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Editorial Results (free)

1. IMF says trimming global growth forecast due to rising risks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the International Monetary Fund says the agency is trimming its forecast for global growth this year.

IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva on Tuesday cited rising risks from inflation, debt and a divergence in growth prospects between nations with access to coronavirus vaccines and those in need of shots.

2. IMF says trimming global growth forecast due to rising risks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the International Monetary Fund says the agency is trimming its forecast for global growth this year.

IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva on Tuesday cited rising risks from inflation, debt and a divergence in growth prospects between nations with access to coronavirus vaccines and those in need of shots.

3. US trade deficit hits record $73.3 billion in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit increased to a record $73.3 billion in August as a small gain in exports was swamped by a much larger increase in imports.

The Commerce Department reported Tuesday that the monthly trade deficit increased 4.2% in August, rising to an all-time high, surpassing the previous record of $73.2 billion set in June. The trade deficit represents the gap between what the country exports to the rest of the world and the imports it purchases from other countries.

4. Democrats push to retool health care programs for millions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dental work for seniors on Medicare. An end to sky's-the-limit pricing on prescription drugs. New options for long-term care at home. Coverage for low-income people locked out of Medicaid by ideological battles.

5. Policy center says debt limit could be hit in mid-October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government will likely face an unprecedented default on its debt obligations between mid-October and mid-November, a Washington think tank said Friday, seconding a warning earlier this week from the Treasury.

6. California recall vote offers test of Biden political clout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has been beset by public health, military and climate crises in the past month. Not much time has been left for a potential political disaster brewing for his party in California.

7. China chases 'rejuvenation' with control of tycoons, society -

BEIJING (AP) — An avalanche of changes launched by China's ruling Communist Party has jolted everyone from tech billionaires to school kids. Behind them: President Xi Jinping's vision of making a more powerful, prosperous country by reviving revolutionary ideals, with more economic equality and tighter party control over society and entrepreneurs.

8. 'Varsity Blues' trial promises fresh insights in old scandal -

BOSTON (AP) — The first trial in the "Operation Varsity Blues" college admissions bribery scandal will begin this week, with the potential to shed light on investigators' tactics and brighten the spotlight on a secretive school selection process many have long complained is rigged to favor the rich.

9. WHO launches hub in Berlin to help prevent future pandemics -

BERLIN (AP) — The World Health Organization on Wednesday inaugurated a new "hub" in Berlin that aims to help prepare the globe better to prevent future pandemics.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and German Chancellor Angela Merkel cut the ribbon to launch the new WHO Hub for Pandemic and Epidemic Intelligence. WHO says Germany is making an initial investment of $100 million in the facility.

10. Work from home not much help to low-wage workers -

Working from home has been a benefit that has developed over the last year and a-half. It has allowed us to see that we can work outside of the normal work building and still be productive.

This situation has encouraged companies to rethink forcing employees to come back in person. In order to be more competitive at recruiting job applicants, many companies are hiring employees from all over the country without forcing them to relocate. The new employees can work from wherever they are today.

11. Dollar General thrives despite ‘retail apocalypse' -

Don’t blink! You might miss the grand opening of another Dollar General store. OK, that’s an exaggeration. But not by much.

In the 14 years since an investment group purchased the family owned business and took it public again two years later, the Goodlettsville-based chain has added nearly 10,000 stores to boast more retail locations than any other company in the United States – quickly closing on 18,000 stores in 46 states.

12. Rescuing ‘Someone like me’ -

Margie Quin recalls the breakthrough with a bit of wonder lingering as she shared the memory: A handful of special agents listening intently to a newly rescued sex trafficking survivor who had just turned 18.

13. Rosengren: Fed should begin slowing stimulus efforts by fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston added his voice Monday to a growing number of people, inside and outside the Fed, who say the central bank should soon begin to dial back its extraordinary aid for an economy that is strongly recovering from the pandemic recession.

14. Climate bid faces tricky path over money for electric cars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The bipartisan compromise on infrastructure cuts in half President Joe Biden's call for $15 billion to build 500,000 electric vehicle charging outlets, raising the stakes as the administration seeks to win auto industry cooperation on anti-pollution rules to curb climate change.

