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Editorial Results (free)

1. In Buffalo, Biden to confront the racism he's vowed to fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When Joe Biden talks about his decision to run against President Donald Trump in 2020, the story always starts with Charlottesville. He says it was the men with torches shouting bigoted slogans that drove him to join what he calls the "battle for the soul of America."

2. Starbucks will cover travel for workers seeking abortions -

Starbucks said Monday it will pay the travel expenses for U.S. employees to access abortion and gender-confirmation procedures if those services aren't available within 100 milof a worker's home.

The Seattle coffee giant said it will also make the travel benefit available to the dependents of employees who are enrolled in Starbucks' health care plan. Starbucks has 240,000 U.S. employees but the company didn't say what percentage of them are enrolled in the its health care plan.

3. In Ukraine and internationally, scenario darkens for Russia -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Europe pushed Monday to sharpen and expand its response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, with Sweden poised to follow Finland in seeking membership of NATO and European Union officials working to rescue proposed sanctions that would target Russian oil exports helping the Kremlin finance its war.

4. Parents swap, sell baby formula; Biden to talk to businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A baby formula shortage in the United States is driving parents to swap, sell and offer leftover supplies to each other, while President Joe Biden plans to speak with manufacturers and retailers Thursday about the plight facing families.

5. Facebook sued in Kenya over work conditions for moderators -

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Attorneys for a man who once worked as a content moderator for Facebook have filed a lawsuit accusing the company of exploitative and unsafe working conditions.

The case against Meta Platforms, Facebook's parent company, and the outsourcing firm Sama was lodged Tuesday with a court in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi.

6. Musk says he's 'aligned' with EU approach to digital rules -

LONDON (AP) — Elon Musk, who is offering to buy Twitter, has given his support to a new European Union law aimed at protecting social media users from harmful content after he met with the bloc's single market chief.

7. Sony's profit surges on healthy film, game, music growth -

TOKYO (AP) — Sony's fiscal fourth quarter surged 67% to 111.1 billion yen ($852.7 million) from the previous year, as the Japanese entertainment and electronics company racked up profits in video game and movie divisions.

8. Face-scanner Clearview agrees to limits in court settlement -

CHICAGO (AP) — Facial recognition startup Clearview AI has agreed to restrict the use of its massive collection of face images to settle allegations that it collected people's photos without their consent.

9. Britain pushes tough tech rules under new digital watchdog -

LONDON (AP) — Big tech companies like Google and Facebook parent Meta would have to comply with tough British rules under a new digital watchdog aimed at giving consumers more choice online — or face the threat of big fines.

10. DHS disinformation board's work, plans remain a mystery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — There is little credible information about the new Disinformation Governance Board.

And that has made it an instant target for criticism.

The board, part of the Department of Homeland Security, was announced last week. But DHS has released few details on how the board will function and what powers it will have.

11. Elon Musk asked to testify on Twitter by UK Parliament -

LONDON (AP) — A British parliamentary committee scrutinizing draft online safety legislation has invited Elon Musk to discuss his plans to buy Twitter and the changes he's proposing for the social media platform.

12. Late tech rally leaves Wall Street indexes modestly higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — A late rally in big technology stocks erased an afternoon slump on Wall Street and left major indexes moderately higher.

The uneven start to May followed a brutal April in which widespread technology sell-offs dragged down major benchmarks.

13. Stocks rally on Wall Street as technology giants rebound -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major stock indexes on Wall Street notched their biggest gains in more than six weeks Thursday, as technology companies clawed back some of the ground they had lost recently.

The S&P 500 rose 2.5%, with roughly 85% of the stocks in the benchmark index closing higher. The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 1.8% and the tech-heavy Nasdaq ended 3.1% higher.

14. Twitter revenue climbs to $1.2B, daily users at 229M -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Twitter posted quarterly earnings of $513 million days after it agreed to be sold to billionaire Elon Musk.

The social media company said Thursday that revenue rose 16% to $1.2 billion in the three months to March compared with the same period last year.

15. Disinformation board to tackle Russia, migrant smugglers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Department of Homeland Security is stepping up an effort to counter disinformation coming from Russia as well as misleading information that human smugglers circulate to target migrants hoping to travel to the U.S.-Mexico border.

