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Editorial Results (free)

1. Climate bill's unlikely beneficiary: US oil and gas industry -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The U.S. oil industry hit a legal roadblock in January when a judge struck down a $192 million oil and natural gas lease sale in the Gulf of Mexico over future global warming emissions from burning the fuels. It came at a pivotal time for Chevron, Exxon and other industry players: the Biden administration had curtailed opportunities for new offshore drilling, while raising climate change concerns.

2. US-China ties on a precipice after Pelosi visit to Taiwan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S.-China relations are teetering on a precipice after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan.

Pelosi received a rapturous welcome in Taipei and was applauded with strong bipartisan support in Washington, despite the Biden administration's misgivings. But her trip has enraged Beijing and Chinese nationalists and will complicate already strained ties even after her departure.

3. Amazon posts 2Q loss but revenue tops estimates, stock jumps -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon on Thursday reported its second-consecutive quarterly loss but its revenue topped Wall Street expectations, sending its stock sharply higher.

The Seattle-based e-commerce giant also said it is making progress in controlling some of the excess costs from its massive expansion during the COVID-19 pandemic.

4. J&J tops 2Q forecasts, trims guidance due to exchange rates -

Johnson & Johnson rode growing sales of the cancer treatment Darzalex and other key drugs to a better-than-expected second quarter, but foreign exchange rates again cut into the health care giant's 2022 forecast.

5. GM's Barra stands by ambitious EV pledge -

NEW YORK (AP) — The economy is a bit wobbly, but General Motors CEO Mary Barra isn't backing off of an audacious prediction: By the middle of this decade, her company will sell more electric vehicles in the U.S. than Tesla, the global sales leader.

6. Womble Bond Dickinson welcomes new partner -

Masami Izumida Tyson has joined Womble Bond Dickinson (US) LLP as a global business and international trade partner in the corporate and securities group. She is based in the firm’s new Nashville office.

7. With US dollar nearly equal to euro, impact is being felt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. dollar has been surging so much that it's nearly equal in value to the euro for the first time in 20 years. That trend, though, threatens to hurt American companies because their goods become more expensive for foreign buyers. If U.S. exports were to weaken as a result, so, too, would the already-slowing U.S. economy.

8. OPEC+ may not be much help with high oil, gasoline prices -

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil prices are high, and drivers are paying more at the pump. But the OPEC oil cartel and allied producing nations may not be much help as they decide Thursday how much more crude to send to world markets.

9. China's Baidu races Waymo, GM to develop self-driving cars -

BEIJING (AP) — With no one at the wheel, a self-driving taxi developed by tech giant Baidu Inc. is rolling down a Beijing street when its sensors spot the corner of a delivery cart jutting into its lane.

10. Solidarity behind Ukraine's Russia fight atop summit agendas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Back-to-back world leader summits in Europe this weekend will focus on uniting Western nations behind Ukraine in its fight against Russia's invasion and overcoming Turkey's opposition to NATO membership for Finland and Sweden.

11. India, China growing markets for shunned Russian oil -

NEW DELHI (AP) — India and other Asian nations are becoming an increasingly vital source of oil revenues for Moscow despite strong pressure from the U.S. not to increase their purchases, as the European Union and other allies cut off energy imports from Russia in line with sanctions over its war on Ukraine.

12. China's trade rebounds in May as anti-virus curbs ease -

BEIJING (AP) — China's trade growth rebounded in May after anti-virus restrictions that shut down Shanghai and other industrial centers began to ease.

Exports surged 16.9% over a year earlier to $308.3 billion, up from April's 3.7% growth, a customs agency statement said Thursday. Imports rose gained 4.1% to $229.5 billion, accelerating from the previous month's 0.7%.

13. US: Turkey's NATO issues with Sweden, Finland will be fixed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken said Friday he's confident Turkey's objections to Finland and Sweden joining NATO can be overcome swiftly, possibly in time for a summit of alliance leaders at the end of next month.

14. Blinken: US to leverage Russia-Ukraine bloc against China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Antony Blinken said Thursday the Biden administration aims to lead the international bloc opposed to Russia's invasion of Ukraine into a broader coalition to counter what it sees as a more serious, long-term threat to global order from China.