15. Once fading, mask sales starting to rebound -

NEW YORK (AP) — Masks, which had started to disappear from store shelves, may be front and center again.

A spot check of businesses and other data sources are showing that mask sales have been rising in recent weeks as Americans worry about the surging cases of the delta variant of the coronavirus. Retail analysts expect mask sales will get another jolt after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention late Tuesday changed course on some masking guidelines, recommending that even vaccinated people return to wearing masks indoors in parts of the U.S. where the cases are surging.

16. SEC takeover: Expansion would just mean more power, wealth -

Barring a dramatic change of direction, Texas and Oklahoma are moving toward taking the Red River Rivalry to the Southeastern Conference in a seismic shift that will have repercussions in college sports from coast to coast.

17. Unvaccinated staff eyed in rising nursing home cases, deaths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lagging vaccination rates among nursing home staff are being linked to a national increase in COVID-19 infections and deaths at senior facilities in July, and are at the center of a federal investigation in a hard-hit Colorado location where disease detectives found many workers were not inoculated.

18. US life expectancy in 2020 sees biggest drop since WWII -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. life expectancy fell by a year and a half in 2020, the largest one-year decline since World War II, public health officials said Wednesday. The decrease for both Black Americans and Hispanic Americans was even worse: three years.

19. Research: Millions may have died in India during pandemic -

NEW DELHI (AP) — India's excess deaths during the pandemic could be a staggering 10 times the official COVID-19 toll, likely making it modern India's worst human tragedy, according to the most comprehensive research yet on the ravages of the virus in the South Asian country.

20. Senator: Bipartisan infrastructure bill loses IRS provision -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A proposal to strengthen IRS enforcement to crack down on tax scofflaws and help fund a nearly $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure spending bill is officially off the table, Republican Sen. Rob Portman said Sunday.

21. Global COVID-19 deaths hit 4 million amid rush to vaccinate -

The global death toll from COVID-19 eclipsed 4 million Wednesday as the crisis increasingly becomes a race between the vaccine and the highly contagious delta variant.

The tally of lives lost over the past year and a half, as compiled from official sources by Johns Hopkins University, is about equal to the number of people killed in battle in all of the world's wars since 1982, according to estimates from the Peace Research Institute Oslo.

22. Biden: US 'coming back together,' but COVID not yet finished -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Calling a vaccination "the most patriotic thing you can do," President Joe Biden on Sunday mixed the nation's birthday party with a celebration of freedom from the worst of the pandemic. He tempered the strides against COVID-19 with a warning that the fight against the virus wasn't over.

23. As US companies scramble to hire, workers enjoy upper hand -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the economy growing rapidly as it reopens from the pandemic, many employers are becoming desperate to hire. Yet the evidence suggests that as a group, the unemployed aren't feeling much urgency to find work.

24. Help wanted: Labor crisis plagues US restaurant industry -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sherry Villanueva's family of Santa Barbara restaurants employed 350 people before the pandemic took hold and darkened dining rooms across California. Now, with the state's economy officially reopened, about 250 workers are back on the job.

25. Vaccine hesitancy puts India's gains against virus at risk -

JAMSOTI, India (AP) — In Jamsoti, a village tucked deep inside India's most populous state of Uttar Pradesh, the common refrain among the villagers is that the coronavirus spreads only in cities. The deadly infection, they believe, does not exist in villages.

26. 'Obamacare' survives: Supreme Court dismisses big challenge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court, though increasingly conservative in makeup, rejected the latest major Republican-led effort to kill the national health care law known as "Obamacare" on Thursday, preserving insurance coverage for millions of Americans.

27. In poorest countries, surges worsen shortages of vaccines -

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Hati Maronjei once swore he would never get a COVID-19 shot, after a pastor warned that vaccines aren't safe.

Now, four months after the first batch of vaccines arrived in Zimbabwe, the 44-year-old street hawker of electronic items is desperate for the shot he can't get. Whenever he visits a clinic in the capital, Harare, he is told to try again the next day.