16. Most in US fear Ukraine war misinformation: AP-NORC poll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of U.S. adults say misinformation around Russia's invasion of Ukraine is a major problem, and they largely fault the Russian government for spreading those falsehoods.

A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows 61% of people in the United States say the spread of misinformation about the war is a major problem, with only 7% saying it's not a problem. Older adults were more likely to identify the wartime misinformation as an issue, with 44% of those under 30 calling it a problem, compared with 65% of those 30 or older.

17. Twitter abuse victims fear Musk's plans, but may not quit -

Perhaps no group of people is more alarmed about Elon Musk's plan to make Twitter a free speech free-for-all than those most likely to be targeted for harassment: women, racial minorities and other marginalized groups.

18. Facebook parent Meta stock soars despite growth slowdown -

Facebook parent Meta's first quarter profit jumped past Wall Street's expectations despite slower revenue growth, sending shares up sharply in after-hours trading.

The company earned $7.47 billion, or $2.72 per share, in the January-March period. That's down 21% from $9.5 billion, or $3.30 per share, in the same period a year earlier.

19. Hierarchy hard to decipher on flat screen of Zoom -

The world of work seems a little flatter now than it did just a few years ago, thanks to remote work and video conferencing.

It reminds me of the military, where there are clear signals about who is who when in uniform. You can tell which branch of the military someone is in. And, you can see what rank they hold.

20. Mariah’s family adds to story of Carnton slave -

Here, there and everywhere: My column on the antebellum home Carnton in Franklin, the Confederate cemetery there and the feelings it evoked for me, drew a surprising and most welcome response.

Damani Keene emailed to say his great-grandmother Mariah Reddick had been a slave held on the plantation.

21. Tech stocks slump again; Nasdaq has worst loss since 2020 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed broadly lower on Wall Street Tuesday, weighed down by sharp declines in Big Tech stocks that also left the Nasdaq with its worst drop since September 2020.

Investors are busy reviewing the latest round of corporate earnings and are facing a particularly heavy week with results from some of the nation's biggest companies. Earnings growth has been one of the pillars of the market, but the reports so far haven't offset investors' concerns about rising inflation, interest rate hikes and potential damage to global economic growth from pandemic-related lockdowns in China.

22. Musk's 'free speech' push for Twitter: Repeating history? -

Elon Musk, the world's richest man, is spending $44 billion to acquire Twitter with the stated aim of turning it into a haven for "free speech." There's just one problem: The social platform has been down this road before, and it didn't end well.

23. Trump says he has no plans to rejoin Twitter after Musk deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Former President Donald Trump said Monday that he has no intention of rejoining Twitter even if his account is reinstated following Elon Musk's agreement to buy the social media giant for roughly $44 billion.

24. EXPLAINER: What's next now that Twitter agreed to Musk bid? -

Twitter's acceptance of Elon Musk's roughly $44 billion takeover bid brings the billionaire Tesla CEO one step closer to owning the social media platform.

The deal is expected to close sometime this year. But before that, shareholders still have to weigh in, as well as regulators in the U.S. and in countries where Twitter does business, before the deal is completed.

25. Elon Musk buys Twitter for $44B and will privatize company -

Elon Musk reached an agreement to buy Twitter for roughly $44 billion on Monday, promising a more lenient touch to policing content on the platform where he promotes his interests, attacks critics and opines on social and economic issues to more than 83 million followers.

26. EU poised to unveil rules forcing Big Tech to protect users -

LONDON (AP) — The European Union is nearing agreement on a set of new rules aimed at protecting internet users by forcing big tech companies like Google and Facebook to step up their efforts to curb the spread of illegal content, hate speech and disinformation.

27. Instagram adds fundraising to Reels to help nonprofits -

NEW YORK (AP) — Meta Platforms Inc., the social media giant formerly known as Facebook, plans to celebrate Earth Day by expanding its offering of fundraising tools and making them more easily available to 1.5 million nonprofits on its Facebook and Instagram platforms, including those involved in fighting climate change.

28. EXPLAINER: What is Musk really doing as he guns for Twitter? -

Mercurial billionaire Elon Musk now says he wants to buy Twitter outright, taking it private to restore its commitment to what he terms "free speech." But his offer, which seemed to fall flat with investors on Thursday, raises as many questions as it answers.

