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Editorial Results (free)

1. Workers, car owners, dealers and GM feel pinch from strike -

DETROIT (AP) — As the United Auto Workers' strike against General Motors stretches into a second week, it's not just the company and striking workers getting pinched.

With many replacement part warehouses shut down, dealers are beginning to run short of components to repair cars, trucks and SUVs. And companies that make auto parts are also starting to see work slowdown. Dealer inventory of new vehicles is holding up but starting to get depleted on a few models.

2. Walton elected to ACGC 2019 class of fellows -

Attorney Leigh Walton of Bass, Berry & Sims has been elected as a member of the 2019 class of fellows by the American College of Governance Counsel. Walton is one of 11 individuals from the United States and Canada elected this year.

3. US stocks climb after major US retailers post solid earnings -

Strong earnings reports from several big retailers helped drive stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Wednesday as the market bounced back from its first loss in four days.

Target notched its biggest-ever gain, while Lowe's had its best day in more than a year, leading a broad rally in companies that rely on consumer spending. Nordstrom, Kohl's, Gap and other retailers closed higher.

4. Retailers' results show sharp divide between losers, winners -

NEW YORK (AP) — The divide between retail winners and losers is widening.

That became even more evident Wednesday with the latest batch of earnings reports: Big-box stores and off-price retailers have been responding faster to shoppers' increasing shift online with expanded deliveries and better merchandise. But many mall-based clothing chains and department stores continue to suffer weak sales as they struggle to lure in shoppers.

5. Target thrives in intense retail environment -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target topped expectations in just about any way measureable during the second quarter as it pushed faster delivery for customers and invested heavily in new private label brands.

Comparable store sales, which include online sales, rose 3.4 % as customer traffic jumped 2.4%. The measure includes sales at stores open at least a year and online sales. Sales at established stores rose 1.5 %. Online sales soared 34%.

6. Major US stock indexes finish lower, snapping a 3-day rally -

Stocks fell broadly on Wall Street Tuesday after another slide in bond yields and a mixed batch of corporate earnings weighed on the market.

The selling pulled every major sector lower, snapping a three-day winning streak for the S&P 500.

7. Execs starting to worry about tariffs' effects on consumers -

Americans continue to shop, vacation and buy cars at a brisk clip. But corporate America is starting to worry out loud that President Donald Trump's tariffs will depress consumer spending and undermine the economy.

8. Home Depot cuts outlook citing tariffs, lumber prices -

Home Depot cut its sales expectations for the year as lumber prices slid and the company braces for the potential impact of tariffs on its customers.

The Trump administration delayed most of the tariffs it planned to impose on Chinese goods last week and dropped others altogether, responding to pressure from businesses and growing fears that a trade war is threatening the U.S. economy.

9. Technology companies drive a broad rally on Wall Street -

Technology companies powered a rally on Wall Street Monday that gave the market its third straight gain.

The surge in tech stocks followed a decision by the U.S. to give Chinese telecom giant Huawei another 90 days to buy equipment from American suppliers. Chipmakers including Qualcomm, Intel and Micron, all rose.

10. Tesla restarts its solar-panel business, offers rental plans -

PALO ALTO, Calif. (AP) — Tesla is trying to spark its solar-panel business by letting consumers rent rooftop systems rather than buy them.

Tesla Inc. CEO Elon Musk announced the offering in a series of tweets Sunday.

11. Beehive love: singer celebrates storied girl groups -

Decades after standing in center-ring with legendary heavyweight prizefighter George Foreman, Laura Powers straightens up in the burgundy loveseat and launches into song.

Snapping her fingers, singing sweetly and swaying back and forth while seated in the living room of her comfortable Bellevue home, Laura, a music entrepreneur, performer, costume-maker and visual artist – with classic styles in each of those venues – captures my full attention and makes me smile, likely as broadly as the grill-peddling former heavyweight champ did in in Reno all those years ago.