28. Millions fear eviction as housing crisis worsens -

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 4 million people say they fear being evicted or foreclosed upon in the coming months just as two studies released Wednesday found that the nation's housing availability and affordability crisis is expected to worsen significantly following the pandemic.

29. Experts: UK is losing race to adapt to climate change -

LONDON (AP) — Britain is losing the race to adapt to the inevitable effects of climate change, including worsening heat and floods, a government-appointed panel of experts said Wednesday.

The Climate Change Committee, set up to advise the U.K. government, said the level of global warming that is already inevitable would cause power cuts, expensive and dangerous overheating in homes, and damage to nature, crops and food supplies. It said the government must act urgently to ensure that Britain is prepared.

30. US vaccine surplus grows by the day as expiration dates loom -

In Tennessee and North Carolina, demand for the COVID-19 vaccine has slowed down so much that they have given millions of doses back to the federal government, even though less than half of their total populations are vaccinated.

31. Chinese exports jump, gap with US grows as tensions persist -

BANGKOK (AP) — China's exports and imports surged in May and its politically sensitive surplus with the U.S. grew as the pandemic was waning in important markets in the West.

Customs data released Monday showed China's exports rose 28% from a year earlier and imports soared 51%, but growth was leveling off after the country's stunning recovery from the slump early in 2020.

32. US adds 559K jobs as firms still struggle to fill positions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added a modest 559,000 jobs in May, an improvement from April's sluggish gain but still evidence that many companies are struggling to find enough workers as the economy rapidly recovers from the pandemic recession.

33. Senate GOP rejects Biden infrastructure plan, prep new offer -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans on Friday panned President Joe Biden's latest infrastructure proposal  and are expected to make a new offer as talks grind toward next week's deadline for progress on a bipartisan deal.

34. Biden, GOP senator meet as infrastructure deadline looms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deadline looming, President Joe Biden is meeting Wednesday with the top Senate Republican negotiator on infrastructure as the administration signals time is running out  to strike a bipartisan deal on the White House's big investment proposal and top legislative priority.

35. Biden honors forgotten victims of Tulsa race massacre -

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — President Joe Biden led a remembrance Tuesday of one of the nation's darkest — and long suppressed — moments of racial violence, marking the 100th anniversary of the destruction of a thriving Black community in Tulsa.

36. Pandemic or no, CEO pay rises again. Typical package: $12.7M -

NEW YORK (AP) — As COVID-19 ravaged the world last year, CEOs' big pay packages seemed to be under as much threat as everything else.

Fortunately for those CEOs, many had boards of directors willing to see the pandemic as an extraordinary event beyond their control. Across the country, boards made changes to the intricate formulas that determine their CEOs' pay — and other moves — that helped make up for losses created by the crisis.

37. US homebuyers increasingly willing to pay above asking price -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The red-hot U.S. housing market is widening the gap between what a home is objectively worth and what eager buyers are willing to pay for it.

Fierce competition amid an ultra-low inventory of homes on the market is fueling bidding wars, prompting a growing share of would-be buyers to sweeten offers well above what sellers are asking. Home prices have rocketed to new highs and many homes are selling for more than their appraised value.

38. First quarter GDP unchanged at robust 6.4% annual rate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a robust annual rate of 6.4% in the first three months of this year, unchanged from the government's initial estimate. The recovery from last year's deep recession gained steam at the beginning of this year, helped by vaccines to combat the virus and trillions of dollars in government assistance.

39. GOP leaders push back as Biden seeks big infrastructure deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden met Wednesday with the four congressional leaders at the White House for the first time and said he wants to reach a compromise on an infrastructure plan, but expectations for a quick deal remain slim despite his history of working with Republicans.

40. Bank of England expects best year for UK economy since 1941 -

LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England has kept interest rates on hold as it forecast the fastest annual pace of growth for the British economy since early on in World War II, largely as a result of the rapid rollout of coronavirus vaccines.

