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Editorial Results (free)

1. Hot inflation dims likelihood Fed can achieve 'soft landing' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For months, Chair Jerome Powell has held out hope that the Federal Reserve will be able to raise interest rates high enough to throttle rampant inflation without tipping the economy into recession.

2. After rough run, Kohl's surges on potential takeover -

Shares of Kohl's spiked more than 11% Tuesday after the retailer said that it is in advanced talks to be sold in a deal worth about $8 billion.

The Wisconsin chain said late Monday that it was in a three-week exclusive takeover period with the owner of Vitamin Shoppe for $60 per share.

3. US stocks fall; investors eye Elon Musk's offer for Twitter -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing lower on Wall Street Thursday as investors gave mixed reviews to earnings from four of the nation's largest banks. The S&P 500 fell 1.2% and ended a shortened trading week with a decline of more than 2%. The yield on the 10-year Treasury rose to 2.83% as inflation worries continue to overhang the markets. Investors again turned their attention to the drama surrounding Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Twitter. Musk offered to buy the social media company for $54.20 a share, two weeks after revealing he'd accumulated a 9% stake. The Commerce Department said retail sales rose 0.5% in March.

4. Kohl's: buyout offers undermine value of business -

NEW YORK (AP) — Kohl's says that recent offers to purchase the department store chain undervalue its business and said it's adopting a shareholder rights plan to head off any hostile takeovers.

The shareholder rights plan, which is effective immediately and is known as a "poison pill," is set to expire on Feb. 2, 2023, the company said Friday.

5. Fed to signal rate hike as it launches risky inflation fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With inflation punishing consumers and threatening the economy, the Federal Reserve this week will likely signal its intent to begin raising interest rates in March for the first time in three years. The Fed's challenges will get only harder from there.

6. Hong Kong loses shine amid tough coronavirus restrictions -

HONG KONG (AP) — The bustling, cosmopolitan business hub of Hong Kong may be losing its shine among foreign companies and expatriates with its stringent anti-pandemic rules requiring up to 21 days of quarantine for new arrivals.

7. Citigroup profits soar due to fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup profits jumped more than five fold from a year earlier, helped by an improving economy that resulted in fewer bad loans on the bank's balance sheet.

Citi is the latest big bank to see profits soar this quarter, along with JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Goldman Sachs. All of them got a one-time boost to their bottom lines because they were able to reverse some of the billions of dollars set aside last year to guard against customer defaults.

8. Stock indexes notch more records ahead of earnings reports -

Banks led stocks to modest gains on Wall Street Monday, nudging the major stock indexes to more record highs ahead of a busy week of corporate earnings reports from big U.S. companies.

The S&P 500 gained 0.3% after bouncing back from an early stumble. The benchmark index, which has notched three straight weekly gains, hit a new high, as did the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite. The indexes have managed multiple new highs despite choppy trading in recent weeks.

9. Explainer: Capital gains tax hike targets wealthy investors -

NEW YORK (AP) — After massive U.S. government spending helped send the stock market back to record heights, with even more potentially on the way, the bill may be coming due for the nation's wealthiest investors.

10. Businesses, philanthropy unite to fight racial wealth gap -

NEW YORK (AP) — The CEOs of Starbucks and Goldman Sachs will join leaders from philanthropy and academia in a new initiative to address the racial wealth gap in the United States.

The initiative is called NinetyToZero, so named for the roughly 90% wealth gap between white and Black Americans. Its leaders describe the goal as providing a roadmap for organizations to "counteract centuries of discrimination, segregation, and financial exploitation," according to the group's launch plans announced Tuesday.

11. Corporations become unlikely financiers of racial equity -

In the months since the police killing of George Floyd sparked a racial reckoning in the United States, American corpo-rations have emerged as an unexpected leading source of funding for social justice.

12. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

13. New boost for minority businesses in underserved communities -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Small minority-owned businesses have often struggled to gain access to capital and other tools to grow, a challenge made more daunting by the economic upheaval of the coronavirus pandemic. But a new effort announced Tuesday aims to address those disparities in pockets of the nation long gripped by poverty.

14. Trump's hesitation on relief bill will delay aid payments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The $900 billion economic relief package that President Donald Trump signed over the weekend will deliver vital aid to millions of struggling households and businesses. Yet his nearly one-week delay in signing the bill means that it will take that much longer for the financial support to arrive.

