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Editorial Results (free)

1. Hit the workweek running with ‘Sprint’ -

All day long, ideas run through your head. Will this work? What if that process is tweaked? Can you make things more efficient, more cost-effective, speed them up, rev their engines?

Or, as you’ll see in the new book “Sprint” by Jake Knapp, John Zeratsky, and Braden Kowitz, is there a better way to conquer the meeting rat-race?

2. So you want to be a social media star -

A little more than a year ago, Leslie Mosier uploaded a video to Facebook and Instagram of her 2-year-old dog, an extraordinarily mellow 20-pound pug named Doug, skittering around Dragon Park with a pug-shaped Mylar balloon tied to his torso.

3. US stock indexes end mixed as investors size up earnings -

A rebound in the price of oil and natural gas helped drive sharp gains for energy and financial companies, nudging U.S. stocks mostly higher Friday.

That offset a slide in the technology sector following disappointing earnings from Microsoft, Google parent Alphabet and other big names.

4. EU expands battle with Google with Android antitrust probe -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union is broadening its battle with Google, alleging that the technology giant rigs the global market for mobile apps by making its Android operating system give preferential treatment to its own products.

5. Microsoft suit is latest tech clash with US over privacy -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — As we live more of our lives online, the companies we trust with our digital secrets are increasingly clashing with authorities who want access to the messages, pictures, financial records and other data we accumulate in electronic form.

6. Aim high: How to reach C-Level decision makers -

Getting a meeting with C-level decision makers is no easy task, but it can be done. As with any true success, it all starts with doing your homework.

First, target the right organizations. Make a list of 10 to 20 companies that would make an ideal customer.

7. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

8. UK's Daily Mail in early talks over bid for Yahoo -

The owner of Britain's Daily Mail newspaper and media group is in early talks over a bid for the ailing U.S. internet company Yahoo.

A spokesman for the DailyMail.com said Sunday that, given the success of its site and Elite Daily, it has "been in discussions with a number of parties who are potential bidders." He said the talks are in a very early stage and there is no certainty any transaction will take place.

9. Experts caution self-driving cars aren't ready for roads -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Self-driving cars are more likely to hurt than help public safety because of unsolved technical issues, engineers and safety advocates told the government Friday, countering a push by innovators to speed government approval.

10. US cites Chinese Internet filters as trade barrier -

BEIJING (AP) — The American government has cited Chinese Internet controls as a trade barrier in a report that comes as Beijing tries to block its public from seeing news online about the finances of leaders' families.

11. Going to job fair not such a bad idea -

Yesterday, I found myself saying something I often say this time of year: “One of my all-time favorite things is to go to a job fair!”

The response I received was not unexpected. The job seeker hadn’t even thought of attending a job fair since college. They seem so juvenile on some level.

12. Facebook programs computers to describe photos for the blind -

MENLO PARK, Calif. (AP) — Facebook is training its computers to become seeing-eye guides for blind and visually impaired people as they scroll through the pictures posted on the world's largest online social network.

13. No, you’re not really a technophobe -

There’s an elephant in the room. It’s something we’re talking about, but not really getting to the heart of. The elephant is our relationship with technology.

Very often, I speak with someone who says, “I’m a great manager and I’m good with people, but I absolutely am not comfortable with technology. I can do anything but things related to technology.”

14. Frost Brown Todd grows in Nashville -

Frost Brown Todd has added two new attorneys to its Nashville office.

Richard (Rick) J. Nickels has joined the firm’s Estates, Trusts and Wills practice group. For nearly 20 years, Nickels’ legal focus has been to represent privately held companies, families and individuals in corporate and estate planning matters. He advises on federal transfer and income taxes, and drafts wills and a range of other estate planning documents. On the corporate side, Nickels advises owners, directors and executives of closely held companies in matters such as early-stage structure and funding, mid-stage buyouts and divorces, and late-stage exits.

15. That secret online resume hack? It doesn’t really exist -

There seems to be a rumor about job searching floating around. Have you heard? Finding a job is easy.

It’s easy as long as you format your resume in a very specific way and you include the perfect phrases on your LinkedIn profile.