12. Q&A: What to know about the Capital One data breach -

NEW YORK (AP) — One of the country's biggest credit card issuers, Capital One Financial, is the latest big business to be hit by a data breach, disclosing that roughly 100 million people had some personal information stolen by a hacker.

13. Capital One target of massive data breach -

SEATTLE (AP) — A security breach at Capital One Financial, one of the nation's largest issuers of credit cards, compromised the personal information of about 106 million people, and in some cases the hacker obtained Social Security and bank account numbers.

14. AutoNation replaces new CEO with a new CEO -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Four months after the country's largest auto dealership chain named a new chief executive to replace its longtime CEO, it's making another change at the top.

Chief Financial Officer Cheryl Miller is the new CEO at AutoNation, replacing Carl Liebert, who came to the company from the USAA financial services firm in March.

15. US stocks notch gains, snap short losing streak -

Gains in energy and internet companies helped drive stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday, snapping a two-day losing streak for the market in an otherwise choppy week of trading.

The gains were initially fueled by rising oil prices, which boosted energy companies following a suspected attack on two oil tankers in the strategic Strait of Hormuz. The sector sustained its gains as a mix of media, internet and consumer-oriented companies took the lead in pushing every major index higher. Small company stocks rose more than the rest of the market.

16. US stocks muster slight gains after listless day of trading -

Major U.S. stock indexes capped a day of listless trading with modest gains Thursday, snapping the market's two-day losing streak.

A late flurry of buying helped lift the indexes, which had spent much of the day moving sideways after an early rally lost momentum. Even so, the market remained on track for its fourth straight weekly loss and its first monthly decline of the year.

17. US stocks fall on mixed earnings, trade tensions; oil slumps -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street Wednesday, weighed down by a mixed batch of corporate earnings from big retailers and lingering uncertainty over the trade spat between the U.S. and China.

Lowe's and Nordstrom were among the biggest decliners in the S&P 500 after the retailers reported quarterly results that fell short of Wall Street's expectations. Target bucked the trend, surging after its latest results handily topped analysts' forecasts.

18. Home Depot posts strong profit, revenue -

ATLANTA (AP) — Home Depot is reporting better than expected profit and revenue for the first quarter despite a damp start to 2019.

That inclement weather and an extra week in the previous fiscal year dampened the home improvement retailer's comparable store sales.

19. Stocks close lower as chipmakers slump -

Chipmakers and other technology companies pulled U.S. stocks lower Monday, extending the market's losses into another week.

The U.S. decision to ban technology sales to China's Huawei hammered the tech sector, particularly chipmakers. About one-third of Huawei's suppliers are American chipmakers and investors are worried that the action against Huawei could crimp sales for companies with revenue heavily tied to China.

20. Stocks give up early gain, close lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks gave up some early gains and ended broadly lower after the head of the Federal Reserve appeared to play down the possibility of an interest rate cut this year, something some investors had been hoping for.

21. Sears to set to open first batch of smaller stores -

NEW YORK (AP) — After its journey through bankruptcy, Sears is getting ready to open its first batch of smaller stores focusing on appliances, mattresses and home services.

The first three stores called Sears Home & Life will open on Memorial Day weekend and are a fraction of the size of the company's traditional stores.

22. Holiday season defines winners and losers in retail -

NEW YORK (AP) — The 2018 holiday season turned out to be a mixed bag for retailers, with some of them defying a gloomy government report in December that raised concerns that shoppers were hunkering down everywhere.

23. A very merry Christmas at Best Buy with sales booming -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy put up some big holiday sales numbers Wednesday, more evidence that Americans are willing and able to spend on gadgets and big TVs.

The nation's largest consumer electronics chain delivered a better-than-expected 3 percent increase in sales at established stores for the fiscal fourth quarter. The company also issued an annual profit forecast that was roughly in line with Wall Street expectations.

