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Editorial Results (free)

1. Pinnacles rates No. 6 on women’s workplace list -

Nashville’s Pinnacle Financial Partners remains one of the nation’s Best Large Workplaces for Women, earning the No. 6 spot on the latest list from Fortune magazine and Great Place to Work.

2. Study: Pentagon reliance on contractors hurt US in 9/11 wars -

Up to half of the $14 trillion spent by the Pentagon since 9/11 went to for-profit defense contractors, a study released Monday found. It's the latest work to argue the U.S. reliance on private corporations for war-zone duties that used to be done by troops contributed to mission failure in Afghanistan.

3. Modest gains nudge Nasdaq above 15,000 for the first time -

Stocks closed modestly higher on Wall Street Tuesday, enough to nudge the Nasdaq composite to a record high and past 15,000 for the first time.

The broader S&P 500 index also set a record high. Banks, consumer-focused companies and small-company stocks outpaced the rest of the market.

4. Wall Street snaps back following worst week since February -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rebounded on Wall Street Monday and clawed back most of their sharp loss from last week. The S&P 500 snapped 1.4% higher as the initial jolt passed from the Federal Reserve's reminder that it will eventually offer less help for markets. Oil producers, banks and other companies that were hit particularly hard last week made the biggest gains. High-growth tech stocks lagged. Shorter-term yields fell, and longer-term yields rose in another reversal from last week's initial reaction to the Fed's saying it may raise rates twice by late 2023.

5. How companies rip off poor employees — and get away with it -

Already battered by long shifts and high infection rates, essential workers struggling through the pandemic face another hazard of hard times: employers who steal their wages.

When a recession hits, U.S. companies are more likely to stiff their lowest-wage workers. These businesses often pay less than the minimum wage, make employees work off the clock, or refuse to pay overtime rates. In the most egregious cases, bosses don't pay their employees at all.

6. Stirring in the oil patch, Chevron buys Noble for $5 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Chevron will take over Noble Energy for $5 billion in the first big deal announced since the coronavirus pandemic shook the energy sector.

Chevron has been shopping for assets since last year and with crude prices down more than 30% this year, it jumped Monday with its all-stock offering for the independent Houston oil and gas driller.

7. Hope dashed: Early rally vanishes, leaving Wall Street mixed -

NEW YORK (AP) — An early rally on Wall Street suddenly vanished on Thursday, the latest example of how fragile the hopes underpinning the stock market's monthlong recovery are.

The S&P 500 initially shot higher in the morning, completely brushing aside another stunning report showing millions of workers are losing their jobs by the week. Investors were looking ahead, beyond the current economic misery, to the prospect of a reopening economy amid expectations that the coronavirus outbreak may be leveling off in areas around the world.

8. Stocks climb after two drops; oil prices crawl off the floor -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied on Wednesday, and the S&P 500 clawed back a chunk of this week's sharp losses as a bit of oxygen pumped through markets around the world.

Even oil gained ground, pulling further away from zero after earlier getting turned upside down amid a collapse in demand. Stocks rose from Seoul to Spain, and winners outnumbered losers in New York by more than two to one. Treasury yields also pushed higher in a sign of a bit less pessimism among investors.

9. Trump tells Chevron to "wind down" oil fields in Venezuela -

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — The Trump administration on Tuesday ordered Chevron Corp. to "wind down" operations in Venezuela by Dec. 1, barring the California-based oil giant in the meantime from drilling or exporting, as the U.S. increases pressure on President Nicolás Maduro to give up power.

10. Oil price goes negative as demand collapses; Dow drops 592 pts. -

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil futures plunged below zero on Monday, the latest never-before-seen number to come out of the economic coma caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Stocks and Treasury yields also dropped on Wall Street, with the S&P 500 down 1.8%, but the market's most dramatic action by far was in oil, where the cost to have a barrel of U.S. crude delivered in May plummeted to negative $37.63. It was at roughly $60 at the start of the year.

11. Stocks drop as recession fears take hold; Dow loses 1,300 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks tumbled more than 5% on Wall Street Wednesday, and the Dow erased virtually all its gains since President Donald Trump's 2017 inauguration. Even prices for investments seen as safe during downturns fell as the coronavirus outbreak chokes the economy and investors rush to raise cash.

