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Editorial Results (free)

1. Pressure on Fed's Powell is rising as inflation worsens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell surely expected to have some breathing room after taking the first step this month to dial back the Fed's emergency aid for the economy.

2. Americans give bosses same message in record numbers: I quit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans quit their jobs at a record pace for the second straight month in September, in many cases for more money elsewhere as companies bump up pay to fill job openings that are close to an all-time high.

3. Soaring prices a heavy burden for consumers as holidays near -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A worsening surge of inflation for such bedrock necessities as food, rent, autos and heating oil is setting Americans up for a financially difficult Thanksgiving and holiday shopping season.

4. US consumer prices soared 6.2% in past year, most since 1990 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices for U.S. consumers jumped 6.2% in October compared with a year earlier as surging costs for food, gas and housing left Americans grappling with the highest inflation rate since 1990.

5. Stocks end higher, giving S&P 500 its best week since July -

Stocks ended higher again on Wall Street Friday, giving the S&P 500 its best week since July. The benchmark index added 0.7% and ended the week up 1.8%.

Encouraging reports on the economy and corporate profits helped the market steady itself following a shaky few weeks.

6. Goldman Sachs' profits jump 60% helped by deal-making frenzy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs' profits jumped 60% in the third quarter, as the deal-making bonanza that dominated financial markets this summer brought in hundreds of millions of dollars in fee revenue for the investment bank.

7. White House: LA port going 24/7 to ease shipping backlog -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said Wednesday it has helped broker an agreement for the Port of Los Angeles to become a 24-hour, seven-days-a-week operation, part of an effort to relieve supply chain bottlenecks and move stranded container ships that are driving prices higher for U.S. consumers.

8. Small businesses navigate ever-changing COVID-19 reality -

NEW YORK (AP) — For a brief moment this summer, it seemed like small businesses might be getting a break from the relentless onslaught of the pandemic. More Americans, many of them vaccinated, flocked to restaurants and stores without needing to mask up or socially distance.

9. Delta variant and worker shortage keep a lid on job growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added just 194,000 jobs in September, a second straight tepid gain and evidence that the pandemic has kept its grip on the economy, with many companies struggling to fill millions of open jobs.

10. Puzzle overhanging job market: When will more people return? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the U.S. government issues the September jobs report on Friday, the spotlight will fall not only on how many people were hired last month. A second question will command attention, too: Are more people finally starting to look for work?

11. Fed watchdog to investigate officials' financial trades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An independent investigator will look into whether Federal Reserve officials broke the law with financial trades last year that have come under congressional scrutiny and sharp criticism from outside the central bank.

12. Ozy CEO: 'premature' to shut down after week of scandal -

NEW YORK (AP) — The CEO of Ozy Media on Monday said it had been "premature" to shut down and that he wants the media company to keep operating.

Carlos Watson, a former former cable-news commentator and host who founded Ozy in 2013, told CNBC Monday morning that he has been meeting with advertisers and investors over the weekend and that he wants Ozy to continue to be around. The company did not answer emailed questions Monday about whether employees were still working or getting paid or how Ozy intended to stay open.

13. Marc Lasry, chairman of embattled media org Ozy, resigns -

Marc Lasry, the hedge-fund billionaire and Milwaukee Bucks co-owner who was named chairman of embattled media organization Ozy earlier this month, has resigned from its board.

"I believe that going forward Ozy requires experience in areas like crisis management and investigations, where I do not have particular expertise," Lasry said in a statement Thursday. "For that reason, I have stepped down from the company's board. I remain an investor in the company and wish it the best going forward."

14. Small agency, big job: Biden tasks OSHA with vaccine mandate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn't make many headlines. Charged with keeping America's workplaces safe, it usually busies itself with tasks such as setting and enforcing standards for goggles, hardhats and ladders.

15. Fed reviews ethics polices after prolific trading uncovered -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is reviewing the ethics policies that govern the financial holdings and activities of its senior officials in the wake of recent disclosures that two regional Fed presidents engaged in extensive trading last year.

