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Editorial Results (free)

1. Yellen reiterates Fed's patience in raising rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the U.S. economy is making steady progress, but for now the Fed is sticking with patience in raising interest rates because the labor market is still healing and inflation is too low.

2. Slight gains push US stocks to record highs; Home Depot up -

The Dow Jones industrial average and the Standard & Poor's 500 index delivered a new set of record highs Tuesday, beating marks they set last week.

The Nasdaq composite also built on its gains for the year, finishing higher for the 10th day in a row.

3. Dollar Drag: surging buck hits US corporate earnings -

NEW YORK (AP) — The biggest obstacle for Coca-Cola and Pepsi these days isn't tied to taste tests, the declining popularity of sugary drinks or even their century-long rivalry. It's the surging U.S. dollar.

4. US stock market ends mostly lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. stock market edged mostly lower on Wednesday, easing back from its latest all-time highs.

The markets barely budged following the midafternoon release of minutes from the Federal Reserve's January meeting. The transcript showed that policymakers were less likely to raise interest rates in June than investors previously thought.

5. US stocks edge higher, bringing market back to record -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks closed slightly higher Tuesday as investors continued to monitor talks between Greece and its creditors in hopes that a deal will be reached to keep the country from falling out of the eurozone.

6. Greece heads for clash with creditors at emergency meeting -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Greece's new government is confronting its eurozone creditors head on at an emergency meeting Wednesday, where Athens will seek to ease its bailout conditions in the face of strong resistance from its partners.

7. US trade deficit jumps 17.1 percent to $46.6 billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit in December jumped to the highest level in more than two years as American exports fell and imports climbed to a record level.

The deficit jumped 17.1 percent to $46.6 billion in December, the biggest imbalance since November 2012, the Commerce Department reported Thursday. The widening trade gap reflected a drop in exports, which fell 0.8 percent to $194.9 billion. Imports soared 2.2 percent to $241.4 billion.

8. Health care, energy stocks among gainers on Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose broadly Thursday, helped by a 6 percent jump in the price of oil and a rise in health care stocks following Pfizer's $16 billion deal to buy drugmaker Hospira.

9. Stocks drift higher in midday trading; Energy stocks slump -

Major stock indexes drifted mostly higher in midday trading Thursday as investors sifted through a mix of corporate earnings and economic news. Energy stocks were among the biggest decliners as oil prices extended their slide.

10. Fed stays 'patient' on rates while noting improving economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve reiterated Wednesday that it will be "patient" in raising interest rates from record lows even as the U.S. economy moves steadily closer to full health.

The Fed signaled in a statement after its latest policy meeting that no rate increase is imminent despite the economic gains. A key reason is that inflation remains well below the Fed's target rate.

11. Low inflation likely to keep Fed 'patient' about a rate hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve ended 2014 with a pledge to be "patient" in raising interest rates from record lows. The way things are going, its patience may endure for a long while.

Though the U.S. economy has steadily improved, inflation has dipped further below the Fed's target rate. Chalk it up to plunging oil prices and a surging dollar, which makes foreign goods cheaper in the United States.

12. Stocks eke out small gains after drifting most of the day -

U.S. stocks eked out tiny gains on Monday after spending much of the day drifting sideways.

Major stock indexes barely budged early as investors took in stride the election of a Greek political party that has called for the elimination of some that nation's rescue loans. Market players also weighed the latest batch of corporate earnings

13. ECB launches bond-buying program to try to revive economy -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank on Thursday launched its most aggressive effort to date to revive the region's ailing economy — a program to buy 1.1 trillion euros in government and private bonds starting in March.

14. US stocks slide; UPS, Kimberly-Clark slump on earnings -

NEW YORK (AP) — A batch of mixed earnings reports Friday helped push the stock market to its first day of losses this week.

Shares of tissue and diaper maker Kimberly-Clark dropped after the company's earnings fell short of expectations and it gave a disappointing outlook. Package-delivery service UPS plunged after it cut its earnings forecast.

15. Stocks rise, euro falls after Europe unveils stimulus plan -

NEW YORK (AP) — A plan to support Europe's sagging economy rippled through markets in Europe and the U.S. on Thursday. The pledge by the European Central Bank to buy 1.1 trillion euros in bonds, lifted stock markets, pushed up government bonds and drove the euro to new lows.