41. Despite business warnings, GOP moves ahead with voting bills -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Republican lawmakers around the country are pressing ahead with efforts to tighten voting laws, despite growing warnings from business leaders that the measures could harm democracy and the economic climate.

42. 5 smart ways to use your tax return on a car -

Tax season will be coming to a close later than usual this year due to the May 17 extended deadline. Until that time, you might hear advertisements from car dealerships urging you to bring in your refund or pandemic stimulus check to buy a new car. Given that the average tax refund issued in 2020 was $2,741, the IRS reports, it is a solid amount that people often use to make major purchases.

43. What's behind the growth slump? Takeaways from census data -

The first batch of once-every-decade data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows a United States that is growing less quickly but still seeing its population shift to the South and the West.

The data released Monday was relatively basic — containing national and state-level population figures and details of how they affect states' representation in Congress. Still, it contained some surprises and pointed to some consequential trends.

44. Go forth and spend: Call for action closes US climate summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — World leaders shared tales of climate-friendly breakthroughs — and feverish quests for more — to close President Joe Biden's virtual global climate summit on Friday, from Kenyans abandoning kerosene lanterns for solar to Israeli start-ups straining for more efficient storage batteries.

45. Hagel scores in OT as Blackhawks beat Predators 5-4 -

CHICAGO (AP) — Brandon Hagel scored 3:00 into overtime, and the Chicago Blackhawks rallied to beat the Nashville Predators 5-4 on Wednesday night.

Hagel also had two assists as Chicago beat Nashville for the first time in seven games this season. Pius Suter and Vinnie Hinostroza each had a goal and an assist, and Malcolm Subban made 35 saves.

46. Equal pay bill nears approval in House, long odds in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats were poised to pass legislation Thursday that they say would help close the gap between what men and women are paid in the workplace, though the measure faces little chance of overcoming Republican opposition in the Senate.

47. 9 money numbers you must know for financial security -

Your doctor needs to know certain numbers to judge your physical health, such as your weight, your blood pressure and your cholesterol levels.

Similarly, you need to know certain numbers to monitor your own financial health, including:

48. COVID testing blitz undermined screening, fight against STDs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After an unprecedented push to test and track COVID-19, public health workers are grappling with a worrisome side effect: a collapse in screening for sexually transmitted diseases that have been on the rise for years.

49. Survey: Even as schools reopen, many students learn remotely -

Large numbers of students are not returning to the classroom even as more schools reopen for full-time, in-person learning, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Biden administration.

The findings reflect a nation that has been locked in debate over the safety of reopening schools during the coronavirus pandemic. Even as national COVID-19 rates continued to ebb in February, key measures around reopening schools barely budged.

50. Poll: Border woes dent Biden approval on immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More Americans disapprove than approve of how President Joe Biden is handling waves of unaccompanied migrant children arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border, and approval of his efforts on larger immigration policy falls short of other top issues — suggesting it could be a weak point for the new administration.

51. Open your door and say ‘Ahhhh’ -

Jacob Melnychuk grew up in San Jose, California, where he occasionally skipped science class at Leland High School to surf.

“I was a terrible high school student,” he admits.

But he also had a genuine sense of community, which rallied around the family of Pat Tillman, a fellow Leland graduate, after the Army Ranger was killed in Afghanistan in 2004. Tillman’s family was a staple in their community, and it was upsetting to Melnychuk to see how the military handled his death.

52. Home is where gender bias, balance issues need fix -

No matter how modern opposite-sex couples can be in their views on equality, old habits die hard. The COVID-19 pandemic has made this abundantly clear to parents who already struggled to find balance.

53. Corporations become unlikely financiers of racial equity -

In the months since the police killing of George Floyd sparked a racial reckoning in the United States, American corpo-rations have emerged as an unexpected leading source of funding for social justice.

54. AP-NORC poll: People of color bear COVID-19's economic brunt -

NEW YORK (AP) — A year ago, Elvia Banuelos' life was looking up. The 39-year-old mother of two young children said she felt confident about a new management-level job with the U.S. Census Bureau — she would earn money to supplement the child support she receives to keep her children healthy, happy and in day care.

