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Editorial Results (free)

1. White House competition council seeks lower consumer prices -

A new White House council on U.S. economic conditions plans to hold its first meeting Friday, with participants to highlight at least 18 actions taken to help consumers and potentially lower prices.

2. Spread the word: Party’s winding down for short-term rentals -

News has never traveled faster than it does today, but the latest news concerning the short-term rental situation in Nashville seems to have exited the information highway.

Short-term rentals (STRs) began to boom in Nashville in 2015, some eight years after the company Airbnb was founded and began to gain momentum in the “It City,” which also has become known as “The Bachelorette Party Capital of the World.”

3. Modest gains produce more record highs for S&P 500, Nasdaq -

Stocks on Wall Street closed with modest gains Wednesday, driving the S&P 500 and Nasdaq to all-time highs for the second day in a row.

Financial and energy companies led the way higher among stocks in the S&P 500. The benchmark index rose 0.2%, marking its fifth straight gain. A rise in bond yields, which allows lenders to charge higher interest rates on loans, helped push bank stocks higher. Health care and technology companies were among the laggards.

4. Without 'right to repair,' businesses lose time and money -

As software and other technologies get infused in more and more products, manufacturers are increasingly making those products difficult to repair, potentially costing business owners time and money.

5. Factory boss defiant as sanctions bite in China's Xinjiang -

AKSU, China (AP) — A backlash against reports of forced labor and other abuses of the largely Muslim Uyghur ethnic group in Xinjiang is taking a toll on China's cotton industry, but it's unclear if the pressure will compel the government or companies to change their ways.

6. Hagerty fills Senate team with 13 ex-Trump admin staffers -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Freshman Republican U.S. Sen. Bill Hagerty has picked more than a dozen former members of the Trump administration to join his Washington office, including a chief of staff who also worked for former Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and former Sen. Bob Corker.

7. Trump follows 1 tradition, leaves note for Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has followed at least one presidential tradition.

The White House says the Republican president left behind a note for his successor, Democrat Joe Biden.

8. Trump bids farewell to Washington, hints of comeback -

WASHINGTON (AP) — His term at an end, President Donald Trump said farewell to Washington on Wednesday but also hinted about a comeback despite a legacy of chaos, tumult and bitter divisions in the country he led for four years.

9. 'Shameful': US virus deaths top 400K as Trump leaves office -

As President Donald Trump entered the final year of his term last January, the U.S. recorded its first confirmed case of COVID-19. Not to worry, Trump insisted, his administration had the virus "totally under control."

10. Analysis: Trump abdicating in the job he fought to retain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's days in office are numbered. But he's already stopped doing much of his job.

In the last three weeks, a bomb went off in a major city and the president said nothing about it. The coronavirus surged to horrifying new levels of illness and death in the U.S. without Trump acknowledging the awful milestones. A violent mob incited by the president's own words chanted for Mike Pence's lynching at the U.S. Capitol and Trump made no effort to reach out to his vice president.

11. Trump to skip Biden swearing-in — Biden's fine with that -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Friday he will skip President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration, refusing to fulfill the outgoing president's traditional role in the peaceful transition of power and undercutting his own message just one day earlier on the need for "national healing and unity."

12. Trump's legacy: He changed the presidency, but will it last? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The most improbable of presidents, Donald Trump reshaped the office and shattered its centuries-old norms and traditions while dominating the national discourse like no one before.

13. Church vandalism exposes divisions over faith and politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vandalism at four downtown Washington churches after rallies in support of President Donald Trump are exposing rifts among people of faith as the nation confronts bitter post-election political divisions.

14. Controversial Fed nominee Shelton stalls in Senate test vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nomination of Judy Shelton, President Donald Trump's controversial pick for the Federal Reserve, is stalled in the Senate after Vice President-elect Kamala Harris returned to the chamber to cast a key vote in a tally Tuesday.

15. Trump's silent public outing belies White House in tumult -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump spent 10 minutes in public honoring America's war veterans — a veneer of normalcy for a White House that's frozen by a defeated president mulling his options, mostly forgoing the mechanics of governing and blocking his inevitable successor.