16. US stocks rise on expected European stimulus, higher oil -

NEW YORK (AP) — Another choppy day on Wall Street ended with stocks broadly higher on hopes of new stimulus measures for Europe's weak economy and a sharp rise in oil prices.

Stocks flitted between gains and losses at the open of trading Wednesday, then rose on media reports that new stimulus measures by the European Central Bank will be as large as investors anticipated. The bank is expected on Thursday to unveil a massive round of government bond buying, a program known as quantitative easing.

17. US stock market ends slightly higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — A late rise in technology stocks helped the U.S. stock market stagger to a tiny gain following a choppy day of trading Tuesday.

A combination of tepid earnings results, falling oil prices and downbeat news kept the market lower for most of the day. Major indexes started higher in the first few minutes of trading but quickly faded, as slipping confidence among homebuilders and another drop in crude pulled housing and energy stocks down. The S&P 500 spent the afternoon slowly recovering, until a late surge in Apple, Netflix and other technology titans helped nudge the index up.

18. China shares dive as regulators clamp down on margin trading -

TOKYO (AP) — Chinese shares plunged about 8 percent Monday after the country's securities regulator imposed margin trading curbs on several major brokerages, a sign authorities are worried about the market's big gains. Other markets in Asia and Europe were mostly higher.

19. Swiss franc's staggering ascent to be felt far and wide -

LONDON (AP) — A 30 percent swing in a blink of an eye is not uncommon in the stock market. In the world of currencies, it can seem as rare as Halley's Comet.

But that's what happened to the Swiss franc on Thursday — a stunning move that is likely to hurt the Swiss economy, inject uncertainty in financial markets and even darken the global outlook.

20. Lagarde: High debt and unemployment threaten global growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two problems stemming from the 2008 financial crisis — heavy government borrowing and high unemployment — still pose challenges to the global economy and require bold action, the head of the International Monetary Fund said.

21. The Currency war is on! Here are the players -

War sounds scary. In the traditional sense, war evokes casualties and loss. For investors, currency wars simply convey economic redistribution.

For instance, if there were only two stores in town selling identical items, and one store raised prices while the other store lowered prices, demand would certainly follow the discount … but overall demand would be the same.

22. US stocks gain, recovering losses from first days of year -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose in midday trading on Thursday, boosted by a combination of positive economic news from the U.S. and expectations of stimulus from Europe's central bank. The price of oil is also showing signs of stabilizing after six months of heavy losses. After two days of gains, the market has recovered most of the ground it lost in the first few days of trading.

23. Eurozone prices falling for first time since 2009 -

LONDON (AP) — It's official. Following months of speculation, the eurozone is seeing a fall in consumer prices, a development that's likely to reinforce expectations that the European Central Bank will soon provide an aggressive monetary stimulus.

24. Eurozone's big economies increasingly drag on the region -

LONDON (AP) — Weakness in the eurozone's major economies, such as Germany and France, risks choking off the growth emerging in countries that were at the forefront of the region's debt crisis, a closely monitored survey indicated Tuesday.

25. Stocks plunge on fears about implications of oil slump -

NEW YORK (AP) — After six months of falling oil prices, investors are starting to worry that the prolonged slump is signaling a weaker global economy.

That fear shook financial markets Monday as oil plunged again, dipping below $50 for the first time in more than five years and triggering a big sell-off, not just among energy stocks but across the entire stock market.

26. US stocks end mixed as manufacturing growth slows -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks got off to a sluggish start on the first day of trading in the New Year, ending the day mixed as a report showed that manufacturing growth slowed in December.

U.S. factory activity grew at the slowest pace in six months last month, weakened by declines in orders and production, according to the Institute for Supply Management. While the sector is still in good health, growth was slower than economists had forecast.

27. Bull market for stocks keeps on going in 2014 -

Stocks delivered again in 2014. Even after a poor start in January and wobbles in October and December, the U.S. market has climbed 13 percent and is ending the year close to record levels.

The solid gain has pushed the bull run for stocks into its sixth year, the longest such streak since the 1990s.

28. Bull market for stocks keeps on going in 2014 -

Stocks delivered again in 2014. Even after a poor start in January and wobbles in October and December, the U.S. market has climbed 13 percent and is ending the year close to record levels.

