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Editorial Results (free)

1. ExxonMobil loses bid to nix climate change lawsuit -

BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts' highest court on Tuesday rejected a bid by ExxonMobil to dismiss a lawsuit brought by the state that accuses the oil giant of misleading the public about the role its fossil fuels play in causing climate change.

2. Stocks fall sharply as Target's woes renew inflation fears -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank more than 1,100 points and the S&P 500 had its biggest drop in nearly two years Wednesday, as big earnings misses by Target and other major retailers stoked investors' fears that surging inflation could cut deeply into corporate profits.

3. US sues casino mogul Steve Wynn over relationship with China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department sued longtime Las Vegas casino mogul Steve Wynn on Tuesday to compel him to register as a foreign agent because of lobbying work it says he performed at the behest of the Chinese government during the Trump administration.

4. Gov. Lee signs new K-12 funding formula into law -

FRANKLIN (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee signed into law Monday an overhaul he proposed for the formula for funding the state's multibillion-dollar K-12 education system.

The Republican signed the law at Franklin High School, where he attended school. Lawmakers in the Republican-supermajority General Assembly passed the bill last week. There were some crossover votes, with Democrats supporting it and Republicans opposing it.

5. Biden launches $6B effort to save distressed nuclear plants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is launching a $6 billion effort to rescue nuclear power plants at risk of closing, citing the need to continue nuclear energy as a carbon-free source of power that helps to combat climate change.

6. Musk says Tesla will build vehicle designed to be a robotaxi -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Tesla will build a vehicle dedicated for use as a robotaxi, and it will start making three new vehicles next year, CEO Elon Musk told fans at a party celebrating the opening of a Texas factory.

7. Analysis: High oil prices, Ukraine war at Saudi pivot point -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A spike in global energy prices benefits Saudi Arabia as the world's top oil exporter, but problems remain for the kingdom's impulsive crown prince.

Whether trying to find jobs for a growing number of unemployed youth or finding a way to end the long war he launched in Yemen, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and his father King Salman now face a potential pivot point for the kingdom amid Russia's war on Ukraine.

8. Pandemic relief money spent on hotel, ballpark, ski slopes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thanks to a sudden $140 million cash infusion, officials in Broward County, Florida, recently broke ground on a high-end hotel that will have views of the Atlantic Ocean and an 11,000-square-foot spa.

9. US works to 'seize and freeze' wealth of Russian oligarchs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Announcing tough sanctions against Russian oligarchs over the war in Ukraine was step one.

Now the U.S. and its allies are creating new teams to act on their vow to "seize and freeze" the giant boats, estates and other pricey assets of Russian elites.

10. Justice Dept. names prosecutor to go after pandemic fraud -

The Justice Department named a chief prosecutor for pandemic fraud Thursday, following through on President Joe Biden's State of the Union promise to go after criminals who stole billions in relief money.

11. Housing is consuming Midstate’s farmland -

The population of Spring Hill was 986 in 1980. It was a proudly rural farming community with the roots of many of the farming families going back hundreds of years.

Then came General Motors, which built a plant to build its Saturn product line on 1,000 acres that was formerly the Haynes Haven Farm.

12. Ruble plummets as sanctions bite, sending Russians to banks -

MOSCOW (AP) — Ordinary Russians faced the prospect of higher prices and crimped foreign travel as Western sanctions over the invasion of Ukraine sent the ruble plummeting, leading uneasy depositors to line up at banks and ATMs on Monday in a country that has seen more than one currency disaster in the post-Soviet era.

13. Biden hits Russia with sanctions, shifts troops to Germany -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden hit back Thursday against Russia's invasion of Ukraine, unleashing robust new sanctions, ordering the deployment of thousands of additional troops to NATO ally Germany and declaring that America would stand up to Russia's Vladimir Putin.

14. Biden hits Russia with new sanctions, says Putin 'chose' war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden ordered broad new sanctions targeting Russia on Thursday after its invasion of Ukraine,  declaring that Russian leader Vladimir Putin "chose this war" and his country will bear the consequences.