16. Trump tests limits as Cabinet members fan out to key states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Education Secretary Betsy DeVos planned a "Moms for Trump" rally in her home state of Michigan. The Department of Homeland Security's top official was in Texas to celebrate completion of a section of the U.S.-Mexico border wall. The chief of the Environmental Protection Agency headed to North Carolina after visiting Georgia the day before.

17. On virus, Trump and health advisers go their separate ways -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A multi-state coronavirus surge in the countdown to Election Day has exposed a clear split between President Donald Trump's bullish embrace of a return to normalcy and urgent public warnings from the government's top health officials.

18. DC faults White House over Rose Garden event, urges testing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an extraordinary step, the Washington, D.C., Department of Health has released an open letter appealing to all White House staff and anyone who attended a Sept. 26 event in the Rose Garden to seek medical advice and take a COVID-19 test.

19. White House staff, Secret Service eye virus with fear, anger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The West Wing is a ghost town. Staff members are scared of exposure. And the White House is now a treatment ward for not one — but two — COVID-19 patients, including a president who has long taken the threat of the virus lightly.

20. White House virus testing couldn't protect Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — His press secretary once described President Donald Trump as the "most tested man in America" when it came to COVID-19. And variations on that message were the White House ready response any time critics questioned the president's lax approach to following guidelines for avoiding the novel coronavirus.

21. Trump's whirlwind week, disdain for masks, ended with COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The scene at the White House a week ago was one of normalcy in these most abnormal times: a crowd of revelers gathered in the Rose Garden, a band playing, the mingling of the elite, good cheer everywhere, handshakes and hugs left and right.

22. Barrett opposed 'abortion on demand,' raising doubts on Roe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett signed a 2006 newspaper ad sponsored by an anti-abortion group in which she said she opposed "abortion on demand" and defended "the right to life from fertilization to the end of natural life."

23. Ginsburg's death exposes fragility of health law protection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With COVID-19 the newest preexisting condition, the Obama-era health law that protects Americans from insurance discrimination is more fragile following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

24. Ex-Pence adviser says Trump bungled virus; she's for Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A former adviser to Vice President Mike Pence who served on the White House coronavirus task force says President Donald Trump once suggested that COVID-19 might be a good thing because it would stop him from having to shake hands with "disgusting people."

25. Climate change largely missing from campaign as fires rage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Historic fires are raging across the western United States ahead of what scientists say is the typical peak of wildfire season. Hurricane Laura devastated parts of the Gulf Coast last month, while swaths of Iowa are recovering from a derecho that brought hurricane force winds to the Midwest.

26. South Lawn, Rose Garden under repair post-convention -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Rose Garden has been a muddy mess and the South Lawn marred by brown patches since President Donald Trump used them as backdrops for last month's Republican National Convention.

27. US says it won't join global effort to find COVID-19 vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said Tuesday that it will not work with an international cooperative effort to develop and distribute a COVID-19 vaccine because it does not want to be constrained by multilateral groups like the World Health Organization.

28. Trump seizes on protests as Dems blame him for tensions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats accused President Donald Trump of trying to inflame racial tensions and incite violence to benefit his campaign after he praised supporters who clashed with protesters during a deadly night in Portland, Oregon. and announced he will travel to Kenosha, Wisconsin, amid anger over the shooting of another Black man by police.

29. What virus? At GOP's convention, pandemic is largely ignored -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It was a scene from a bygone era: Vice President Mike Pence shaking hands with and fist-bumping audience members who rushed forward, shoulder to shoulder, to greet him and the president after Pence's speech at the Republican National Convention.

30. Trump's convention blurs official business, politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Plenty of presidents have walked right up to the line separating official business from politics — or even stepped over it. President Donald Trump has blown past it with a bulldozer, and his planned Republican convention speech from the White House lawn this week might be the latest and most blatant example yet.

31. S&P 500 ticks higher to record, powered again by tech stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — The S&P 500 ticked higher to close at another all-time high Friday, powered by strength for technology stocks and a couple reports on the U.S. economy that were better than expected.

32. Analysis: Trump has a go-to solution, and it's more Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has a ready solution for almost any crisis: more Donald Trump.