16. Who said that? Some old saying not really so old -

I wrote a couple of columns in October 2008 that, taken together, set forth a quotation and then endeavored to correctly identify the source thereof.

That quotation – “I don’t cry over spilt milk, but a fallen scoop of ice cream is enough to ruin my whole day,” attributed to one Terri Guillemets – may be found throughout cyberspace to this day.

17. Google gives federal plan for self-driving car -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Google wants Congress to create new federal powers that would let the tech giant receive special, expedited permission to bring to market a self-driving car that has no steering wheel or pedals.

18. Autonomous cars aren't perfect, but how safe must they be? -

DETROIT (AP) — As autonomous car technology rapidly progresses, makers of the cars face the difficult question of how safe they must be before they're ready to move people on highways and city streets.

19. New industry, housing spur Midstate growth -

The bitter taste of Hemlock Semiconductor’s abandonment of plans to build a billion-dollar plant in Montgomery County has been sweetened somewhat, one of many in the commercial real estate market in Nashville’s surrounding counties.

20. GM buys software company to speed autonomous car development -

DETROIT (AP) — With hopes of speeding development of self-driving cars, General Motors has acquired a small software company that's been testing vehicles on the streets of San Francisco.

The Detroit automaker says it purchased Cruise Automation, a 40-person firm that was founded just three years ago.

21. Snapchat, Seagate among companies duped in tax-fraud scam -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Tax-filing season is turning into a nightmare for thousands of employees whose companies have been duped by email fraudsters. A major phishing scheme has tricked several major companies — among them, the messaging service Snapchat and disk-drive maker Seagate Technology — into relinquishing tax documents that exposed their workers' incomes, addresses and Social Security numbers.

22. Tech industry groups, security experts back Apple -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The nation's leading tech companies joined security experts, independent programmers and civil liberties advocates who filed court papers backing Apple in its fight with the FBI over an encrypted iPhone used by an extremist killer.

23. Amazon amplifies its Alexa line of voice-controlled devices -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Amazon.com is introducing two devices designed to amplify the role its voice-controlled assistant Alexa plays in people's homes and lives.

24. Google donates $1M to help fight Zika virus spread -

Google is donating $1 million to fight the spread of the Zika virus and help engineers and data scientists determine where it will hit next.

Zika has become epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean since last fall. The virus is mainly spread through mosquito bites and has been potentially linked to birth defects.

25. CEO Tim Cook defends Apple's resistance in FBI iPhone case -

CUPERTINO, California (AP) — Apple CEO Tim Cook defended his company's opposition to the FBI's iPhone-hacking plan at its annual shareholder meeting, one day after the tech giant formally challenged a court order to help the FBI unlock an encrypted iPhone used by a murderous extremist in San Bernardino, California.

26. Google will back Apple in court against the FBI -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google will back Apple in its court battle with the FBI over the security of its iPhone.

Last week, a court ordered Apple to help the FBI hack into a locked iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino killers in December's shooting spree. Apple opposes the order.

27. Companies experiment with build-your-own smartphone programs -

NEW YORK (AP) — If you could build your dream smartphone, what would it look like? Now suppose you could put it together yourself.

That's the promise of modular design, a new concept in smartphones that would basically let you snap together different components like Lego blocks. Say you want a great camera. Snap! A vivid screen and good sound because you watch a lot of video? Snap! But maybe you could live with a smaller battery because you spend most of your day at home or work. Snap!

28. Study: Lexus, Porsche and Buick are most dependable -

DETROIT (AP) — Lexus, Porsche and Buick are the most dependable vehicle brands based on the number of problems reported by owners, according to a study released Wednesday by the consulting firm J.D. Power.

29. Bill Gates sides against Apple in FBI iPhone-unlocking case -

LONDON (AP) — Bill Gates is siding against Apple — and many other technology companies — in saying the firm should help the U.S. government to hack into a locked iPhone as part of an investigation into the San Bernardino shooting.

30. Zuckerberg to press on with Internet access despite setback -

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg vowed Monday to press on with his 3-year-old effort to bring the developing world online, even after Indian regulators banned one of the pillars of the campaign.

