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Editorial Results (free)

1. Trial Lawyers name Welborn to state committee -

Butler Snow attorney Joseph F. Welborn III has been named to the American College of Trial Lawyers’ Tennessee State Committee.

Welborn has more than 28 years of trial experience in business and commercial litigation including shareholder, corporate merger and acquisition, banking, contractual, real estate, intellectual property and business tort disputes. He also is experienced in representing individuals and businesses in civil rights litigation, as well as catastrophic personal injury and wrongful death cases.

2. Fed approves rules loosening Dodd-Frank bank restrictions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is easing restrictions imposed on banks following the 2008 financial crisis, giving a victory to the banking industry and President Donald Trump.

The Fed on Thursday approved a set of rule changes that implement legislation passed by Congress last year to loosen restrictions, particularly for smaller community banks, imposed by the Dodd-Frank Act passed in 2010.

3. Bradley wins at Life Sciences Awards -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP was named a “Firm to Watch” in the nationwide Litigation & Enforcement category at the LMG Life Sciences Awards.

The LMG Life Sciences Awards recognize the year’s top firms and legal professionals in the life sciences sector. The award winners were announced Sept. 18 at an event in New York City.

4. As cashless stores grow, so does the backlash -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hembert Figueroa just wanted a taco. So he was surprised to learn the dollar bills in his pocket were no good at Dos Toros Taqueria in Manhattan, one of a small but growing number of establishments across the U.S. where customers can only pay by card or smartphone.

5. Creswell named GNR Realtor of the Year -

Denise Creswell with Pilkerton Realtors has been named the 2018 Realtor of the Year by Greater Nashville Realtors.

The Realtor of the Year award is presented annually to the association’s member who has made the most significant contribution to their clients, the real estate profession and the community. Creswell was awarded the honor for her commitment to professionalism, clients and the real estate industry at the association’s annual Awards of Excellence Gala on March 9. The 2017 recipient, Amy Cannon, presented Creswell with the award.

6. Banks could face tighter scrutiny under Rep. Maxine Waters -

NEW YORK (AP) — Come January, the banking industry is going to be on Rep. Maxine Waters' time.

With Democrats taking control of the House of Representatives, the California representative is expected to become chairwoman of the powerful House Financial Services Committee, which oversees the nation's banking system and its regulators.

7. Americans who don't have a bank account at lowest level ever -

NEW YORK (AP) — The number of Americans who do not have a bank account fell to a record low last year, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. said Tuesday, a sign that the economic fortunes of the country's most vulnerable people continues to improve.

8. Trump eager to sign bill rolling back Dodd-Frank regulations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump indicated Wednesday that he's eager to sign a bill that would dismantle a chunk of the rules framework for banks, installed to prevent recurrence of the 2008 financial crisis that brought millions of lots jobs and foreclosed homes.

9. Congress nears dismantling of post-crisis bank rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress was taking a final step Tuesday toward dismantling a chunk of the rules framework for banks installed to prevent a recurrence of the 2008 financial crisis that brought millions of lost jobs and foreclosed homes.

10. Commerce Union becomes Reliant Bancorp -

Brentwood-based Commerce Union Bancshares, Inc. changed its name to Reliant Bancorp, as of the last day of 2017.

Commerce Union is the parent company for Reliant Bank.

The action preceded the company’s merger with Community First, Inc. the parent company of Community First Bank & Trust located in Columbia, Tennessee which occurred on Jan. 1

11. Tax on medical devices to resume after 2-year suspension -

BOSTON (AP) — While much of corporate America will enjoy a tax cut in the new year, one industry is getting a tax increase it has fought hard but so far unsuccessfully to avoid.

A 2.3 percent excise tax on medical device manufacturers went back into effect Monday after a two-year hiatus. It was originally imposed in 2013 as one of several taxes and fees in the Affordable Care Act that pay for expanded health insurance under the law.