24. Lowe's swings to 4Q loss on charges, anemic housing market -

MOORESVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Lowe's swung to a loss in its fourth quarter, weighed down by sizeable one-time charges and a lethargic housing market.

The home improvement company lost $824 million, or $1.03 per share, for the period ended Feb. 1. That includes $1.6 billion in charges, most from a $952 million goodwill impairment charge. Stripping out the charges, earnings were 80 cents per share, a penny better than analysts polled by FactSet had expected.

25. US stock indexes end slightly lower after wobbly day -

U.S. stock indexes capped a day of wobbly trading with slight losses Tuesday, erasing some of their modest gains from a day earlier.

The market changed course several times during the day as investors balanced conflicting U.S. economic data and testimony from Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell.

26. Home Depot sales cool along with real estate market -

ATLANTA (AP) — Strains in the nation's housing sector emerged in the aisles of Home Depot, a store with a reputation for consistently delivering surprises to the upside for its investors.

In the final quarter of the year, Home Depot fell short on profit, revenue and same-stores sales as rising real estate prices cast a chill over U.S. home sales.

27. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for December 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, December 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

28. US indexes hit one-month highs as Netflix leads tech rally -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied to their highest level in more than a month Tuesday after China's government moved to inject more life into its economy by cutting taxes and increasing spending. Netflix led a surge in high-tech companies.

29. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for October 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, October 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

30. US retail sales rose a solid 0.8 percent last month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. retail sales rose at a solid pace in October, though the gains were boosted by one-time factors such as hurricane recovery spending and higher gas prices.

Retail sales rose a seasonally adjusted 0.8 percent last month, following two months of slight declines, the Commerce Department reported Thursday. Excluding gasoline sales, which were inflated by higher prices, sales climbed 0.5 percent.

31. US retail sales rose a solid 0.8 percent last month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. retail sales rose at a solid pace in October, though the gains were boosted by one-time factors such as hurricane recovery spending and higher gas prices.

Retail sales rose a seasonally adjusted 0.8 percent last month, following two months of slight declines, the Commerce Department reported Thursday. Excluding gasoline sales, which were inflated by higher prices, sales climbed a 0.5 percent.

32. Walmart flexes its muscle against Amazon -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart, armed with grocery and other online services, is proving it can do battle with Amazon.

The world's largest retailer delivered strong third-quarter results Thursday, extending a streak of sales growth into its 11th straight quarter that showed it's pulling shoppers online and in the store. It also raised profit expectations for the year heading into the holiday shopping season.

33. Tech giants slide, pulling US stock market sharply lower -

A broad sell-off in technology companies pulled U.S. stocks sharply lower Monday, knocking more than 600 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

The wave of selling snared big names, including Apple, Amazon and Goldman Sachs. Banks, consumer-focused companies, and media and communications stocks all took heavy losses. Crude oil prices fell, erasing early gains and extending a losing streak to 11 days.

34. As risks outweigh growth, Wall Street looks for value -

NEW YORK (AP) — As stocks hit record after record in the past decade, investors didn't much care if a stock was cheap or expensive. What mattered most was: Is it growing quickly?

If the answer was yes, the stock was in high demand, almost regardless of the price. Investors were ravenous for companies able to add customers and deliver fat growth. So they were willing to pay premium prices for an Amazon or a Netflix. Left behind were stocks in more staid industries, even if they looked like better bargains by several measures.

35. Stocks erase most of early losses after huge gain; IBM sinks -

NEW YORK (AP) — After an early slide, U.S. stocks clawed back much of the ground they lost and ended slightly lower Wednesday. Banks climbed but retailers, homebuilders and smaller companies fell.

36. Girdles and socket wrenches: Sears was the Amazon of its day -

Before there was Amazon — or, for that matter, Home Depot or Walmart or Kmart — there was Sears.

From its beginnings as a mail-order watch business in Minneapolis 132 years ago, the company grew to become America's everything-under-one-roof store and the biggest retailer in the world.