31. How Apple ended up in the government's encryption crosshairs -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — As the maker of trend-setting gadgets like the iPhone and iPad, Apple has changed the way people use technology in their daily lives. Now, after positioning itself as a champion of privacy, the tech giant has sparked a potentially momentous conflict with the federal government over encryption.

32. Apple to fight order to help FBI unlock shooter's iPhone -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook says his company will fight a federal magistrate's order to help the FBI hack into an encrypted iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino, California shooters. The company said that could potentially undermine encryption for millions of other users.

33. Government will consider Google computer to be car's driver -

DETROIT (AP) — Computers that control cars of the future can be considered drivers just like humans, the federal government's highway safety agency has found.

The redefinition of "driver" by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is an important break for Google, taking it a step closer to its goal of self-driving cars without steering wheels, pedals or human drivers.

34. Alphabet comes before Apple as world's most valuable company -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Alphabet now comes before Apple atop the list of the world's most valuable companies.

The shift occurred in Monday's extended trading after Alphabet, Google's new parent company, released a fourth-quarter earnings report that highlighted the robust growth of the digital ad market. Apple Inc.'s iPhone, meanwhile, is suffering its first downturn since it debuted eight years ago.

35. Stocks sink, weighed down by another drop in price of oil -

NEW YORK (AP) — Another steep drop in the price of oil weighed on global markets Tuesday. Investors remained deeply concerned about the global economy following this week's disappointing Chinese and U.S. manufacturing data.

36. Regulators get input — sort of — on self-driving car rollout -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California regulators deciding how to permit the future rollout of self-driving cars have been told by consumer advocates that their cautious approach was right on, and by companies developing the technology that the current course will delay deployment of vehicles that promise huge safety benefits.

37. California wrestles with making self-driving cars public -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Companies that are developing self-driving cars of the future want government regulators to clear the road for public access to the technology, once it emerges from current prototype testing.

38. How much bandwidth do you really need? -

As Americans move more of their life online, they’re also looking for higher Internet speeds that are best provided by the cable and fiber networks that cable companies like Comcast own – although most don’t need the much-hyped gigabit speed Internet service that Comcast currently offers in Tennessee and Google will offer in Nashville when it finishes building its Google Fiber network.

39. Cutting cable/satellite: Here’s how to build your system -

Are you ready to cut the coax and enter the wild world of cable-free content? Here’s how to build your own TV service a la carte.

Internet access – for high definition streaming of movies and TV shows

Chances are you already have Internet service in your house and can go online on your computers and other digital devices.

40. Ready to cut the cord on cable/satellite? -

If you’ve resolved to lower your bills this year, you might want to look at your TV screen. No, not for help from Dave Ramsey or Suze Orman, but at the cable connected to it.

Can you can envision life without hundreds of channels? If so, you might be able to save money by becoming a cord-cutter.

41. US Government developing policies for self-driving cars -

DETROIT (AP) — The federal government wants to get autonomous vehicles on the road more quickly, and says it will fast-track policies and possibly even waive regulations to do it.

U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx — surrounded by representatives from General Motors and Ford as well as Google and Tesla — said Thursday that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will spend the next six months developing guidance for automakers on what's expected of self-driving prototype cars and what sort of tests should be used to make sure they are safe.

42. Mobile means everything to marketing in 2016 -

The ninth in an 11-part series on the Top Ten 2016 Marketing Trends.

In 2016, mobile doesn’t just matter; it’s everything.

In 2015, 62 percent of all digital time – that’s total Internet traffic – was spent on mobile devices, up from 50 percent in 2014. And that number is expected to continue growing rapidly in 2016.

43. Cancer survivor Scott builds Narus on lessons learned -

Whether it was building models from an erector set, writing a cookbook at age 10 or starting a catering company at age 13, Sloane Scott’s parents knew early on that she was “made of different stuff” and, to their credit, never sought to tame it.

44. In California tests, self-driving cars still need human help -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Futuristic self-driving cars traveling along California roads have needed plenty of old-fashioned human intervention to stay safe.

California's Department of Motor Vehicles on Tuesday released reports filed by seven companies the agency gave permission to test prototype vehicles in public. The documents summarized instances in which a human driver had to take over due to technology problems or other safety concerns.