12. Travel grinds to a halt, plants close as virus takes hold -

The number of confirmed cases of the new coronavirus worldwide surpassed 200,000 for the first time Wednesday and the damage being seeded in the global economy is growing more clear by the day. Furloughs and job cuts, from dog walkers to oilfield workers, have begun. Governments around the world are pushing drastic countermeasures to help workers, particularly those who live paycheck to paycheck.

13. US stock indexes slip, but rush for safety slows -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks mostly fell on Tuesday, but the big rush for safety that coursed through global markets after the United States killed a top Iranian general on Friday slowed.

Gold's momentum eased a day after touching its highest price in nearly seven years, several Asian and European stock markets clawed back much of their losses from Monday and benchmark U.S. crude dropped for the first time in four days. The S&P 500 dipped but remains within 0.6% of its record, and a measure of fear in the stock market moved lower.

14. Gold climbs on war worries; US stocks shake off early loss -

NEW YORK (AP) — Gold touched its highest price in nearly seven years Monday as investors sought safety amid worries that rising U.S.-Iran tensions could lead to war.

Stocks in Asia and Europe retreated as dollars flowed out of riskier investments, but the U.S. market shook off its morning losses to grind out a modest gain. After dropping 0.6% as soon as trading opened, the S&P 500 pushed steadily higher through the day and ended up recovering half its sharp loss from Friday.

15. Stocks rise broadly; S&P 500 ends 3-day losing streak -

Stocks closed broadly higher Wednesday amid renewed hopes on Wall Street that a U.S. trade deal with China may be nearing, despite tough recent talk from President Donald Trump.

The gains snapped a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500, though the benchmark index remains on track for a weekly decline.

16. US stocks stumble amid trade tensions, weak economic data -

Technology companies led a broad slide for stocks on Wall Street Monday, handing the market a downbeat start to the month after notching strong gains in November.

Industrial, communication services and financial stocks also accounted for a big share of the sell-off. Energy stocks notched the biggest gain, aided by a 1.4% increase in the price of U.S. crude oil. Bond yields rose.

17. Stocks drop as Dems eye Trump inquiry -

Stocks dropped on Wall Street Tuesday as House Democrats met to consider a potential impeachment probe of President Donald Trump and a report showed a drop in consumer confidence.

After a higher open, stocks declined as the Conference Board, a business research group, reported its consumer confidence index fell to 125.1 in September from a revised reading of 134.2 in August. That's worrisome because consumer spending has underpinned the economy during a slowdown in manufacturing.

18. US stock indexes edge up as oil gives up half of its spurt -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes ticked closer to record heights on Tuesday, but the modest moves belied plenty of churning underneath.

Oil prices and energy stocks slumped to give back nearly half of their huge gains from a day earlier. Rising prices for technology stocks and companies that sell to consumers, though, more than made up for those losses. Treasury yields fell a second straight day as the Federal Reserve opened a two-day meeting on interest rates, where investors expect it to announce a cut for the second time in as many months.

19. US stocks close lower as spike in crude oil rattles market -

Airlines, cruise lines and other companies in fuel-dependent industries dragged U.S. stocks lower Monday after an attack on Saudi Arabia's biggest oil processing facility sent crude prices soaring.

20. S&P 500 finishes flat; smaller company stocks notch gains -

Major U.S. stock indexes ended mixed Monday as large companies gave up early gains and smaller companies closed broadly higher.

The S&P 500 ended virtually flat as losses in technology and health care stocks outweighed gains in financials and other sectors. The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks, which has lagged the S&P 500 this year, outpaced the rest of the market.

21. Technology shines on an otherwise sluggish day for US stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Tech stocks were the standouts in an otherwise sluggish day of trading on Monday, as investors gear up for the arrival of the heart of earnings reporting season.

Apple, Intel and several chip makers jumped more than 2%, and technology stocks in the S&P 500 climbed 1.2%. But the other 10 sectors that make up the index were evenly split between gainers and losers, and none moved by more than 0.5%.

22. Walmart to pay $282 million over foreign corruption -

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — Walmart agreed Thursday to pay $282 million to settle civil and criminal allegations of overseas corruption, including payment through a Brazilian subsidiary of more than $500,000 to an intermediary known as a "sorceress" for her uncanny ability to make permit problems disappear.

23. Tech companies lead US stocks broadly higher; oil slumps -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street for the second straight day Wednesday, extending Tuesday's strong gains as investors bet an interest rate cut could be ahead.

Technology, industrial and health care companies accounted for much of the broad gains, which were tempered by a slide in energy stocks following a 3.4% plunge in the price of U.S. crude oil.

