63. Senate confirms Katherine Tai as Biden's top trade envoy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate confirmed Katherine Tai as the top U.S. trade envoy in an overwhelming bipartisan vote on Wednesday . She will be the first Asian American and first woman of color to hold the position.

64. UK trade with EU plunges after Brexit, hurting economy -

LONDON (AP) — U.K. trade with the European Union plunged in January as Britain's departure from the bloc and widespread coronavirus restrictions dealt a double blow to the nation's struggling economy.

65. US trade deficit up 1.9% in January on record goods imports -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The level of imported goods to the U.S. in January reached unprecedented levels and pushed the trade deficit 1.9% higher as the coronavirus pandemic continues to distort global commerce.

66. Biden's trade pick vows to work more closely with allies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to be the top U.S. trade envoy promised to work with America's allies to combat China's aggressive trade policies, indicating a break from the Trump administration's go-it-alone approach.

67. Biden to order a review of US supply chains for vital goods -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is preparing to sign an executive order to review U.S. supply chains for large-capacity batteries, pharmaceuticals, critical minerals and semiconductors that power cars, phones, military equipment and other goods.

68. Hospitals still ration medical N95 masks as stockpiles swell -

Mike Bowen's warehouse outside Fort Worth, Texas, was piled high with cases of medical-grade N95 face masks. His company, Prestige Ameritech, can churn out 1 million masks every four days, but he doesn't have orders for nearly that many. So he recently got approval from the government to export them.

69. U.S. trade deficit rises to $679B in 2020, a 12-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit rose 17.7% last year to $679 billion, highest since 2008, as the coronavirus disrupted global commerce and confounded then-President Donald Trump's attempts to rebalance America's trade with the rest of the world.

70. WHO team visits Wuhan virus lab at center of speculation -

WUHAN, China (AP) — World Health Organization investigators on Wednesday visited a research center in the Chinese city of Wuhan that has been the subject of speculation about the origins of the coronavirus, with one member saying they'd intended to meet key staff and press them on critical issues.

71. Study: Russia's Sputnik V vaccine appears safe, effective -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian scientists say the country's Sputnik V vaccine appears safe and effective against COVID-19, according to early results of an advanced study published in a British medical journal.

72. EU approves more state aid to boost car batteries industry -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union has approved 2.9 billion euros in subsidies from 12 member countries for a second pan-European project to develop the electric battery industry and move away from its reliance on Asian imports.

73. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's fiction in his goodbye to Washington -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In his final remarks as president, Donald Trump tried to take credit for accomplishments of his predecessor and even those to come under President Joe Biden.

Falsehoods suffused his farewell remarks Wednesday morning and the night before, though he was spot on with this: "We were not a regular administration."

74. WHO team arrives in Wuhan to investigate pandemic origins -

WUHAN, China (AP) — A global team of researchers arrived Thursday in the Chinese city where the coronavirus pandemic was first detected to conduct a politically sensitive investigation into its origins amid uncertainty about whether Beijing might try to prevent embarrassing discoveries.

75. China demands US lift Xinjiang cotton, tomato import ban -

BEIJING (AP) — China on Thursday demanded Washington drop a ban on cotton and tomato imports from its Muslim northwest over complaints they are produced by forced labor, which a spokesman dismissed as the "lie of the century."

76. US to block cotton from China region targeted in crackdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government announced Wednesday that it will halt imports of cotton and tomatoes from the Uighur region of China in its most sweeping action yet to pressure the Communist Party over its campaign against ethnic minorities.

77. US trade deficit jumps to $68.1 billion in November -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit jumped to $68.1 billion in November, the highest monthly deficit in 14 years, as a surge in imports overwhelmed a smaller increase in exports.

The November gap between what America buys from abroad compared to what it sells abroad rose by 8% from the October deficit of $63.1 billion, the Commerce Department said Thursday.

78. US bans second Malaysian palm oil giant over forced labor -

The U.S. said it will ban all shipments of palm oil from one of the world's biggest producers after finding indicators of forced labor and other abuses on plantations that feed into the supply chains of some of America's most famous food and cosmetic companies.

79. US brands Vietnam, Switzerland as currency manipulators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Treasury Department has branded Vietnam and Switzerland as currency manipulators while putting China and nine other countries on a watch list in an annual report designed to halt countries from manipulating their currencies to gain unfair trade advantages.

80. Biden to pick Katherine Tai as top trade envoy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is set to nominate Katherine Tai to be the top U.S. trade envoy, according to two people familiar with his plans.

Tai, who is chief trade counsel for the House Ways and Means Committee, will be tapped as the U.S. Trade Representative, according to the two people, who spoke Wednesday on the condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to speak publicly about it.

81. Honda halts UK production amid COVID-19 shipping delays -

LONDON (AP) — Car maker Honda said Wednesday it has temporarily halted production at its plant in England after shipping delays linked to the COVID-19 pandemic and preparations for Brexit left it with a shortage of parts.

82. China trade surplus hits record $75B as Nov exports soar -

BEIJING (AP) — China's politically sensitive trade surplus soared to a record $75.4 billion in November as exports surged 21.1% over a year earlier, propelled by American consumer demand.

Exports to the United States rose 46% despite lingering tariff hikes in a trade war with Washington, customs data showed Monday.