45. The smart-tech future beckons to us from the CES gadget show -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Look around. How many computing devices do you see? Your phone, probably; maybe a tablet or a laptop. Your car, the TV set, the microwave, bedside alarm clock, possibly the thermostat, and others you've never noticed.

46. General Motors invests $500m in Lyft, forms partnership -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors Co. and ride-hailing company Lyft Inc. are forming an unprecedented partnership that could help them beat their rivals to the self-driving future.

47. A breakdown of the S&P 500's sectors in 2015 -

NEW YORK (AP) — While the Standard & Poor's index is finishing 2015 around where it started, the index has been sharply divided between winners and losers. Four of the index's 10 sectors rose, while energy and five others lost ground.

48. US stocks are ending 2015 mostly flat, capping volatile year -

The U.S. stock market took investors for a wild ride in 2015, but in the end it was a trip to nowhere.

Despite veering between record highs and the steepest dive in four years, the stock market is on track to end the year essentially flat. That means if you invested in a fund that tracks the Standard & Poor's 500 index, you have little to show for the past 12 months.

49. Is your business ready for online video marketing? -

A shocking 80 percent of the world’s Internet traffic will be video by 2019. Think for a moment about the sheer magnitude.

This has been a landmark year for video, with 2015 being the first year in which U.S. adults spent more time digesting video content than they spent on social networks, according to eMarketer.

50. New app helps Nashvillians catch their bus -

One of the biggest complaints about Metro’s bus system has long been not enough people use it.

The reason for this, and/or the second-biggest complaint, depending on your perspective, has been that the buses were difficult to use because the schedule seemed more like a suggestion than an actual timetable.

51. Expect 2016 to be 'pivotal year' in app adoption -

With our sights set on 2016, it’s the perfect time for reflection on your growth strategy. What marketing successes will you carry over from 2015 into the New Year, and which will you abandon? What marketing trends, anticipated for 2016, are worthy of consideration in your 2016 plan?

52. Women are out-earning men in corporate finance -

Women may be badly outnumbered in the top ranks of corporate America, but at least they aren't underpaid.

Compensation for female chief financial officers at S&P 500 companies last year outpaced that of their male counterparts, according to an analysis by executive compensation firm Equilar and the Associated Press. It follows a similar trend seen with female CEOs in recent years.

53. Facebook adding 'Photo Magic' to Messenger application -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook is trying to make it easier to send photos as the holiday season's picture-taking frenzy escalates with the arrival of Christmas and New Year's Eve.

The world's largest social networking service is offering a feature call "Photo Magic" that will automatically address a message so it can be sent quickly to Facebook friends identified in a picture. The option relies on the same image-recognition technology that attaches people's names to Facebook posts.

54. California: Self-driving cars must have driver behind wheel -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California unveiled precedent-setting draft rules Wednesday that would slow the public's access to self-driving cars of the future until regulators are confident the technology is safe.

55. Too many social media choices? Bank on Facebook -

With the New Year almost upon us, it’s time to adjust your marketing strategy to propel your company’s growth in 2016.

Reflect on what worked and what didn’t with your 2015 plan, and consider trends on the horizon that could further amplify your results.

56. Entrepreneur Center names Lingo president, COO -

Sam Lingo has been appointed president and COO of the organization Nashville Entrepreneur Center.

In addition, John Murdock has been promoted to vice president of entrepreneurial development and Heather McBee has been promoted to vice president of accelerator programming, and Kelli Nowers has been promoted to community director.

57. Wal-Mart to launch own mobile pay system -

NEW YORK (AP) — The mobile payment wars are heating up. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's largest retailer, said it's launching its own mobile payment system that will allow shoppers to pay with any major credit or debit card or its own store gift card through its existing smartphone app at the cash register.

58. Wal-Mart to launch own mobile pay system -

NEW YORK (AP) — The mobile payment wars are heating up. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's largest retailer, said it's launching its own mobile payment system that will allow shoppers to pay with any major credit or debit card or its own store gift card through its existing smartphone app at the cash register.