55. 5 things agents wish people knew about insurance -

Insurance is notoriously complicated, and few people have the time or desire to pore over their policies. But some basic knowledge can go a long way – and that’s where an insurance agent can help, by clearing up some of the most common misconceptions they encounter.

56. EU wants employers to report pay levels to fix gender gap -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union executive wants to force employers to be much more open about how much their staff earn to make it easier for women to challenge wage imbalances and close the gender pay gap.

57. Nashville gets a taste of something big -

We’re No. 1 – and in a really good way. This week, Phase 1 of Assembly Food Hall, the largest food hall in the country, opened in the new Fifth + Broadway development, which also includes retail, office, residential units, the National Museum for African American Music and abundant parking (cheers to downtown parking!). It fills the entire footprint of the old convention center.

58. Black franchise owner sues McDonald's, cites persistent bias -

CLEVELAND (AP) — The Black owner of 14 McDonald's franchises says the company has shown more favorable treatment to white owners and denied him the opportunity to buy restaurants in more affluent communities, according to a civil rights lawsuit filed Tuesday in federal court in Youngstown.

59. Powell stresses commitment to full employment, low rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell on Wednesday underscored the Fed's commitment to reducing unemployment to multi-decade lows, where it stood before the pandemic, while signaling little concern about the risk of potentially high inflation or financial-market instability.

60. Dems attempt to push through school funding, wage increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats muscled past Republicans on portions of President Joe Biden's pandemic plan, including a proposed $130 billion in additional relief to help the nation's schools reopen and a gradual increase of the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour.

61. New Museum of African American Music covers many genres -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A new museum two decades in the making is telling the interconnected story of Black musical genres through the lens of American history.

The National Museum of African American Music, which opened with a virtual ribbon-cutting on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, is seated in the heart of Nashville's musical tourism district, alongside honky-tonks and the famed Ryman Auditorium and blocks from the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

62. Sitting on billions, Catholic dioceses amassed taxpayer aid -

When the coronavirus forced churches to close their doors and give up Sunday collections, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charlotte turned to the federal government's signature small business relief program for more than $8 million.

63. Why US hiring could rebound faster than expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring has weakened for six straight months. Nearly 10 million jobs remain lost since the coronavirus struck. And this week, the Congressional Budget Office forecast that employment won't regain its pre-pandemic level until 2024.

64. UK says new study vindicates delaying 2nd virus vaccine shot -

LONDON (AP) — Britain's health chief said Wednesday that a new study suggesting that a single dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine provides a high level of protection for 12 weeks supports the government's strategy of delaying the second shot so it can protect more people quickly with a first dose.

65. Biden warns of growing cost of delay on $1.9T econ aid plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden warned Friday of a steep and growing "cost of inaction" on his $1.9 trillion COVID relief plan as the White House searched for "creative" ways to win public support for a package that is getting a cold shoulder from Senate Republicans.

66. China's Xi calls for unity in fighting virus, climate change -

Countries must cooperate more closely in fighting the challenges of the pandemic and climate change and in supporting a sustainable global economic recovery, Chinese President Xi Jinping said Monday in an address to the World Economic Forum.

67. States report vaccine shortages and cancel appointments -

NEW YORK (AP) — The push to inoculate Americans against the coronavirus is hitting a roadblock: A number of states are reporting they are running out of vaccine, and tens of thousands of people who managed to get appointments for a first dose are seeing them canceled.

68. Calamity? Anomaly? 2020 was a box office year like no other -

When the sun sets on the 2020 film box office, it'll be difficult to look at the numbers as anything but disastrous.

After five consecutive years of North American revenues exceeding $11 billion, this year they're expected to cap out at an almost 40-year low of around $2.3 billion. That'll be down 80% from last year according to data firm Comscore. Globally, where markets have been able to recover more fully, ticket sales will likely end up somewhere between $11 and $12 billion. Last year, that total hit $42.5 billion. But of course, 2020 is a year with a big asterisk.