12. VUMC now operating clinics in Walgreens -

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has begun operating and providing clinical services at 14 retail health clinics within Walgreens stores located across Middle Tennessee. The clinics build upon the continued relationship between Walgreens and Vanderbilt Health, which has included infusion services provided throughout the Middle Tennessee and Walgreens pharmacy participation in VUMC’s clinically-integrated network.

13. Trump seeks end to health care penalty in House GOP tax bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is pressuring Republicans to repeal a health care law penalty in their tax rewrite, a step the House's top tax writer indicated is politically problematic.

Rep. Kevin Brady, chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, said Friday the president had spoken to him twice by phone and once in person, imploring him to scrap the so-called individual mandate that requires Americans to obtain health insurance or face a penalty.

14. Women who own businesses find bank loans harder to get -

NEW YORK (AP) — Getting a bank loan is still a struggle for many women who own businesses.

Kirsten Curry has had three rejections in the past six months and is waiting to hear from a fourth bank. Curry, owner of Seattle-based Leading Retirement Solutions, has applied to national banks, a regional bank and a credit union. The problem is that her 8-year-old retirement advisory firm lost money last year as it invested in technology to help it expand. Although revenue has consistently risen and her company has no debt, her expenses last year were a red flag.

15. SBA head sees businesses held back by lack of loans, workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Six months into her tenure as head of the Small Business Administration, Linda McMahon sees a split among small business owners — they are increasingly optimistic, she says, but many are held back by their inability to get loans or find the right workers for jobs that are staying open.

16. Tennessee Bank & Trust gets state approval -

Tennessee Bank & Trust has received approval from the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, moving the organization one step closer to becoming the first bank to open in the state of Tennessee in 10 years. The charter for the bank was filed with the state of Tennessee on June 30, 2017.

17. Authorities: Former Franklin banker Cox pleads guilty in deception -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Federal prosecutors say a former executive of a now-defunct Franklin-based bank has pleaded guilty to lying to federal regulators.

The office of Acting U.S. Attorney Jack Smith said 73-year-old Lamar Cox of Nashville pleaded guilty to causing Tennessee Commerce Bank to make a false statement to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). Cox was the bank's chief operating officer at the time.

18. Limits on Tennessee campaign investments headed to governor -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A bill to prevent campaign funds from being invested in private companies is headed for Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's desk.

The legislation was introduced following reports that expelled Rep. Jeremy Durham heavily invested campaign funds in a company owned by prominent GOP donor Andy Miller Jr.

19. Senate passes bill limiting Tennessee campaign investments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The state Senate has passed a bill seeking to prevent campaign funds from being invested in private companies.

The legislation follows the release of a Tennessee Registry of Campaign Fiance audit that found that former Rep. Jeremy Durham loaned $120,000 to a company run by prominent GOP donor Andrew Miller Jr.

20. US banks' profits up 7.7 percent in Q4; lending grows -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks' earnings in the final quarter of 2016 rose 7.7 percent from a year earlier, as lending continued to grow and banks set aside less for losses on loans for the first time since late 2015.

21. Trump voter lost her home to new Treasury secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When Donald Trump named his Treasury secretary, Teena Colebrook felt her heart sink.

She had voted for the president-elect on the belief that he would knock the moneyed elites from their perch in Washington, D.C. And she knew Trump's pick for Treasury_Steven Mnuchin_all too well.

22. US bank earnings up nearly 13 percent in 3Q -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks' earnings in the July-September period jumped nearly 13 percent from a year earlier as continued growth in lending fueled interest income.

The data issued Tuesday by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. showed strength in the banking industry more than eight years after the financial crisis struck. However, the impact of low oil prices on energy companies led banks to continue to post bigger losses on commercial and industrial loans. Some energy companies have struggled to repay loans, causing distress for banks in oil and gas producing regions.