15. Survey: Business economists see full recovery by end of 2021 -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. economy's growth is likely slowing as 2020 comes to a close, but a growing number of economists expect it to claw back to its pre-pandemic strength by the second half of next year as vaccines for the coronavirus become widely distributed.

16. Biden's next obstacle: How to help mangled economy -

BALTIMORE (AP) — Joe Biden will inherit a mangled U.S. economy — one that never fully healed from the coronavirus and could suffer again as new infections are climbing.

The once robust recovery has shown signs of gasping after federal aid lapsed. Ten million remain jobless and more layoffs are becoming permanent. The Federal Reserve says factory output dropped.

17. Surge in virus threatens to reverse global economic rebounds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The resurgence of coronavirus cases engulfing the United States and Europe is imperiling economic recoveries on both sides of the Atlantic as millions of individuals and businesses face the prospect of having to hunker down once again.

18. Summer US economic growth already fading -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans may feel whiplashed by a report Thursday on the economy's growth this summer, when an explosive rebound followed an epic collapse.

The government will likely estimate that the economy grew faster on an annualized basis last quarter than in any such period since record-keeping began in 1947.

19. As election uncertainty sweeps markets, the pros hold steady -

NEW YORK (AP) — This presidential election is clearly unlike any other, but investors might be wise to treat it just like most of the previous ones.

History shows the stock market's performance doesn't correlate that closely with which party controls the White House: It tends to rise following elections regardless of who wins. Because of that, many fund managers are sticking with their investment strategies and focusing on the long term — even in a year when the election's outcome could be in doubt past Election Day, and the nation is in the grip of a pandemic.

20. Ex-Trump adviser Steve Bannon charged in border wall scheme -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump's former chief strategist, Steve Bannon, was pulled from a yacht and arrested Thursday on allegations that he and three associates ripped off donors trying to fund a southern border wall, making him the latest in a long list of Trump allies to be charged with a crime.

21. Stocks rise on vaccine hopes; S&P 500 back within 5% of high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Markets worldwide rallied on rising hopes for a COVID-19 vaccine Wednesday, and the S&P 500 climbed back to where it was a few days after it set its record early this year.

22. You're not the only one skeptical of the stock market rally -

Just because stocks have scrambled nearly all the way back to their record heights doesn't necessarily mean the market is in the clear.

Stocks have a long history of making big gains within long-term down markets, only for the bottom to give out again. Such mini-, ultimately futile rallies were regular occurrences during the Great Depression, and they've been recurring in some of the most recent downturns. They've happened often enough that Wall Street has a name for them: bear market rallies.

23. CEO pay has topped $12.3M. Can it keep rising post-pandemic? -

The typical pay package for CEOs at the biggest U.S. companies topped $12.3 million last year, and the gap between the boss and their workforces widened further, according to AP's annual survey of executive compensation.

24. Housing market chills, layoffs, US cos. dial up virus fight -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

25. Stocks surge again after relief bill passed; indexes up 6% -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks marched higher for a third straight day Friday as a massive coronavirus relief bill gets closer to passing Congress and Wall Street took some historically bad unemployment figures in stride.

26. Many businesses cautious about restarting economy amid virus -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — President Donald Trump wants the country open for business by mid-April, but some experts warn it's not as easy as flipping a switch: Economies run on confidence, and that is likely to be in short supply for as long as coronavirus cases in the United States are still rising.

27. Whiplash: All at once, a steady US economy screeches to halt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three weeks ago, EmpireCLS was heading toward a second straight year of record business. A car service company in New Jersey, Empire couldn't even find enough chauffeurs and office workers to meet its needs.

28. Dow drops more than 900 points, ending worst week since 2008 -

Wall Street ended the week the same way it began: in full retreat from the coronavirus.

Stocks fell sharply and the price of oil sank Friday as federal and state governments moved to shut down bigger and bigger swaths of the nation's economy in the hope of limiting the spread of the outbreak.

29. Stocks nosedive on Wall Street, triggering trading halt -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks dropped 8% in the first minutes of trading Monday on Wall Street and triggered another temporary halt to trading as huge swaths of the economy come closer to shutting down, from airlines to restaurants. Emergency actions taken by the Federal Reserve late Sunday to prop up the economy and get financial markets running smoothly again may have raised fears even further, some investors said.