69. UK OKs 'vaccine for the world'; extends time between doses -

LONDON (AP) — Britain authorized an easy-to-handle coronavirus vaccine Wednesday and decided to stretch out the time between doses to allow more people to get some level of protection faster as infections surge. The first greenlight for the shot dubbed the "vaccine for the world" brought a measure of hope that the pandemic could be brought under control.

70. Ford F-150 vs. Ram 1500: Picking pickup for 2021 -

The Ford F-150 has long been the pickup truck to beat, not to mention the top-selling vehicle of any kind in the country. But Fiat Chrysler Automobiles took many by surprise when it introduced the tech-savvy Ram 1500 pickup truck in 2018 for the 2019 model year.

71. GOP blocks $2,000 checks as Trump leaves COVID aid in chaos -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's sudden demand for $2,000 checks for most Americans was swiftly rejected by House Republicans on Thursday as his haphazard actions throw a massive COVID  relief and government funding bill into chaos.

72. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

73. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

74. You might have life insurance, but is it enough? -

You probably need life insurance if your death would cause financial hardship to someone else. If the only coverage you have is through your job, though, you may not have enough.

Fortunately, buying life insurance has gotten easier in some ways during the pandemic. Plus, coverage may be cheaper than you think.

75. Poor countries face long wait for vaccines despite promises -

NEW DELHI (AP) — With Americans, Britons and Canadians rolling up their sleeves to receive coronavirus vaccines, the route out of the pandemic now seems clear to many in the West, even if the rollout will take many months. But for poorer countries, the road will be far longer and rougher.

76. Biden returns to Georgia as validator for Ossoff, Warnock -

ATLANTA (AP) — Republicans eager to cement GOP control of the U.S. Senate have branded Georgia's Democratic candidates as puppets who would ensure a leftist takeover of the federal government if Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler aren't reelected.

77. Congress stuck, McConnell resists state aid in COVID-19 deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An emerging $900 billion COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers has all but collapsed after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republican senators won't support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal.

78. McConnell signals no GOP support for emerging COVID-19 deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is hitting the brakes on emerging COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers, saying Republican senators won't support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal.

79. US jobless claims jump to 853,000 amid resurgence of virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people applying for unemployment aid jumped last week to 853,000, the most since September, evidence that companies are cutting more jobs as new virus cases spiral higher.

80. US jobless claims jump to 853,000 amid resurgence of virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people applying for unemployment aid jumped last week to 853,000, the most since September, evidence that companies are cutting more jobs as new virus cases spiral higher.

81. Trump ally McCarthy is reelected leader of House Republicans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Kevin McCarthy easily won reelection as House Republican leader, a stunning turnaround as the entire GOP leadership team was rewarded by their colleagues for reducing the Democrats' House advantage in the November election.

82. Another booming quarter for Walmart but sales are slowing -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart turned out another stellar quarter as the world's largest retailer powers through a pandemic that has felled other national chains.

But sales at stores opened at least a year slowed in the three months that ended with October compared with earlier this year as the pandemic gained ground. Americans spent more per trip when they did go to Walmart, but they cut down on the number of visits they made.

83. Much at stake as Supreme Court weighs future of 'Obamacare' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the Supreme Court weighs the fate of "Obamacare," arguments will revolve around arcane points of law like severability — whether the justices can surgically snip out part of the law and leave the rest.

84. Much at stake as Supreme Court weighs future of 'Obamacare' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the Supreme Court weighs the fate of "Obamacare" on Tuesday, arguments will revolve around arcane points of law like severability — whether the justices can surgically snip out part of the law and leave the rest.

85. AP VoteCast: Trump wins white evangelicals, Catholics split -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump won support from about 8 in 10 white evangelical Christian voters in his race for reelection, but Catholic voters split almost evenly between him and Democratic opponent Joe Biden, according to AP VoteCast.

86. Trump sues in Pennsylvania, Michigan; asks for Wis. recount -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump campaign said it filed lawsuits Wednesday in Pennsylvania and Michigan, laying the groundwork for contesting the outcome in undecided battleground states that could determine whether President Donald Trump gets another four years in the White House.