15. After 3 months of war, life in Russia has profoundly changed -

When Vladimir Putin announced the invasion of Ukraine, war seemed far away from Russian territory. Yet within days the conflict came home — not with cruise missiles and mortars but in the form of unprecedented and unexpectedly extensive volleys of sanctions by Western governments and economic punishment by corporations.

16. Biden invokes Defense Production Act for formula shortage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden invoked the Defense Production Act to speed production of infant formula and authorized flights to import supply from overseas, as he faces mounting political pressure over a domestic shortage caused by the safety-related closure of the country's largest formula manufacturing plant.

17. Europe's push to cut Russian gas faces a race against winter -

While Europeans bask in the warmth of spring, governments are in a race against winter.

Europe is trying to cut use of Russian natural gas because of the war in Ukraine, but still find enough fuel to keep the lights on and homes warm before it gets cold again.

18. Musk's China ties add potential risks to Twitter purchase -

BEIJING (AP) — Elon Musk's ties to China through his role as electric car brand Tesla's biggest shareholder could add complexity to his bid to buy Twitter.

Other companies that want access to China give in to pressure to follow Beijing's positions on Taiwan and other issues. But Twitter is shut out by internet barriers that block most Chinese users from seeing global social media, which gives Beijing no leverage over the company, though the ruling Communist Party uses it to spread propaganda abroad.

19. French carmaker Renault to sell Russian operations to Moscow -

Russia will take control of French car manufacturer Renault's operations in the country and resurrect a Soviet-era auto brand, officials said Monday, marking the first major nationalization of a foreign business since the war in Ukraine began.

20. Carmaker Stellantis says 1Q revenues rose, low Russia risk -

MILAN (AP) — Carmaker Stellantis on Thursday reported higher first-quarter revenues despite lower deliveries, with no significant impact from the closure of its Russian plant due to sanctions.

Stellantis, the world's fourth-largest car company formed last year from the merger of PSA Peugeot and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, said first-quarter revenue rose 12% to 41.5 billion euros ($44 billion), despite a 12% decline in shipments.

21. Energy chief Granholm touts $3B plan to boost EV batteries -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Continuing its push to dramatically boost sales of electric vehicles, the Biden administration on Monday announced $3.1 billion in funding to U.S. companies that make and recycle lithium-ion batteries.

22. US economy shrinks, threats loom, but growth likely to last -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy shrank in the first three months of the year, and faces threats from high inflation and rising interest rates, yet economists foresee a return to growth for the rest of 2022 based on the strength of the job market and consumer spending.

23. J&J suspends COVID-19 vaccine sales forecast -

Johnson & Johnson is suspending sales forecasts for its COVID-19 vaccine only a few months after saying the shot could bring in as much as $3.5 billion this year.

A global supply surplus and uncertainty about future demand — fueled in part by vaccine hesitancy in some developing markets — prompted the change, J&J said Tuesday. The company also reported a better-than-expected first-quarter profit and announced a dividend increase.

24. Efforts to make protective medical gear in US falling flat -

UNIVERSITY CITY, Mo. (AP) — When the coronavirus pandemic first hit the U.S., sales of window coverings at Halcyon Shades quickly went dark. So the suburban St. Louis business did what hundreds of other small manufacturers did: It pivoted to make protective supplies, with help from an $870,000 government grant.

25. COVID outbreak 'extremely grim' as Shanghai extends lockdown -

BEIJING (AP) — The COVID-19 outbreak in China's largest metropolis of Shanghai remains "extremely grim" amid an ongoing lockdown confining around 26 million people to their homes, a city official said Tuesday.

26. New vehicles must average 40 mpg by 2026, up from 28 mpg -

DETROIT (AP) — New vehicles sold in the U.S. will have to average at least 40 miles per gallon of gasoline in 2026, up from about 28 mpg, under new federal rules unveiled Friday that undo a rollback of standards enacted under President Donald Trump.

27. China Eastern crash is rare disaster for state-run airlines -

BEIJING (AP) — China is, along with North America and Europe, one of the world's top three air travel markets. It has dramatically improved safety since a string of deadly crashes in the 1990s and 2000s.

28. China tries to calm markets by pledging support for economy -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government tried Wednesday to reassure jittery investors by promising support for real estate and technology companies after regulatory crackdowns caused stock prices to plunge.