59. Farm, historic building weddings gain in popularity -

If you’ve got it, flaunt it – that’s the mindset of many couples that want to show off the beauty of Tennessee to their family and friends with a rustic, indoor or outdoor wedding.

60. Yahoo going back to the drawing board with Alibaba spinoff -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo's long-running identity crisis is spiraling in a new direction now that the company is abandoning a year's work on a tax-dodging spinoff to pursue an alternative path that will carve off its Internet business instead.

61. Country music exhibit included in Google interactive -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum is included in a new online exhibition called Google Cultural Institute.

The museum and Google say in a news release the exhibition offers interactive experiences from 60 cultural institutions. Google says it allows viewers to experience the best in dance, music, opera and more.

62. Google ups ante, nearly doubles bet on renewable energy -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google is nearly doubling the amount of renewable energy feeding its massive data centers that enable more than 1 billion people to search for information, watch video clips and communicate virtually anytime they want.

63. Yahoo mulls shareholder demand to sell Internet business -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo's board is considering an activist shareholder's demand to sell the Internet services the company is best known for, a maneuver that might help the company dodge a tax bill of more than $10 billion looming over its holdings in China's Alibaba Group.

64. Siri, please tell me why I’m losing business -

While some of the tried and true strategies that performed well for you in 2015 should no doubt carry forward, there are also several emerging marketing trends that could benefit your company’s growth strategy.

65. Upbeat feds revising self-driving car position -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Federal transportation officials are rethinking their position on self-driving cars with an eye toward getting the emerging technology into the public's hands.

Just two years ago, the U.S. Department of Transportation struck a cautious tone. Its official policy statement, published in May 2013, says cars should be limited to testing and not "authorized for use by members of the public for general driving purposes."

66. Corporate America's problem: Falling profit, revenue -

NEW YORK (AP) — Corporate America has a profit problem. U.S company earnings are falling for the first time since 2009, when the economy was still reeling from the Great Recession.

The main culprit is the plunging price of oil, which has decimated earnings at big energy companies like Exxon Mobil and Chevron. Mining companies have also taken a beating because of tumbling prices for gold, silver and copper.

67. Stocks march higher, ending their best week so far this year -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market closed out its best week of the year Friday as big gains by retailers and technology companies pushed major indexes higher.

Stocks faded as Friday wore on, but they still finished higher. The S&P 500 index climbed almost 3.3 percent this week. By just a hair, that was the biggest weekly gain for the index in 2015.

68. Emerald ash borer devastates Tennessee forests -

The emerald ash borer is an unassuming little bug, an almost-pretty insect that could fit on the head of a penny with three or four of its brothers.

But these little green pests are weaving a wormy path of destruction through Tennessee’s lumber industry to the tune of $11 billion. That’s a lot of pennies, and a lot of emerald ash borers.

69. Apple Pay expands as it vies for broader acceptance -

NEW YORK (AP) — Apple's year-old mobile-payments service is expanding to more countries, banks and merchants, as it faces growing competition and some challenges before it becomes as commonplace as plastic cards.

70. Google Maps offers offline option when Internet is spotty -

NEW YORK (AP) — Google Maps is getting disconnected. With an update for Android phones Tuesday, you'll be able to search nearby businesses and get driving directions, including turn-by-turn voice prompts, even if your Internet connection is spotty or non-existent. Google says a version for iPhones will come soon.

71. Toyota invests $1 billion in artificial intelligence in US -

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota is investing $1 billion in a research company it's setting up in Silicon Valley to develop artificial intelligence and robotics, underlining the Japanese automaker's determination to lead in futuristic cars that drive themselves and apply the technology to other areas of daily life.

72. Microsoft gets stingy with free online storage -

NEW YORK (AP) — Microsoft is getting stingy with online storage. The company just cut the free space it offers through its OneDrive service by two-thirds, making it the second major company to retreat from a consumer cloud-storage boom that tempted users with price cuts and ever-larger free offers.

73. Google founder hopes Alphabet spells innovation -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google founder Larry Page is hoping his newly created company called Alphabet becomes synonymous with innovation.