30. Virus seizes markets; it's no longer business as usual -

Global markets and businesses big and small opened the week to a landscape seemingly altered by the coronavirus pandemic. National retail chains have closed all stores. Banks are taking steps to keep cash on hand, lots of it. Markets in Asia, Europe and the U.S. are plunging. Following is a quick look at how the outbreak is impacting the financial and business sector, as well as millions of workers and customers.

31. Trump economic team grasps for credibility with outbreak -

WASHINGTON (AP) — During the financial crisis a decade ago, President Barack Obama could look around the room and turn to an economist who served as Harvard's president, a former president of the New York Federal Reserve and a renowned academic considered one of the world's authorities on the Great Depression.

32. Trump economic team grasps for credibility with outbreak -

WASHINGTON (AP) — During the financial crisis a decade ago, President Barack Obama could look around the room and turn to an economist who served as Harvard's president, a former president of the New York Federal Reserve and a renowned academic considered one of the world's authorities on the Great Depression.

33. Market swings and a wave of cancellations as virus spreads -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the outbreak is now classified as a pandemic and it's doing widespread damage to critical economic sectors of the global economy.

34. UBS Bank won't fund new offshore Arctic oil, gas projects -

KENAI, Alaska (AP) — A multinational investment bank has ended support for offshore drilling in the Arctic amid efforts to tackle climate change, a move that could affect future funding for oil and gas projects in Alaska, a newspaper said.

35. Fed's Powell faces a puzzling crisis with no simple solution -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jerome Powell is confronting his stiffest test yet as head of the Federal Reserve in an atmosphere vastly altered from what his predecessors faced. It makes an uncertain situation even more challenging.

36. Alaska officials react strongly to JPMorgan oil pullback -

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska state officials reacted with alarm this week after a second large U.S. bank said it would not support future oil and gas projects in the Arctic.

The state's energy commission responded by shredding his Chase credit card after JPMorgan Chase & Co. announced a broad initiative earlier this week to combat climate change and promote renewable energy, The Anchorage Daily News reported Thursday.

37. US economy grew at 2.1% rate in Q4 but virus threat looms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of 2.1% in the final quarter of last year, but damage from the spreading coronavirus is likely depressing growth in the current quarter and for the rest of the year.

38. US manufacturing output hit by Boeing troubles, slips 0.1% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. manufacturing output fell slightly in January, driven lower by Boeing's decision to halt production of its troubled 737 MAX aircraft.

The Federal Reserve said Friday that factory output declined 0.1% last month after eking out a 0.1% gain in December. Excluding the production of airplanes and parts, factory production rose 0.3%.

39. Powell hears bipartisan Senate support for Fed independence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican and Democratic senators voiced strong support for an independent Federal Reserve during a hearing with Fed Chair Jerome Powell, one day after President Donald Trump launched another attack directed at Powell on Twitter.

40. Banks post big profits, but lower interest rates are a worry -

NEW YORK (AP) — So far, it appears 2019 was another record year for Wall Street.

Trading of stocks and bonds rebounded after a terrible end to 2018 and consumers spent tons of money on their credit cards, buoyed by a strong job market and steady economic growth. On Tuesday, JPMorgan Chase reported a record annual profit, while Citigroup posted its best results since before the Great Recession.

41. Stocks climb ahead of trade deal, sending S&P 500 to record -

Technology companies led stocks to broad gains on Wall Street Monday, driving the S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite indexes to more record highs.

Financial, communications services and industrial stocks also notched solid gains. Health care stocks were the only decliners. Bond prices fell, sending yields higher, and the price of gold fell, signs that investors were favoring higher-risk holdings.

42. After ebullient 2019, Wall Street warns of slower road ahead -

NEW YORK (AP) — After a year of nirvana, investors may need to get ready for something a little more normal.

Markets are coming off a fabulous 2019, where stocks and bonds around the world climbed in concert. But for the next year — and decade, in fact — Wall Street is telling investors to set their expectations considerably lower.

43. After ebullient 2019, Wall Street warns of slower road ahead -

NEW YORK (AP) — After a year of nirvana, investors may need to get ready for something a little more normal.

Markets are coming off a fabulous 2019, where stocks and bonds around the world climbed in concert. But for the next year — and decade, in fact — Wall Street is telling investors to set their expectations considerably lower.

44. Slight gains on Wall Street are enough for more record highs -

Wall Street extended its milestone-shattering run Tuesday with modest gains for stocks, nudging the major indexes to more record highs.

The S&P 500 had its fifth gain in a row. The benchmark index and the Nasdaq closed at new highs for the fourth straight day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also closed at a record high, it's second milestone this week.