29. Ukraine's port of Mariupol holds out against all odds -

LVIV, Ukraine (AP) — Under relentless bombardment and a Russian blockade, the key port of Mariupol is holding out, but weapons and supplies shortages could weaken the resistance that has thwarted the Kremlin's invasion plans.

30. Kremlin crackdown silences war protests, from benign to bold -

A former police officer who discussed Russia's invasion on the phone. A priest who preached to his congregation about the suffering of Ukrainians. A student who held up a banner with no words — just asterisks.

31. Ex-officer convicted of storming Capitol to disrupt Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal jury convicted a former Virginia police officer of storming the U.S. Capitol with another off-duty officer to obstruct Congress from certifying President Joe Biden's 2020 electoral victory.

32. Meta: Russian invasion driving more disinformation online -

Hackers aligned with Russia broke into the social media accounts of dozens of Ukrainian military officers and were working to upload videos of defeated and surrendering Ukrainian soldiers when the plot was disrupted, according to a report from Meta that details a troubling increase in social media disinformation this year.

33. Lyft, Spin partner, scoot into Nashville -

Lyft and Spin have announced a partnership to bring Spin scooters to the Lyft app in 60 U.S. markets, including Nashville.

More cities are launching over the coming months.

This integration further positions Lyft as the go-to transportation platform as riders have new, cost-effective and more sustainable ways to get from point A to point B. This exclusive partnership creates a seamless experience: riders can simply rent and pay for Spin scooters in the Lyft app without needing to download another app or add new payment information.

34. New Twitter biggie Musk may have thoughts on edit button -

Elon Musk, the billionaire Tesla CEO and power Twitter user who is now Twitter's largest shareholder and newly appointed board member, may have thoughts on a long-standing request from users: Should there be an edit button?

35. Ex-police officer faces jury trial on Capitol riot charges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Over a year ago, two off-duty police officers from a small town in Virginia were charged with storming the U.S. Capitol together. One of them is heading to trial and faced a courtroom full of potential jurors on Monday. The other could be a key prosecution witness.

36. House panel's possible options for alleging Trump 1/6 crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate acquitted former President Donald Trump last year of inciting the Capitol insurrection. But neither Trump nor any of his top advisers have faced charges over the attack in a court of law, and it's uncertain if they ever will.

37. Face scanner Clearview AI aims to branch out beyond police -

NEW YORK (AP) — A controversial facial recognition company that's built a massive photographic dossier of the world's people for use by police, national governments and — most recently — the Ukrainian military is now planning to offer its technology to banks and other private businesses.

38. How China's TikTok, Facebook influencers push propaganda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To her 1.4 million followers across TikTok, YouTube, Instagram and Facebook, Vica Li says she is a "life blogger" and "food lover" who wants to teach her fans about China so they can travel the country with ease.

39. Ukraine pleads for help, says Russia wants to split nation -

LVIV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy accused the West of cowardice Sunday while another top official said Russia was trying to split the nation in two, like North and South Korea.

40. US, EU sign data transfer deal to ease privacy concerns -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union and United States made a breakthrough in their yearslong battle over the privacy of data that flows across the Atlantic with a preliminary agreement Friday that paves the way for Europeans' personal information to be stored in the U.S.

41. EU agrees on new digital rules to rein in Big Tech dominance -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union set the stage for a stepped-up crackdown on big tech companies with an agreement on landmark digital rules to rein in online "gatekeepers" such as Google and Facebook parent Meta.

42. US, Ukraine quietly try to pierce Putin's propaganda bubble -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. and Ukraine have knocked back Russian President Vladimir Putin's efforts to falsely frame the narrative of his brutal war, but they are struggling to get a more accurate view of the Kremlin's invasion in front of the Russian people.

43. Russia court bans Facebook, Instagram on 'extremism' charges -

MOSCOW (AP) — A Moscow court banned Facebook and Instagram on Monday for what it deemed extremist activity in a case against their parent company, Meta.

The Tverskoy District Court fulfilled a request from prosecutors to outlaw Meta Platforms Inc. and banned Facebook and Instagram for what they called "extremist activities." Prosecutors have accused the social media platforms of ignoring government requests to remove what they described as fake news about the Russian military action in Ukraine and calls for protests in Russia.