37. Sears files for Chapter 11 amid plunging sales, massive debt -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sears filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday, with plans to shutter 142 unprofitable stores in the hopes that it can stay in business.

The question now is whether a smaller version of the company that once towered over the American retail landscape can be viable. Sears, which started as a mail order catalog in the 1880s, has been on a slow march toward extinction as it lagged far behind its peers and incurred huge losses over the years.

38. Storm's uncertain track sows fear; 10 million in crosshairs -

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence put a corridor of more than 10 million people in the crosshairs Wednesday as the monster storm closed in on the Carolinas, uncertainty over its projected path spreading worry across a widening swath of the Southeast.

39. Technology and energy companies help send US stocks higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied Tuesday as technology companies continued to recover from their recent losses.

The approach of Hurricane Florence sent home improvement retailers and gas prices higher. The Department of Energy said it's seeing signs that shipments of oil from Iran are falling as the U.S. prepares to resume sanctions on the Iranian energy industry and pushes other countries to stop buying.

40. Stocks end losing streak as industrials, retailers rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks broke a four-day losing streak Monday as industrial companies and retailers rose. Technology companies recovered some of their steep losses from last week.

Transportation and other industrial companies continued their recent rally and retailers like Nike, Home Depot and Walmart all climbed. While technology companies rose overall, Apple fell after saying a new round of bigger U.S. tariffs could push it to raise prices.

41. 4 reasons why shoppers are in the mood to spend -

NEW YORK (AP) — The store isn't dead for Home Depot, Kohl's, Best Buy or Target. Many traditional chains have posted strong sales, both online and at stores, as people are in a mood to spend.

What's driving it? A booming economy and companies' own efforts to try to Amazon-proof their businesses. That means making their stores more pleasant, updating their websites and speeding up delivery.

42. Big investments in stores, tech pay off at Target -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target reported strong sales growth both at stores and online, helped by remodeled locations and new delivery services as well as a stronger economy. Like Nordstrom, Walmart and Home Depot, it also raised its outlook as retailers benefit from shoppers spending more freely.

43. Walmart sees sales rise at stores and online, raises outlook -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart raised its financial outlook for the year after beating Wall Street's expectations for the quarter and seeing the strongest growth in more than a decade in sales at established stores. Its shares rose nearly 10 percent.

44. Trump pushing job training as employers search for workers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is pressing U.S. companies and trade associations to bolster their job training opportunities as employers search for qualified skilled workers to fill vacancies.

45. Tesla cuts 9 pct. of workforce in bid to post a profit -

DETROIT (AP) — Electric car maker Tesla Inc. is laying off about 3,600 workers mainly from its salaried ranks as it slashes costs in an effort to deliver on CEO Elon Musk's promise to turn a profit in the second half of the year.

46. Fed gives stocks a boost; technology and retailers rally -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks turned higher Wednesday after the Federal Reserve indicated it's not in a hurry to raise interest rates too quickly. Retailers and technology companies led the way as the market erased some early losses.

47. JC Penney's CEO Ellison departs for Lowe's -

NEW YORK (AP) — J.C. Penney's CEO Marvin Ellison, one of only a handful of African American CEOs to lead a Fortune 500 company, is leaving to become the top executive at Lowe's.

The announced departure of Ellison on Tuesday sent shares of the besieged department store down more than 4 percent in early trading.

48. Stocks sink late as smaller companies and industrials fade -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks faded Tuesday afternoon and finished the day mostly lower as industrial companies and retailers fell. Smaller and more U.S.-focused companies slumped after setting records the last few days.

49. Tech and health care lead US stocks lower; bond yields rise -

Losses in technology and health care companies helped pull U.S. stocks lower Tuesday, snapping an eight-day winning streak by the Dow Jones industrial average.

The broad sell-off followed a slide in bond prices, which sent the 10-year Treasury yield to its highest level in almost seven years. That paves the way for higher borrowing costs on mortgages and other loans.