29. War censorship exposes Putin's leaky internet controls -

BOSTON (AP) — Long before waging war on Ukraine, President Vladimir Putin was working to make Russia's internet a powerful tool of surveillance and social control akin to China's so-called Great Firewall.

30. Russia built an economy like a fortress but the pain is real -

Western sanctions are dealing a severe blow to Russia's economy. The ruble is plunging, foreign businesses are fleeing and sharply higher prices are in the offing. Familiar products may disappear from stores, and middle-class achievements like foreign vacations are in doubt.

31. Ukraine invasion leads US lobbyists to ditch Russian clients -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A half-dozen U.S. lobbying firms severed ties with Russian-linked businesses over the past week, a dramatic pullback for an industry that often has few qualms about representing controversial interests.

32. Russia's war spurs corporate exodus, exposes business risks -

LONDON (AP) — Car factories idled, beer stopped flowing, furniture and fashion orders ceased, and energy companies fled oil and gas projects.

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has thrown business plans into disarray and forced a growing number of the world's best known brands — from Apple to Mercedes-Benz and BP — to pull out of a country that's become a global outcast as companies seek to maintain their reputations and live up to corporate responsibility standards.

33. AP FACT CHECK: Biden's State of Union is off on guns, EVs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden related a faulty Democratic talking point about guns in his first State of the Union speech, made his plan on electric vehicles sound more advanced than it is and inflated the sweep of his infrastructure package. On several fronts, he presented ambitions as achievements.

34. Russia eyes sanctions workarounds in energy, gold, crypto -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The harsh sanctions imposed on Russia and the resulting crash of the ruble have the Kremlin scrambling to keep the country's economy running. For Vladimir Putin, that means finding workarounds to the Western economic blockade even as his forces continue to invade Ukraine.

35. Shell to pull out of energy investments in Russia over war -

LONDON (AP) — Global oil and gas giant Shell said Monday that it is pulling out of Russia as President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine continues to cost the country's all-important energy industry foreign investment  and expertise.

36. China sanctions Raytheon, Lockheed over Taiwan deal -

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — China said Monday it will impose new sanctions on U.S. defense contractors Raytheon Technologies and Lockheed Martin due to their arms sales to Taiwan, stepping up a feud with Washington over security and Beijing's strategic ambitions.

37. European companies' Russian ties could make sanctions tough -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe is contemplating sanctions against Russia if it invades Ukraine — and the work is far from simple.

Sanctions would seek to maximize the pain for the Kremlin, its key banks and energy companies but also avoid jeopardizing the continent's Russian-dependent energy supplies or inflicting too much damage on European companies with strong ties to Russia, including German industrial manufacturer Siemens AG, Italian tiremaker Pirelli and automakers like Volkswagen and Mercedes-Benz.

38. US approves major $14 billion arms sale to Indonesia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration on Thursday approved a nearly $14 billion arms sale to Indonesia, as the U.S. presses ahead with steps it believes will help counter China's increasing assertiveness in the Indo-Pacific.

39. Top athletes finally cashing in on name, image, likeness change -

Scotty Pippen Jr., Donovan Sims and Uros Plavsic come from vastly different backgrounds but have this much in common: They all play college basketball in Tennessee and are among the hundreds of the state’s collegiate athletes – joined by thousands nationwide – that have taken advantage of the name, image, likeness (NIL) opportunities now afforded them.

40. EXPLAINER: Why US sanctions may target individual Russians -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House and U.S. officials have threatened Russia with financial sanctions carrying "severe consequences" if it invades Ukraine, but so far plenty of people have been prime targets for Western pain.

41. Court ruling gives Biden chance for reset on climate policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has an opportunity for a reset on climate policy after a federal judge rejected an administration plan to lease millions of acres in the Gulf of Mexico for offshore oil drilling.

42. US approves major arms sale to Egypt despite rights concerns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration on Tuesday approved a massive $2.5 billion arms sale to Egypt despite ongoing concerns over human rights.

The sales were announced just hours after congressional Democrats urged the administration not to release a much smaller package of military assistance that had been put on hold last year pending the Egyptian government meeting certain rights-related conditions.

43. China pursues tech 'self-reliance,' fueling global unease -

BEIJING (AP) — To help make China a self-reliant "technology superpower," the ruling Communist Party is pushing the world's biggest e-commerce company to take on the tricky, expensive business of designing its own processor chips — a business unlike anything Alibaba Group has done before.

