» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'delta air lines' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:24
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:23
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Delta to begin paying flight attendants during boarding -

Delta Air Lines, which has narrowly fought off several attempts to unionize its flights attendants, will begin paying cabin crews during boarding, a change that is expected to increase their wages by several thousand dollars a year.

2. United plots big expansion of flights between US and Europe -

DALLAS (AP) — United Airlines plans to offer more flights across the Atlantic this summer than it did in 2019, a wager that international travel will bounce back strongly despite the persistent pandemic.

3. Airlines want to bring back passengers banned over masks -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines have banned several thousand passengers since the pandemic started for refusing to wear masks. Now they want most of those passengers back.

American, United and Delta have all indicated that they will lift the bans they imposed now that masks are optional on flights.

4. US airlines say they've reached a turning point in recovery -

DALLAS (AP) — U.S. airlines say they have hit a turning point: After a lousy first quarter, they expect to be profitable as Americans return to travel in the biggest numbers since the start of the pandemic.

5. EXPLAINER: What happens in the post-mask world of travel? -

DALLAS (AP) — A ruling by a federal judge has ended — at least for now — the requirement that people wear masks on planes and public transportation, and there is plenty of confusion about the new, post-mask world of travel.

6. Cheers, fear as judge strikes down U.S. transit mask mandate -

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge's decision to strike down a national mask mandate was met with cheers on some airplanes but also concern about whether it's really time to end one of the most visible vestiges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

7. Wall Street ends higher, breaking a 3-day losing streak -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed higher on Wall Street Wednesday as investors reviewed the latest round of corporate earnings and an upbeat report from Delta Air Lines that bodes well for the travel industry.

8. A million empty spaces: Chronicling COVID's cruel US toll -

On the deadliest day of a horrific week in April 2020, COVID took the lives of 816 people in New York City alone. Lost in the blizzard of pandemic data that's been swirling ever since is the fact that 43-year-old Fernando Morales was one of them.

9. CDC extends travel mask requirement to May 3 as COVID rises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration announced Wednesday that it is extending the nationwide mask requirement for airplanes and public transit for 15 days as it monitors an uptick in COVID-19 cases.

10. Delta loses $940 million in Q1 but bookings, revenue, surge -

Delta Air Lines lost $940 million in the first quarter yet bookings surged in recent weeks, setting up a breakout summer as Americans try to put the pandemic behind them.

Shares jumped 6% before the opening bell Wednesday on strong revenue numbers and pulled other airlines with it. Shares of Southwest, United and American all rose more than 4%.

11. FAA seeks biggest fines yet against 2 unruly passengers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Aviation Administration said Friday that it it seeking the largest fines yet for passengers who disrupt flights after two incidents that occurred on airliners last summer.

12. FAA head resigns after effort to rebuild agency's reputation -

The leader of the Federal Aviation Administration, whose agency has been criticized for its oversight of Boeing and handling of questions surrounding 5G interference with aircraft, said Wednesday he will step down March 31.

13. US blocks flights by Chinese airlines in escalating dispute -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States moved Friday to block 44 flights to the U.S. by Chinese airlines in retaliation for China forcing the cancellation of flights by U.S. airlines.

The Transportation Department order affecting four Chinese airlines is the latest development in a long-running dispute over COVID-19 restrictions.

14. American Airlines reports $931 million fourth-quarter loss -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines lost $931 million in the fourth quarter and the omicron variant of COVID-19 is delaying its recovery from nearly two years of pandemic.

First-quarter revenue is expected to be down about 20% to 22% compared with the first quarter of 2019, and it will fly slightly less than it did two years ago, the airline said Thursday.

15. Tech stocks lead Wall Street lower again, Nasdaq falls 2.5% -

Technology stocks led another decline on Wall Street Thursday, leaving the Nasdaq composite down 2.5%.

Microsoft, Nvidia and other big tech companies had some of the biggest losses. The S&P 500 fell 1.4% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average gave back 0.5% Industrial stocks did relatively well.

16. Delta extends life of expiring travel vouchers from pandemic -

ATLANTA (AP) — Delta Air Lines said Wednesday it will extend through 2023 the window for customers to rebook credits earned when they purchased but then canceled flights during the pandemic.