15. Tennessee unveils new K-12 funding plan to lawmakers -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Lee and Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn unveiled a sweeping new rewrite of how the state funds its multibillion-dollar K-12 education system Thursday, saying it provides for more money per student and valuable services.

16. EXPLAINER: A look at US steps taken, and not, against Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. President Joe Biden hit Russia with some of the broadest and toughest financial penalties that the world's biggest economy can muster on Thursday, hours after President Vladimir Putin launched his military's invasion of Ukraine.

17. New K-12 funding formula proposal to be revealed next week -

NASHVILLE (AP) — After months of gathering input from across the state on how Tennessee should fund its multibillion-dollar K-12 education system, Gov. Bill Lee and Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn say they are close to finally revealing their plan for how the formula should be rewritten.

18. Gov. Lee's State of the State speech -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee's State of the State speech, as prepared for delivery Monday night.

Thank you very much. Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speaker Sexton, Speaker Pro Tem Haile, Speaker Pro Tem Marsh, Members of the 112th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers.

19. DC, 3 states sue Google saying it invades users' privacy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The District of Columbia and three states are suing Google for allegedly deceiving consumers and invading their privacy by making it nearly impossible for them to stop their location from being tracked.

20. Climate, COVID, China: Takeaways from online Davos event -

GENEVA (AP) — Government and business leaders have urged cooperation on the world's biggest issues — climate change, the coronavirus pandemic and the economic recovery — at the World Economic Forum's virtual gathering.

21. Top Davidson County residential sales for 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

22. $56K Alzheimer's drug avoiding Biden's cost curbs, for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new $56,000-a-year Alzheimer's medication that's leading to one of the biggest increases ever in Medicare premiums is highlighting the limitations of President Joe Biden's strategy for curbing prescription drug costs.

23. Dollar General opening more $5 or less Popshelf stores -

Getting more bang for your buck used to be the mantra of dollar store shoppers everywhere, but times are changing - and prices are rising.

As consumers continue to contend with escalating prices for food, clothing and other items thanks to inflation, discount retail chains like dollar stores are rethinking their pricing strategies. Dollar Tree announced last month that it will be boosting prices to $1.25 for most of its products. And now Dollar General is looking to roll out more of its Popshelf stores, where most items cost $5 or less.

24. LA luxury mall latest to be hit by smash-and-grab thieves -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A group of thieves smashed windows at a department store at a luxury mall in Los Angeles, triggering a police pursuit just days after high-end stores throughout the San Francisco Bay Area were targeted.

25. Amazon settles California COVID workers notification dispute -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Amazon has agreed to pay $500,000 and be monitored by California officials to ensure it properly notifies its workers about new coronavirus cases, the state's attorney general said Monday.

26. Biden signs $1T infrastructure bill with bipartisan audience -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed his $1 trillion infrastructure deal into law Monday on the White House lawn, hailing it as an example of what bipartisanship can achieve.

The president hopes to use the law to build back his popularity and says it will deliver jobs, clean water, high-speed internet and a clean energy future. Support for Biden has taken a hit amid rising inflation and the inability to fully shake the public health and economic risks from COVID-19.

27. Rare Starbucks union vote set to begin in Buffalo -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Never in its 50-year history has Starbucks relied on union workers to serve up frothy lattes as its U.S. cafes. But some baristas aim to change that.

Workers at three separate Starbucks stores in and around Buffalo, New York, are expected to begin voting by mail this week on whether they want to be represented by Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union.

28. Justice Dept. conducting cyber crackdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is stepping up actions to combat ransomware and cybercrime through arrests and other actions, its No. 2 official told The Associated Press, as the Biden administration escalates its response to what it regards as an urgent economic and national security threat.

29. US says oil, gas sales damage climate — won't stop them -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Biden administration is planning to sell oil and gas leases on huge tracts of public land in the U.S. West, despite the Interior Department's conclusion that doing so could cost society billions of dollars in climate change impacts.