In a template forged in his 2016 convention speech when he declared that "I alone can fix it," the president has repeatedly put himself forth as the answer, injecting himself into controversies and refusing to cede the spotlight. And that has only accelerated as he barrels toward Election Day.

33. Dems say Trump's payroll tax break weakens Social Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's move to defer Social Security payroll taxes could be taking him into treacherous political territory.

His directive — aimed at boosting an economy shaken by the coronavirus pandemic — doesn't affect retirement benefits but impacts how they're paid for. Democrats seized on it Monday as a signal that Trump would cut the social safety net and break a promise he made as a candidate in 2016 not to touch Social Security and Medicare. Some nonpartisan experts also expressed concerns.

34. McConnell: No room for new FBI building in virus aid bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Republican says he opposes a push by President Donald Trump to include in a new coronavirus aid package nearly $1.8 billion to rebuild the FBI headquarters on its current site in downtown Washington.

35. Trump offers confusion, contradictions on immigration order -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is promising new executive action on immigration as he returns to the defining issue of his administration. But Trump has offered contradictory and confusing statements about his plans in recent days. His comments come after the Supreme Court rejected his efforts to end the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, which protects young immigrants brought to the country as children. Trump said last month that he would quickly be filing paperwork to address the court's concerns, but has yet to make a move.

36. Four more years? Trump struggles to outline second term plan -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump is adamant that he wants another four years in office. It's less clear what he would do with them.

The Republican president repeatedly assailed Democratic rival Joe Biden during a rambling, hourlong Rose Garden news conference Tuesday that doubled as a reelection rally. But he offered few clues about what he would do if he remains in the White House. He similarly stammered through an interview last month when pressed by a friendly TV host to talk about what a second term would look like.

37. Trump looks to scale back environmental reviews for projects -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is expected to announce a new federal rule to speed up the environmental review process for proposed highways, gas pipelines and other major infrastructure, a move that critics are describing as the dismantling of a 50-year-old environmental protection law.

38. Trump undercuts health experts -- again -- in schools debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House seating chart spoke volumes. When the president convened a roundtable this week on how to safely reopen schools with coronavirus cases rising, the seats surrounding him were filled with parents, teachers and top White House officials, including the first and second ladies.

39. PGA Tour, Memorial scrap plans to have limited spectators -

The PGA Tour and the Memorial scrapped state-approved plans to have limited spectators next week because of what it described as rapidly changing dynamics of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Memorial, hosted by Jack Nicklaus on his Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio, was in line to be the first tournament with spectators since golf resumed its schedule on June 11 in Texas.

40. Dem climate plan would end greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats on Tuesday unveiled a plan to address climate change that would set a goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, while pushing renewable energy such as wind and solar power and addressing environmental injustice that harms low-income and minority communities.

41. Trump administration seeks to scrap ACA as pandemic surges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As coronavirus cases rise in more than half of the states, the Trump administration is urging the Supreme Court to overturn the Affordable Care Act.

The administration's high court filing at 10:30 p.m. Thursday came the same day the government reported that close to half a million people who lost their health insurance amid the economic shutdown to slow the spread of COVID-19 have gotten coverage through HealthCare.gov.

42. With a jab at Trump, Pelosi unveils new 'Obamacare' bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Flicking a dismissive jab at President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled a plan Wednesday to expand the Obama-era health law, even as Trump's administration is about to file arguments in a Supreme Court case to strike down "Obamacare."

43. White House scales back temperature checks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Visitors are able to enter the White House complex without having their temperatures checked for the first time since mid-March, although several other coronavirus precautions remain in place.

44. Protests eclipse pandemic, but White House fears resurgence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For weeks, President Donald Trump has been eager to publicly turn the page on the coronavirus pandemic. Now fears are growing within the White House that the very thing that finally shoved the virus from center stage — mass protests over the death of George Floyd — may bring about its resurgence.

45. Protests eclipse pandemic, but White House fears resurgence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For weeks, President Donald Trump has been eager to publicly turn the page on the coronavirus pandemic. Now fears are growing within the White House that the very thing that finally shoved the virus from center stage — mass protests over the death of George Floyd — may bring about its resurgence.