The solid gain has pushed the bull run for stocks into its sixth year, the longest such streak since the 1990s.

29. Why the US will power the world economy in 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is back, and ready to drive global growth in 2015.

After long struggling to claw its way out of the Great Recession, the world's biggest economy is on an extended win streak that is edging it closer to full health. But the new year doesn't look quite so bright in other major countries.

30. Investors expect higher stocks in 2015, but also turbulence -

NEW YORK (AP) — Can the U.S. hold everyone else above water? That is the question investors are asking as Wall Street heads into 2015.

A strong U.S. economy helped propel the stock market higher in 2014, continuing a bull market that is on pace to celebrate its sixth birthday in March. On more than one occasion, investors dumped stocks following geopolitical flare-ups and concerns about the global economy, only to jump back in when an economic report or results from a big company suggested the U.S. economy was still resilient.

31. Putin accuses West of trying to sideline Russia -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin vowed Thursday to fix Russia's economic woes within two years, voicing confidence that the plummeting ruble will recover and promising to diversify Russia's gas-dependent economy.

32. Stocks recover losses on ECB stimulus speculation -

NEW YORK (AP) — After being lower most of the morning, U.S. stocks were trading flat in Thursday afternoon trading after media reports said European Central Bank officials are considering a large stimulus package for next month. The reports followed comments from ECB President Mario Draghi, who said the bank was holding off on making any large moves until 2015.

33. Energy companies lead an advance in US stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Energy and health-care companies led major stock indexes higher on Tuesday, even as crude oil resumed its slide. General Motors rose after reporting stronger sales, and Biogen, a biotech company, soared following news that its drug for Alzheimer's disease showed promise.

34. US stocks inch further into record territory -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market stayed at record levels on Monday as investors remained confident that stimulus measures from the world's central banks would help revive global economic growth.

35. Dow, S&P 500 push further into record territory -

U.S. stocks capped a week that already had several record highs by delivering a couple more.

The Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor's 500 index carved out all-time highs on Friday, extending the market's gains for the week. It was the third record close for the Dow in the week and the fourth for the S&P 500.

36. Toyota to start sales of fuel cell car next month -

TOKYO (AP) — There will only be a few hundred, and they won't be cheap, but Toyota is about to take its first small step into the unproven market for emissions-free, hydrogen-powered vehicles.

The world's largest automaker announced Tuesday that it will begin selling fuel cell cars in Japan on Dec. 15 and in the U.S. and Europe in mid-2015. The sporty-looking, four-door Toyota Mirai will retail for 6.7 million yen ($57,600) before taxes. Toyota Motor Corp hopes to sell 400 in Japan and 300 in the rest of the world in the first year.

37. Yellen says Fed must focus on globalization -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The growing globalization of financial markets requires the Federal Reserve to understand how economic developments in other nations may affect the U.S. economy, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Thursday.

38. US-China climate deal aims to prod others to act -

BEIJING (AP) — A groundbreaking agreement struck Wednesday by the United States and China puts the world's two worst polluters on a faster track to curbing the heat-trapping gases blamed for global warming. With the clock ticking on a worldwide climate treaty, the two countries sought to move beyond their troubled history as environmental adversaries and spur other nations.

39. US stock market drifts a day after setting record -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. stock market drifted in Thursday trading, a day after closing at a record high. In Europe, markets climbed after the head of the European Central Bank said he was ready to take more steps to revive the region's struggling economy.

40. Wall Street caps a wild month with rally, closes at all-time high. -

NEW YORK (AP) — For stock investors, there was no shortage of drama in October. Stocks started the month modestly below a record high, only to cascade to their worst slump in two years. But after flirting with a correction, or a 10 percent drop, the U.S. market rebounded and closed at all-time highs on the last day of the month.

41. China’s growth expectations met -

The global economy is a symphony of regional and local economies interconnected by trade, interest rates and currency movements. We can generalize the influence of our leading instrumentalists in the following ways:

42. Market jolt is reality check for investors -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sometimes a little fear is healthy for stock investors.