23. Survey: More Americans now have access to bank accounts -

NEW YORK (AP) — More Americans have access to a checking or savings account, according to a survey released Thursday by federal regulators, a sign that the improving economy is helping lift the nation's poorest households.

24. Regulators looking to strengthen banks' cyber defenses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators are looking to set up new standards for big banks' planning and testing for possible cyberattacks. The aim is to bolster the banking industry's defenses amid concern over periodic security breaches at U.S. banks.

25. Report says Obama administration failed to follow health law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration failed to follow the president's health care law in a $5 billion dispute over compensating insurers for high costs from seriously ill patients, Congress' investigative arm said Thursday.

26. US regulators: Still heavy risk in big bank loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators say risk remains heavy in large loans made by banks and other financial institutions, though lending standards have improved.

The Federal Reserve and other agencies cite increasing risks in loans to oil and gas producers as oil prices have fallen to three-month lows. The regulators said their latest examinations also showed continued high risk from loans made to companies that are already heavily in debt.

27. US bank earnings dip 2 percent in 1Q amid low oil prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The impact of low oil prices has continued to hobble the finances of U.S. banks, which posted increased loan losses in the first quarter driven by a huge jump in delinquent energy loans.

28. Low rates, troubled loans send bank profits lower -

PHOENIX (AP) — 2016 is getting off to a lousy start for major U.S. banks. Energy loans are turning bad, low interest rates are making it hard to make profitable loans, and markets have been volatile.

29. Some big US banks have 6 months shape up plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Five of the biggest U.S. banks have six months to get their disaster plans in shape. That's the message regulators issued Wednesday after giving the banks failing grades for the strategies they would deploy if they tumbled into bankruptcy.

30. US bank earnings up 7.3 percent in 1st Qtr -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks' earnings jumped 7.3 percent in the April-June period from a year earlier as revenues increased and the volume of soured loans banks had to write off fell to the lowest level since before the financial crisis.

31. US bank earnings up 6.9 percent in Q1 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks' earnings rose 6.9 percent in the first quarter from a year earlier as revenues increased, delinquent loans continued to fall and the number of "problem" banks reached a six-year low.

32. US bank earnings drop 7.3 percent in 4Q -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks' earnings dropped 7.3 percent in the fourth quarter from a year earlier as a few big banks had increased costs to settle legal cases and the industry had declines in income from the mortgage business.

33. Hackers' $1 billion bank theft may still impact consumers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The hacker gang that looted as much as $1 billion worldwide from banks was unusual: It stole directly from the banks, instead of ripping off their customers.

But this was hardly a bit of Robin Hood banditry that spared innocent account holders. Security experts say consumers still need to keep a close eye on their checking and savings, as epic computer breaches such as this theft — documented in a report issued Monday — are becoming all too common.

34. Senate to take up $1.1T bill to keep govt running -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A battle between the Senate's old school veterans and new-breed freshmen such as tea partier Ted Cruz and liberal Elizabeth Warren is taking shape Friday as leaders push for passage of a $1.1 trillion spending bill needed to keep the government running.

35. Liberals and conservatives gripe about $1.1T bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Exposed to the light of day, a year-end, $1.1 trillion spending bill drew vociferous objections from liberals and milder criticism from conservatives on Wednesday while lawmakers readied a brief, stopgap measure to prevent a government shutdown both parties vowed to avoid.

36. US bank earnings up 7.3 percent in 3Q -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. bank earnings rose 7.3 percent in the July-September quarter from a year earlier, as banks reduced their expenses and continued to lend out more money, which help drive up revenue.

37. How prepaid cards work and why Feds are watching -

NEW YORK (AP) — Prepaid cards allow users to store and spend their money without tying themselves to a traditional bank. Now regulators want many of the protections that cover bank accounts expanded to this product.

38. New consumer protections for prepaid cards -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is extending many of the financial protections of bank accounts to prepaid cards.