16. US slightly upgrades GDP estimate for last quarter to 6.6% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a robust 6.6% annual rate last quarter, slightly faster than previously estimated, the government said Thursday in a report that pointed to a sustained consumer-led rebound from the pandemic recession. But worries are growing that the delta variant of the coronavirus is beginning to cause a slowdown.

17. Poll: Half of US workers favor employee shot mandate -

NEW YORK (AP) — Half of American workers are in favor of vaccine requirements at their workplaces, according to a new poll, at a time when such mandates gain traction following the federal government's full approval of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine.

18. SEC's Gensler says crypto investors need more protection -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission said that investors need more protection in the cryptocurrency market, which he said is "rife with fraud, scams and abuse."

19. Walmart mandates vaccines for workers at headquarters -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is requiring that all workers at its headquarters as well as managers who travel within the U.S. be vaccinated against COVID-19 by Oct. 4.

The Bentonville, Arkansas-based retailer is also reversing its mask policy for its employees, including vaccinated ones, who work in stores, clubs, distribution facilities and warehouses. Going forward, they will be required to wear masks in areas with high infection rates.

20. Biden orders tough new vaccination rules for federal workers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has announced sweeping new pandemic requirements aimed at boosting vaccination rates for millions of federal workers and contractors as he lamented the "American tragedy" of rising-yet-preventable deaths among the unvaccinated.

21. Biden pushing federal workers — hard — to get vaccinated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is announcing strict new testing, masking and distancing requirements for federal employees who can't — or won't — show they've been vaccinated against the coronavirus, aiming to boost sluggish vaccine rates among the millions of Americans who draw federal paychecks and to set an example for employers around the country.

22. EXPLAINER: Employers have legal right to mandate COVID shots -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The state of California. New York City. Hospitals and nursing homes. Colleges and universities. Employers are putting COVID-19 vaccine requirements into place and it's getting attention. But what happens if workers refuse?

23. Fed to discuss a pullback in economic aid with inflation up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With inflation uncomfortably high and the COVID-19 Delta variant raising economic concerns, a divided Federal Reserve will meet this week to discuss when and how it should dial back its ultra-low-interest rate policies.

24. Citigroup profits soar due to fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup profits jumped more than five fold from a year earlier, helped by an improving economy that resulted in fewer bad loans on the bank's balance sheet.

Citi is the latest big bank to see profits soar this quarter, along with JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Goldman Sachs. All of them got a one-time boost to their bottom lines because they were able to reverse some of the billions of dollars set aside last year to guard against customer defaults.

25. Bank of America's 2Q profit jumps, helped by fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America's second quarter profit more than doubled from a year earlier, as the consumer banking giant was able to move more loans onto the "good" side of its balance sheet as the pandemic wanes.

26. Stocks ease below recent records as earnings reports roll in -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street Tuesday, bringing major indexes slightly below the record highs they set a day earlier.

The S&P 500 fell 0.4%. Investors were weighing the latest quarterly earnings reports from big U.S. companies and concerns about inflation.

27. Goldman Sachs 2Q profits beat forecasts; boosts dividend -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs had the second-best quarterly profit in the firm's history in the quarter ended in June, helped by a strong performance in its investment banking division that more than made up for a decline in trading revenues.

28. Stock indexes notch more records ahead of earnings reports -

Banks led stocks to modest gains on Wall Street Monday, nudging the major stock indexes to more record highs ahead of a busy week of corporate earnings reports from big U.S. companies.

The S&P 500 gained 0.3% after bouncing back from an early stumble. The benchmark index, which has notched three straight weekly gains, hit a new high, as did the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite. The indexes have managed multiple new highs despite choppy trading in recent weeks.

29. All big banks pass latest Federal Reserve 'stress tests' -

NEW YORK (AP) — All 23 of the nation's biggest banks are healthy enough to withstand a sudden economic catastrophe, the Federal Reserve said Thursday as it released the results from its latest "stress tests," giving the banks the green light to resume paying out dividends to investors and buying back stock.

30. Big US banks to employees: Return to the office vaccinated -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's big investment banks are sending a message to their employees this summer: Get back into the office and bring your vaccination card.