30. Tennessee lawmakers OK $900M Ford incentive package -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers on Wednesday committed to spending nearly $900 million on state incentives, infrastructure upgrades and more as part of a sweeping plan with Ford Motor Co. to build an electric vehicle and battery plant near Memphis.

31. Tennessee leaders to review education funding formula -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Lee and Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn on Friday announced plans to review how the state funds its multibillion dollar K-12 education system.

Lee and Schwinn say they hope school leaders, families and other members of the public will provide their feedback on how the system can be improved over the next few months. While no firm timeline has been set yet, state officials say they want to present suggestions to the General Assembly by next year.

32. Fed watchdog to investigate officials' financial trades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An independent investigator will look into whether Federal Reserve officials broke the law with financial trades last year that have come under congressional scrutiny and sharp criticism from outside the central bank.

33. MTSU poll: Statewide growth in second quarter -

A new economic report from Middle Tennessee State University shows the state’s housing market continues to show signs of a recovery from the impact of COVID-19.

The MTSU Business and Economic Research Center’s statewide analysis for the second quarter “showed mostly positive outcomes,” with home sales increasing overall from the previous quarter and home prices up from the previous year across the state, noted report author Murat Arik, director of the BERC at MTSU.

34. France rallies EU as trust in US, UK and Australia wanes -

BRUSSELS (AP) — France's European Union partners agreed Tuesday to put the country's festering dispute over a major Indo-Pacific defense deal between the U.S., Australia and Britain at the top of bloc's political agenda, including at an EU summit next month.

35. UK recommends COVID-19 booster shots for over 50s -

LONDON (AP) — The U.K. said Tuesday it will offer a third dose of COVID-19 vaccine to everyone over age 50 and other vulnerable people after an expert panel said the boosters were needed to protect against waning immunity this winter.

36. Bradley attorneys appointed to ABA leadership positions -

Seven Bradley Arant Boult Cummings attorneys have been appointed to new leadership roles with the American Bar Association, including Junaid Odubeko, a partner in the firm’s Nashville office.

37. From ‘It’s curtains!’ to ‘curtains up!’ -

The show must go on? No, March 14, 2020, changed all that when the shows definitely did not go on. Theaters, concert halls and other arts venues around Tennessee were forced to cease operations as COVID-19 began its march across the state. A jarring situation, certainly, but given that a life in the performing arts is one that requires near-daily adapting to new challenges, everyone from actors and musicians to artistic directors and CEOs initially took it in stride.

38. Imagination, Skittles help boy, 5, conquer Appalachian Trail -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Harvey Sutton, or "Little Man," as he is known on the Appalachian Trail, won't have long to bask in the glory of hiking its full length. After all, he starts kindergarten Friday.

39. Dollar General thrives despite ‘retail apocalypse' -

Don’t blink! You might miss the grand opening of another Dollar General store. OK, that’s an exaggeration. But not by much.

In the 14 years since an investment group purchased the family owned business and took it public again two years later, the Goodlettsville-based chain has added nearly 10,000 stores to boast more retail locations than any other company in the United States – quickly closing on 18,000 stores in 46 states.

40. Top Davidson County residential sales for July 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

41. Attorney: $35M settlement was opioid firm's best, last offer -

NASHVILLE (AP) — An attorney who helped reach a $35 million settlement with an opioid manufacturer over the company's role in the epidemic in Tennessee said Thursday that his team accepted the drug maker's "last, best and final" offer, arguing the agreement avoids the possible complications of a jury verdict.

42. EXPLAINER: How Democrats hope to enact Biden domestic agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers' most consequential battle this year over President Joe Biden's expansive domestic agenda will snake through a legislative maze that's eye-rolling even by Congress' standards.

43. Senator: Bipartisan infrastructure bill loses IRS provision -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A proposal to strengthen IRS enforcement to crack down on tax scofflaws and help fund a nearly $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure spending bill is officially off the table, Republican Sen. Rob Portman said Sunday.