44. Markets 2021: Stocks soar, IPOs explode, crypto goes wild -

Wall Street delivered another strong year for investors in 2021, as a resurgence in consumer demand fueled by the reopening of the global economy pumped up corporate profits.

As of Dec. 22, the S&P 500 had risen 25%, its third-straight annual increase. Along the way, the benchmark index set 67 all-time highs.

45. Intel apologizes for asking suppliers to avoid Xinjiang -

BEIJING (AP) — Intel Corp. apologized Thursday for asking suppliers to avoid sourcing goods from Xinjiang after the world's biggest chipmaker joined other foreign brands that face the fury of state media over complaints of abuses by the ruling Communist Party in the mostly Muslim region.

46. US trade deficit narrows in October as exports rebound -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit narrowed to $67.1 billion in October, the lowest in six months, after hitting a record high in September. A big rebound in exports helped to offset a much smaller rise in imports.

47. EXPLAINER: Chinese builder's debt struggle rattles investors -

BEIJING (AP) — Global investors are watching nervously as one of China's biggest real estate developers tries to avoid a default on its $310 billion mountain of debt.

Evergrande Group, which is scrambling to turn assets into cash, rattled financial markets Friday when it warned it might run out of money. It said missing a payment on bonds or other debts might trigger an avalanche of demands to pay other debts immediately.

48. Biden pushes electric vehicle chargers as energy costs spike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is highlighting billions of dollars in his giant bipartisan infrastructure deal to pay for the installation of electric vehicle chargers across the country, an investment he says will go a long way to curbing planet-warming carbon emissions while creating good-paying jobs.

49. Biden bill includes boost for union-made electric vehicles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress are looking to give U.S. automakers with union employees the inside track on the burgeoning electric vehicle market, triggering vocal opposition from foreign trade partners and Republicans who worry that manufacturers in their home states will be placed at a competitive disadvantage.

50. Supply chain delays disrupt California agriculture exports -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Amid an historic drought posing threats to future harvests, California farmers now say they have no way to export the crops they do have because of a kink in the global supply chain that has left container ships lined up off the Southern California coast with nowhere to deliver their goods.

51. US says oil, gas sales damage climate — won't stop them -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Biden administration is planning to sell oil and gas leases on huge tracts of public land in the U.S. West, despite the Interior Department's conclusion that doing so could cost society billions of dollars in climate change impacts.

52. Pfizer tops Q3 forecasts as total COVID vaccine sales soar -

Pfizer beat third-quarter expectations and raised its 2021 forecast again even as sales of its top product, the COVID-19 vaccine Comirnaty, slipped in the U.S.

Soaring international sales of the preventive shots helped pushed total Comirnaty revenue close to $13 billion in the quarter, and the drugmaker said Tuesday that it now expects to book about $36 billion in sales from the vaccine this year.

53. Japan keeps tourism freeze despite plunge in virus cases -

TOKYO (AP) — Filled with pink and fuzzy things and cuddly bears, 6%DOKIDOKI, a tiny store in the heart of Tokyo's Harajuku district, is bursting with "kawaii," the Japanese for "cuteness."

What it doesn't have enough of, as in zero, are foreign tourists. And it could sure use some.

54. US details new international COVID-19 travel requirements -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Children under 18 and people from dozens of countries with a shortage of vaccines will be exempt from new rules that will require most travelers to the United States be vaccinated against COVID-19, the Biden administration announced Monday.

55. Biden pushing child care provisions in stalled spending bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden was set to highlight his plan to lower the cost of child care for most American families as he makes the case for his stalled social spending bill during a visit to Connecticut on Friday.

56. EXPLAINER: Why is Chinese builder's debt struggle rattling investors? -

BEIJING (AP) — Global investors are watching nervously as one of China's biggest real estate developers struggles to avoid defaulting on tens of billions of dollars of debt, fueling fears of possible wider shock waves for the financial system.

57. AP FACT CHECK: Biden overstates UAW support of electric cars -

DETROIT (AP) — President Joe Biden glossed over important details and oversimplified the facts in his boast about support from the United Auto Workers union for his effort to dramatically increase sales of electric vehicles by decade's end.

58. Japan suspends 1.63M doses of Moderna over contamination -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan suspended use of about 1.63 million doses of Moderna vaccine Thursday after contamination was found in unused vials, raising concern of a supply shortage as the country tries to accelerate vaccinations amid a COVID-19 surge.