New York-based Morgan Stanley said this week that all employees will be required to attest to their vaccination status. Those who are not vaccinated will be required to work remotely, which could potentially put their jobs at risk, since the bank's top executives have said they want everyone back in the office by September.

31. Want a job? Employers say: Talk to the computer -

A day after her interview for a part-time job at Target last year, Dana Anthony got an email informing her she didn't make the cut.

32. EXPLAINER: 5 key takeaways from the May jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The American economy delivered 559,000 added jobs in May.

In ordinary times, that would amount to a blockbuster burst of hiring for one month, and the response would be an outpouring of cheers.

33. Bank CEOs tell Congress they'll work to avoid foreclosures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chief executives of the nation's largest banks went in front of Congress for a second day Thursday, facing questions ranging from bitcoin to their efforts to keep Americans in their homes after government aid to pandemic-hit mortgage holders expires this summer.

34. Bank CEOs return to Congress at time of deep partisan divide -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEOs of the biggest banks went before Congress on Wednesday with plans to discuss how helpful Wall Street was for borrowers and businesses during the pandemic. Senators, reflecting the deep partisan divide between Democrats and Republicans, spent much of the hearing wanting to talk about political hot button issues like climate change, guns and voting rights.

35. US stocks close higher as banks, technology lead broad rally -

A choppy day of trading on Wall Street ended Thursday with stocks broadly higher and another all-time high for the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

Banks and technology companies led a late-afternoon turnaround that pushed the S&P 500 to a 0.8% gain, reversing the benchmark index's losses for the week. Gains in most Dow companies, including Goldman Sachs, IBM and Cisco Systems, nudged the blue chip index to a new high for the second straight day.

36. Explainer: Capital gains tax hike targets wealthy investors -

NEW YORK (AP) — After massive U.S. government spending helped send the stock market back to record heights, with even more potentially on the way, the bill may be coming due for the nation's wealthiest investors.

37. Citigroup profit triples in 1Q, tops estimates; revenue down -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's profits more than tripled in the first quarter, the banking conglomerate said Thursday, helped by the release of billions of dollars from its loan-loss reserves.

The New York-based company said it earned a profit of $7.94 billion, or $3.62 per share, compared to a profit of $2.54 billion, or $1.06 a share, in the same period a year earlier. The bank's profits were well above the $2.60 per share that analysts had been looking for, according to FactSet.

38. Bank of America profit doubles in 1Q to $8.1 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America's profits doubled in the first quarter, the bank said Thursday, as the improving economy allowed it to release billions from its loan-loss reserves that it originally set aside in the early days of the pandemic.

39. Most US stocks rise, indexes end mixed as earnings kick off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most U.S. stocks rose on Wednesday, but indexes petered out to a mixed finish as momentum weakened following an encouraging start to what's expected to be a thunderous earnings reporting season.

40. Senate OKs tough former regulator as market watchdog chief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has approved President Joe Biden's choice of Gary Gensler to head the Securities and Exchange Commission, signaling an emphasis on investor protection for the Wall Street watchdog agency after a deregulatory stretch during the Trump administration.

41. Businesses, philanthropy unite to fight racial wealth gap -

NEW YORK (AP) — The CEOs of Starbucks and Goldman Sachs will join leaders from philanthropy and academia in a new initiative to address the racial wealth gap in the United States.

The initiative is called NinetyToZero, so named for the roughly 90% wealth gap between white and Black Americans. Its leaders describe the goal as providing a roadmap for organizations to "counteract centuries of discrimination, segregation, and financial exploitation," according to the group's launch plans announced Tuesday.

42. US stocks slip in mixed trading as rate pressure ratchets up -

Rising Treasury yields put pressure once more on big technology companies Tuesday, pulling U.S. stock indexes further below their recent all-time highs.

The S&P 500 lost 0.3%. Health care stocks also dragged down the market, outweighing gains by banks, industrial stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. Smaller companies bucked the downward trend, powering the Russell 2000 index to a 1.7% gain.

43. Stock trading app company Robinhood files plan to go public -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Stock trading app company Robinhood said Tuesday that it has submitted a confidential plan to go public later this year.