New rules proposed Thursday by the federal regulator would require that prepaid card users be protected against fraudulent charges and provided with free monthly billing statements. The rules come as more Americans are using "reloadable" prepaid cards as a substitute for checking accounts. Consumers have gone from loading less than $1 billion onto their cards in 2003 to nearly $100 billion through 2014.

39. New rules on banks' risk in mortgage bonds eased -

New rules on banks' risk in mortgage bonds eased

WASHINGTON (AP) — New U.S. rules aimed at getting banks to take on more of the risk when they package and sell mortgage securities are being relaxed with an eye to spurring broader home lending.

40. US bank earnings up 5.2 pct in 2Q -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks' earnings rose 5.2 percent in the April-June quarter from a year earlier, as banks reduced their expenses and lending marked its fastest pace since 2007.

The data issued Wednesday by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. showed a robust picture as the banking industry continues to recover from the financial crisis that struck six years ago. The improving economy has brought greater demand for loans and stepped-up lending.

41. US economy, though sluggish, may now be sturdier -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Out of a seemingly hollow recovery from the Great Recession, a more durable if still slow-growing U.S. economy has emerged.

That conclusion, one held by a growing number of economists, might surprise many people. After all, in the five years since the recession officially ended, Americans' pay has basically stagnated. Millions remain unemployed or have abandoned their job searches. Economic growth is merely plodding along.

42. Citigroup to pay $7B in subprime mortgages probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Citigroup has agreed to pay $7 billion to settle a federal investigation into its handling of risky subprime mortgages, admitting to a pattern of deception that Attorney General Eric Holder said "shattered lives" and contributed to the worst financial crisis in decades.

43. US bank earnings decline 7.7 percent in 1Q -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks' earnings declined 7.7 percent in the January-March quarter from a year earlier, as higher interest rates dampened demand for mortgage refinancing and reduced banks' revenue from the mortgage business.

44. Regulators act to require stronger bank capital -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators are acting to require U.S. banks to build a sturdier financial base to lessen the risk that they could collapse and cause a global meltdown.

The eight biggest banks will have to meet stricter measures for holding capital — money that provides a cushion against unexpected losses — under a rule that regulators are adopting Tuesday.

45. Major bitcoin exchange said to be insolvent -

TOKYO (AP) — One of the world's largest bitcoin exchanges has seemingly disappeared, delivering a severe blow to the virtual currency as it struggles to gain legitimacy.

A coalition of virtual currency companies said Tuesday that Tokyo-based Mt. Gox went under after secretly racking up catastrophic losses.

46. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for January 2013 -

Top January 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

47. GAO recommends changes for student debit cards -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Small fees add up for college students using college-issued debit and prepaid cards, which are often used to draw financial aid, and congressional investigators on Thursday urged greater oversight of their use.

48. AmEx will pay at least $75.7M in settlement -

NEW YORK (AP) — American Express has agreed to pay at least $75.7 million to end an investigation by regulators into some discontinued card products.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation said Tuesday that American Express led consumers to believe that an account protection product would work for up to two years when the benefits usually lasted no more than three months, and it didn't properly explain the enrollment process for a product intended to protect against identity theft. It says most consumers didn't complete the enrollment process but were billed anyway.

49. US ban on high-risk bank trades approved -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks will be barred in most cases from trading for their own profit under a federal rule approved Tuesday.

The Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. each unanimously voted to adopt the so-called Volcker Rule, taking a major step toward preventing extreme risk-taking on Wall Street that helped trigger the 2008 financial crisis.

50. US banks earn $36 billion in third quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks earned less in the July-September quarter than they did a year earlier, marking their first year-over-year profit decline since the spring of 2009 when the country was still mired in the Great Recession.

51. US banks earn record $42.2B in 2nd quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks earned more from April through June than during any quarter on record, aided by a steep drop in losses from bad loans.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. says the banking industry earned $42.2 billion in the second quarter, up 23 percent from the second quarter of 2012. About 54 percent of U.S. banks reported improved earnings from a year earlier.