45. Wall Street feuds with Warren, much to her apparent delight -

NEW YORK (AP) — Senator Elizabeth Warren’s fight with Wall Street escalated when billionaire investor Leon Cooperman called the presidential candidate’s proposal to put a new tax on the nation’s wealthiest people a plan to “penalize success” and said her ideas “made no sense.”

46. Solid company earnings power broad rally for US stocks -

Stocks notched solid gains on Wall Street Tuesday as investors welcomed surprisingly good quarterly results from some of the nation's biggest companies.

Strong earnings from UnitedHealth Group, JPMorgan Chase and other companies helped power the market's broad gains, erasing modest losses from a day earlier.

47. US stocks rebound from sell-off as Fed rate cut odds improve -

Technology and health care companies helped U.S. stocks rebound broadly from an early sell-off Thursday, snapping the market’s steep two-day skid.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average swung from a loss of more than 330 points to a gain of more than 120 after another disappointing economic report raised expectations among investors that the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates again to help keep the U.S. economy growing. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq also recovered from the early rout.

48. Dow Jones industrials cross 27,000 points for first time -

A turbulent day on Wall Street ended in the record books Thursday as the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed above 27,000 for the first time and the S&P 500 index hit another all-time high.

The milestones came on a day when the S&P 500 briefly moved above 3,000 for the second straight day before an early rally lost some of its momentum.

49. Big business to Supreme Court: Defend LGBTQ people from bias -

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 200 corporations, including many of America' best-known companies, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

50. US stocks, bond yield slump, signaling market jitters -

U.S. stocks fell broadly Tuesday as anxious investors shifted money into bonds, sending yields to their lowest level in nearly two years.

Rising bond prices, which pull yields lower, are typically a sign that traders feel jittery about long-term growth prospects and would rather put their money into safer holdings.

51. Climate activists block entrance to London Stock Exchange -

LONDON (AP) — Environmental activists who have disrupted the British capital for 10 days blocked the main entrance to the London Stock Exchange on Thursday, gluing themselves to the doorway while wearing LED displays reading "climate emergency."

52. Climate activists block entrance to London Stock Exchange -

LONDON (AP) — Environmental activists who have disrupted the British capital for 10 days blocked the main entrance to the London Stock Exchange on Thursday, gluing themselves to the doorway while wearing LED displays reading "climate emergency."

53. S&P 500 notches 3rd straight weekly gain as US stocks rally -

Stocks notched solid gains on Wall Street Friday, erasing most of the losses the market sustained after an uneven week of trading.

The strong finish gave the S&P 500 its third straight weekly gain. The benchmark index is now just under 1% from its most recent all-time high set on September 20, reflecting the strong rebound for the market this year after a dismal slide in December.

54. CEOs of big banks face off with House Democrats -

NEW YORK (AP) — The heads of seven of the largest banks in the U.S. fielded sometimes contentious questions from a House committee on Wednesday, some dealing with current risks to the financial system and other focused on more politically-charged topics.

55. US-China trade truce sends US stocks solidly higher -

A welcome truce in the escalating U.S.-China trade dispute put investors in a buying mood Monday, sending U.S. stocks solidly higher and extending the market's gains from last week.

The broad rally, which lost some of its early morning momentum, followed gains in overseas markets as investors welcomed news of the temporary, 90-day stand-down, which was agreed to over dinner between President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit over the weekend.

56. Tech giants slide, pulling US stock market sharply lower -

A broad sell-off in technology companies pulled U.S. stocks sharply lower Monday, knocking more than 600 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

The wave of selling snared big names, including Apple, Amazon and Goldman Sachs. Banks, consumer-focused companies, and media and communications stocks all took heavy losses. Crude oil prices fell, erasing early gains and extending a losing streak to 11 days.

57. US stocks wobble as trade hopes flicker and tech stocks slip -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks wobbled between gains and losses then finished with a split decision Wednesday as technology companies dropped. That canceled out gains for energy companies.

Oil and gasoline prices continued to rise Wednesday after a big gain the day before, and U.S. crude reached its highest price in two months. Chipmakers fell, while Apple slipped after announcing new features for iPhones and Apple Watches.

58. Stocks fall as crude oil prices drop 4 percent; banks climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major U.S. indexes closed mostly lower Monday as investors bought banks but sold most other types of stocks, including health care and technology companies. Energy stocks sank along with oil prices.