44. Putin likens opponents to 'gnats,' signaling new repression -

NEW YORK (AP) — Facing stiff resistance in Ukraine and crippling economic sanctions at home, Russian President Vladimir Putin is using language that recalls the rhetoric from Josef Stalin's show trials of the 1930s.

45. Putin appears at big rally as troops press attack in Ukraine -

Vladimir Putin appeared at a huge flag-waving rally at a packed Moscow stadium Friday and lavished praise on his troops fighting in Ukraine, three weeks into the invasion that has led to heavier-than-expected Russian losses on the battlefield and increasingly authoritarian rule at home.

46. Tech leaders face threat of prison under new UK online bill -

LONDON (AP) — Tech bosses face criminal prosecution if they fail to comply with proposed British rules aimed at ensuring people are safe online, the U.K. government said Thursday as it unveiled the draft legislation in Parliament.

47. War censorship exposes Putin's leaky internet controls -

BOSTON (AP) — Long before waging war on Ukraine, President Vladimir Putin was working to make Russia's internet a powerful tool of surveillance and social control akin to China's so-called Great Firewall.

48. Not all Western companies sever ties to Russia over Ukraine -

A shrinking number of well-known companies are still doing business in Russia, even as hundreds have announced plans to curtail ties.

Burger King restaurants are open, Eli Lilly is supplying drugs, and PepsiCo is selling milk and baby food, but no more soda.

49. Google, Meta face EU, UK probes into ad bidding agreement -

BRUSSELS (AP) — British and European regulators threatened to crack down on Google and Facebook parent Meta over an agreement for online display advertising services, saying Friday that the deal may breach rules on fair competition.

50. US inflation soared 7.9% in past year, a fresh 40-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Propelled by surging costs for gas, food and housing, consumer inflation jumped 7.9% over the past year, the sharpest spike since 1982 and likely only a harbinger of even higher prices to come.

51. Gas price hikes fueling electric vehicle conspiracy theories -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some social media users suggest that soaring fuel prices in the U.S. aren't the result of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, increased consumption or supply chain issues as daily life resumes after two years of stagnation brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.

52. Did Amazon violate federal laws? Lawmakers ask for DOJ probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers followed through Wednesday on their threat to seek a criminal investigation of Amazon, asking the Justice Department to investigate whether the tech giant and senior executives obstructed Congress or violated other federal laws in testimony on its competition practices.

53. Netflix, TikTok block services in Russia to avoid crackdown -

Netflix and TikTok suspended most of their services in Russia on Sunday as the government cracks down on what people and media outlets can say about Russia's war in Ukraine.

Pulling the plug on online entertainment — and information — is likely to further isolate the country and its people after a growing number of multinational businesses have cut off Russia from vital financial services, technology and a variety of consumer products in response to Western economic sanctions and global outrage over the invasion of Ukraine.

54. Ukrainian drone enthusiasts sign up to repel Russian forces -

In better times, Ukrainian drone enthusiasts flew their gadgets into the sky to photograph weddings, fertilize soybean fields or race other drones for fun. Now some are risking their lives by forming a volunteer drone force to help their country repel the Russian invasion.

55. Apple investors urge company to undergo civil rights audit -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Apple's shareholders have approved a proposal urging the iPhone maker to undergo an independent audit assessing its treatment of female and minority employees, delivering a rare rebuke to a management team that runs the world's most valuable company.

56. Russian propaganda 'outgunned' by social media rebuttals -

Russian state media is spreading misinformation about the location of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in what analysts said is an attempt to discourage resistance fighters and erode support for Ukraine around the globe.

57. Russians take Ukraine nuclear plant; no radiation after fire -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian troops Friday seized the biggest nuclear power plant in Europe after a middle-of-the-night attack that set it on fire and briefly raised worldwide fears of a catastrophe in the most chilling turn yet in Moscow's invasion of Ukraine.

58. Takeaways as Jan. 6 panel eyes Trump 'criminal conspiracy' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House panel investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection at the Capitol has previewed some of its findings in a federal court filing, and investigators for the first time said they have enough evidence to suggest then-President Donald Trump committed crimes.