Before the announcement, Delta flight credits were set to expire at the end of 2022. The new date will also apply to all tickets bought in 2022. Customers will be able to use the credits throughout 2024 if the trip is booked by Dec. 31, 2023, the airline said.

17. After wave of cancellations, Delta sees recovery in 2022 -

Delta Air Lines lost $408 million in the final quarter of 2021, dragged down by a COVID-19 surge that rocked the airline in December, and the carrier predicted Thursday that it will suffer one more quarterly loss before travel perks up in spring and summer.

18. It’ll be your best vacation ever! -

The two words that sum up travel in 2022 are “cautiously optimistic.’’ To be sure, travel is one of the top priorities for many of the pandemic weary. An Expedia report on 2022 travel trends found that more than 68% of American travelers are planning a big trip for their first foray out, whether it be travel to a foreign country or upgrading to luxury accommodations in the United States.

19. Thousands of flights canceled, delayed at start of workweek -

A winter storm hitting the mid-Atlantic combined with the pandemic to further frustrate air travelers whose return flights home from the holidays were canceled or delayed in the first few days of the new year.

20. US move to shorten COVID-19 isolation stirs confusion, doubt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials' decision to shorten the recommended COVID-19 isolation and quarantine period from 10 days to five is drawing criticism from some medical experts and could create more confusion and fear among Americans.

21. Wall Street ends higher, marking another record for S&P 500 -

Technology companies led U.S. stocks broadly higher Monday, extending the market's recent rally and nudging the S&P 500 to another all-time high.

Wall Street kicked off the final week in a banner year for the stock market with mostly muted trading as investors returned from the Christmas holiday and several overseas markets remained closed.

22. To grandmother's house or no? Omicron disrupts holiday plans -

Dave Fravel and his wife invited several relatives to their Cape Cod home for Christmas to share food, gifts and the togetherness they've longed for during the lonely days of the pandemic. They were also looking forward to a holiday sightseeing trip to New York City.

23. Biden pivots to home tests to confront omicron surge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fighting the omicron variant surging through the country, President Joe Biden announced the government will provide 500 million free rapid home-testing kits, increase support for hospitals under strain and redouble vaccination and boosting efforts.

24. Biden pledges 500M free virus tests to counter omicron -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fighting the omicron variant surging through the country, President Joe Biden announced Tuesday that the government would provide 500 million free rapid tests, increase support for hospitals under strain and redouble vaccination and boosting efforts.

25. Airlines face shortage of pilots, other workers, execs say -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airlines are having trouble hiring pilots, flight attendants and other personnel, and that's part of what is causing canceled flights and scrapping of service to some airports, executives told legislators on Wednesday.

26. Southwest: We won't put unvaccinated workers on unpaid leave -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines will let unvaccinated employees keep working past early December instead of putting them on unpaid leave if they apply for an exemption on medical or religious grounds.

27. Modest gain breaks a 3-day losing streak for S&P 500 index -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Thursday, snapping a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 despite another choppy day of trading.

The benchmark index rose 0.3% after having been down 0.5% in the early going. It's still on pace for a 0.6% weekly loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ended flat, while the Nasdaq rose 0.7%.

28. Delta posts $1.2 billion Q3 profit, touts holiday bookings -

Delta Air Lines posted a $1.2 billion profit for the third quarter, helped by the latest installment of federal pandemic aid for the airline industry, and gave an upbeat forecast for the holiday-dominated fourth quarter.

29. Stocks drop the most since May on worries over China, Fed -

Stocks on Wall Street closed sharply lower Monday, mirroring losses overseas and handing the S&P 500 index its biggest drop in four months.

Worries about debt-engorged Chinese property developers — and the damage they could do to investors worldwide if they default — rippled across markets. Investors are also concerned that the U.S. Federal Reserve could signal this week that it's planning to pull back some of the support measures it's been giving markets and the economy.

30. US easing virus restrictions for foreign flights to America -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. said Monday it will ease airline restrictions this fall on travel to the country for people who have vaccination proof and a negative COVID-19 test, replacing a hodgepodge of rules that had kept out many non-citizens and irritated allies in Europe and beyond where virus cases are far lower.