24. US stocks fall on mixed earnings, trade tensions; oil slumps -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street Wednesday, weighed down by a mixed batch of corporate earnings from big retailers and lingering uncertainty over the trade spat between the U.S. and China.

Lowe's and Nordstrom were among the biggest decliners in the S&P 500 after the retailers reported quarterly results that fell short of Wall Street's expectations. Target bucked the trend, surging after its latest results handily topped analysts' forecasts.

25. Poll shows most in US want changes in how government works -

After more than two years of the Donald Trump presidency, Andrea Petrusky is ready for some fundamental changes in the way the United States government works.

"Right now we're being shown all of the loopholes, the president being able to do all the things that no president should," said Petrusky, a 46-year-old elementary school teacher in a Seattle suburb. "It's time to update what he's allowed to do and not do. I think it's time to toddler-proof the presidency."

26. Poll finds hunger for change to US system of government -

After more than two years of the Donald Trump presidency, Andrea Petrusky is ready for some fundamental changes in the way the United States government works.

"Right now we're being shown all of the loopholes, the president being able to do all the things that no president should," said Petrusky, a 46-year-old elementary school teacher in a Seattle suburb. "It's time to update what he's allowed to do and not do. I think it's time to toddler-proof the presidency."

27. Energy companies lead modest gains for US stock indexes -

U.S. stock indexes finished modestly higher Monday, extending the market's solid gains from a rally last week.

Energy companies notched the biggest gains after the price of U.S. crude oil closed above $59 a barrel for the first time since November. Smaller company stocks fared better than the rest of the market.

28. Health companies lead US stocks their 3rd loss in a row -

Health care companies led U.S. stocks broadly lower Wednesday, giving the market its third straight loss.

Technology and energy stocks also bore the brunt of the selling, offsetting gains in materials and utilities companies. Several retailers also rose. Smaller companies fell more than the rest of the market.

29. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

30. Supreme Court rejects appeal over military burn pits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is rejecting appeals from military veterans who claim they suffer health problems because of open burn pits in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The justices on Monday left in place a federal appeals court ruling that more than 60 lawsuits over the burn pits could not go forward.

31. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for October 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, October 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

32. Energy companies lead US stocks lower after oil price plunge -

The steepest drop in oil prices in more than three years put investors in a selling mood Tuesday, extending a losing streak for the S&P 500 index to a fourth day.

Energy stocks led a late-afternoon sell-off on Wall Street after the price of U.S. crude oil plunged 7.1 percent to $55.69 a barrel, the lowest level since December 2017.

33. Tech stocks drop as Congress scrutinizes social media -

NEW YORK (AP) — Technology companies dropped Wednesday as Facebook and Twitter executives testified before Congress. Consumer-focused companies like Amazon and Netflix also slumped.

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey told a Senate panel they are working to stop manipulation of their services by foreign countries. Legislators criticized Alphabet, Google's parent company, for refusing to send its CEO to the hearing.

34. US stock indexes end unevenly after day of listless trading -

U.S. stock indexes capped a day of listless trading with a mixed finish Monday, as gains by banks and technology companies were offset by losses in other sectors.

Bond yields rose, pointing to a pickup in interest rates on consumer loans, which helped drive bank shares higher. Technology stocks also posted solid gains, adding to the sector's market-leading showing this year. Alphabet, Google's parent company, surged in aftermarket trading after it reported its latest quarterly results.

35. After an early stumble, US stock indexes end modestly higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market shook off a bumpy start and ended modestly higher Friday, led by gains in consumer products companies like Monster Beverage and Procter & Gamble. Health care companies also rose. Energy companies slipped along with the price of oil.

36. After an early stumble, US stock indexes end modestly higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market shook off a bumpy start and ended modestly higher Friday, led by gains in consumer products companies like Monster Beverage and Procter & Gamble. Health care companies also rose. Energy companies slipped along with the price of oil.

37. Pharma deals, shutdown pact help stocks set more records -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hefty gains for energy and technology companies helped U.S. stocks set more records Monday. Drugmakers announced two major deals worth about $20 billion and smaller-company stocks climbed after the Senate reached a short-term deal to end the government shutdown.

38. US stocks decline for a second straight day; oil falls -

Technology companies led U.S. stocks lower Wednesday, giving the market its biggest loss since early September.