Nine days ago, after a series of sharp sell-offs, the Standard & Poor's 500 index was down 7.4 percent from its September record as fears of a global economic slowdown intensified. Stocks have surged back this week, thanks to strong corporate earnings, and on Friday the S&P 500 had its best gain in nearly two years.

43. Slide in energy sector drags US stock market lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell broadly on Wednesday, snapping a four-day winning streak for the Standard & Poor's 500 index, as investors shaken by recent swings in the market sold some of their holdings.

44. For varying groups, market frenzy may help or hurt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The turbulence that's roiling financial markets is punishing stock investors, raising worries for major U.S. companies and will likely produce even punier returns for savers.

Yet some Americans actually stand to benefit from the forces that are driving the frenzied trading. Lower oil prices and sinking interest rates are lowering gas prices, keeping inflation low and cutting mortgage rates to levels that, for some, will scream refinance.

45. Top finance officials hope to boost growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Finance officials from the world's largest economies are being urged to prevent the global economy from falling into a "new mediocre" in which growth remains stuck at subpar levels for years to come, trapping millions of people on unemployment rolls.

46. Finance officials face global economy under threat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Though braced by a resurgent United States, the global economy is under threat from other regions — from Europe and Latin America to China and Japan — where growth is stalling and prospects remain dim.

47. IMF trims forecast for global economic growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The International Monetary Fund slightly lowered its outlook for global economic growth this year and next, mostly because of weaker expansions in Japan, Latin America and Europe.

48. Dow jumps 208 on job gains; Gold, bonds fall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investors think the U.S. economy is at a perfect temperature for stocks: not too hot, not too cold.

The latest evidence came Friday in a jobs report that showed a pickup in hiring last month that could mean more people with paychecks, more spending and higher corporate profits. But the report also showed that wages were stagnant, which cheered investors worried anything pushing up inflation could prompt the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates soon and kill the rally.

49. The return of King Dollar -

The market’s game ball in the third quarter goes to the U.S. dollar.

The U.S. dollar rose 7 percent, boosted by the comparative hawkishness of the U.S. Fed. The currency has now advanced for 11 consecutive weeks, its longest winning streak in nearly 20 years (although the uptrend actually started in mid-2011).

50. Falling oil prices drag US stock market lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks fell again Thursday, putting indexes on track for a fourth straight decline, as energy companies dragged down the broader market. Once again, economic concerns in Europe were translating into worries in the U.S.

51. US stocks drop sharply; Airlines sink -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was a rough start to October for financial markets Wednesday, with the Dow Jones industrial average dropping more than 200 points as investors reacted to a round of negative economic news in the U.S. and abroad.

52. US stock market sinks as Apple drags down tech -

NEW YORK (AP) — Technology companies are leading a broad decline in U.S. stocks that has pulled the Dow Jones industrial average down 200 points.

Apple dropped 3.4 percent after the company pulled a software update for its iPhones late Wednesday as users complained that they weren't able to make calls.

53. Europe, Syria drag on global stock markets -

NEW YORK (AP) — Grim economic news from Europe and airstrikes in Syria rattled global stocks Tuesday.

Most of the damage was felt in European markets, which fell sharply after a closely watched gauge of business activity for the region fell to a nine-month low.

54. Low energy prices, rate worries weigh on stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks edged lower as investors mulled the outlook for interest rates, the latest sanctions against Russia and volatile energy prices. Health care stocks, the year's biggest gainers, fell back. Lululemon, the high-end yoga apparel maker, surged after reporting income that beat expectations.

55. ECB action alone can't lift gloom over Europe -

LONDON (AP) — Europe has gotten another dose of stimulus. But the latest medicine by itself will not bring life to an economy that over the past six years has slid from crisis to crisis.

Though the European Central Bank surprised markets Thursday with the broad thrust of its stimulus measures, most economists think the 18-country eurozone will continue to lag its counterparts, including the United States, for years.

56. S&P 500 hits record on dividend stocks, Ukraine -

NEW YORK (AP) — A surge in dividend-rich utility stocks helped push the Standard & Poor's 500 index close to a record Friday.

Investors bought up the stocks after the government reported that U.S. employers added fewer jobs than forecast for August. That boosted demand for bonds and pushed down their yields. In turn, stocks with big dividends became more attractive to investors seeking income-paying securities.