31. Federal mandate takes vaccine decision off employers' hands -

Larger U.S. businesses now won't have to decide whether to require their employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Doing so is now federal policy.

President Joe Biden announced sweeping new orders Thursday that will require employers with more than 100 workers to mandate immunizations or offer weekly testing. The new rules could affect as many as 100 million Americans, although it's not clear how many of those people are currently unvaccinated.

32. Airlines say rise in COVID-19 cases is hurting ticket sales -

DALLAS (AP) — Several leading U.S. airlines warned Thursday that the rise in COVID-19 cases due to the delta variant is hurting their bookings and further delaying a recovery for the travel industry.

33. United lays out employee rules as vaccine requirement looms -

United Airlines says that more than half its employees who weren't vaccinated last month have gotten their shots since the company announced that vaccines would be required.

The airline's 67,000 U.S.-based employees face a Sept. 27 deadline for getting vaccinated. United said Wednesday, however, that employees whose bids for exemptions based on medical reasons or religious beliefs are denied will get five more weeks to get vaccinated.

34. From ‘It’s curtains!’ to ‘curtains up!’ -

The show must go on? No, March 14, 2020, changed all that when the shows definitely did not go on. Theaters, concert halls and other arts venues around Tennessee were forced to cease operations as COVID-19 began its march across the state. A jarring situation, certainly, but given that a life in the performing arts is one that requires near-daily adapting to new challenges, everyone from actors and musicians to artistic directors and CEOs initially took it in stride.

35. How 9/11 changed air travel: more security, less privacy -

DALLAS (AP) — Ask anyone old enough to remember travel before Sept. 11, 2001, and you're likely to get a gauzy recollection of what flying was like.

There was security screening, but it wasn't anywhere near as intrusive. There were no long checkpoint lines. Passengers and their families could walk right to the gate together, postponing goodbye hugs until the last possible moment. Overall, an airport experience meant far less stress.

36. Companies loosen job requirements but challenges remain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Landing a waitressing job or bartending gig at the Lost Dog Cafe in Northern Virginia had never been easy.

"Help Wanted" signs were a rarity, and half the chain's staff stuck around for at least 10 years. The onset of the pandemic made job prospects even worse when Lost Dog had to temporarily shut down indoor dining.

37. What can employers do if workers avoid COVID-19 vaccines? -

What can employers do if workers avoid COVID-19 vaccines? They can require vaccination and fire employees who don't comply, or take other actions such as withholding company perks or charging extra for health insurance.

38. Delta Air Lines will make unvaccinated employees pay charge -

Delta Air Lines will charge employees on the company health plan $200 a month if they fail to get vaccinated against COVID-19, a policy the airline's top executive says is necessary because the average hospital stay for the virus costs the airline $40,000.

39. Spirit Air says canceled flights cost $50M, hurt bookings -

Spirit Airlines said Monday the cancellation of more than 2,800 flights over an 11-day stretch this summer cost the budget airline about $50 million in lost revenue and caused spending to soar.

The airline said the service meltdown that started in late July and a rise in COVID-19 cases are causing more last-minute cancellations and softer bookings.

40. Delta variant spreads, Southwest no longer sees profit in Q3 -

Southwest Airlines said Wednesday that it no longer expects to turn a profit in the third quarter as a surge in COVID-19 infections fueled by the highly contagious delta variant darkens the outlook for travel.

41. United Airlines will require US employees to be vaccinated -

United Airlines will require employees in the U.S. to be vaccinated against COVID-19 by late October, perhaps sooner, joining a growing number of big corporations that are responding to a surge in virus cases.

42. Air travel hits another pandemic high, flight delays grow -

DALLAS (AP) — Air travel in the U.S. is hitting new pandemic-era highs, and airlines are scrambling to keep up with the summer-vacation crowds.

Despite rising numbers of coronavirus infections fueled by the delta variant, the U.S. set another recent high mark for air travel Sunday, with more than 2.2 million people going through airport checkpoints, according to the Transportation Security Administration.

43. Flight attendants report high frequency of unruly passengers -

DALLAS (AP) — Nearly one in five flight attendants say they have witnessed physical incidents involving passengers this year, and their union is calling for criminal prosecution of people who act up on planes.