The company based in Menlo Park, California, filed the paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission while at the center of a battle between online activist retail investors and institutional investors over companies such as GameStop and AMC Entertainment. Robinhood had to restrict trading of those companies earlier in the year, and has been subject to congressional investigations.

44. Corporations become unlikely financiers of racial equity -

In the months since the police killing of George Floyd sparked a racial reckoning in the United States, American corpo-rations have emerged as an unexpected leading source of funding for social justice.

45. Biden to name Sperling to oversee COVID-19 relief package -

Gene Sperling, a veteran of the Clinton and Obama administrations, will lead the oversight for distributing funds from President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus rescue package, a White House official said Monday.

46. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

47. Biden's pick for SEC flags trading app gimmicks for scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's choice to head the Securities and Exchange Commission told Congress on Tuesday that the agency should address how to protect investors who use online stock-trading platforms with flashy tech gimmicks that entice them to trade more.

48. New boost for minority businesses in underserved communities -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Small minority-owned businesses have often struggled to gain access to capital and other tools to grow, a challenge made more daunting by the economic upheaval of the coronavirus pandemic. But a new effort announced Tuesday aims to address those disparities in pockets of the nation long gripped by poverty.

49. Sitting on billions, Catholic dioceses amassed taxpayer aid -

When the coronavirus forced churches to close their doors and give up Sunday collections, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charlotte turned to the federal government's signature small business relief program for more than $8 million.

50. Why US hiring could rebound faster than expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring has weakened for six straight months. Nearly 10 million jobs remain lost since the coronavirus struck. And this week, the Congressional Budget Office forecast that employment won't regain its pre-pandemic level until 2024.

51. It's not just GameStop worrying Wall Street about a bubble -

NEW YORK (AP) — Now, even the pros on Wall Street are asking if the stock market has shot too high.

U.S. stocks have been on a nearly nonstop rip higher since March, up roughly 70% to record heights and causing outsiders to say the market had lost touch with the pandemic's reality. But Wall Street kept justifying the gains by pointing to massive support from the Federal Reserve, lifesaving deliverance from COVID-19 vaccines and efforts by Congress to pump more stimulus into the economy.

52. Goldman Sachs' profits more than double, despite pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs said its profits more than doubled from a year earlier thanks to a surge in both trading and advising revenue.

The New York-based investment bank said it earned a profit of $4.36 billion, or $12.08 per share, up from a profit of $1.72 billion, or $4.69 a share, in the same period a year earlier. The earnings were significantly better than the $7.45-per-share profit that analysts were expecting.

53. Yellen pushes GOP senators on $1.9 trillion relief package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Janet Yellen, President-elect Joe Biden's choice as Treasury secretary, said Tuesday that the incoming administration would focus on winning quick passage of its $1.9 trillion pandemic relief plan, rejecting Republican arguments that the measure is too big given the size of U.S. budget deficits.

54. Biden's test: Engineering economic boom in a partisan divide -

BALTIMORE (AP) — When Joe Biden entered the White House as vice president, the economy was cratering. Job losses were mounting. Stocks were crashing. Millions of Americans were in the early stages of losing their homes to foreclosure as the housing bubble burst.

55. Biden picks Chopra, Gensler for financial oversight roles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is set to nominate Rohit Chopra as the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, tapping a progressive ally of Sen. Elizabeth Warren to helm the agency whose creation she championed.

56. Biden's aid plan could revamp economy, prompt GOP resistance -

BALTIMORE (AP) — The $1.9 trillion rescue plan unveiled by President-elect Joe Biden offers the chance to sculpt the U.S. economy toward the Democrats' liking: a $15 minimum wage, aid to poor families and federal dollars going to public schools.

57. US loses 140,000 jobs, first monthly drop since spring -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers shed jobs last month for the first time since April, cutting 140,000 positions, clear evidence that the economy is faltering as the viral pandemic tightens its grip on consumers and businesses.

58. US unemployment claims slip to still-high 787,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment aid fell slightly last week to 787,000, a historically high number that points to a weak job market held back by the viral pandemic.

59. Trump's hesitation on relief bill will delay aid payments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The $900 billion economic relief package that President Donald Trump signed over the weekend will deliver vital aid to millions of struggling households and businesses. Yet his nearly one-week delay in signing the bill means that it will take that much longer for the financial support to arrive.