83. U.S. trade deficit rises 1.7% to $63.1 billion in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit widened 1.7% in October to $63.1 billion. The politically sensitive gap in the trade of goods with China and Mexico grew.

The gap between the goods and services the United States sold and what it bought abroad rose from $62.1 billion in September, the Commerce Department reported Friday. Exports rose 2.2% to $182 billion, led by sales of aircraft engines. Imports increased 2.1% to $245.1 billion on an uptick in shipments of auto parts.

84. US to block goods from Chinese company over rights abuses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. said Wednesday it would block imports from a major Chinese producer of cotton goods because of its reliance on workers detained as part of a crackdown on ethnic minorities in China's northwest.

85. US to block goods from Chinese company over rights abuses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. said Wednesday it would block imports from a major Chinese producer of cotton goods because of its reliance on workers detained as part of a crackdown on ethnic minorities in China's northwest.

86. Biden says he won't immediately lift China tariffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden says he won't immediately lift tariffs placed by President Donald Trump on many imports from China or break Trump's initial trade deal.

Biden says he wants to maximize his leverage in future talks with the United States' geopolitical rival.

87. Pandemic has taken a bite out of seafood trade, consumption -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has hurt the U.S. seafood industry due to a precipitous fall in imports and exports and a drop in catch of some species.

Those are the findings of a group of scientists who sought to quantify the damage of the pandemic on America's seafood business, which has also suffered in part because of its reliance on restaurant sales. Consumer demand for seafood at restaurants dropped by more than 70% during the early months of the pandemic, according to the scientists, who published their findings recently in the scientific journal Fish and Fisheries.

88. Xi: China will avoid decoupling amid tension with US, Europe -

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — China's President Xi Jinping on Thursday spurned suggestions that his country might decouple or separate itself from the U.S. and other trading partners amid tension with Washington and Europe over technology and security.

89. Bidenomics: More stimulus, tougher regulation and gridlock -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden will inherit a vulnerable economic recovery under threat from a resurgent virus, likely with a divided Congress that will hinder his ability to address the challenges.

90. US trade deficit falls to $63.9 billion in September -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit fell in September after hitting a 14-year high the previous month as exports outpaced imports.

The gap between what the U.S. sells and what it buys abroad fell to $63.9 billion in September, a decline of 4.7%, from a $67 billion deficit in August, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. September exports rose 2.6% to $176.4 billion, pushed higher by the food and beverage category, where shipments worth $12.9 billion were the highest since July of 2012. Soybean exports rose 63% in September.

91. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's errant final pitches on virus, energy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Making final arguments before Tuesday's election, President Donald Trump asserted the U.S. was shaking off a coronavirus pandemic that is only getting worse, falsely claimed Democrat Joe Biden would lock down the country for years and baselessly alleged that the COVID-19 death count is being inflated by doctors.

92. China's leaders vow to become self-reliant technology power -

BEIJING (AP) — China's leaders are vowing to make their country a self-reliant "technology power" as a feud with Washington cuts access to U.S. computer chips and other high-tech components, hampering Beijing's industrial ambitions.

93. China's leaders vow to become self-reliant technology power -

BEIJING (AP) — China's leaders are vowing to make their country a self-reliant "technology power" as a feud with Washington cuts access to U.S. computer chips and other high-tech components, hampering Beijing's industrial ambitions.

94. From Beijing to Brussels, Trump's trade wars at a glance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said he would shake up American trade policy. That he did. From Beijing to Brussels to Mexico City, he waged war with trading partners on multiple fronts. Here's a look at four tumultuous years of Trump trade policy:

95. Trump trade policy: 4 years of high drama, limited results -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump spent four years upending seven decades of American trade policy.

In what became his defining economic act, Trump launched a trade war with China. On another front, he taxed the steel and aluminum of U.S. allies. And he terrified America's own corporations by threatening to wreck $1.4 trillion in annual trade with Mexico and Canada.

96. Post-Abe agenda: Suga says Japan to go carbon-free by 2050 -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan will achieve zero carbon emissions by 2050, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga declared Monday, outlining an ambitious agenda as the country struggles to balance economic and pandemic concerns.

97. Japan, Britain sign free trade deal for post-Brexit era -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan and Britain signed a bilateral free trade deal Friday in the first such major post-Brexit deal, reducing tariffs on Yorkshire lamb sold in Japan, as well as auto parts for Japan's Nissan plant.

98. Japan, Vietnam agree to boost defense ties, resume flights -

HANOI, Vietnam. (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, in his first overseas summit since taking office last month, agreed with his Vietnamese counterpart to step up defense and security cooperation in the face of China's expanding influence in the region.

99. China's trade growth accelerates in Sept; exports up 9.9% -

BEIJING (AP) — China's trade picked up in September as global demand for masks and medical supplies boosted exports and the economy's early reopening gave producers an edge over foreign competitors.

100. Trump vs. Biden: Where they stand on health, economy, more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid the tumult of the 2020 presidential campaign, one dynamic has remained constant: The Nov. 3 election offers voters a choice between substantially different policy paths.

President Donald Trump, like many fellow Republicans, holds out tax reductions and regulatory cuts as economic imperatives and frames himself as a conservative champion in the culture wars. The president has offered few details about how he would pull the levers of government in a second term. His most consistent argument focuses on stopping Democratic opponent Joe Biden and his party from pushing U.S. policy leftward.