57. Stocks flat as oil drop offsets ECB stimulus -

NEW YORK (AP) — A slump in oil prices weighed on the stock market Thursday, pushing the Standard & Poor's 500 index to its third straight loss.

Stocks had started the day higher after the European Central Bank surprised investors by announcing that it had cut its benchmark interest rate to a record low and planned to purchase asset-backed securities in an effort to stimulate the region's ailing economy. Investors were also cheered by some encouraging reports on the U.S. economy.

58. ECB surprises with rate cuts, new stimulus plan -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Trying to salvage a weak recovery, the European Central Bank on Thursday cut interest rates and announced a new economic stimulus program that involves buying financial assets.

59. US stocks rise on European Central Bank stimulus -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose Thursday after the European Central Bank surprised traders by trimming its main interest rate to a record low, and announcing that it would purchase asset-backed securities in an effort to stimulate the region's ailing economy.

60. Dollar stronger as Yen, Euro struggle -

Movements between the dollar, euro, and yen profoundly impact global flows of goods and capital. Given recent language and policy shifts from the US Federal Reserve (FED), the European Central Bank (ECB) and the Bank of Japan (BOJ), let’s re-examine global currency trends.

61. Tech stocks drag Wall Street lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — The relief that greeted reports of a possible cease fire in Ukraine faded on Wall Street, as a slide in Apple and other technology stocks tugged the U.S. stock market to a small loss Wednesday.

62. US stock market ends slightly lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — Concerns over weaker global growth appeared to overshadow strong reports about the U.S. economy Tuesday, nudging the stock market to a tiny loss.

Crude prices sank 3 percent, pulling down stocks of oil producers. Small-companies, which have fewer ties to the world economy, made gains. Meanwhile, the dollar reached a one-year high against the euro.

63. Markets drift as Wall Street has day off -

LONDON (AP) — Ahead of a raft of economic developments this week, financial markets started the week on a lackluster note Monday as Wall Street was closed for the Labor Day holiday.

KEEPING SCORE: In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of leading British shares closed up 0.1 percent at 6,825.31 while Germany's DAX rose the same rate to 9,479.03. The CAC-40 in France ended a tad lower at 4,379.73. Earlier in Asia, China's Shanghai Composite rose 0.8 percent to 2,235.51 points and Tokyo's Nikkei 225 added 0.3 percent to 15,476.60. Hong Kong's Hang Seng was marginally higher, adding 0.04 percent to 24,752.09.

64. AP survey: Fed's outlook correct but not solution -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Economists appear to be of two minds about the Federal Reserve.

They agree with the Fed that the job market still isn't healthy. Yet the latest Associated Press survey of economists finds that most fear the Fed will wait too long to raise interest rates and thereby risk stoking inflation or creating asset bubbles.

65. At Jackson Hole, central bankers eye varying goals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The central bankers meeting this week at their annual conference in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, aren't exactly in sync. Many are taking steps that clash with the policies of others.

66. Yellen: Job market makes Fed hesitant on rate hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) — If anyone thought Janet Yellen might clarify her view of the U.S. job market in her speech here Friday, the Federal Reserve chair had a message:

The picture is still hazy.

67. Stocks close mostly lower as Ukraine tensions flare -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market paused Friday, following four days of gains, after a speech by Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen left investors unsure about how the nation's most important financial voice feels about raising interest rates in the coming months.

68. Why global turmoil hasn't sunk US markets. Yet. -

NEW YORK (AP) — Europe appears on the brink of another recession. Islamic militants have seized Iraqi territory. Russian troops have massed on the Ukraine border, and the resulting sanctions are disrupting trade. An Ebola outbreak in Africa and Israel's war in Gaza are contributing to the gloom.

69. US stocks creep higher following earnings news -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. stock market crept higher Thursday following a mixed batch of corporate news. In Europe, investors brushed aside more worrying news on the economy and nudged markets up.

70. US stocks edge lower in late morning trading -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks edged lower in late morning trading as investors assessed the latest company earnings and the outlook for the economy. Investors are still troubled by the potential for escalating tensions between Russia and the West over Ukraine.

71. Global tensions can't dent enthusiasm for stocks -

A war breaks out between Israel and Hamas. An airliner is shot out of the sky in Ukraine. A Portuguese bank's finances look shaky.