46. Trump continues to claim broad powers he doesn't have -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Threatening to shut down Twitter for flagging false content. Claiming he can "override" governors who dare to keep churches closed to congregants. Asserting the "absolute authority" to force states to reopen, even when local leaders say it's too soon.

47. Trump continues to claim broad powers he doesn't have -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Threatening to shut down Twitter for flagging false content. Claiming he can "override" governors who dare to keep churches closed to congregants. Asserting the "absolute authority" to force states to reopen, even when local leaders say it's too soon.

48. Trump committed to July 4 celebration despite lawmaker alarm -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said Tuesday that President Donald Trump remains committed to holding a Fourth of July celebration in the nation's capital even as Democratic lawmakers from the region -- one of the hardest hit by the coronavirus -- warn that the area will not be ready to hold a major event.

49. Trump lashes out at scientists whose findings contradict him -

WASHINGTON (AP) — "A Trump enemy statement," he said of one study.

"A political hit job," he said of another.

As President Donald Trump pushes to reopen the country despite warnings from doctors about the consequences of moving too quickly during the coronavirus crisis, he has been lashing out at scientists whose conclusions he doesn't like.

50. As Trump resumes travel, staff takes risks to prepare trip -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For much of the last two months, President Donald Trump has rarely left the grounds of the White House as he's dealt with the fallout of the coronavirus pandemic and sought to minimize his own exposure to the disease.

51. Fauci warns states against 'tempting' a coronavirus rebound -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's top infectious disease expert said Thursday that new cases of the coronavirus are a certainty as states begin to roll back restrictions. States need to proceed carefully as they take steps to reopen businesses and allow greater freedom of movement, Dr. Anthony Fauci said.

52. Trump says he's not extending social distancing guidelines -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said the federal government will not be extending its coronavirus social distancing guidelines once they expire Thursday, and his son-in-law and adviser, Jared Kushner, predicted that by July the country will be "really rocking again."

53. White House says no 'surprise' bills for COVID-19 patients -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hospitals taking money from the $2 trillion stimulus bill will have to agree not to send "surprise" medical bills to patients treated for COVID-19, the White House said Thursday.

Surprise bills typically happen when a patient with health insurance gets treated at an out-of-network emergency room, or when an out-of-network doctor assists with a hospital procedure. They can run from hundreds of dollars to tens of thousands. Before the coronavirus outbreak, lawmakers in Congress had pledged to curtail the practice, but prospects for such legislation now seem highly uncertain.

54. Turn out the lights, the party’s over -

He’s seen fire and he’s seen rain, but his violinist and accompanying vocalist, Andrea Zonn, says James Taylor never thought that he’d see a time when a virus from China would wipe out his spring and, likely, summer schedules.

55. Country singer Joe Diffie tests positive for coronavirus -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A publicist for Joe Diffie says the country singer has tested positive for COVID-19.

Scott Adkins released a statement to The Associated Press from Diffie that said he is under the care of medical professionals and is receiving treatment.

56. White House moves to protect Trump, staff against virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House put in place new measures Monday to protect President Donald Trump and his staff during the coronavirus outbreak, including taking the temperature of anyone who enters the complex, including visitors and members of the press corps.

57. As virus inches closer, Trump says he's likely to be tested -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Friday he will likely be tested for the coronavirus "fairly soon," as questions swirled about why the president, his top aides and his family weren't doing more to protect themselves and others against COVID-19.

58. Trump declares virus pandemic a national emergency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Friday declared the coronavirus pandemic a national emergency in order to free up more money and resources. But he denied any responsibility for delays in making testing available for the new virus, whose spread has roiled markets and disrupted the lives of everyday Americans.

59. A look at some of the hardest hit sectors in the S&P 500 -

Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the outbreak is now classified as a pandemic and it's doing widespread damage to critical economic sectors of the global economy. Airlines are dropping routes because people are not flying, workers are staying home, public events that raise millions of dollars for local communities have been canceled and oil prices have sunk to near $30 a barrel. Here's a look at some of the hardest hit sectors in the S&P 500, and how far they've fallen in the past 30 days.