44. Tennessee, dozens others target Google's app store in antitrust suit -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Dozens of states are taking aim at Google in an escalating legal offensive on Big Tech.

This time, attorneys general for 36 states and the District of Columbia have filed a lawsuit targeting Google's Play store, where consumers download apps designed for the Android software that powers most of the world's smartphones.

45. In hunt for infrastructure deal, every Dem has leverage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a crucial moment for Democrats, party leaders are hunting for a sweet spot that would satisfy their rival moderate and progressive wings on legislation to finance President Joe Biden's multitrillion-dollar agenda of bolstering the economy and helping families.

46. Tax law experts see 'strong' case against Trump Org. CFO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies give perks to their employees all the time. Many top executives at Fortune 500 companies have access to a corporate jet for personal use, a company apartment, or an expense account for fancy meals. Even lower-level employees regularly get access to perks like tuition reimbursement or cash to join a gym.

47. Senators press Interior Secretary Haaland on oil lease pause -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Both Republican and Democratic senators pressed Interior Secretary Deb Haaland for answers Wednesday after a federal court blocked the Biden administration's suspension of new oil and gas leases on federal lands and waters.

48. Emails show Trump pressured Justice Dept. over 2020 election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — During the last weeks of his presidency, Donald Trump and his allies pressured the Justice Department to investigate unsubstantiated claims of widespread 2020 election fraud that even his former attorney general declared without evidence, newly released emails show.

49. US recovers most of ransom paid after Colonial Pipeline hack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has recovered most of a multimillion-dollar ransom payment made to hackers after a cyberattack that caused the operator of the nation's largest fuel pipeline to halt its operations last month, officials said Monday.

50. Gresham Smith names new owners in Nashville -

Gresham Smith has named 14 new firm owners, including six from Nashville. Nashvillians selected are:

• Andy Aparicio is director of corporate communications and has joined the firm in 2020. He has since developed an extensive internal and external communications strategy to support the firm’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. He also has led his team to deliver several other high-profile initiatives, including the firm’s first virtual Celebration and the communication of the firm’s Diversity, Equity & Inclusion program.

51. Survey: Business economists more optimistic about US growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The accelerated rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, along with the Biden administration's rescue aid policies, have brightened the outlook for the U.S. economy as it extends its recovery from the pandemic recession.

52. VW, Ford unveil SUVs at China auto show under virus controls -

SHANGHAI (AP) — Volkswagen, Ford and Chinese brands unveiled new SUVs for China on Monday at the Shanghai auto show, the industry's biggest marketing event in a year overshadowed by the coronavirus pandemic.

53. Cooper: Oracle to bring 8,500 jobs, $1.2B investment -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Oracle Corporation plans to bring 8,500 jobs and a $1.2 billion investment to fast-growing Nashville over the coming decade, a deal Mayor John Cooper's office announced Wednesday as unprecedented in the history of Tennessee economic development projects.

54. US nominates NY lawyer to monitor United Auto Workers union -

DETROIT (AP) — The U.S. attorney's office in Detroit is recommending that a federal judge name New York lawyer Neil Barofsky to monitor the United Auto Workers union's behavior after a corruption scandal.

55. Uber to give UK drivers minimum wage, pension, holiday pay -

LONDON (AP) — Uber is giving its U.K. drivers the minimum wage, pensions and holiday pay, following a recent court ruling that said they should be classified as workers and entitled to such benefits.

56. Nashville-based Bridgestone offers employees $100 to vaccinate -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Bridgestone said Wednesday it will offer its 33,000 U.S. employees $100 payments to get vaccinated against COVID-19, joining a group of large companies offering incentives for the shots.

57. No vaccine, no job? Not yet -

A steady stream of people line up quietly on a weekday morning to get vaccinated against COVID-19. “We’ve been waiting for this for months,” one man says as he reaches the head of the line.

58. Kentucky Kingdom sold to company that operates Dollywood -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A Kentucky amusement park that once operated as a Six Flags has been sold to a company that operates family-oriented venues around the country including Dollywood in Tennessee and Silver Dollar City in Missouri.