59. US trade deficit hits record $75.7 billion in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit increased to a record $75.7 billion in June as a rebounding American economy sent demand for imports surging.

The Commerce Department reported Thursday that the deficit rose 6.7% from a revised May deficit of $71 billion. The June deficit set a record, topping the old mark of $75 billion set in March. The trade deficit represents the gap between what the country exports to the rest of the world and what it purchases from other countries.

60. Toyota reports record profit amid pandemic, keeps forecasts -

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota reported Wednesday a record 897.8 billion yen ($8.2 billion) profit for the fiscal first quarter, underlining the Japanese automaker's resilience even amid the coronavirus pandemic.

61. EXPLAINER: Risks underlie tumbling Chinese company shares -

BEIJING (AP) — Foreign shareholders in China's tech companies are learning what its entrepreneurs have long known: The ruling Communist Party's decisions about what is good for the economy can hurt your business.

62. EU unveils tough climate rules, eyes tax on foreign firms -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union on Wednesday unveiled sweeping new legislation to help meet its pledge to cut emissions of the gases that cause global warming by 55% over this decade, including a controversial plan to tax foreign companies for the pollution they cause.

63. As employers struggle to fill jobs, teens come to the rescue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The owners of restaurants, amusement parks and retail shops, many of them desperate for workers, are sounding an unusual note of gratitude this summer:

Thank goodness for teenagers.

64. Retiring UAW leader reflects on tough times past, ahead -

DETROIT (AP) — When Rory Gamble took over as president of the United Auto Workers in 2019, the union was embroiled in a federal corruption probe that had ensnared two of Gamble's predecessors. It had just endured a 40-day strike against General Motors. And then the viral pandemic erupted, forcing auto plants to halt production and idle its workers for weeks until safety precautions were adopted.

65. EXPLAINER: Curbing tax avoidance by multinational companies -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — How can governments keep multinational companies from avoiding taxes by shifting profits to subsidiaries in low-tax countries?

Years of international discussion over the issue gathered momentum after U.S. President Joe Biden proposed a global minimum corporate tax rate of at least 15% and possibly higher. The Biden proposal has found support among the Group of Seven wealthy democracies, raising the prospect that a new approach to international taxation might be reached this year.

66. Eying deal, GM softens on tough standards for car pollution -

DETROIT (AP) — The nation's largest automaker said Wednesday it can support greenhouse gas emissions limits that other car manufacturers negotiated with California — if they are achieved mostly by promoting sales of fully electric vehicles.

67. EXPLAINER: Curbing tax avoidance by multinational companies -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — How can governments keep multinational companies from avoiding taxes by shifting their profits to low-tax countries?

For nearly a decade, nations have grappled with that question, seeking to deter companies from legally avoiding tax by resorting to so-called tax havens — typically small countries that entice companies with low or zero taxes, even though the firms do little actual business there.

68. Biden widens list of Chinese firms off-limits for investment -

China vehemently objected Friday to U.S. President Joe Biden's expansion of a list of Chinese companies whose shares are off-limits to American investors because of their purported links to the Chinese military and surveillance.

69. Huawei ex-exec on trial, accused of spying for China -

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Two men accused of spying for China went on trial Tuesday in the Polish capital of Warsaw: a Chinese citizen who is a former sales director of Huawei in Poland and a Polish cybersecurity expert.

70. Factory boss defiant as sanctions bite in China's Xinjiang -

AKSU, China (AP) — A backlash against reports of forced labor and other abuses of the largely Muslim Uyghur ethnic group in Xinjiang is taking a toll on China's cotton industry, but it's unclear if the pressure will compel the government or companies to change their ways.

71. Congratulations, your home sale has fallen through -

The negative side of the current residential real estate market, other than the fact that, on average, 90% of the offers that are submitted are rejected, is that an inordinately number of the accepted offers are eventually terminated.

72. Senator urges tough US rules barring gas-powered cars sales by 2035 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A top Senate Democrat is urging U.S. anti-pollution standards that would follow a deal brokered by California with five automakers and then set targets to end sales of new gasoline-powered vehicles by 2035, a goal that reaches farther than President Joe Biden's climate plan.