50. US stocks sink again as banks, health care companies slide -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are skidding Thursday morning as the market continues a sell-off that began late the previous day. Big losses for insurer AIG are hurting financial stocks while Cardinal Health tumbles and takes the health care sector lower. Tesla is skidding after the electric car maker posted another big loss, and Wall Street reacted negatively to comments by CEO Elon Musk.

51. Axe throwing? Why not -

Throwing dishes is a loud, cherished and time-honored way to relieve tension. If you’re loathe to part with the family china, however, BATL Nashville has the answer.

Located in a former Nashville Auto Diesel College outbuilding at the corner of Douglas Avenue and Gallatin Pike in East Nashville, BATL, or Backyard Axe Throwing League, provides the opportunity to hang out, grab some food and a drink – and hurl axes at targets with friends, coworkers or even in league play.

52. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for March 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, March 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

53. Trump announces stiff trade tariffs, unswayed by warnings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Unswayed by Republican warnings of a trade war, President Donald Trump ordered steep new tariffs on steel and aluminum imports to the U.S. on Thursday, vowing to fight back against an "assault on our country" by foreign competitors. The president said he would exempt Canada and Mexico while negotiating for changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement.

54. Kerr finds winding path to success in Music City -

Les Kerr, purveyor of what he calls “hillbilly blues Caribbean rock ’n’ roll” in a town where faux-cowboy music and lusty songs about pickup trucks reign, leans back in a chair in his “music room/office” and noodles with the 1975 Ovation guitar his grandfather gave him as a high school graduation present.

55. Dow turns 567 point loss into 567 point gain as stocks rally -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied Tuesday as a late surge helped them regain almost half their losses from the day before, when they had their biggest plunge in 6 ½ years. That came at the end of a day of huge swings for the market.

56. FedEx to give wage increases, bonuses to workers -

MEMPHIS (AP) — FedEx says it'll be giving wage increases, bonuses and make a voluntary $1.5 billion contribution to the company's pension plan, citing recent tax reform legislation.

The package delivery company follows others doing the same, including Home Depot, Disney, Starbucks and Walmart.

57. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 690 commercial real estate transactions worth $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 333, followed by Williamson (152), Rutherford (104), Sumner (51) and Wilson (50).

58. Sears raises $100M in new financing, eyes $200M in cost cuts -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sears has secured more financing, and is eying more cost cutting, as the beleaguered retailer reported a big sales drop during the critical holiday season.

The company, which operates Sears and Kmart stores, said Wednesday that it secured $100 million in new financing, will seek twice that from other sources, and will attempt $200 million in additional cost cuts this year unrelated to store closings. It also warned that if the company's efforts to complete these transactions are not fully successful, then the board will consider all other options to maximize the value of its assets.

59. 2017 winners and losers: Amazon, Boeing soared; GE plunged -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was a strong year for the stock market, but 2017 was a great year if you made airplanes (think Boeing), were an online juggernaut (Amazon) or built homes (KB Homes). It was a year to forget if you were an energy company (Chesapeake) made Barbie dolls (Mattel) or if you were a storied industrial conglomerate about to go on a radical slim-down program (General Electric).

60. 2017 winners and losers: Amazon, Boeing soared; GE plunged -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was a strong year for the stock market, but 2017 was a great year if you made airplanes (think Boeing), were an online juggernaut (Amazon) or built homes (KB Homes). It was a year to forget if you were an energy company (Chesapeake) made Barbie dolls (Mattel) or if you were a storied industrial conglomerate about to go on a radical slim-down program (General Electric).

61. Home Depot's online push continues with Company Store buy -

ATLANTA (AP) — Home Depot is buying online retailer The Company Store, moving forward with aggressive plans to protect itself from competitors like Amazon.com.