59. Fed's Powell: Recovery incomplete, higher inflation unlikely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell underscored the U.S. economy's ongoing weakness Tuesday in remarks that suggested that the Fed sees no need to alter its ultra-low interest rate policies anytime soon.

60. Puerto Rico rejects key deal with creditors to reduce debt -

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico's governor announced Tuesday that a federal control board reached a key deal that would reduce the U.S. territory's overall debt by nearly 80%, but that his administration is rejecting it because it would require cuts to the island's crumbling public pension system.

61. Pandemic first job for HHS pick but health agenda is broader -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Health secretary nominee Xavier Becerra told senators Tuesday that confronting the coronavirus pandemic will be his first priority if confirmed, but he also pledged to expand health insurance, rein in prescription drug costs and reduce racial and ethnic disparities in medical care.

62. US charges North Korean computer programmers in global hacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has charged three North Korean computer programmers in a broad range of global hacks, including a destructive attack targeting an American movie studio, and in the attempted theft and extortion of more than $1.3 billion from banks and companies, federal prosecutors said Wednesday.

63. Stax Music Academy found a way to flourish during pandemic -

MEMPHIS (AP) — For the denizens of Soulsville — the South Memphis-based community/nonprofit foundation centered on the Stax Museum of American Soul Music and the Stax Music Academy — 2020 was supposed to have been a year of celebration. Stax Music Academy was set to mark its 20th anniversary with a series of concerts and events, while the museum was poised to continue its curatorial reinvigoration. Instead, COVID-19 happened.

64. TVA gives raise to CEO that Trump had criticized -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A federal utility's board voted Thursday to increase the multimillion-dollar pay scale of its CEO, coming to the decision based on findings of an independent review ordered up after then-President Donald Trump blasted the executive as "ridiculously overpaid" last summer.

65. Trump can't hang on to lawyers after false election claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump spent much of his career deploying high-powered lawyers to do his bidding. Now he is having trouble finding top-tier help when he might need it most.

Since losing the November election to President Joe Biden, Trump has been hemorrhaging attorneys. Established firms backed away from his baseless claims of election fraud. Those he did retain made elementary errors in cases that were quickly rejected as meritless. His personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, was ridiculed for his performance before a federal judge during one election-related case.

66. 9 Bradley lawyers named ‘Attorneys for Justice’ -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP attorneys Kimberly M. Ingram, Alexandra C. Lynn, Erin Malone-Smolla, Casey L. Miller, Peter C. Sales, Edmund S. Sauer, Jeffrey W. Sheehan, Fritz Spainhour and David K. Taylor have been recognized by the Tennessee Supreme Court as 2020 “Attorneys for Justice.”

67. Full text of Gov. Bill Lee's State of the State address -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Thank you very much. Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speaker Sexton, Speaker Pro Tem Haile, Speaker Pro Tem Marsh, Members of the 112th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, fellow Tennesseans:

68. Stuck in DC, Biden team pitches rest of US on big virus aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Even as President Joe Biden meets with senators and works the phones with Capitol Hill to push for a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package, his team is increasingly focused on selling the plan directly to voters.

69. UN forecasts 4.7% global economic growth in 2021 -

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United Nations warned Monday that the world economy is "on a cliffhanger," still reeling from the COVID-19 pandemic whose impact will be felt for years but still expected to make a modest recovery of 4.7% in 2021 which would barely offset 2020 losses.

70. Dollar General, other companies push incentives for vaccinations -

As vaccinations continue across the U.S., some companies are offering financial incentives to encourage their workers to get the shots.

Instacart Inc., the grocery delivery service, announced Thursday that it would provide a $25 stipend for workers who get the COVID-19 vaccine. It joins others, including Dollar General, which plans to pay workers extra if they get vaccinated.

71. AP VoteCast: Warnock relied on Black and young voters to win -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Georgia's Senate runoff elections were a clash of two closely matched coalitions, with Democrat Raphael Warnock edging out his rival in the one-time Republican stronghold.