Grocery stores and packaged foods and beverage companies also accounted for much of the decline. Energy stocks fell as the price of crude oil closed lower a day after its biggest loss since October. Banks and phone companies eked out modest gains.

39. US stocks bounce back to records as tech companies rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks bounced back to record highs Tuesday as investors put an end to a two-day drop for technology companies. Energy and consumer-focused companies also made outsize gains.

40. Oil's well: Rising energy stocks help send S&P 500 to record -

NEW YORK (AP) — A spurt in oil prices on Monday revived energy stocks, which have been among the year's worst performers, and helped push the broader market back to record highs.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index climbed 11.42 points, or 0.5 percent, to 2,402.32, edging past its prior record set last week.

41. Losses for finance, health care companies send stocks lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slumped Friday as financial and health care companies moved lower. Industrial companies rose as stocks continued the up-and-down pattern they've been stuck in for the last month.

42. Stocks hold steady as oil prices slide further; banks rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes are slightly higher Thursday morning as interest rates continue to move higher and banks climb with them. Energy companies continue to fall with the price of oil. Retailers Tailored Brands and Staples are falling after weak quarterly reports, but Sears is climbing as investors are pleased it cut its losses. Stocks have fallen for the last three days.

43. US stock indexes close slightly lower; oil prices slide -

Energy companies led U.S. stock indexes slightly lower Monday as the price of crude oil fell.

Real estate, phone companies and other high-dividend stocks did better than the rest of the market as bond yields headed lower, making those sectors more appealing to investors seeking income.

44. Companies set monthly record for mergers, acquisitions -

U.S. companies are cutting merger deals at a record pace even though antitrust regulators have moved to oppose several recent high-profile combinations.

So far this month, companies have agreed to mergers and acquisitions valued at $249 billion, according to financial information provider Dealogic. That surpasses the previous record of $240 billion in July 2015.

45. Stocks wilt after FBI inquiry into new Clinton emails -

NEW YORK (AP) — A midday advance on the stock market wilted in afternoon trading Friday after the FBI notified Congress that it will investigate new emails linked to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

46. Stocks rise as tepid jobs report stokes hopes for low rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are rising Friday as a slowdown in hiring last month raised investors' hopes that the Federal Reserve may wait even longer before raising interest rates. Energy companies made the biggest gains as the price of oil turned higher for the first time this week.

47. Feds say health mergers would increase costs, threaten care -

WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — The U.S. government is suing to stop two major health insurance mergers, a move regulators say is needed to protect Americans from potential cost hikes and lower quality care.

48. Stocks skid, bond yields hit record lows on British worries -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slumped Tuesday as investors grew fearful over the health of the British financial system. Looking for safety, they flocked to Treasury notes and pushed the yields on long-term government bonds to all-time lows. Energy companies took the biggest losses as oil prices tumbled.

49. Federal Reserve relief and oil prices send stocks higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks jumped Monday after Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen again managed to soothe investors' jangled nerves. The Standard & Poor's 500 index made its highest close in 2016, and oil prices also reached their highest levels of the year.

50. Bridgestone abandons crisis-wracked Venezuela after 62 years -

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Tire maker Bridgestone is selling its business in Venezuela after six decades in the country, the latest blue chip company to abandon the country as a result of runaway inflation and strict currency controls.

51. Retailers lead a broad decline in stocks as Macy's plunges -

NEW YORK (AP) — A rout in retail stocks pulled U.S. indexes down on Wednesday. Macy's, the largest U.S. department store chain, slashed its annual profit forecast after it reported a steep drop in earnings. Office Depot and Staples took big losses after a judge blocked their plans to merge.

52. Halliburton, Baker Hughes eye future after merger scuttled -

DALLAS (AP) — Halliburton and Baker Hughes, whose planned merger is the latest big deal to be shot down by antitrust regulators, now must pick up the pieces and shore up their companies during a severe slump in oil and gas drilling.

53. US stocks rise as health care and energy companies soar -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks broke a two-day losing streak Wednesday as investors bought up drugmakers and other health care companies. Energy companies also jumped as the price of oil surged.

54. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for January 2016 -

Top commercial real estate sales, January 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

55. Energy stocks lead a market gain as oil price climbs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks advanced for a third straight day on Wednesday, once again helped by higher oil prices, which lifted shares in oil and gas companies.

Trading was light as Wall Street and the rest of the country heads into Christmas and the New Year. U.S. markets will be open for only a half day on Thursday.