60. Stocks fall on worries about virus' spread, but pare losses -

Stocks fell on Wall Street Monday, giving back some of their recent gains, as a new, potentially more infectious strain of the coronavirus in the United Kingdom raised worries that the global economy could be in for even more punishment.

61. Survey: Business economists see full recovery by end of 2021 -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. economy's growth is likely slowing as 2020 comes to a close, but a growing number of economists expect it to claw back to its pre-pandemic strength by the second half of next year as vaccines for the coronavirus become widely distributed.

62. GOP senator, business leaders urge prompt Biden transition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pressure is increasing on a Trump administration official to authorize a formal transition process for President-elect Joe Biden.

Republican Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio on Monday called for the head of the General Services Administration to release money and staffing needed for the transition.

63. SEC Chair Clayton leaving post as top financial regulator -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jay Clayton, a former Wall Street lawyer who has headed the Securities and Exchange Commission as the financial markets' top regulator during the Trump administration, is leaving the position at year's end, the SEC announced Monday.

64. Rally fades on Wall Street, pulling indexes below records -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed mostly higher on Wednesday, helped by big technology stocks, but news of tighter restrictions in New York State helped dent an earlier rally.

The S&P 500 closed up 27.13 points, or 0.8%, to 3,572.66. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite, meanwhile, rose by 2%.

65. Biden's next obstacle: How to help mangled economy -

BALTIMORE (AP) — Joe Biden will inherit a mangled U.S. economy — one that never fully healed from the coronavirus and could suffer again as new infections are climbing.

The once robust recovery has shown signs of gasping after federal aid lapsed. Ten million remain jobless and more layoffs are becoming permanent. The Federal Reserve says factory output dropped.

66. Surge in virus threatens to reverse global economic rebounds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The resurgence of coronavirus cases engulfing the United States and Europe is imperiling economic recoveries on both sides of the Atlantic as millions of individuals and businesses face the prospect of having to hunker down once again.

67. US economy grew at 33% rate in Q3, recovery incomplete -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a record 33.1% annual rate in the July-September quarter but has yet to fully rebound from its plunge in the first half of the year — and the recovery is slowing as coronavirus cases surge and government aid dries up.

68. US economy grew at 33% rate in Q3, recovery is far from complete -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a sizzling 33.1% annual rate in the July-September quarter — by far the largest quarterly gain on record — rebounding from an epic plunge in the spring, when the eruption of the coronavirus closed businesses and threw tens of millions out of work.

69. Summer US economic growth already fading -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans may feel whiplashed by a report Thursday on the economy's growth this summer, when an explosive rebound followed an epic collapse.

The government will likely estimate that the economy grew faster on an annualized basis last quarter than in any such period since record-keeping began in 1947.

70. As virus resurges, so does fear of more economic pain ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With winter looming and confirmed viral cases rising, Bob Szuter's craft brewery and restaurant in Columbus, Ohio, could use another government lifeline to help survive until spring.

71. Standoff in Washington imperils jobless and small businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With winter looming and confirmed viral cases rising, Bob Szuter's craft brewery and restaurant in Columbus, Ohio, could use another government lifeline to help survive until spring.

72. Goldman Sachs subsidiary pleads to US charges in 1MDB probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A subsidiary of Goldman Sachs pleaded guilty on Thursday and agreed to pay more than $2.9 billion in a foreign corruption probe tied to the Malaysian 1MDB sovereign wealth fund, which was looted of billions of dollars in a corruption scandal.

73. As election uncertainty sweeps markets, the pros hold steady -

NEW YORK (AP) — This presidential election is clearly unlike any other, but investors might be wise to treat it just like most of the previous ones.

History shows the stock market's performance doesn't correlate that closely with which party controls the White House: It tends to rise following elections regardless of who wins. Because of that, many fund managers are sticking with their investment strategies and focusing on the long term — even in a year when the election's outcome could be in doubt past Election Day, and the nation is in the grip of a pandemic.