59. Trump economic adviser Larry Kudlow suffers heart attack -

NEW YORK (AP) — Larry Kudlow, the prominent economic commentator who joined the Trump administration this year as the president's top economic adviser, has suffered a "very mild" heart attack, the White House said Monday night.

60. Fed proposes easing rule that limits risky bank trading -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is proposing to ease a rule aimed at defusing the kind of risk-taking on Wall Street that helped trigger the 2008 financial meltdown.

The Fed under new leadership on Wednesday unveiled proposed changes to the Volcker Rule, which bars banks' risky trading bets for their own profit with depositors' money. The changes would match the strictest applications of the rule to banks that do the most trading.

61. Uber CEO aims to pare losses and get 'the love back' -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi is focused on cutting the company's massive losses and "getting the love back" after a year of damaging revelations about the ride-hailing service's sometimes heartless treatment of its employees, drivers, regulators and rivals.

62. Goldman Sachs expects $5B hit from tax overhaul in 4Q -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs expects to take a $5 billion hit to profits for the fourth quarter and year because of the tax overhaul signed into law last week.

The New York bank on Friday became one of the first to release details on how changes in the tax code will affect how money parked overseas is handled.

63. US stock indexes close mostly up; New highs for S&P 500, Dow -

Big-name companies notched gains on Wall Street Tuesday, delivering more records for two of the major stock indexes.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index and the Dow Jones industrial average finished at all-time highs for the second day this week, while a slide in technology stocks pulled the Nasdaq lower. Small-company stocks also lagged.

64. Bitcoin futures soar amid frenzy over virtual currency -

CHICAGO (AP) — Bitcoin's debut on a major U.S. exchange is a hit so far, with the price of the first-ever futures contract for the virtual currency rising 16 percent.

The futures contract that expires in January was up $2,440 to $17,900 Monday afternoon on the Chicago Board Options Exchange. Trading began Sunday, and the price rose as high as $18,850, according to data from the CBOE.

65. As Brexit talks stall, European cities hunt for London jobs -

LONDON (AP) — Hubertus Vaeth is not about to let a good crisis go to waste.

With London-based banks, insurers and asset managers scrambling to prepare for Britain's exit from the European Union, he's putting out the welcome mat for anyone looking for a new EU base. Vaeth, who heads Frankfurt's financial services trade association, estimates 10,000 jobs could move to the German city from London as a result of the impending upheaval.

66. US stock indexes close mostly higher; new highs for Dow, S&P -

Gains by health care companies led U.S. stock indexes mostly higher Tuesday, pushing the market further into record territory.

The Dow Jones industrial average briefly climbed above the 23,000 mark for the first time, settling just below the milestone. Slight gains nudged the Dow and Standard & Poor's 500 indexes to new highs for the second straight day this week.

67. US stock indexes post slight gains, extending winning streak -

U.S. stocks posted modest gains Monday, extending a record-setting run into a sixth straight week.

Financial and technology companies notched some of the biggest gains. Energy stocks also rose as crude oil prices closed higher. Health care companies declined the most. Bond prices fell.

68. Actively managed funds catch up, a bit, to index funds -

NEW YORK (AP) — At last, a bit of redemption for the stock pickers.

Nearly half of all actively managed U.S. stock funds did better than a composite of index funds in the 12 months through June, according to Morningstar. Only about a quarter of those funds could make that claim at the end of 2016.

69. A puzzle for central bankers: Solid growth but low inflation -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) — Against a backdrop of strengthening growth but chronically low inflation, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen and other central bankers are taking their measure of the global economy at their annual conference in the shadow of Wyoming's Grand Teton Mountains.

70. Johnson & Johnson, Goldman sneeze and stocks catch a cold -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks fell Tuesday after weak first-quarter reports from Johnson & Johnson and Goldman Sachs frustrated investors who hope that company earnings are on the rise. Health care companies lost the most.

71. Kushner, taking new White House role, faces rare scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jared Kushner has been a power player able to avoid much of the harsh scrutiny that comes with working in the White House. But this week he's found that even the president's son-in-law takes his turn in the spotlight.

72. Business with China only sometimes a deal-breaker for Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Anthony Scaramucci announced to the world in January that he would be leaving Wall Street for the White House to become President Donald Trump's top public liaison. Not long after, Scaramucci was told by Trump's chief of staff that the sale of his hedge fund — a deal that includes a well-known Chinese conglomerate — raised too many ethics issues for him to start work immediately.