62. Home Depot's online push continues with Company Store buy -

ATLANTA (AP) — Home Depot is buying online retailer The Company Store, moving forward with aggressive plans to protect itself from competitors like Amazon.com.

63. Lowe's gets a hurricane boost, but investors not blown away -

MOORESVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Lowe's profit more than doubled in the third quarter as Americans along the Gulf Coast loaded up trunks and trucks with materiel to repair the damage delivered by a pair of gigantic hurricanes.

64. Amazon or Walmart? Some retailers are choosing alliances -

NEW YORK (AP) — Store chains feeling the upheaval in retail are making strategic alliances — and that can mean picking sides.

Kohl's shoppers can find Amazon devices at some stores, and return items they bought from the online retailer. Nike has made some of its sneakers available through Amazon. The owner of Sears is selling Kenmore-branded appliances on Amazon in some markets. And Best Buy is teaming up with Amazon for voice shopping.

65. Energy leads modest slide in US stocks as oil prices fall -

Energy companies led U.S. stocks modestly lower Tuesday, erasing the small gains the market made a day earlier.

The biggest drop in crude oil prices since October weighed on oil producers and other energy stocks. Disappointing results or outlooks from retailers and other companies also weighed on the market.

66. Tech, housing boom creates homeless crisis on West Coast -

SEATTLE (AP) — In a park in the middle of a leafy, bohemian neighborhood where homes list for close to $1 million, a tractor's massive claw scooped up the refuse of the homeless - mattresses, tents, wooden frames, a wicker chair, an outdoor propane heater. Workers in masks and steel-shanked boots plucked used needles and mounds of waste from the underbrush.

67. Why the explosive growth of e-commerce could mean more jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the robots came to online retailer Boxed, dread came, too: The familiar fear that the machines would take over, leaving a trail of unemployed humans in their wake.

"I had a lot of people asking me, 'What is going to happen to us?'" says Veronica Mena, a trainer for the e-commerce startup, recalling the anxiety that rippled through her co-workers after company executives announced plans to open an automated warehouse in nearby Union, New Jersey.

68. The thrill is gone ... Sears-Whirlpool split after 100 years -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sears will no longer sell Whirlpool appliances, ending a business relationship that dates make more than 100 years.

In a note sent to its stores last week, Sears said that Whirlpool was making demands that would've made it difficult to sell its appliances at a competitive price.

69. Record highs for major US stock indexes; Dow passes 23,000 -

A day of modest gains on Wall Street resulted in more milestones for U.S. stocks Wednesday as the Dow Jones industrial average closed above 23,000 points for the first time.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index and Nasdaq composite also finished at record highs.

70. Target to up hourly base pay to $15 by end of 2020 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target Corp. is raising its minimum hourly wage for its workers to $11 starting next month and then to $15 by the end of 2020 in a move it says will help it better recruit and retain top-quality staff and provide a better shopping experience for its customers.

71. After Equifax, public shaming but GOP wary of new rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prospects are good for a public shaming in the Equifax data breach, but it's unlikely Congress will institute sweeping new regulations after hackers accessed the personal information of an estimated 143 million Americans.

72. US stocks set records as Irma and North Korea worries fade -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied to record highs Monday as Hurricane Irma weakened without causing as much damage as many had feared, and a North Korean holiday passed without new missile launches. Financial and technology companies lead the way.

73. Home Depot settles charges that it sold recalled products -

NEW YORK (AP) — Home Depot has agreed to pay the U.S. government $5.7 million to settle charges that it sold recalled washing machines, fire extinguishers and other faulty products.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says the recalled products were sold by the home-improvement retailer between 2012 and 2016.

74. Lowe's not catching the same tail wind Home Depot is riding -

MOORESVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Lowe's second-quarter profit got a boost from the sales of an Australian joint venture, but its performance was weak by most measures in a vibrant housing market, and its profit outlook for the year was well below the expectations of industry analysts.