52. US banks earn record $42.2B in 2nd quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks earned more from April through June than during any quarter on record, aided by a steep drop in losses from bad loans.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. says the banking industry earned $42.2 billion in the second quarter, up 23 percent from the second quarter of 2012. About 54 percent of U.S. banks reported improved earnings from a year earlier.

53. Dollars for docs -

When Urology Associates bought land on Charlotte Avenue to build a new facility in 1999, the two dozen members of the physician group signed for the loan with personal guarantees.

“We wrote our names down and said we’d guarantee this $8 or $10 million loan, so we had a lot of sweating for a number of years that it wouldn’t come back to haunt us,” recalls Dr. Charles Eckstein, president of the practice. “But it turned out to be a wise move on our part.”

54. Regulators propose stricter rule for 8 big banks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators took a step Tuesday toward requiring eight of the largest U.S. banks to meet a stricter measure of health to reduce the threat they pose to the financial system.

The Federal Reserve, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency proposed that banks increase their ratio of equity to loans and other assets from 3 percent to 5 percent. In addition, the banks' deposit-holding subsidiaries would have to increase that ratio to 6 percent.

55. Regulators proposing stricter rule for 8 big banks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators want to require eight of the largest U.S. banks to meet a stricter measure of health to reduce the threat they pose to the financial system.

The Federal Reserve, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency are expected to propose Tuesday that banks increase their ratio of equity to loans and other assets from 3 percent to 5 or 6 percent.

56. US banks report record earnings of $40.3B for Q1 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks earned more from January through March than during any quarter on record, buoyed by greater income from fees and fewer losses from bad loans.

The banking industry earned $40.3 billion in the first quarter, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. said Wednesday. That's the highest ever for a single quarter and up 15.8 percent from the first quarter of 2012, when the industry's profits were $34.8 billion.

57. US 4Q bank earnings up 37 pct.; highest in 6 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Profits at U.S. banks jumped almost 37 percent from October through December, reaching the highest level in six years as banks continued to step up lending.

The figures are fresh evidence of the industry's sustained recovery more than four years after the financial crisis.

58. Fewer US banks failing as industry strengthens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks are ending the year with their best profits since 2006 and fewer failures than at any time since the financial crisis struck in 2008. They're helping support an economy slowed by high unemployment, flat pay, sluggish manufacturing and anxious consumers.

59. Bill to extend fed insurance plan dies in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal program giving unlimited insurance guarantees to some no-interest bank accounts, enacted at the height of the financial meltdown, will die out at the end of the year following defeat of a Senate plan to extend it.

60. Hogan, Evans named to CapStar leadership -

Dan W. Hogan has been appointed chief operating officer and Tipton H. Evans chief information officer as part of a reorganization of management at CapStar Bank.

61. US bank earnings up 6.6 pct., most in 6 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. banks earned more from July through September than in any other quarter over the past six years. The increase is further evidence that the industry is strengthening four years after the 2008 financial crisis.

62. Rule subjects 100 more US banks to stress tests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — About 100 medium-sized U.S. banks will have to show how prepared they are to withstand a financial crisis next year, under a rule adopted Tuesday.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. voted to require banks with between $10 billion and $50 billion in assets to conduct yearly stress tests to assess their ability to withstand possible worsening economic conditions. The requirement is mandated by the 2010 financial overhaul law.

63. Geithner pressures SEC on money-market funds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner is putting pressure on the Securities and Exchange Commission to overhaul its rules for money-market mutual funds.

Geithner sent a letter Thursday to members of the Financial Stability Oversight Council seeking their help in pressuring the SEC to change its rules. Geithner, who heads the panel, said the changes are necessary to protect the system.

64. An easy way to pay where cash is king -

Customers who normally go to the MAPCO Express convenience store on East Thompson Lane for a bag of chips or a six pack can do something new – pay their bills.