73. Dublin sees future as hub for financial firms fleeing Brexit -

DUBLIN (AP) — Britain's plans to leave the European Union threaten to cause Ireland all kinds of economic and security headaches. But a silver lining is expanding daily along the crane-filled banks of the River Liffey, a likely post-Brexit refuge for British banking operations.

74. Record highs for US stocks; Dow crosses 21,000-point mark -

Investors bet big on U.S. stocks Wednesday, giving the market its biggest single-day gain in nearly four months and pushing the major indexes to record highs.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose above 21,000 points for the first time in what was the biggest gain for the blue-chip index so far this year.

75. Stocks battle to a mixed finish as drugmakers rally -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks fought their way to a mixed finish Tuesday as drugmakers rallied, which mostly canceled out losses for industrial companies. Investors shifted their money to less risky investments for the second day in a row.

76. US stock indexes move lower in morning trading; oil rises -

Real estate investment trusts led a modest slide for U.S. stocks in morning trading Wednesday. The broad decline wiped out most of the gains from the day before, when the Nasdaq composite index closed at a record high. Trading was quiet in a light week of economic and company news before the New Year's Day holiday weekend.

77. The holiday shopping season is losing some of its power -

NEW YORK (AP) — The holiday shopping season is losing some of its power in the year's sales.

November and December now account for less than 21 percent of annual retail sales at physical stores, down from a peak of over 25 percent, and experts believe it'll keep dropping. Those extra percentage points would have translated into an extra $70 billion more in buying for last year, says Michael Niemira, principal at The Retail Economist.

78. Goldman ordered to pay $120M to settle manipulation charges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Goldman Sachs has been ordered to pay $120 million to settle federal regulators' charges that it deliberately manipulated a global benchmark for interest-rate swaps to its advantage.

79. Trump voter lost her home to new Treasury secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When Donald Trump named his Treasury secretary, Teena Colebrook felt her heart sink.

She had voted for the president-elect on the belief that he would knock the moneyed elites from their perch in Washington, D.C. And she knew Trump's pick for Treasury_Steven Mnuchin_all too well.

80. Treasury nominee Mnuchin was Trump's top fundraiser -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Steven Mnuchin, President-elect Donald Trump's expected choice to be the nation's 77th treasury secretary, has had a long history as a successful financial executive and a shorter but significant period in a job that ushered him into Trump's inner circle: head of Trump's campaign finance operation.

81. US stock market notches biggest gain in 8 months; oil rises -

The U.S. stock market rebounded from a nine-day losing streak Monday, posting its biggest gain in eight months and driving the Dow Jones industrial average up more than 370 points.

Financial stocks led the broad market rally, which erased more than half of the losses racked up by the Standard & Poor's 500 index since October 25.

82. US stocks rebound on strong company earnings; oil rises -

Surprisingly strong earnings from Netflix, UnitedHealth Group and other companies put investors in a buying mood Tuesday, driving U.S. stocks solidly higher.

Health care stocks led the gainers. Materials, utilities and a broad swath of other companies also posted gains. Industrials and consumer-focused stocks notched the smallest gains. Energy stocks also rose as the price of crude oil recovered from an earlier slide.

83. OPEC output rises, complicating cartel's price-boosting plan -

PARIS (AP) — Oil production from OPEC nations hit a record last month, according to an international energy group, highlighting the cartel's challenge in trimming output to drive up prices.

The International Energy Agency said Tuesday that production from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries hit a record high in September of 33.64 million barrels a day.

84. Outdoor giant Bass Pro to acquire rival Cabela's for $4.5B -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Outdoor gear giant Bass Pro is snapping up rival Cabela's in a $4.5 billion deal announced Monday.

Bass Pro is paying Cabela's shareholders $65.50 cash per share, a 19 percent premium to Friday's closing price. The deal combines two companies known for their giant destination superstores.

85. Steady hiring is now benefiting a broader group of Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Years of steady job gains have finally begun to benefit a wider range of Americans, including those with less education and in lower-paying jobs.

A second straight month of robust hiring — 255,000 jobs added in July — pointed to employer confidence that suggested that the economy is powering through a slump that struck early this year. The unemployment rate remained a low 4.9 percent, the Labor Department said Friday.