59. Russia's top radio station shut amid crackdown on dissent -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's top independent radio station was closed Thursday and a leading independent TV station has suspended its operations as Russian authorities moved forcefully to stifle criticism of the country's invasion of Ukraine.

60. States launch probe into TikTok's effect on kids' health -

WASHINGTON (AP) — State attorneys general have launched a nationwide investigation into TikTok and its possible harmful effects on young users' mental health, widening government scrutiny of the wildly popular video platform.

61. What to watch in Biden's 1st State of the Union address -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden sat through many State of the Union speeches as a senator and vice president. On Tuesday night, he'll deliver the address himself.

But it comes at a challenging time for Biden, who is weighed down by public disapproval of his handling of the economy and the pandemic. The address also comes days after Russia opened war against Ukraine, despite U.S.-led efforts to prevent military conflict. And it follows Biden's announcement last week of his candidate for an opening on the Supreme Court.

62. Big tech grapples with Russian state media, propaganda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Russia's war in Ukraine  plays out for the world on social media, big tech platforms are moving to restrict Russian state media from using their platforms to spread propaganda and misinformation.

63. US, Europe agree to freeze assets of Russia's Putin, Lavrov -

BRUSSELS (AP) — With a military intervention in Ukraine off the table, and countries around the world looking to heap more financial punishment on Moscow, the United States, Britain and European Union said Friday they will move to sanction Russian President Vladimir Putin and Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.

64. European Union agrees to freeze assets of Putin and minister -

BRUSSELS (AP) — With a military intervention in Ukraine off the table for now, countries around the world looked to heap more financial punishment on Moscow, including the European Union's approval of an asset freeze on Russian President Vladimir Putin and Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.

65. Wall Street losses mount amid simmering Ukraine crisis -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's losses mounted Wednesday as world leaders waited to see if Russian President Vladimir Putin orders troops deeper into Ukraine.

The S&P 500 fell 1.8% to an 8-month low, deepening the benchmark index's "correction," or a loss of 10% from its recent peak. More than 85% of stocks in the S&P 500 fell, with technology companies weighing down the index most.

66. Nashville-area summer camps full? Already? -

If parents thought it was stressful getting their children into the school of their choice these days in Middle Tennessee, wait until they try to sign up for camp.

More and more families are moving to the Nashville area from out of state, and parents are looking for camps as soon as they get here – if not before.

67. Europe braces for further strife as Ukraine crisis escalates -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russia began evacuating its embassy in Kyiv, and Ukraine urged its citizens to leave Russia on Wednesday as the region braced for further confrontation after President Vladimir Putin received authorization to use military force outside his country and the West responded with sanctions.

68. All 3 defendants convicted of hate crimes in Arbery killing -

BRUNSWICK, Ga. (AP) — The three men convicted of murder in Ahmaud Arbery's fatal shooting were found guilty of federal hate crimes and other lesser charges Tuesday for violating Arbery's civil rights and targeting him because he was Black.

69. Companies revert to more normal operations as COVID wanes -

NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time in two years for many people, the American workplace is transforming into something that resembles pre-pandemic days.

Tyson Foods said Tuesday it was ending mask requirements for its vaccinated workers in some facilities. Walmart and Amazon — the nation's No. 1 and 2 largest private employers respectively — will no longer require fully vaccinated workers to don masks in stores or warehouses unless required under local or state laws. Tech companies like Microsoft and Facebook that had allowed employees to work fully remote are now setting mandatory dates to return to the office after a series of fits and starts.

70. Facebook parent Meta settles decade-old data-privacy lawsuit -

Facebook parent Meta Platforms Inc. has settled a decade-old class action lawsuit over the company's use of "cookies" in 2010 and 2011 that tracked people online even after they logged off the Facebook platform.

71. Texas AG sues Facebook parent Meta over facial recognition -

The Texas Attorney General is suing Facebook parent Meta, saying the company has unlawfully collected biometric data on Texans for commercial purposes, without their informed consent.

Attorney General Ken Paxton filed the lawsuit Monday a state district court claiming Meta has been "storing millions of biometric identifiers" — identified as retina or iris scans, voice prints, or a record of hand and face geometry — contained in photos and videos people upload to its services, including Facebook and Instagram.