The location is one of 37 MAPCO stores in Nashville and Memphis where self-service, reverse ATMs – machines that collect money instead of dispensing it – have recently been installed.

65. Feds order Discover to refund $200M to cardholders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Discover Bank will pay millions in fees to settle accusations by regulators that it pressured credit card customers to buy costly add-on services like payment protection and credit monitoring.

66. US bank earnings rose 21 percent in 2Q, lending up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. bank earnings rose 21 percent in the April-June quarter and lending to consumers increased, adding to evidence that the industry is strengthening four years after the financial crisis.

67. IndyMac leaders agree to settle class-action suit -

Some leaders of the failed IndyMac Bancorp have agreed to settle a shareholder class-action lawsuit for $6.5 million.

The lawsuit names former IndyMac CEO Michael W. Perry and Chief Financial Officer Scott Keys as defendants.

68. Rescue loans for Spain's banks buys Europe time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A $125 billion plan to rescue Spain's banks won't solve Europe's debt crisis or ease the pain of double-digit unemployment across the continent.

But it is likely to calm financial markets and buy time for European policymakers to work with other weak economies threatening the stability of the 17 countries that use the euro.

69. Regulator: JPMorgan changed risk strategy in 2011 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Starting late last year, JPMorgan Chase & Co. reduced the amount of hedging it was doing to contain potential losses, according to a top federal regulator.

70. Stocks inch higher as investors await Europe news -

NEW YORK (AP) — As world leaders searched for a way out of Europe's mounting debt crisis, U.S. investors moved to the sidelines.

The major market indexes closed modestly higher, after wavering between slight gains and losses throughout the morning. Trading volume was light and the stock moves were small. In Europe, markets were mixed.

71. US bank earnings rose this winter to 5-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. bank earnings rose in the first three months of the year to the highest level in nearly five years and the number of troubled banks fell for the fourth straight quarter.

The mostly positive first-quarter earnings released Thursday illustrate how far the banking industry has come since the 2008 financial crisis. Still, the report noted that many banks remain cautious about lending, a necessary driver of economic growth.

72. US bank earnings rose this winter to 5-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. bank earnings rose in the first three months of the year to the highest level in nearly five years and the number of troubled banks fell for the fourth straight quarter.

73. GOP plan boosts Pentagon, cuts social programs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republicans who control the House are using cuts to food aid, health care and social services like Meals on Wheels to protect the Pentagon from a wave of budget cuts come January.

74. Fed: Economy growing moderately; no policy changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve says the economy is growing moderately while cautioning that risks from Europe remain. It's holding off on taking any further steps to boost the recovery.

75. FDIC: Bank earnings hit five-year high in 2011 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A surge in bank earnings at the end of last year made 2011 the most profitable time for the industry in five years. More earnings and fewer troubled banks suggest the industry has healed since the 2008 financial crisis.

76. Consumer-finance watchdog probes overdraft fees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government's new consumer-watchdog agency is launching a probe into costly overdraft fees charged by big banks.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Wednesday that it will ask banks for information about how overdraft fees affect consumers, how overdraft protection is marketed and what information consumers receive.

77. Former Crosland executives form Stewart + Dossett -

Ronn Stewart and Burgin Dossett have formed Stewart + Dossett, LLC, a development, construction and real estate services firm. A minority-owned and operated business enterprise, the company offers a wide range of project experience in the commercial, hospitality, mixed-use and residential sectors.

78. FDIC seizes Franklin-based Tennessee Commerce Bank -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Regulators on Friday closed banks in Tennessee and Florida, lifting to five the number of U.S. bank failures this year following 92 closures in 2011.

The number of closures dropped sharply in 2011 from the two previous years, when banks were working their way through the bad debt accumulated in the recession. And the rate seems to be slowing more this year; by this time in 2011, regulators had shuttered 11 banks.