74. Stocks fall on Wall Street as hopes fade for stimulus deal -

Stocks gave up early gains and closed lower Wednesday, adding to Wall Street's losses from a day earlier.

The S&P 500 fell 0.7% after spending the morning swaying between small gains and losses. Companies that rely on consumer spending, banks and technology and communication stocks bore the brunt of the selling. Trading in stock markets overseas was subdued as coronavirus counts climb around the world, raising the risk of more government restrictions on businesses. Treasury yields fell, while prices for crude oil and gold rose.

75. Goldman Sachs profits nearly doubles, helped by trading -

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina (AP) — Goldman Sachs said Wednesday that its profits jumped sharply in the third quarter, helped by a strong performance by its trading desks and less need to set aside funds to cover potentially bad loans.

76. Government probes Microsoft's effort to boost diversity -

Microsoft says the U.S. Labor Department is scrutinizing its efforts to boost Black employment and leadership at the tech company.

Microsoft disclosed in a blog post Tuesday that it received a letter from the agency last week asking about the company's June pledge to double the number of Black and African American managers, senior individual contributors and senior leaders by 2025.

77. US layoffs remain elevated as incomes and spending weaken -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits declined last week to a still-high 837,000, evidence that the economy is struggling to sustain a tentative recovery that began this summer.

78. US layoffs remain elevated as 837,000 seek jobless aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits declined last week to a still-high 837,000, evidence that the economy is struggling to sustain a tentative recovery that began this summer.

79. Tesla announces plans to sell up to $5B in new stock shares -

DETROIT (AP) — A day after its 5-for-1 stock split took effect, Tesla is announcing plans to sell up to $5 billion worth of common shares.

The electric car and solar panel maker says in a filing with securities regulators that it intends to sell up to 10.03 million shares and use the proceeds for unspecified general corporate purposes.

80. Ex-Trump adviser Steve Bannon charged in border wall scheme -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump's former chief strategist, Steve Bannon, was pulled from a yacht and arrested Thursday on allegations that he and three associates ripped off donors trying to fund a southern border wall, making him the latest in a long list of Trump allies to be charged with a crime.

81. Ex-Trump adviser Steve Bannon charged in border wall scheme -

NEW YORK (AP) — Former White House adviser Steve Bannon was arrested Thursday on charges that he and three others ripped off donors to an online fundraising scheme "We Build The Wall."

The charges were contained in an indictment unsealed in Manhattan federal court that alleged Bannon received over $1 million himself, using some to secretly pay a co-defendant, Brian Kolfage, and to cover hundreds of thousands of dollars of Bannon's personal expenses.

82. Fed officials worried about withdrawal of government support -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumers lifted their spending in May and June but businesses remained cautious because of the tremendous uncertainty surrounding the economic outlook, Federal Reserve officials said at a policy meeting last month.

83. S&P 500 closes at a record, erasing last of pandemic losses -

Wall Street clawed back the last of the historic, frenzied losses unleashed by the new coronavirus, as the S&P 500 closed at an all-time high Tuesday.

The day's move was a relatively mild one, nudging the index up 7.79 points, or 0.2%, to 3,389.78. That eclipses the S&P 500's previous record closing high of 3,386.15, which was set Feb. 19, before the pandemic  shut down businesses around the world and knocked economies into their worst recessions in decades.

84. Stocks rise on vaccine hopes; S&P 500 back within 5% of high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Markets worldwide rallied on rising hopes for a COVID-19 vaccine Wednesday, and the S&P 500 climbed back to where it was a few days after it set its record early this year.

85. Stocks sink as virus cases jump, forcing states to backtrack -

Stocks on Wall Street fell sharply Friday as confirmed new coronavirus infections in the U.S. hit an all-time high, prompting Texas and Florida to reverse course on the reopening of businesses.

The combination injected new jitters into a market that's been mostly riding high since April on hopes that the economy will recover from a deep recession as businesses open doors and Americans begin to feel more confident that they can leave their homes again.

86. 1.48M more workers seek US jobless aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of laid-off workers seeking U.S. unemployment benefits dipped only slightly last week, and the economy shrank in the first three months of the year — evidence of the ongoing economic damage being inflicted by the viral pandemic.