44. Airlines cite concerns about fuel shortages at some airports -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — The fuel needle is moving closer to "empty" at some U.S. airports.

American Airlines says it's running into fuel shortages at some smaller and mid-size airports, and in some cases the airline will add refueling stops or fly fuel into locations where the supply is tight.

45. US airlines say COVID-19 variants aren't hurting bookings -

Rising concern about the fast-spreading delta variant of COVID-19 is creating turbulence for the stocks of big travel companies, but airline executives say they don't see any slowdown in ticket sales, maybe because a high percentage of their best customers are fully vaccinated.

46. Travel stocks slump, with airlines, cruises, hotels tumble -

Air travel in the United States hit another pandemic-era record over the weekend as vacationers jammed airports, but shares of airlines, cruise lines, hotels and almost anything else related to travel tumbled Monday on growing concerns about highly contagious variants of coronavirus.

47. American recalling flight attendants to handle travel crowds -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines is canceling extended leaves for about 3,300 flight attendants and telling them to come back to work in time for the holiday season.

And American plans to hire 800 new flight attendants by next March, according to an airline executive.

48. With taxpayers' help, Delta posts $652 million profit in 2Q -

Delta Air Lines is reporting a $652 million profit in the second quarter, helped by hordes of vacation travelers in the U.S. and money from taxpayers, positioning the airline for stronger results once business and international flying recover from the pandemic.

49. Stock indexes notch more records ahead of earnings reports -

Banks led stocks to modest gains on Wall Street Monday, nudging the major stock indexes to more record highs ahead of a busy week of corporate earnings reports from big U.S. companies.

The S&P 500 gained 0.3% after bouncing back from an early stumble. The benchmark index, which has notched three straight weekly gains, hit a new high, as did the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite. The indexes have managed multiple new highs despite choppy trading in recent weeks.

50. Southwest, American delays hint at hard summer for travelers -

This summer is already shaping up to be a difficult one for air travelers.

Southwest Airlines customers have struggled with thousands of delays and hundreds of canceled flights this month because of computer problems, staffing shortages and bad weather.

51. US plans to make airlines refund fees if bags are delayed -

The Transportation Department will propose that airlines be required to refund fees on checked baggage if the bags aren't delivered to passengers quickly enough.

The proposal, if made final after a lengthy regulation-writing process, would also require prompt refunds for fees on extras such as internet access if the airline fails to provide the service during the flight.

52. Wall Street hits another record; energy stocks, banks gain -

Stocks finished broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday, adding to the gains that helped the market close out its best first half of a year since the dotcom bubble.

The S&P 500 rose 0.5%, marking its sixth straight gain and fourth consecutive record high. The price of U.S. crude oil rose more than 2%, giving a boost to energy companies. Bond yields edged higher and helped lift bank stocks. Health care and communication companies also helped lift the market. The consumer staples sector was the only laggard, weighed down by a pullback in shares of Walgreens Boots Alliance.

53. Travel numbers climb as Americans hit the road for holiday -

Americans hit the road in near-record numbers at the start of the Memorial Day weekend, as their eagerness to break free from coronavirus confinement overcame higher prices for flights, gasoline and hotels.

54. US cuts Mexico's aviation safety rating, curbing new flights -

U.S. regulators have downgraded Mexico's aviation safety rating, a move that prevents Mexican airlines from expanding flights to the United States just as travel is recovering from the pandemic.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Tuesday it downgraded Mexico after finding that the country does not meet standards set by a United Nations aviation group.

55. US officials seek big fines against more airline passengers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators are continuing to pursue large penalties against a few airline passengers accused of disrupting flights.

The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday that it will seek fines totaling more than $100,000 against four passengers on recent flights, including a penalty of $52,500 against a man who was arrested after trying to open the cockpit door and striking a flight attendant in the face.

56. Despite business warnings, GOP moves ahead with voting bills -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Republican lawmakers around the country are pressing ahead with efforts to tighten voting laws, despite growing warnings from business leaders that the measures could harm democracy and the economic climate.