87. Mother Nature saves 2020 -

Tourism officials love gaudy economic-impact numbers. Tennessee’s most recent report on travel doesn’t disappoint, offering up record-breaking figures that are the envy of many other states. Unfortunately, the report is for calendar year 2019.

88. Trump seeks to stop 'all voting,' but only counting remains -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says he'll take the presidential election to the Supreme Court, but it's unclear what he means in a country in which vote tabulations routinely continue beyond Election Day, and states largely set the rules for when the count has to end.

89. GOP tries to save its Senate majority, with or without Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans are fighting to save their majority, a final election push against the onslaught of challengers in states once off limits to Democrats but now hotbeds of a potential backlash to President Donald Trump and his allies on Capitol Hill.

90. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's errant final pitches on virus, energy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Making final arguments before Tuesday's election, President Donald Trump asserted the U.S. was shaking off a coronavirus pandemic that is only getting worse, falsely claimed Democrat Joe Biden would lock down the country for years and baselessly alleged that the COVID-19 death count is being inflated by doctors.

91. Texas early voting exceeds total of all 2016 ballots -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texans have already cast more ballots in the presidential election than they did during all of 2016, an unprecedented surge of early voting in a state that was once the country's most reliably Republican, but may now be drifting toward battleground status.

92. AP FACT CHECK: Trump sees voting chaos that does not exist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeing chaos where others don't, President Donald Trump is falsely asserting that voting by mail is proving to be rife with problems across the country. For the most part, the surge in early votes has been managed smoothly.

93. From Beijing to Brussels, Trump's trade wars at a glance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said he would shake up American trade policy. That he did. From Beijing to Brussels to Mexico City, he waged war with trading partners on multiple fronts. Here's a look at four tumultuous years of Trump trade policy:

94. Road to 270: Trump's best path hinges on Florida, Penn. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump still has a path to the 270 Electoral College votes he needs to win reelection. But it requires everything to break in his direction a second time.

Persuadable voters in battleground states will need to overwhelmingly swing in his favor. He'll have to win back crucial voting blocs. And his turnout operation will need to dramatically outperform Democrat Joe Biden's in an extraordinarily turbulent year.

95. Road to 270: Trump's best path to victory hinges on FL, PA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump still has a path to the 270 Electoral College votes he needs to win reelection. But it requires everything to break in his direction a second time.

Persuadable voters in battleground states will need to overwhelmingly swing in his favor. He'll have to win back crucial voting blocs. And his turnout operation will need to dramatically outperform Democrat Joe Biden's in an extraordinarily turbulent year.

96. Henry vs. Steelers defense will be great matchup -

First down: Keep rolling with Derrick Henry. Teams had been wondering when Henry was going to have a breakout game in 2020. That came against the Texans with 212 yards rushing, including the game-winning touchdown in overtime.

97. 'Our house is on fire': Suburban women lead a Trump revolt -

TROY, Mich. (AP) — She walks with the determination of a person who believes the very fate of democracy might depend on the next door she knocks on, head down, shoulders forward. She wears nothing fussy, the battle fatigues of her troupe: yoga pants and sneakers. She left her Lincoln Aviator idling in the driveway, the driver door open -- if this house wasn't the one to save the nation, she can move quickly to the next.

98. COVID-19 relief helps push U.S. budget deficit to a record $3.1T -

WASHINGTON (AP) — New, eye-popping federal budget figures released Thursday show an enormous $3.1 trillion deficit in the just-completed fiscal year, a record swelled by coronavirus relief spending that pushed the tally of red ink to three times that of last year.

99. IMF head says global economy facing long climb to recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the International Monetary Fund says that the global economy has started on a long climb to stronger growth with prospects looking a little better than four months ago.

100. UK, EU leaders to discuss Brexit, free trade talks -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union and Britain said Friday the gap separating them in their fraught talks on a rudimentary trade agreement following the Brexit divorce remained yawning and called for intensified negotiations in the final couple of weeks.