72. Biden has long-term inflation plan, but voter patience short -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden came into office with a plan to fix inflation — just not the particular inflationary problem that the country now faces.

His belief is that a cluster of companies control too many industries, which reduces competition for both customers and workers. That leads to higher prices and lower wages in what the White House says is an average cost of $5,000 annually for U.S. families. Biden is now trying to remedy the situation with 72 distinct initiatives — everything from new rules for cell phone repairs to regulations on meatpacking to more merger reviews.

73. Stocks fall, this time on Ukraine worries, to cap rough week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks tumbled again Friday, and this time bond yields joined in the swoon as worries about an imminent Russian invasion of Ukraine piled onto Wall Street's already heavy list of concerns about inflation and interest rates.

74. Super Bowl ads look toward the future — and the past -

NEW YORK (AP) — Super Bowl advertisers this year want Americans to forget about pandemic woes and focus on the future: of electric vehicles, mind reading Alexas, robots and cryptocurrency -- and also to harken back to the nostalgic past of '90s movies like "Austin Powers" and "The Cable Guy."

75. Twitter posts loss for 2021, but stock up on share buyback -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Twitter's shares jumped in early trading Thursday after it posted strong revenue growth last year and announced a $4 billion share buyback program. That's despite losing money in 2021 and falling short of Wall Street's expectations for user growth in the final quarter of the year.

76. Watch for debt collectors, scams on social media -

Social media is where you watch cooking videos, gaze at photos of dreamy travel destinations and doomscroll through endless news headlines. Now, sites like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter could also be where debt collectors slide into your DMs.

77. Sportsbooks pick a winner in Tennessee -

With Super Bowl LVI fast approaching, you might be surprised by the number of friends and co-workers who are talking about bets they’ve placed via one of Tennessee’s nine legal online sportsbooks.

78. Samsung unveils new phones as premium market share shrinks -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Samsung is trying to reclaim lost ground in the coveted high end of the smartphone market with a new lineup of Galaxy S models designed to appeal to consumers who are increasingly sharing videos of their antics on TikTok, Facebook, YouTube and other popular apps.

79. Congress moves to end forced arbitration for sex misconduct -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. House has passed legislation barring contracts that force people to settle sexual assault or harassment cases through arbitration rather than in court, a process that often benefits employers and keeps misconduct allegations from becoming public.

80. Rogan dispute draws Spotify into content liability debate -

NEW YORK (AP) — Like Facebook and Twitter, Spotify is learning the limits of deflecting responsibility for what is said on its platform.

Podcasting has sprouted as an industry with few standards about policing offensive or misleading content. That has left Spotify trying to figure out how to keep podcaster Joe Rogan's millions of devoted fans happy without further alienating artists and listeners angry about him amplifying vaccine skeptics and using racial slurs.

81. A year after Trump purge, 'alt-tech' offers far-right refuge -

Philip Anderson is no fan of online content moderation. His conservative posts have gotten him kicked off Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. Two years ago, Anderson organized a "free speech" protest against the big tech companies. A counterprotester knocked his teeth out.

82. Complaint: Teacher proselytized, made antisemitic comments -

CHATTANOOGA (AP) — The mother of a Tennessee middle-schooler claims a class on the Bible as literature included Christian proselytizing and comments offensive to Jews and other non-Christians, the Chattanooga Times Free Press reported.

83. Yacht reportedly built for Bezos too big for Dutch bridge -

ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) — A plan to temporarily dismantle a recently restored historic bridge in the heart of Dutch port city Rotterdam so that a huge yacht, reportedly being built for Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, can get to the North Sea is unlikely to be plain sailing.

84. Snap stock soars 58% after posting profit for 1st time -

Investors are snapping up shares of Snap Inc. after the owner of the disappearing message platform Snapchat surprised Wall Street by posting a quarterly profit for the first time.

85. A plunge in Facebook's parent company weighs on tech stocks -

A historic plunge in the stock price of Facebook's parent company helped yank other tech stocks lower on Wall Street Thursday, abruptly ending a four-day winning streak for the market.

The 26.4% wipeout in Meta Platforms, as Facebook's parent company is now known, erased more than $230 billion in market value, easily the biggest one-day loss in history for a U.S. company.