57. More than 400 businesses back LGBTQ rights act -

More than 400 companies – including Tesla, Pfizer, Delta Air Lines and Amazon – have signed on to support civil rights legislation for LGBTQ people that is moving through Congress, advocates said Tuesday.

58. Delta posts $1.2 billion loss, says it's flying into recovery -

Delta Air Lines lost $1.2 billion in the first quarter but executives said Thursday that the airline could be profitable by late summer if the budding recovery in air travel continues.

CEO Ed Bastian said Thursday that ticket sales have been stronger in the last two weeks than at any time since the pandemic hit the U.S. last year. Right now it's mostly vacationers booking trips to mountains, beaches and resorts, but he expects business travel to come back by late summer or fall as more Americans are vaccinated against COVID-19.

59. Big-business pushback against voting measures gains momentum -

Big business has ratcheted up its objections to proposals that would make it harder to vote, with several hundred companies and executives signing a new statement opposing "any discriminatory legislation."

60. Business leaders urge Biden to set ambitious climate goal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 300 businesses and investors, including such giants as Apple, Google, Microsoft and Coca-Cola, are calling on the Biden administration to set an ambitious climate change goal that would cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50% below 2005 levels by 2030.

61. Business faces tricky path navigating post-Trump politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For more than a half-century, the voice emerging from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's monolithic, Beaux Arts-styled building near the White House was predictable: It was the embodiment of American business and, more specifically, a shared set of interests with the Republican Party.

62. McConnell warns biz off political speech, says it's 'stupid' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday "it's quite stupid" for corporations to speak out politically, intensifying his warnings for big business to stand down as Congress delves into voting rights, President Joe Biden's infrastructure package and other defining issues.

63. Delta cancels about 100 flights, opens some middle seats -

DETROIT (AP) — Delta Air Lines canceled about 100 flights Sunday due to staff shortages, and it opened up middle seats a month earlier than expected in order to carry more passengers.

The airline says it had over 1 million passengers during the past few days, the highest number since before the coronavirus pandemic began last year.

64. Corporations gave over $50M to voting restriction backers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When executives from Coca-Cola and Delta Air Lines spoke out against Georgia's new voting law as unduly restrictive last week, it seemed to signal a new activism springing from corporate America.

65. Open your door and say ‘Ahhhh’ -

Jacob Melnychuk grew up in San Jose, California, where he occasionally skipped science class at Leland High School to surf.

“I was a terrible high school student,” he admits.

But he also had a genuine sense of community, which rallied around the family of Pat Tillman, a fellow Leland graduate, after the Army Ranger was killed in Afghanistan in 2004. Tillman’s family was a staple in their community, and it was upsetting to Melnychuk to see how the military handled his death.

66. After backlash, Delta CEO says Ga. voting law 'unacceptable' -

ATLANTA (AP) — The CEO of Georgia-based Delta Air Lines said Wednesday that the state's new election law overhaul is "unacceptable" and "based on a lie," after the company faced criticism that it didn't speak out forcefully enough in opposition to the bill when it was being considered by the state's Republican leaders.

67. Airlines return to old ways; Southwest drops boarding change -

As Americans slowly return to flying, airlines are dropping some of the changes they made early in the pandemic.

Southwest Airlines has gone back to boarding passengers in lots of 30. During the pandemic, it restricted boarding to 10 passengers at a time to create more space between them.

68. Stocks extend gains for fifth day, led by technology shares -

Stocks shook off an early stumble and closed broadly higher Monday, nudging some of the major U.S. indexes to more all-time highs as the market added to its recent string of gains.

The S&P 500 rose 0.7% after having been down 0.5% in the early going, extending its winning streak to a fifth day. Technology stocks, airlines, cruise operators and other companies that rely on consumer spending helped lift the market. Banks and energy stocks were the only laggards.

69. US air travel rises to highest levels yet since pandemic hit -

Across the United States, air travel is recovering more quickly from the depths of the pandemic, and it is showing up in longer airport security lines and busier traffic on airline websites.

The Transportation Security Administration screened more than 1.3 million people both Friday and Sunday, setting a new high since the coronavirus outbreak devastated travel a year ago. Airlines believe the numbers are heading up, with more people booking flights for spring and summer.