56. Extended slump in oil taking toll on industry, economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — As drivers, shippers and airlines continue to enjoy lower fuel prices, the oil industry is responding to much lower profits with sharp cuts in spending and employment that are hurting economic growth.

57. US stocks notch modest gains on solid earnings reports -

U.S. stocks are closing with modest gains after several companies reported solid earnings.

Toymaker Hasbro and the oil and gas company Halliburton rose after reporting results Monday that were better than analysts were expecting.

58. US stocks gain, rebounding from Friday's slump; Hasbro jumps -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market bounced back from a big loss on Friday after getting a boost from some good first-quarter earnings reports.

Toy maker Hasbro reported an unexpected gain in sales on the back of strong demand for its Transformer, Nerf and Marvel toys. Oil and gas services company Halliburton and investment bank Morgan Stanley also reported results that we're better than analysts were expecting.

59. CEOs in 10 big mergers to get $430M: Equilar study -

NEW YORK (AP) — This year's flurry of corporate mergers may not pay off for shareholders in the long run, but one thing is for sure: The bosses who are selling their companies will do just fine.

The CEOs who've decided to sell in the 10 biggest U.S. deals this year are set to rake in an estimated $430 million in "golden parachute" payments, according to a study done by pay-tracking firm Equilar at the request of The Associated Press. Translation: It would take the typical American household 847 years of work to get what the average CEO will receive in one fell swoop.

60. S&P 500 index ekes out a record; DreamWorks sinks -

Despite a day of mostly listless trading, the Standard & Poor's 500 index managed to notch another all-time high.

The index on Monday inched past its most recent record-high close set on Friday, extending its gain for the year to 10.4 percent. The Dow Jones industrial average also ended higher after briefly eclipsing its most recent high. The Nasdaq composite ended lower.

61. Energy stocks fall as oil slips below $80 -

NEW YORK (AP) — The price of oil dipped below $80 a barrel Monday, after a major investment bank lowered its forecast for crude prices this year and next.

Goldman Sachs analysts now expect U.S. oil prices to be roughly $75 a barrel in 2015, down from their previous forecast of $90 a barrel. Goldman also sees Brent crude, a benchmark used to price international oils used by many U.S. refineries, to be around $85 a barrel.

62. Falling oil prices drag US stock market lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks fell again Thursday, putting indexes on track for a fourth straight decline, as energy companies dragged down the broader market. Once again, economic concerns in Europe were translating into worries in the U.S.

63. Gulf of Mexico residents hail ruling against BP -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Environmentalists, recreational fishermen and people who make their living on the Gulf of Mexico are hailing a federal judge's ruling that could mean $18 billion in additional fines for BP over the nation's worst offshore oil spill.

64. Judge: BP's reckless conduct caused Gulf oil spill -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — BP bears the majority of responsibility among the companies involved in the nation's worst offshore oil spill, a federal judge ruled Thursday, citing the energy giant's reckless conduct in a ruling that exposes the company to billions of dollars in penalties.

65. Halliburton reaches $1.1B oil spill settlement -

HOUSTON (AP) — Halliburton says it has agreed to pay $1.1 billion to settle a substantial portion of plaintiff claims arising from the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

The settlement, which is subject to court approval, will be paid into a trust until appeals are resolved over the next two years.

66. Officials: Sanctions on Russia could be delayed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sanctions aimed at key economic sectors in Russia because of its threatening moves in Ukraine might be delayed because of positive signals from Russian President Vladimir Putin, according to Obama administration officials.

67. Court raises bar for securities class action cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday made it tougher for investors to join together to sue corporations for securities fraud, a decision that could curb the number of multimillion dollar legal settlements companies pay out each year.

68. Supreme Court to decide 17 more cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's crunch time at the Supreme Court, where the justices are racing to issue opinions in 17 cases over the next two weeks.

The religious rights of corporations, the speech rights of abortion protesters and the privacy rights of people under arrest are among the significant issues that are so far unresolved.

69. Stocks end mixed on quiet day; energy stocks fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market paused Monday, ending on a mixed note, after a string of records in recent weeks.

Investors had little company-specific news to digest and trading was light ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday later this week. Still, the market was hit with broader geopolitical news. The U.S. and other world powers reached a deal Sunday to limit Iran's nuclear program, an event that dragged down oil prices and energy stocks.