74. Nissan test car drives itself safely, recognizes pedestrians -

TOKYO (AP) — Being a passenger in a self-driving car is similar to being driven around by a very cautious person, maybe your grandmother.

Requiring neither hands on the steering wheel nor a foot on the gas pedal or brakes, the Nissan Motor Co. car making its way on Japanese public roads is instead packed with radars, lasers, cameras and computer chips.

75. Nashville Public Library selects Meacham for honor -

Acclaimed presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning Nashvillian Jon Meacham will receive the 2015 Nashville Public Library Literary Award and will join Nashville’s own American history buff and country performer Tim McGraw for a free public lecture and conversation on Dec. 7.

76. Green self-driving cars take center stage at Tokyo auto show -

TOKYO (AP) — Visions of cars that drive themselves without emitting a bit of pollution while entertaining passengers with online movies and social media are what's taking center stage at the Tokyo Motor Show.

77. US stocks return to black after summer swoon -

NEW YORK (AP) — Maybe you shouldn't have put your money under a mattress after all.

The stock market is back in the black for the year after a bruising late-August tumble that had investors worrying about their money in a way they hadn't in four years.

78. Tech companies face rocky road on the way to making cars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Silicon Valley may think it can build a better car. But should it?

As tech giants like Google and Apple look to automobiles as the next frontier for innovation, they face a looming reality: Cars are a lot harder to manufacture and sell than smartphones.

79. Amazon 3Q results up on strong sales, cloud computing growth -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon is Primed for success as the busy holiday season approaches. The e-commerce powerhouse reported a surprise third-quarter profit, driven by a boost in revenue from its Prime Day promotion and continued strong growth in its cloud-computing offerings.

80. Tech stocks lead a rally; S&P 500 turns positive for year -

U.S. stocks closed higher on Friday, delivering their second gain in two days and pushing the Standard & Poor's 500 index back into positive territory for the year.

Strong quarterly earnings from several big-name technology companies helped rally the market, which has been gradually regaining ground following a swoon in August and September. Microsoft vaulted to a 15-year high, while Amazon and Google's parent company Alphabet closed sharply higher.

81. Appeals court rules in favor of Google's online library -

NEW YORK (AP) — Google is not violating copyright laws by digitizing books for a massive online library, a federal appeals court ruled Friday in a decadelong dispute.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan agreed with a judge who concluded that the snippets Google showed customers from its database did not violate copyright laws.

82. Yahoo's updated email app aims to kill the password -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo is trying to phase out passwords with an update to its mobile application for its email service.

The renovated app released Thursday for iPhones and Android devices will include an option called "Account Key" that allows people to sign into their email accounts by pressing on a notification sent to their smartphones instead of typing in a password.

83. Obamacare: What to do, when and how to sign up -

Open enrollment in the Affordable Care Act is just around the corner, but there’s still plenty of time to do your research, find your best health insurance options and then secure coverage for 2016.

84. Top EU court rules data sharing pact with US invalid -

LUXEMBOURG (AP) — Europe's top court ruled Tuesday that data stored on U.S. servers isn't safe because of government spying, a giant blow to companies such as Facebook that might need to change the way they handle private data from Europe.

85. Toyota shows self-driving technology being readied for 2020 -

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota unveiled its vision for self-driving cars in a challenge to other automakers as well as industry newcomer Google Inc., promising to start selling such vehicles in Japan by 2020.

86. Top economies move toward crackdown on corporate tax dodging -

PARIS (AP) — Dozens of world economies are close to adopting sweeping changes to international tax rules that could end tax-dodging by powerful multinationals — practices believed to deprive governments of up to $240 billion every year.

87. US stocks end sharply higher; GE leads gains in industrials -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied in the U.S. and overseas Monday after last week's gloomy jobs report led investors to expect that the Federal Reserve will wait even longer before making its first interest rate increase since the financial crisis.

88. GM warns the Valley: Prepare to compete over driverless cars -

MILFORD TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — Move that tiny self-driving pod out of the way.

That might as well have been the message Thursday from General Motors to Google, Apple and anyone else with designs on dominating the market for autonomous cars.