70. US airlines adding jobs, extending rebound from October low -

U.S. airlines are adding jobs as industry employment extends a rebound from a low in October, when tens of thousands of airline workers were briefly laid off after federal payroll aid expired.

Cargo airlines have added jobs while passenger airlines have shed workers, mostly through incentives for workers to quit or take early retirement.

71. FAA seeks $27,500 from passenger it says hit air attendant -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal officials are seeking a $27,500 civil penalty against an airline passenger who allegedly struck a flight attendant who asked the passenger and a companion to leave the plane after a dispute over wearing a face mask.

72. United Airlines posts $1.9 billion loss in pandemic-laden 4Q -

United Airlines said Wednesday that it finished one of the worst years in its history by losing $1.9 billion in the last three months of 2020, and it predicted more of the same in the first quarter of this year.

73. A $12 billion loss for 2020, Delta is cautious in early 2021 -

Delta Air Lines closed the books on a disastrous 2020 with a comparatively small fourth-quarter loss, and executives expect a few more rocky months before — they hope — widespread coronavirus vaccinations and testing might salvage something of the upcoming summer travel season.

74. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

75. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

76. Delta won't furlough pilots; job cuts possible at Southwest -

DALLAS (AP) — Delta Air Lines on Wednesday dropped a threat to furlough more than 1,700 pilots after they ratified a cost-cutting agreement that the airline said was needed to help it cope with a downturn caused by the pandemic.

77. FAA clears Boeing 737 Max to fly again -

After nearly two years and a pair of deadly crashes, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has cleared Boeing's 737 Max for flight.

The nation's air safety agency announced the move early Wednesday, saying it was done after a "comprehensive and methodical" 20-month review process.

78. Is it safe yet to fly during the pandemic? -

Is it safe yet to fly during the pandemic? Public health experts say staying home is best to keep yourself and others safe from infection. But if you're thinking about flying for the holidays, you should know what to expect.

79. Rally fades on Wall Street, pulling indexes below records -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed mostly higher on Wednesday, helped by big technology stocks, but news of tighter restrictions in New York State helped dent an earlier rally.

The S&P 500 closed up 27.13 points, or 0.8%, to 3,572.66. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite, meanwhile, rose by 2%.

80. Legal Aid, Catholic Charities partner for COVID-19 assistance -

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands has partnered with Catholic Charities of Tennessee to offer assistance to individuals experiencing financial or personal hardships due to COVID-19.

81. Future of business travel unclear as virus upends work life -

Brian Contreras represents the worst fears of the lucrative business travel industry.

A partner account executive at a U.S. tech firm, Contreras was used to traveling frequently for his company. But nine months into the pandemic, he and thousands of others are working from home and dialing into video conferences instead of boarding planes.

82. JetBlue is the latest airline to retreat from blocking seats -

The days of airlines blocking seats to make passengers feel safer about flying during the pandemic are coming closer to an end.

JetBlue is the latest to indicate it is rethinking the issue. A spokesman for the carrier said Thursday that JetBlue will reduce the number of seats it blocks after Dec. 1 to accommodate families traveling together over the holidays.

83. American, Southwest, Alaska add to airline loss parade in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in additional losses as the pandemic chokes off air travel, but a recent uptick in passengers, however modest, has provided some hope.

84. American, Southwest add to parade of airline losses in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in losses as the pandemic causes a massive drop in air travel.

American Airlines on Thursday reported a loss of $2.4 billion and Southwest Airlines lost $1.16 billion in the third quarter, typically a very strong period of air travel that includes most of the summer vacation season.

85. United loses $1.8 billion, aims to shift focus to recovery -

United Airlines financial hole grew deeper over the summer as a modest recovery in air travel slowed down, pushing the carrier to a loss of $1.84 billion in the typically strong third quarter.

The airline said Wednesday that revenue plummeted 78% from a year earlier. The loss was worse than analysts had expected.

86. Delta posts $5.4 billion 3Q loss as pandemic hammers travel -

The summer travel season was even worse than expected for Delta Air Lines, which said Tuesday that it lost $5.4 billion in the third quarter as people hunkered down at home during the pandemic.