87. Stocks erase an early loss after Fed widens bond purchases -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied back from a sharp, early slump on Monday to notch modest gains after the Federal Reserve unveiled its latest push to prop up the economy.

The S&P 500 climbed 0.8% in the latest day of big swings for global markets, as a remarkable, weekslong rally shows some cracks. Worries are rising that additional waves of coronavirus infections could derail the swift economic recovery that Wall Street just a week ago had seemed so sure was on the way.

88. You're not the only one skeptical of the stock market rally -

Just because stocks have scrambled nearly all the way back to their record heights doesn't necessarily mean the market is in the clear.

Stocks have a long history of making big gains within long-term down markets, only for the bottom to give out again. Such mini-, ultimately futile rallies were regular occurrences during the Great Depression, and they've been recurring in some of the most recent downturns. They've happened often enough that Wall Street has a name for them: bear market rallies.

89. US job losses in May could raise 3-month total to 30 million -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The epic damage to America's job market from the viral outbreak will come into sharper focus Friday when the government releases the May employment report: Eight million more jobs are estimated to have been lost. Unemployment could near 20%. And potentially fewer than half of all adults may be working.

90. CEO pay has topped $12.3M. Can it keep rising post-pandemic? -

The typical pay package for CEOs at the biggest U.S. companies topped $12.3 million last year, and the gap between the boss and their workforces widened further, according to AP's annual survey of executive compensation.

91. Tech stocks keep rallying, help keep Wall Street steady -

Wall Street was split on Monday, as continued gains for technology and health care stocks helped cover up for more prevalent losses elsewhere.

The S&P 500 ended the day at a virtual standstill, up just 0.52 points at 2,930.32, despite a lot of movement going on underneath. It rallied back from an earlier loss of 0.9% in the morning.

92. Banks brace for big loan defaults by US, global customers -

NEW YORK (AP) — The major banks in the U.S. are anticipating a flood of loan defaults as households and business customers take a big financial hit from the coronavirus pandemic.

JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Citigroup and Goldman Sachs raised the funds set aside for bad loans by nearly $20 billion combined in the first quarter, earnings reports released over the past two days show. And Wall Street expects that figure may go even higher next quarter, a possibility bank executives acknowledged on earnings conference calls.

93. New Trump advisory groups to consult on reopening US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he's enlisting advisers from nearly all sectors of American commerce, the medical field and elected office to help shape his plans to reopen the coronavirus-battered economy.

94. Housing market chills, layoffs, US cos. dial up virus fight -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

95. Stocks fall, capping Wall Street's worst quarter since 2008 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell Tuesday to close out Wall Street's worst quarter since the most harrowing days of the 2008 financial crisis.

The S&P 500 dropped a final 1.6%, bringing its loss for the first three months of the year to 20% as predictions for the looming recession caused by the coronavirus outbreak got even more dire. Stocks haven't had this bad a quarter since the last time economists were talking about the worst downturn since the Great Depression, when the S&P 500 lost 22.6% at the end of 2008.

96. Stocks extend losses, oil trades below $20 on virus impact -

BANGKOK (AP) — World markets started the week with more losses as countries reported surging numbers of infections from the coronavirus, forcing prolonged shutdowns of travel and business in many regions.

97. Stocks drop, but hold on to weekly gains after a big rally -

Wall Street closed lower Friday but still notched big gains for the week as investors held out hope that a $2 trillion rescue package will cushion businesses and households from the economic devastation being caused by the coronavirus.

98. Stocks surge again after relief bill passed; indexes up 6% -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks marched higher for a third straight day Friday as a massive coronavirus relief bill gets closer to passing Congress and Wall Street took some historically bad unemployment figures in stride.

99. Many businesses cautious about restarting economy amid virus -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — President Donald Trump wants the country open for business by mid-April, but some experts warn it's not as easy as flipping a switch: Economies run on confidence, and that is likely to be in short supply for as long as coronavirus cases in the United States are still rising.

100. Goldman sees US oil prices 'well below' $20 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs is warning of another sharp drop in oil prices, saying some oil producers are eventually going to have to shut some wells because of dramatic decline in demand due to the coronavirus outbreak.