And the U.S. stock market's response? After dipping briefly on the bad news, it climbs higher.

72. IMF cuts US and global growth forecasts for 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The International Monetary Fund foresees the global economy expanding less than it had previously forecast, slowed by weaker growth in the United States, Russia and developing economies.

73. IMF cuts US and global growth forecasts for 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The International Monetary Fund foresees the global economy expanding less than it had previously forecast, slowed by weaker growth in the United States, Russia and developing economies.

74. US stocks drift as investors digest earnings -

Stocks were little changed in early trading Tuesday as investors sized up corporate earnings and new government data showing that retail sales inched up last month. Earnings from JPMorgan Chase and Goldman Sachs trumped Wall Street's expectations. Tobacco companies fell as investors got a look at the details of Reynolds American's takeover of rival Lorillard.

75. Who put sleeping pills into Wall Street's water? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Is the lack of fear on Wall Street something to fear?

Sunni extremists are inching closer to Baghdad. A housing bubble in China is deflating. Russia is massing troops near the Ukrainian border again. Military forces in Egypt and Thailand have staged coups.

76. Energetic stock market pushes toward milestones -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. stock market is back to setting records.

After treading water for most of March and April, stocks are nudging deeper into record territory and are closing in on milestones with lots of zeros attached to them. The Dow Jones industrial average is within 30 points of 17,000 while the Standard & Poor's 500 is just shy of 2,000 after rising 6 percent this year.

77. US employers add 217K jobs; rate stays at 6.3 pct -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 217,000 jobs in May, a substantial gain for a fourth straight month, fueling hopes that the economy will accelerate after a grim start to the year.

Monthly job growth has averaged 234,000 for the past three months, up sharply from 150,000 in the previous three. The unemployment rate, which is derived from a separate survey, remained 6.3 percent in May. That's the lowest rate in more than five years.

78. ECB enters uncharted territory with new stimulus -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank ventured into uncharted territory Thursday with a raft of unusual measures meant to revive the eurozone economy by getting credit flowing to companies and preventing a debilitating bout of deflation.

79. ECB takes raft of new steps to avoid deflation -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank on Thursday cut interest rates and took a raft of unconventional steps to prevent the 18-country eurozone from sliding into a bout of deflation that could kill off a muted economic recovery.

80. Stocks are higher after Europe steps up stimulus -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are higher at midday after the European Central Bank took new steps to boost the region's sluggish economy.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose eight points, or 0.4 percent, to 1,936 as of noon Eastern time Thursday.

81. US stocks edge higher; Protective Life soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rose modestly Wednesday, erasing an early decline, as investors waited to hear from the European Central Bank on Thursday.

Insurer Protective Life soared on news that it was being acquired by a Japanese company.

82. Stocks edge lower; Hillshire bidding war heats up -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market fell slightly Tuesday, pulling back from record highs the day before.

Hillshire Brands jumped as a bidding war for the company heated up, while Krispy Kreme Doughnuts plunged after issuing a disappointing forecast.

83. Stocks rise following revised manufacturing report -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed mostly higher on a quiet Monday following two reports that showed the manufacturing industries of the world's two largest economies expanded last month.

Both the Dow Jones industrial average and the Standard & Poor's 500 index were able to set record highs for a second trading day in a row.

84. How Low Can We Go? -

With the S&P 500 back at all-time highs, investors may be experiencing a bit of altitude sickness. With the S&P 500 now up 180 percent from the bottom, it’s right to question how much upside remains. However, the better question might be how much downside lies below.

85. Uneven global economy a test for central banks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The global economy is plodding ahead in fits and starts as the largest countries struggle to achieve consistent growth.

Europe is faltering again. Japan is suddenly surging. China is cooling. The U.S. is strengthening.

86. US trade deficit drops 3.6 percent in March -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit narrowed in March as exports rebounded to the second highest level on record, led by strong gains in sales of aircraft, autos and farm goods.

The deficit declined to $40.4 billion, down 3.6 percent from a revised February imbalance of $41.9 billion, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. The February deficit had been the biggest trade gap in five months.

87. IMF official: Bold actions needed for recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the International Monetary Fund said Thursday the global economy is finally turning the corner after a deep recession but the recovery remains too weak.

IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde called on governments to aggressively pursue programs to spur economic growth to help the millions of people who remain unemployed.

88. Renewing Our Vows -

Last week, U.S. indices ascended briefly back into record territory on supportive comments from global powerbrokers.

In Europe, Mario Draghi, the head of the European Central Bank, initiated a bold conversation on monetary stimulus measures. Reality has set in across the Eurozone that the euro is too strong and inflation too weak for enduring economic expansion.

89. Oil falls on weak China trade data, US supply rise -

The price of oil edged slightly lower from a five-week high Thursday after China reported weak monthly trade data and U.S. crude supplies rose substantially last week.

By early afternoon in Europe, benchmark crude for May delivery was down 24 cents to $103.36 in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. On Wednesday, the Nymex contract gained $1.04 to settle at $103.60 amid unrest in eastern Ukraine after adding more than $2 the day before. The last time it closed above $103 was on March 4.

90. IMF: World economy is stronger but faces threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The global economy is strengthening but faces threats from super-low inflation and outflows of capital from emerging economies, the International Monetary Fund warned Tuesday.

The lending organization expects the global economy to grow 3.6 percent this year and 3.9 percent in 2015, up from 3 percent last year. Those figures are just one-tenth of a percentage point below the IMF's previous forecasts in January.

91. US consumer spending up modest 0.3 percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans barely increased their spending in February following a weak January performance, strong evidence that the severe winter will hold back the economy in the first quarter.

92. Senate, House back bills to aid Ukraine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress spoke with one voice on Thursday against Russia's annexation of Crimea, passing legislation in the House and Senate giving help to cash-strapped Ukraine and imposing sanctions against Russia.

93. Big climate report: Warming is big risk for people -

If you think of climate change as a hazard for some far-off polar bears years from now, you're mistaken. That's the message from top climate scientists gathering in Japan this week to assess the impact of global warming.

94. London 'draining life' from rest of UK economy -

LONDON (AP) — There's London. And then there's the rest of the U.K.

A tale of two Britains has increasingly emerged since the Great Recession. While the government trumpets the country's recovery from the financial crisis and its status as the world's fastest-growing developed economy, the rhetoric hides an increasing divide: One that pits London's boom against the malaise in cities such as Manchester and Birmingham that are struggling to remain vibrant in the 21st century.

95. Trade bills divide Obama, fellow Dems -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House says it will continue to press Congress for "fast track" authority to speed approval of trade deals even as election-year politics makes the task harder.

The Obama administration is engaged in two difficult trade negotiations, one with Japan and 10 other Pacific nations, and the other a proposed trans-Atlantic deal with European Union nations. The trans-Pacific talks are closer to completion.

96. Obama, fellow Dems are at odds on big trade bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama wants to put major emerging trade deals with Europe and Asia on a "fast track" to congressional passage. But with midterm elections looming, many fellow Democrats are working to sidetrack them instead.

97. AP survey: US income gap is holding back economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The growing gap between the richest Americans and everyone else isn't bad just for individuals.

It's hurting the U.S. economy.

So says a majority of more than three dozen economists surveyed last week by The Associated Press. Their concerns tap into a debate that's intensified as middle-class pay has stagnated while wealthier households have thrived.

98. Keep your eye on the bouncing ball -

Markets bounced around a bit last week due to the continued volley between economic/earnings expectations and interest rate expectations. As a market observer, you must fully grasp this dynamic to translate daily volatility.

99. Strong dollar drives oil down to near $94 a barrel -

The price of oil fell to near $94 a barrel Thursday, as an unexpected rate cut by the European Central Bank strengthened the dollar and an OPEC report depicted abundant global supplies.

By mid-afternoon in Europe, benchmark U.S. crude for December delivery was down 57 cents to $94.23 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. On Wednesday, it added $1.43 to close at $94.80 a barrel. That was still about 9 percent below its Oct. 2 close of $104.10.

100. Oil steady below $97 amid high supplies, Fed -

LONDON (AP) — Oil remained below $97 a barrel Thursday, with gains limited by concerns over plentiful supplies and the prospect of less U.S. monetary stimulus.

Benchmark U.S. crude for December delivery was up 10 cents at $96.87 a barrel at midday European time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract dropped $1.43 on Wednesday.