89. New TiVo DVR will skip through entire commercial break -

NEW YORK (AP) — TiVo wants to help you skip TV commercials. With one press of a button on the remote, TiVo's new digital video recorder will skip the entire commercial break.

That's quicker than the 30-second forward feature found on previous TiVos. On the new TiVo Bolt, TiVo will tag the start and end of commercial breaks so that viewers can skip that section when watching on their recordings. The feature will work with about 20 over-the-air and cable channels, including the major broadcast networks, mostly during prime-time hours.

90. Major companies form group to push for LGBT rights globally -

NEW YORK (AP) — A dozen corporations, including Google Inc., Microsoft Corp., and Coca-Cola Co., are joining a new coalition to push for LGBT rights in the workplace in places beyond the U.S. and Western Europe.

91. Google's driverless car drivers ride a career less traveled -

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — Fresh out of college, Brian Torcellini dreamed about getting a job writing about surfing.

Instead, he wound up in a dusty, dimly lit garage near Google's Silicon Valley headquarters six years ago, getting ready to ride a wave of technology that thrust him into an occupational oxymoron. He became a driver in a driverless car.

92. Nasdaq center aims to build relationships with startups -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Nasdaq has long been known as the "tech-heavy" stock exchange, where some of Silicon Valley's best-known companies have gone to sell shares. Now, as it faces stiff competition from rival exchanges to lure the next hot IPO, it's reaching out to business startups before they go public.

93. Investment treaty between China and US key business goal -

SEATTLE (AP) — When Chinese President Xi Jinping addresses a meeting of some of the top names in Chinese and American business Wednesday, they may be most interested what he says about progress toward a treaty between the nations that would provide a framework for broader investment in each other's economy.

94. Why Europe isn't creating any Googles or Facebooks -

HELSINKI (AP) — Micha Benoliel grew up in France and launched his first technology startup there, but he never forgot the atmosphere of adventure and optimism in San Francisco, where he studied in the early 1990s.

95. Report: Apple moving forward on building a car -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Apple is speeding up work on a project that could lead to the California tech giant building its own electric car, according to a new report.

The maker of iPhones and iPads is tripling the number of engineers on the project, code-named Titan, and has set a "ship date" of 2019, the Wall Street Journal said Monday. The newspaper said that could just be a target for engineers to sign off on the design, not necessarily when a car would be available for sale.

96. Events -

Business Studio Workshop: Crisis Management. Aileen Katcher of Katcher Strategic Communications will lead this workshop to help small business owners develop a crisis management plan. We’ll outline the key elements to include in the plan and how to make sure your team is ready to use it to communicate when and if (or even before) a crisis hits. This will be an interactive workshop and attendees will be put into small groups to practice managing a “crisis” with their newly developed plans. Thursday, 3:30-5 p.m. Refinery Nashville, 438 Houston Street, Suite 263, Nashville. Information: nashvillechamber.com, 615 743-3060

97. HP to jettison up to 30,000 jobs as part of spinoff -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Hewlett-Packard Co. is preparing to shed up to another 30,000 jobs as the Silicon Valley pioneer launches into a new era in the same cost-cutting mode that has marred much of its recent history.

98. Tech disruption hangs over automakers at Frankfurt show -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — A sense of impending disruption hangs over all the shiny new cars at this year's edition of the Frankfurt International Motor Show.

The potential impact of automated driving and of extensively connected cars has pushed aside electric and low-emission vehicles as the major theme in just the two years since the show was last held.

99. Fund established to close digital divide in Nashville -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Officials in Nashville have announced a fund to provide free or low-cost digital access to people in the city who don't have it.

Mayor Karl Dean's office said in a news release Tuesday that more than 40 percent of Metro Nashville Public Schools students didn't have access to computers or Internet connectivity at home in 2012.

100. Google names auto veteran to lead self-driving car push -

Google has hired auto industry veteran and former Hyundai U.S. CEO John Krafcik to run its self-driving car program.

Krafcik, 53, is credited with turning around Hyundai's U.S. operations, leading the company to huge sales increases after the Great Recession. Early in his career as a mechanical engineer he worked at a joint venture between Toyota and General Motors where he became a proponent of lean manufacturing.