70. Halliburton seeking settlement over Gulf oil spill -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — BP's cement contractor on the drilling rig that exploded in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 announced Monday that it is trying to negotiate a settlement over its role in the disaster, a focus of trial testimony that ended last week.

71. Halliburton posts 1Q loss on litigation charges -

HOUSTON (AP) — Halliburton says it lost $18 million in the first quarter, pulled down by $637 million in charges related to its role in the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

But it made money if unusual items are excluded, beating Wall Street expectations.

72. Energy stocks lead a turnaround on Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing modestly higher on Wall Street, led by energy companies as oil prices rise back following a plunge last week.

Investors were focusing on earnings news from major U.S. companies.

73. BP exec back on the stand in oil spill trial -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Another BP executive was expected on the witness stand Thursday to face more questions from attorneys for the U.S. government, which is trying to prove the oil company is mostly to blame for a deadly explosion on the Deepwater Horizon rig that led to a massive oil spill.

74. S&P 500 in longest winning streak since 2004 -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Standard & Poor's 500 index closed above 1,500 on Friday for the first time since the start of the Great Recession in 2007, lifted by strong earnings from Procter & Gamble and Starbucks.

75. BP to pay US billions for Gulf spill -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Oil giant BP has agreed to pay the largest criminal penalty in U.S. history, totaling billions of dollars, for the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a person familiar with the deal said Thursday.

76. Hands On Nashville has new president & CEO, officers -

Hands On Nashville’s board of directors has recognized executive director Brian Williams’ leadership contributions and the nonprofit’s historic capacity growth by changing Williams’ title to president and CEO.

77. 2nd triple-digit loss for Dow in 2 days -

NEW YORK (AP) — Fear that Spain may need a bailout sent its borrowing costs soaring, the euro to a two-year low against the dollar and stocks around the world tumbling as investors pulled back Monday from all manner of risk.

78. Halliburton 1Q income rises 23 pct -

NEW YORK (AP) — Halliburton Co. says its first-quarter profit increased 22.7 percent as the oil industry aggressively searched for new oil fields in North America.

79. Europe weighs heavily on US stock market -

NEW YORK (AP) — It hardly needed it, but the U.S. stock market on Wednesday got another reminder of how its fortunes are inexorably tied to the European economy.

All three major U.S. stock indexes sank after a dismal report about bad loans on the books of Spanish banks. The day before, U.S. stocks had soared after Spain held a successful auction of 2-year bonds.

80. BP shares rise on Gulf settlement news -

LONDON (AP) — Shares in BP PLC hit their highest level in more than a year Monday in the wake of the oil company's announcement that it had reached a settlement with victims of the massive Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

81. BP hikes dividend after strong fourth quarter -

LONDON (AP) — BP PLC has raised its quarterly dividend by 14 percent after posting double-digit gains in profit and revenue in the last three months of 2011 despite further big payments to compensate for the disastrous oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

82. Halliburton 4Q profit jumps 50 pct -

NEW YORK (AP) — Halliburton is reporting that its net income jumped nearly 50 percent in the final three months of 2011 as rising oil prices sparked new drilling projects.

The Texas-based company posted earnings of $906 million Monday, or 98 cents per share, for the fourth quarter. That compares with $605 million, or 66 cents per share, for the same part of 2010.

83. BP settles with maker of failed blowout preventer -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Cameron International, the maker of the Deepwater Horizon blowout preventer that failed to stop last year's massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, has agreed to pay $250 million to BP under a legal settlement, BP said Friday.

84. BP cited for 5 more alleged violations -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Federal regulators have issued a second set of violations against BP for activities related to the 2010 blown-out well that led to the deaths of 11 rig workers and the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history.

85. Halliburton boosts 3Q profits by 26 pct -

NEW YORK (AP) — Halliburton reported a 26 percent jump in the third-quarter net income Monday as drilling projects in North American continue to boost revenue.

The Houston oil services company reported earnings of $683 million, or 74 cents per share, for the three months ended Sept. 30. That compares with $544 million, or 60 cents per share for the same period in 2010.

86. US gov't prepares to release BP oil spill report -

A key report into what caused the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history was being readied for release as early as Wednesday amid revelations that BP made critical mistakes on the well and failed to tell its partners and the U.S. government when it realized it.

87. Halliburton 2Q earns grow 54 percent -

NEW YORK (AP) — The expansion of oil and natural gas drilling in North America continued to drive Halliburton Co. as its earnings jumped by nearly 54 percent in the second quarter. Revenue also hit a company record for the period.