Warnock and fellow Democrat Jon Ossoff — whose race was still too early to call — relied on the backing of Black voters, younger voters, people earning less than $50,000 and newcomers to the state, according to AP VoteCast, a survey of more than 3,700 voters in Tuesday's high-stakes Senate contests.

72. A look at the 29 people Trump pardoned or gave commutations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law's father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

73. Biden picks deal-makers, fighters for climate, energy team -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden is picking deal-makers and fighters to lead a climate team he'll ask to remake and clean up the nation's transportation and power-plant systems, and as fast as politically possible.

74. At tiny rural hospitals, weary doctors treat friends, family -

MEMPHIS, Mo. (AP) — As Dr. Shane Wilson makes the rounds at the tiny, 25-bed hospital in rural northeastern Missouri, many of his movements are familiar in an age of coronavirus. Masks and gloves. Zippered plastic walls between hallways. Hand sanitizer as he enters and exits each room.

75. Report: Millions of full-time US workers get government aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of Americans who are working full-time jobs still rely on federal health care and food assistance programs because of low wages, a bipartisan congressional watchdog says.

76. Mother Nature saves 2020 -

Tourism officials love gaudy economic-impact numbers. Tennessee’s most recent report on travel doesn’t disappoint, offering up record-breaking figures that are the envy of many other states. Unfortunately, the report is for calendar year 2019.

77. Uber, Lyft spend big, win in California vote about drivers -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Uber, Lyft and other app-based ride-hailing and delivery services spent $200 million in a winning bet to circumvent California lawmakers and the courts to preserve their business model by keeping drivers from becoming employees eligible for benefits and job protections.

78. Justice Dept. to file landmark antitrust case against Google -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department on Tuesday sued Google for antitrust violations, alleging that it abused its dominance in online search and advertising to stifle competition and harm consumers.

79. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's dubious claims on health care, court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if "Obamacare" is ruled unconstitutional.

80. Justice Dept. expected to file antitrust action vs. Google -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is expected to bring an antitrust action against Google in coming weeks, focusing on its dominance in online search and whether it was used to stifle competition and hurt consumers, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press Thursday.

81. Australian bank agrees to $919M fine for money laundering -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Westpac, Australia's second-largest bank, agreed to pay a 1.3 billion Australian dollar ($919 million) fine for breaches of anti-money laundering and counterterrorism financing laws, the largest ever civil penalty in Australia, a financial crime regulator said on Thursday.

82. DOJ nearing antitrust action on Google; Trump eyes tech curb -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the Trump administration moves toward antitrust action against search giant Google, it's campaigning to enlist support from sympathetic state attorneys general across the country.

83. AP-NORC poll: Majority plan to vote before Election Day -

DENVER (AP) — A majority of President Donald Trump's supporters plan to cast their ballot on Election Day, while about half of Joe Biden's backers plan to vote by mail, a sign of a growing partisan divide over how best to conduct elections in the United States.

84. Google exec on hot seat in Congress over advertising power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate panel put a top Google executive on the defensive Tuesday over the company's powerful position in online advertising as some lawmakers look hopefully toward an expected antitrust case against the tech giant by the Trump administration.

85. AP FACT CHECK: Is Trump's America great again or hellscape? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican National Convention begged this question: Why are President Donald Trump's most fervent supporters describing the state of his union as a hellscape?

It was perhaps the central paradox for voters wondering what to believe in the rhetoric, because it defied logic to believe it all. Are Americans living in a dystopia or in an America made great again by Trump?

86. AP FACT CHECK: GOP taps distortions to heap praise on Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Eric Trump echoed falsehoods of his father, Melania Trump credited her husband with a dubious religious first, and the president's economic adviser wholly distorted the conditions Donald Trump inherited as Republicans stepped up to praise him at their national convention Tuesday.

87. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's baseless claim of 'deep state' at FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is leveling unfounded attacks on his Food and Drug Administration and distorting the science on effective treatments for COVID-19.