Delta officials pushed back their timetable for breaking even, from year-end to next spring, as their previous expectation that COVID-19 would be contained proved too rosy. The airline's shares fell almost 3% on Tuesday.

87. Stocks climb again on Wall Street with hopes for stimulus -

Stocks rose for the second day in a row Thursday, reflecting hope on Wall Street that Washington can approve more aid for the economy and encouragement from a report that suggests the pace of layoffs is slowing a bit, even though it remains incredibly high.

88. Stocks rise as Trump tweets on stimulus keep market spinning -

Stocks closed broadly higher on Wall Street Wednesday after President Donald Trump appeared to backtrack on his decision to halt talks on another rescue effort for the economy.

The S&P 500 climbed 1.7% after Trump sent a series of tweets late Tuesday saying he's open to sending out $1,200 payments to Americans, as well as limited programs to prop up the airline industry and small businesses.

89. CEO says Southwest needs union pay cuts to avoid furloughs -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines will cut pay for nonunion workers in January and says union workers must also accept less pay or face furloughs next year as the pandemic continues to hammer the airline business.

90. Delta, American join United in dropping most US change fees -

This could be the final boarding call for the $200 ticket-change fee that has enraged so many U.S. airline travelers over the past decade.

Delta Air Lines and American Airlines said Monday that they are dropping the fee on most tickets for domestic flights, copying United Airlines' move one day earlier.

91. White House is mulling options to prevent airline furloughs -

The White House is considering whether it can take action to prevent thousands of job losses in the airline industry a month before the election if it cannot reach a deal with Congress on a broader package of additional pandemic relief.

92. American Airlines plans 19,000 furloughs, layoffs in October -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines said Tuesday it will cut more than 40,000 jobs, including 19,000 through furloughs and layoffs, in October as it struggles with a sharp downturn in travel because of the pandemic.

93. US stocks join global rally amid COVID treatment hopes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks plowed higher on Wall Street Monday, as hopes for a COVID-19 treatment and vaccine had investors looking ahead to the possibility of a healthier economy that has shed the virus.

94. American, pilots agree on steps aimed at reducing job cuts -

American Airlines has reached a deal with its pilots' union designed to reduce the number of job losses in October as the airline shrinks because fewer people are flying during the pandemic.

American had previously offered early retirement to pilots and other employees. But, Senior Vice President Kimball Stone said Tuesday, "we still had many more people than necessary to run our operation."

95. Virgin Atlantic airline files for US bankruptcy protection -

NEW YORK (AP) — Virgin Atlantic, the airline founded by British businessman Richard Branson, filed Tuesday for protection in U.S. bankruptcy court as it tries to survive the virus pandemic that is hammering the airline industry.

96. Southwest tightens face-mask rule, Delta steps up testing -

DALLAS (AP) — Delta Air Lines will provide at-home coronavirus tests for some employees and Southwest Airlines will tighten its rule on face masks by ending exceptions for medical reasons.

"We're simply seeing too many exceptions to the (mask) policy, it has put our flight crews in a really tough spot and also made our customers pretty uncomfortable," Southwest President Tom Nealon said Thursday.

97. American, Southwest add to US airline industry's 2Q losses -

DALLAS (AP) — Delta Air Lines will provide at-home coronavirus tests for some employees, while Southwest and American will tighten their rules on face masks by ending exceptions for medical reasons.

98. American, Southwest add to US airline industry's 2Q losses -

DALLAS (AP) — Major airlines reported huge second-quarter losses Thursday and warned that the recovery in air travel seen in April has stalled as coronavirus cases surge in the U.S.

American posted a loss of more than $2 billion, and Southwest lost $915 million. That pushed the combined loss of the nation's four biggest airlines to more than $10 billion in just three months.

99. United Airlines posts $1.6 billion loss in virus-scarred 2Q -

United Airlines said Tuesday that it lost $1.63 billion in the second quarter as revenue plunged 87%, and it will operate at barely over one-third of capacity through September as the coronavirus throttles air travel.

100. American Airlines warns 25,000 workers they could lose jobs -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is notifying about 25,000 workers that their jobs could be eliminated in October because of plunging demand for air travel, adding to the toll that the virus pandemic is taking on the airline industry.