79. Renasant Corp.'s 4thQ profit rises -

TUPELO, Miss (AP) — Renasant Corp. says fourth-quarter profit rose on the strength of its expansion.

The regional bank said Tuesday that it earned $5.8 million, or 23 cents per share, in 2011's final quarter. That's up 23 percent from the $4.72 million, or 19 cents per share, that the Tupelo, Miss.-based firm earned in 2010's last three months.

80. Big banks must show break-up plans under new rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The largest U.S. banks must show how they would break up their assets if they were in danger of failing, under a rule approved Tuesday.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. voted to require banks with $50 billion or more in assets to submit so-called living wills. Seven banks with more than $250 billion in assets will have to show their plans by July. The other 30 affected by the rule have until 2013.

81. FDIC: Bank earnings hit highest level in 4 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bank earnings rose over the summer to their highest level in more than four years, while the number of troubled banks fell for the second straight quarter, federal regulators reported Tuesday.

82. Ingrams honored as top philanthropists -

Centerstone, the nation’s largest not-for-profit provider of community-based mental health and addiction services, today announced that board chair Lee Ann Ingram and her husband Orrin have been named Philanthropists of the Year by the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) Nashville Chapter. The couple will be honored during the chapter’s annual National Philanthropy Day (NPD) luncheon on Nov. 10 at the Hutton Hotel.

83. Feds close banks in Ga, Fla, Colo; 84 failures so far in 2011 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators on Friday closed two banks in Georgia and one each in Florida and Colorado, raising to 84 the number of U.S. banks that have failed this year.

The number of closures has fallen sharply this year as banks have worked their way through the bad debt accumulated in the recession. By this time last year, regulators had shuttered 139 banks.

84. FDIC backs ban on banks trading for own profit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Banks would be barred from trading for their own profit instead of their clients under a rule federal regulators proposed Tuesday.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. backed the draft rule on a 3-0 vote. The ban on so-called proprietary trading was required under the financial overhaul law.

85. Watchdog: Regulators bowed to banks on bailout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators bowed to pressure from big banks seeking a quick exit from the financial bailout program and did not uniformly apply the government's own conditions set for repaying the taxpayer funds, a new watchdog report says.

86. Bank of America to cut 3,500 jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America Corp., the nation's largest bank, said Friday that it plans to cut 3,500 jobs by the end of September.

The cuts amount to a little more than 1 percent of the bank's workforce of roughly 288,000. But they follow a string of other layoffs, including 2,500 already announced this year.

87. Down on the farm, investors see big potential -

Braden Janowski has never planted seeds or brought in a harvest. He doesn't even own overalls.

Yet when 430 acres of Michigan cornfields was auctioned last summer, it was Janowski, a brash, 33-year-old software executive, who made the winning bid. It was so high — $4 million, 25 percent above the next-highest — that some farmers stood, shook their heads and walked out. And Janowski figures he got the land cheap.

88. Overcoming historical mistrust of banks is key to building base -

Having banks that cater to the needs of the Hispanic community is helpful. Getting that community to use the banks is a little harder.

Local nonprofits are stepping in, providing financial education programs for those who might be new to the Nashville area, unfamiliar with banking services in the United States or accustomed to handling transactions on a cash-only basis.

89. Rule lets board recover pay from failed bank execs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators will be able to take back two years of pay from executives held responsible for a large bank's failure.

Executives deemed "negligent" and "substantially responsible" for a big bank's failure can lose all of their compensation from the previous two years under a rule approved Wednesday by the board of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

90. Watchdog: Treasury risks overpaying law firms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Treasury Department paid out more than $27 million to law firms overseeing the financial bailouts without requiring detailed bills or questioning the incomplete records that the lawyers provided, a government watchdog says.

91. SEC backs rule that would delay executive bonuses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Securities and Exchange Commission took steps Wednesday toward curbing risk-taking at big Wall Street firms and reducing the influence of credit-rating agencies, two factors that contributed to the financial crisis.