Heading this week into the Republican National Convention, he asserted that the agency is slow-walking vaccines and treatments for the coronavirus in a bid to undermine his November reelection effort. There's no evidence of that, and one of his former FDA commissioners on Sunday rejected the accusation as groundless.

88. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's flawed justification for postal cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is misrepresenting the U.S. Postal Service's financial problems as his postmaster general defends cuts that have slowed mail delivery in advance of the November election.

89. State Department watchdog resigns after predecessor's ouster -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department's acting inspector general resigned abruptly on Wednesday following the firing of his predecessor in circumstances now being investigated by Congress.

Stephen Akard announced his resignation just two days after Democrats issued subpoenas for several of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's top aides to answer questions about the shakeup in the watchdog's office. The department said Akard would return to the private sector but offered no other reason for his departure.

90. House committees subpoena top Pompeo aides over IG firing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats have subpoenaed four top aides to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, saying that the Trump administration is stonewalling their investigation into the firing of the State Department's top independent watchdog earlier this year.

91. Trump donors among early recipients of coronavirus loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As much as $273 million in federal coronavirus aid was awarded to more than 100 companies that are owned or operated by major donors to President Donald Trump's election efforts, according to an Associated Press analysis of federal data.

92. UK firms slash jobs to cope with outbreak's long-term impact -

LONDON (AP) — Companies linked to hospitality and travel in Britain have announced thousands of more job cuts as the longer term consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic take hold, choosing to slim down for survival rather than await potential government handouts.

93. Nominee to be CIA watchdog says he'll stand up to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to be the CIA's chief watchdog is pledging independence, saying he will perform his role "in an unbiased and impartial manner, free of undue or inappropriate influences" by Trump or anyone else.

94. Fired State Dept watchdog says he was bullied by officials -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The independent State Department watchdog fired by President Donald Trump says top department officials tried to bully him and dissuade his office from conducting a review of a multibillion-dollar arms sale to Saudi Arabia.

95. Ousted State watchdog confirms investigations into Pompeo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ousted State Department Inspector General Steve Linick on Wednesday told members of three congressional committees that before he was abruptly fired, he was investigating Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's use of government resources as well as the secretary's decision to approve a multibillion-dollar arms sale to Saudi Arabia.

96. VW spending $2.2B to expand in China's electric car market -

BEIJING (AP) — Volkswagen is spending 2 billion euros ($2.2 billion) to expand its presence in China's electric car industry in the biggest foreign investment announced since the country's economy began to reopen following the coronavirus pandemic.

97. Pompeo denies retaliation but won't explain watchdog ouster -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Wednesday adamantly denied that he recommended firing the State Department's independent watchdog in retaliation for investigations into Pompeo's conduct as America's top diplomat. But Pompeo again declined to provide specific reasons for Steve Linick's dismissal as inspector general.

98. Who got what? Details scant on small-business relief effort -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A small, overlooked federal agency is shouldering a massive relief effort for the nation's small businesses and their workers left reeling by the pandemic.

The Small Business Administration has committed to auditing every sizable emergency loan it approves.

99. SBA leaves businesses still hoping for more leeway on loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small businesses hoping for more leeway in using coronavirus loan money were disappointed as the government released instructions for seeking forgiveness for the loans.

Forms the Small Business Administration released late Friday didn't address two concerns shared by many owners about the $659 billion Paycheck Protection Program. According to the instructions, loans can still be forgiven in full only if the money is spent within eight weeks of receiving it. And businesses must use at least 75% of it for workers' pay, with the remaining amount limited to rent, mortgage interest and utility expenses.

100. Pandemic brings fortunes – and headaches – to Amazon -

Amazon has spent years honing the business of packing, shipping and delivering millions of products to doorsteps around the world.

Now it has a captive audience.

With much of the globe in various stages of a lockdown because of the coronavirus pandemic, the world's largest online retailer has become a lifeline to many shoppers. But it is also grappling with delivery delays and mounting complaints from workers who worry about contagion while on the job.