75. The boom is booming and Home Depot is setting records -

ATLANTA (AP) — Americans are plowing money into their homes at an astonishing rate, new, used and even those not yet built, creating for Home Depot a frenzy of loyal customers.

The world's biggest home improvement retailer rang up its highest quarterly sales, and richest earnings in the company's history, and it boosted its outlook for the year Tuesday.

76. Retailers stumble but stocks are little changed overall -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes finished Tuesday close to where they started as technology companies and household goods makers rose. But weak reports from sporting goods and auto parts retailers left a lot of smaller companies with steep losses.

77. Traditional retail is in trouble as buying habits evolve -

Are Tennessee’s shopping destinations, once beacons of consumer demand, doomed to extinction?

One might think so by reading recent reports on traditional retail outlets. The headlines certainly are attention grabbers:

78. Is your job going away? -

How confident are you that your job will still exist in one year? How about five years? Ten years?

While much of the national attention has been on President Trump’s promise to restore some portion of the 22,000 coal jobs lost since 2001, 500,000 department store jobs have been lost during that same period, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data show.

79. Top Midstate commercial transactions for second quarter 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, second quarter 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

80. Alexa, turn up my Kenmore AC; Sears cuts a deal with Amazon -

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill. (AP) — Sears will begin selling its appliances on Amazon.com, including smart appliances that can be synced with Amazon's voice assistant, Alexa.

81. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for May 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, May 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

82. Stocks slip as investors seek safety after weak sales data -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks dipped Wednesday as investors worried about weak retail sales and oil prices sank. The Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the third time in six months.

The Commerce Department said retail spending decreased in May, which surprised experts. Investors reacted by buying traditionally safe assets like government bonds and high-dividend companies while selling stocks from other industries that depend more on economic growth. Bond yields hit their lowest level of 2017. Oil prices also hit an annual low after the government's weekly report on oil stockpiles.

83. US stocks bounce back to records as tech companies rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks bounced back to record highs Tuesday as investors put an end to a two-day drop for technology companies. Energy and consumer-focused companies also made outsize gains.

84. Nashville lawyer named TBA executive director -

The Tennessee Bar Association has named Nashville lawyer Joycelyn Stevenson as its new executive director.

A shareholder with Littler Mendelson PC with a practice focused on labor and employment law, Stevenson has been a leader in the Tennessee legal community, serving as president of both the Nashville Bar Association and the Lawyers’ Association for Women - Marion Griffin Chapter. She is the first African-American woman to lead both organizations and will be the first African-American woman to direct the TBA.

85. US stocks extend gains to a 5th day as tech companies rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose for the fifth consecutive day Wednesday as investors went on a late buying spree. The gains came after news that the Federal Reserve plans to start reducing its huge portfolio of bonds. The Standard & Poor's 500 index closed at a record high.

86. Stocks claw back more lost ground with 4th straight gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose for the fourth day in a row Tuesday as they continued to recover the ground they lost last week. Major indexes approached record highs again.

Most of the gains went to banks, which surged as bond yields jumped. That will allow them to charge higher rates on loans. Banks took steep losses last Wednesday, when stocks had their worst day since September. Scientific instrument companies and drugmakers also rose. However auto parts companies were hammered after poor third-quarter results from AutoZone and home builders fell after sales of new homes sank in April.

87. US stock indexes end mostly lower; Nasdaq notches new high -

A subdued day of trading on Wall Street ended Tuesday with stocks closing mostly lower even as the Nasdaq composite notched another record high.

Utilities, phone companies and other high-dividend paying stocks were among the biggest decliners. Energy stocks also fell along with a drop in the price of crude oil. Technology companies climbed the most. Financials also eked out a small gain.

88. Hard times for Sears as retailer notes doubt about future -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sears, a back-to-school shopping destination for generations of kids, has said that after years of losing money that there is "substantial doubt" it will be able to keep its doors open. But it also insisted that its actions to turn around its business should help reduce that risk.