73. China's Huawei says 2020 sales rose despite US sanctions -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei said Wednesday it eked out higher sales and profit last year but growth plunged after its smartphone unit was hammered by U.S. sanctions imposed in a fight with Beijing over technology and security.

74. Why the pandemic left long-term scars on global job market -

Esther Montanez's housecleaning job at the Hilton Back Bay in Boston was a lifeline for her, a 31-year-old single mother with a 5-year-old son.

The pay was steady and solid — enough to pay her bills and still have money left over to sock away for a savings account for her child. Montanez liked her co-workers and felt pride in her work.

75. Gibraltar, a vaccine champion, launches 'Operation Freedom' -

GIBRALTAR (AP) — Maskless parents pick up smiling Cinderellas, Harry Potters and hedgehogs from schools that reopened after a two-month hiatus just in time for World Book Day's costume display. Following weeks under lockdown, a soccer team resumes training at the stadium. Coffee shops and pubs have finally raised their blinds, eager to welcome locals and eyeing the return of tourists.

76. Biden to order a review of US supply chains for vital goods -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is preparing to sign an executive order to review U.S. supply chains for large-capacity batteries, pharmaceuticals, critical minerals and semiconductors that power cars, phones, military equipment and other goods.

77. Suit blames Saudi Arabia for attack at Florida military base -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Victims of a 2019 shooting at a Florida military base and their families are suing Saudi Arabia, claiming the kingdom knew the gunman had been radicalized and that it could have prevented the killings.

78. Okonjo-Iweala becomes first woman, African to lead WTO -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Nigeria's Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala was appointed Monday to head the World Trade Organization, becoming the first woman and first African to take on the role amid disagreement over how the body decides cases involving billions in sales and thousands of jobs.

79. China arrests suspects in fake COVID-19 vaccine ring -

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Chinese police have arrested more than 80 suspected members of a criminal group that was manufacturing and selling fake COVID-19 vaccines, including to other countries.

Police in Beijing and in Jiangsu and Shandong provinces broke up the group led by a suspect surnamed Kong that was producing the fake vaccines, which consisted of a simple saline solution, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

80. Biden pauses Trump policies as Blinken takes diplomatic helm -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration paused or put under review a wide swath of Trump-era foreign policies as America's new top diplomat took the helm of the State Department.

The administration placed at least temporarily holds on several big-ticket arms sales to the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, while newly installed Secretary of State Antony Blinken said he is looking urgently at a terrorism designation against Yemen's Houthi rebels that his predecessor enacted shortly before leaving office.

81. US puts hold on foreign arms sales, including F-35s to UAE -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration has put a temporary hold on several major foreign arms sales initiated by former President Donald Trump.

Officials say that among the deals being paused is a massive $23 billion transfer of stealth F-35 fighters to the United Arab Emirates. That sale and several other massive purchases of U.S. weaponry by Gulf Arab countries had been harshly criticized by Democrats in Congress. The officials did not identify the other sales that had been temporarily halted.

82. China economy grows in 2020 as rebound from virus gains -

BEIJING (AP) — China eked out 2.3% economic growth in 2020, likely becoming the only major economy to expand as shops and factories reopened relatively early from a shutdown to fight the coronavirus while the United States, Japan and Europe struggled with rising infections.

83. China trade surplus hits record $75B as Nov exports soar -

BEIJING (AP) — China's politically sensitive trade surplus soared to a record $75.4 billion in November as exports surged 21.1% over a year earlier, propelled by American consumer demand.

Exports to the United States rose 46% despite lingering tariff hikes in a trade war with Washington, customs data showed Monday.

84. U.S. trade deficit rises 1.7% to $63.1 billion in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit widened 1.7% in October to $63.1 billion. The politically sensitive gap in the trade of goods with China and Mexico grew.

The gap between the goods and services the United States sold and what it bought abroad rose from $62.1 billion in September, the Commerce Department reported Friday. Exports rose 2.2% to $182 billion, led by sales of aircraft engines. Imports increased 2.1% to $245.1 billion on an uptick in shipments of auto parts.

85. Glimmers of hope for world economy, but dangers lurk -

PARIS (AP) — Vendors broke out in applause in the flagship Galeries Lafayette department store in Paris as eager shoppers returned for the first time in a month, after yet another virus lockdown.