86. Stocks skid, bond yields hit record lows on British worries -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slumped Tuesday as investors grew fearful over the health of the British financial system. Looking for safety, they flocked to Treasury notes and pushed the yields on long-term government bonds to all-time lows. Energy companies took the biggest losses as oil prices tumbled.

87. Late sell-off leaves US stocks barely higher; oil rises -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes inched upward Tuesday, led by gains in energy companies as the price of oil closed above $50 a barrel for the first time in almost a year.

The market had been on track for its highest close since last July, but an afternoon stumble erased most of the early rally, leaving broad indicators with meager gains for the day.

88. US stock indexes close mostly higher; oil price rebounds -

U.S. stocks closed mostly higher on Tuesday, led by gains in energy, mining and financial companies.

The Dow Jones industrial average and the Standard & Poor's 500 index eked out small gains. The tech-heavy Nasdaq composite closed modestly lower, reflecting a slump in technology stocks, which were dragged down by Netflix and IBM.

89. GE asks US to drop "systemically important" tag for Capital -

NEW YORK (AP) — General Electric Co. asked the U.S. to drop the "too big to fail" tag for GE Capital, saying that its financing operations are a shadow of what they were when the Federal Reserve placed it under strict oversight in the aftermath of the global economic crisis almost a decade ago.

90. AP FACT CHECK: Claims from the Republican debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Did Ted Cruz mean to suggest he would have gone to war with Iran over its brief detention of U.S. sailors? Did Donald Trump forget that he proposed a massive tax on Chinese goods? And does Ben Carson really think Islamic State militants chill out with a cigar?

91. Goldman Sachs to pay $5 billion in mortgage settlement -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs said Thursday it will pay roughly $5 billion to settle federal and state probes of its role in the sale of shoddy mortgages in the years leading to the housing bubble and subsequent financial crisis.

92. Expect less and buy antacid: 2016 investment forecasts -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investing is becoming more of a grind. Expect it to stay that way.

Analysts, mutual-fund managers and other forecasters are telling investors to expect lower returns from stocks and bonds in 2016 than in past years. They're also predicting more severe swings in prices. Remember that 10 percent drop for stocks that freaked investors out in August? It likely won't take another four years for the next one.

93. US spending bill may aid economy just as Fed is pulling back -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just as the Federal Reserve is pulling back slightly on the economic accelerator, Congress is pressing down a bit harder.

The spending and tax-cut package that Congress approved Friday stands to modestly boost growth next year. It could also help drive a shift away from government as a drag on economic growth to a source of potential stimulus.

94. UnitedHealth cuts outlook, casts doubt on overhaul exchanges -

The nation's largest health insurer is questioning its future in public insurance exchanges, the latest signal of major concerns about the online marketplaces that have helped the Affordable Care Act extend coverage to millions of people.

95. UnitedHealth ties to public insurance exchanges uncertain -

UnitedHealth chopped its 2015 earnings forecast and the nation's largest health insurer has begun to question its future in public insurance exchanges, a key component in the nation's health care overhaul.

96. Major companies form group to push for LGBT rights globally -

NEW YORK (AP) — A dozen corporations, including Google Inc., Microsoft Corp., and Coca-Cola Co., are joining a new coalition to push for LGBT rights in the workplace in places beyond the U.S. and Western Europe.

97. Oil production in US seen tumbling due to price drop -

PARIS (AP) — Oil supply from the United States, Russia and other non-OPEC countries is expected to drop sharply next year — possibly the steepest decline since the Soviet Union collapsed — because of low prices, the International Energy Agency forecast Friday.

98. White House announces $4B in private sector climate pledges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is announcing $4 billion in pledges from major foundations and institutional investors to pay for innovations that reduce carbon pollution. President Barack Obama is also using his executive powers to help make such investments easier.

99. Why I skipped the bank and took out a loan from my 'peers' -

NEW YORK (AP) — When I realized I was paying off six different credit cards and not getting anywhere, I decided to consolidate my debt, like millions of other Americans.

I visited my local bank, asked for a $15,000 loan but was offered an interest rate higher than my cards were charging.

100. Largest US banks all pass latest round of Fed 'stress tests' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — All of the nation's 31 largest banks are adequately fortified to withstand a severe U.S. and global recession and keep lending, the Federal Reserve said Thursday.

Results of the Fed's annual "stress tests" show that as a group, the 31 banks are stronger than at any time since the 2008 financial crisis struck, thanks to a steadily recovering economy. The results build on positive outcomes from last year's stress tests.