89. Channel 2 weatherman says goodbye Nashville, viva Las Vegas -

Justin Brousse really isn’t pushing his luck by insisting he takes Justin Bruce along with him to his new job in Las Vegas. They’re inseparable.

If you don’t know it, “Brousse” is pronounced “Bruce” and “Brousse” became “Bruce” on the air thanks to his first boss in a wind-swept prairie town three-quarters of the way to nowhere.

90. Dow nears 20,000 as energy companies and tech stocks climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major U.S. stock indexes set records again Tuesday as energy companies continued to climb following international deals that will cut oil production. Big-name technology companies like Apple and IBM also traded higher as the Dow Jones industrial average closed above 19,900 for the first time.

91. Dow surpasses 19,000 as a record-setting drive continues -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones industrial average surpassed 19,000 for the first time Tuesday as a post-election rally drove indexes further into record territory. Discount store chains made large gains, but health care companies tumbled.

92. Energy companies lead indexes higher as oil price soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks climbed Tuesday as the price of oil made its biggest jump in seven months and energy companies rose with it. Technology stocks like Microsoft and Google's parent Alphabet traded higher and bond yields slipped, a break with the pattern since last week's election.

93. Home Depot crushes it again; ups outlook for the year -

ATLANTA (AP) — Home Depot, with unemployment falling, mortgage rates near historic lows and wages and home prices rising, upped its outlook for the year as sales surged in the third quarter and customers spent more with each visit.

94. US retail sales jump 0.8 pct. in sign of consumer health -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers ramped up their spending last month in a sign of robust health heading into the crucial holiday shopping season.

Retail sales rose 0.8 percent in October, after an upwardly-revised 1 percent gain in September, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. The two-month increase was the largest since the spring of 2014.

95. Consumer stocks fall as Whirlpool, GM and others skid -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shaky results from consumer companies dragged the U.S. stock market lower on Tuesday as well-known names like appliance maker Whirlpool and athletic apparel maker Under Armour suffered their worst losses in years.

96. US stocks slide as banks tumble on Deutsche Bank worries -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slumped Monday, and banks took the biggest losses. Deutsche Bank plunged as investors worried about the financial health of Germany's largest bank. Pfizer pulled drugmakers down after it announced it won't break up into two companies.

97. US stocks get modest lift from Federal Reserve comments -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks closed barely higher Wednesday as big gains for utilities balanced out losses for retailers like Lowe's, Target and Staples.

Stocks fell in morning trading as a recent slump in phone company and utility stocks continued. But the indexes reversed directions after noon as those stocks turned higher, as did banks and household goods makers. Investors scrutinized the minutes from the Federal Reserve's late July meeting and found no suggestion the central bank's in any hurry to raise interest rates.

98. Target cuts outlook as it sees fewer customers in stores -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target Corp. cut its profit forecast and a key sales outlook Wednesday as it saw fewer customers in its stores and acknowledged it didn't push the second part of its "Expect More, Pay Less" slogan.

99. Sheraton Music City among hotels that may have been hit by hackers -

NEW YORK (AP) — An undisclosed number of people who used credit cards at 20 Hyatt, Sheraton, Marriott, Westin and other hotels in 10 states and the District of Columbia – including the Sheraton Music City in Nashville between March 1 and June 8 – may have had their cards compromised as a result of hack of the hotels' payment system.

100. US stocks again rebound as miners and machinery makers rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks closed at a record high Monday behind gains for chemical and machinery companies. Energy companies rose as the price of oil continued its recent recovery.

Makers of chemicals and mining companies made the biggest gains, and machinery companies and banks followed. Investors sold government bonds and utility and phone companies. Those stocks climbed earlier in the year as investors sought safety. Stocks have seesawed between small gains and losses for more than a week as investors consider mixed reports on the health of the economy and a decline in corporate earnings. That hasn't stopped them from setting records, but it's kept investors wary.