86. Pandemic has taken a bite out of seafood trade, consumption -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has hurt the U.S. seafood industry due to a precipitous fall in imports and exports and a drop in catch of some species.

Those are the findings of a group of scientists who sought to quantify the damage of the pandemic on America's seafood business, which has also suffered in part because of its reliance on restaurant sales. Consumer demand for seafood at restaurants dropped by more than 70% during the early months of the pandemic, according to the scientists, who published their findings recently in the scientific journal Fish and Fisheries.

87. Barack Obama memoir off to record-setting start in sales -

NEW YORK (AP) — Former President Barack Obama's "A Promised Land" sold nearly 890,000 copies in the U.S. and Canada in its first 24 hours, putting it on track to be the best selling presidential memoir in modern history.

88. FAA clears Boeing 737 Max to fly again -

After nearly two years and a pair of deadly crashes, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has cleared Boeing's 737 Max for flight.

The nation's air safety agency announced the move early Wednesday, saying it was done after a "comprehensive and methodical" 20-month review process.

89. Walmart sells majority stake in Japanese Seiyu supermarket -

TOKYO (AP) — U.S. retailer Walmart is selling off 85% of its wholly owned Japanese supermarket subsidiary Seiyu, while retaining a 15% stake, in a deal valued at 172.5 billion ($1.6 billion), the companies said Monday.

90. Trump bans US investment in Chinese military-linked firms -

BEIJING (AP) — U.S. President Donald Trump has stepped up a conflict with China over security and technology by barring Americans from investing in companies that U.S. officials say are owned or controlled by the Chinese military.

91. Wall Street rallies again as election-week gains continue -

Wall Street's post-election wave swept stocks solidly higher again Thursday, pushing the S&P 500 toward its biggest weekly gain since April.

Markets are banking on Tuesday's election leading to split control of Congress, which could mean low tax rates, lighter regulation on businesses and other policies that investors like remain the status quo. The election still hasn't made clear who will run the White House next year, though Joe Biden is pushing closer toward the needed mark.

92. Debut of Chinese e-finance giant derailed by fear of risks -

BEIJING (AP) — The world's biggest online finance company was racing toward a stock market debut when it was derailed by Beijing's anxiety about risks in the fledgling industry, jarring global investors and deepening uncertainty about China's financial markets.

93. Market debut of Chinese e-finance giant Ant postponed -

HONG KONG (AP) — The planned stock market debut of the world's biggest online finance company, Ant Group, was suspended in Shanghai and Hong Kong on Tuesday, disrupting a record-setting $34.5 billion initial public offering that highlighted China's recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

94. China's leaders vow to become self-reliant technology power -

BEIJING (AP) — China's leaders are vowing to make their country a self-reliant "technology power" as a feud with Washington cuts access to U.S. computer chips and other high-tech components, hampering Beijing's industrial ambitions.

95. China's leaders vow to become self-reliant technology power -

BEIJING (AP) — China's leaders are vowing to make their country a self-reliant "technology power" as a feud with Washington cuts access to U.S. computer chips and other high-tech components, hampering Beijing's industrial ambitions.

96. US announces planned $2.37 billion weapon sale to Taiwan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Monday notified Congress of plans for a $2.37 billion sale of Harpoon missile systems to Taiwan just hours after Beijing announced sanctions on U.S. defense contractors, including Boeing, the lead contractor on the Harpoon deal.

97. Goldman Sachs subsidiary pleads to US charges in 1MDB probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A subsidiary of Goldman Sachs pleaded guilty on Thursday and agreed to pay more than $2.9 billion in a foreign corruption probe tied to the Malaysian 1MDB sovereign wealth fund, which was looted of billions of dollars in a corruption scandal.

98. China's economy accelerates as virus recovery gains strength -

BEIJING (AP) — China's shaky economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic is gaining strength as consumers return to shopping malls and auto dealerships while the United States and Europe endure painful contractions.

99. Japan, Vietnam agree to boost defense ties, resume flights -

HANOI, Vietnam. (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, in his first overseas summit since taking office last month, agreed with his Vietnamese counterpart to step up defense and security cooperation in the face of China's expanding influence in the region.

100. China's trade growth accelerates in Sept; exports up 9.9% -

BEIJING (AP) — China's trade picked up in September as global demand for masks and medical supplies boosted exports and the economy's early reopening gave producers an edge over foreign competitors.