86. Meta, formerly Facebook, faces historic drop as stock tanks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Shares in Facebook parent company Meta are in the midst of their worst day ever Thursday after the social media giant reported a rare decline in profit due to a sharp increase in expenses as it invests heavily in its transformation into a virtual reality-based company.

87. Spider-Man lifts profit at Japanese electronics maker Sony -

TOKYO (AP) — Sony's profit for the quarter through December edged up 11% on healthy sales from its film division, including the new Spider-Man movie, the Japanese electronics and entertainment company said Wednesday.

88. The end: Facebook-backed digital currency Diem sold to bank -

A once-ambitious but now faltering Facebook-backed digital currency project known as Diem is dead, its assets sold to bank holding company Silvergate Capital.

Silvergate and the Diem Association announced the sale on Tuesday. Meta, which owns Facebook, did not have a comment.

89. Cyberattacks increasingly hobble pandemic-weary US schools -

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — For teachers at a middle school in New Mexico's largest city, the first inkling of a widespread tech problem came during an early morning staff call.

On the video, there were shout-outs for a new custodian for his hard work, and the typical announcements from administrators and the union rep. But in the chat, there were hints of a looming crisis. Nobody could open attendance records, and everyone was locked out of class rosters and grades.

90. US response on Ukraine offers little optimism, Russia says -

MOSCOW (AP) — The U.S. rejection of Russia's main demands to resolve the crisis over Ukraine left little ground for optimism, the Kremlin said Thursday, while adding that dialogue was still possible.

91. DC, 3 states sue Google saying it invades users' privacy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The District of Columbia and three states are suing Google for allegedly deceiving consumers and invading their privacy by making it nearly impossible for them to stop their location from being tracked.

92. Anti-abortion protesters optimistic at March for Life in DC -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of anti-abortion protesters were in a celebratory mood Friday as they rallied in the nation's capital and marched to the Supreme Court with a growing sense of optimism that their goal was finally in reach: a sweeping rollback of abortion rights.

93. New step to curb tech giants' power advanced by Senate panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has taken a new step toward reining in the market dominance of Big Tech.

Bipartisan legislation advanced by a Senate panel would bar the dominant online platforms from favoring their own goods and services over those of rivals. It could, for example, prevent Amazon from steering consumers to its own brands and away from competitors' products on its giant e-commerce platform.

94. Intel building $20B Ohio chip facility amid global shortage -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Chip maker Intel said it will invest $20 billion to build a new factory in Ohio, an attempt to help alleviate a global shortage of chips powering everything from phones to cars to home appliances while also signaling the giant company's commitment to manufacturing crucial technology products in the U.S.

95. Gov. Lee to give State of the State speech Jan. 31 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee plans to give his annual State of the State speech on Jan. 31.

The Republican will deliver the address to state lawmakers for his fourth time since taking office in 2019. Lee is seeking reelection to a second term this year.

96. EXPLAINER: Microsoft's Activision buy could shake up gaming -

Microsoft stunned the gaming industry when it announced this week it would buy game publisher Activision Blizzard for $68.7 billion, a deal that would immediately make it a larger video-game company than Nintendo.

97. US regulators aiming at illegal, anticompetitive mergers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. competition regulators have mounted an effort to tighten enforcement against illegal mergers, in line with President Joe Biden's mandate for greater scrutiny to big business combinations.

98. Microsoft buys game maker Activision Blizzard for about $70B -

Microsoft is paying nearly $70 billion for Activision Blizzard, the maker of Candy Crush and Call of Duty, as it seeks an edge in the fiercely competitive businesses of mobile gaming and virtual-reality technology.

99. Lawsuit: Google, Facebook CEOs colluded in online ad sales -

Newly unredacted documents from a state-led antitrust lawsuit against Google accuse the search giant of colluding with rival Facebook to manipulate online advertising sales. The CEOs of both companies were aware of the deal and signed off on it, the lawsuit alleges.

100. Twitter, Meta among tech giants subpoenaed by Jan. 6 panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Months after requesting documents from more than a dozen social platforms, the House committee investigating the Capitol insurrection has issued subpoenas targeting Twitter, Meta, Reddit and YouTube after lawmakers said the companies' initial responses were inadequate.