60. Secret Service might leave Homeland Security, rejoin Treasury -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is throwing its support behind a plan to transfer the U.S. Secret Service back to the Treasury Department to better focus on the growing threat of online financial crimes.

61. Trump's economy: Solid and steady but vulnerable to threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A portrait of a robust U.S. economy is sure to take center stage Tuesday night when President Donald Trump gives his third State of the Union address. It is an economy that has proved solid and durable, yet hasn't fulfilled many of Trump's promises.

62. Trump suggests he may be open to Medicare, Social Security cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump appeared to suggest in a television interview Wednesday that he's willing to consider entitlement cuts in the future, a move that would mark a tectonic shift from his stance during his 2016 run for the White House.

63. 3 years in, no sign of Trump's replacement for Obamacare -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a candidate for the White House, Donald Trump repeatedly promised that he would "immediately" replace President Barack Obama's health care law with a plan of his own that would provide "insurance for everybody."

64. Trump appears to hit record with 115 Thursday tweets -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The always-prolific Tweeter-in-chief appears to have hit a new record.

The president's @realDonaldTrump account had tweeted and retweeted 115 times by late Thursday night, marking what could be his most active day on the platform yet.

65. Modest gains drive US stock indexes to more record highs -

Investors capped a day of light trading on Wall Street ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday by serving up another set of stock market record highs.

The S&P 500, Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite closed at all-time highs for the third straight day Wednesday. And the Russell 2000 index of smaller companies hit its highest level in a year.

66. Stocks rise on trade progress, S&P 500 notches weekly gain -

The S&P 500 finished with its first weekly gain in four weeks Friday as investors welcomed a thaw in the punishing trade war between the U.S. and China.

After two days of negotiations in Washington, the U.S. agreed to suspend a planned hike in tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese goods that had been set to kick in Tuesday. Beijing, meanwhile, agreed to buy $40 billion to $50 billion in U.S. farm products.

67. Gun legislation stalls as congressional leaders trade barbs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that Democrats are engaging in "theatrics" over gun control legislation, while House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that "people are dying" because the Senate leader refuses to act.

68. US stock indexes end mostly higher after late buying burst -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Tuesday, erasing much of an early slide, as investors favored smaller, U.S.-focused companies for the second straight day.

Industrial, energy and health care stocks helped power the market higher. Banks also notched solid gains amid a broad pullback in demand for U.S. government bonds, which pushed yields higher. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note climbed to 1.73% from 1.62% late Monday, a big move.

69. Trump acknowledges China policies may mean US economic pain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump acknowledged his aggressive China trade policies may mean economic pain for Americans but insisted they're needed for more important long-term benefits. He contended he does not fear a recession but is nonetheless considering new tax cuts to promote growth.

70. Drug cost bill advances but GOP resistance spells trouble -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A prescription drug compromise that would lower costs for Medicare recipients and save billions for Medicare and Medicaid cleared a key hurdle in the Senate on Thursday, but Republican resistance signaled trouble as the legislation faces floor consideration.

71. Trump's July Fourth event drains DC security fund -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's July Fourth event has drained a special fund used to provide security and protect the nation's capital from terrorist threats.

The Washington Post reports the celebration cost the District of Columbia about $1.7 million, not including police expenses for related demonstrations.

72. Setbacks for Trump's drive to lower prescription drug costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After two setbacks this week, President Donald Trump is now focusing his drive to curb drug costs on congressional efforts aimed at helping people on Medicare and younger generations covered by workplace plans.

73. Trump's July Fourth event bankrupts DC security fund -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's July Fourth event has bankrupted a special fund used to provide security and protect the nation's capital from terrorist threats.

The Washington Post reports the celebration cost the District of Columbia about $1.7 million, not including police expenses for related demonstrations.

74. Tech sector leads US stocks higher as Fed signals rate cut -

Stocks finished higher Wednesday as Wall Street welcomed new signals suggesting the Federal Reserve is ready to cut interest rates for the first time in a decade.

Technology stocks drove much of the gains, nudging the Nasdaq composite to an all-time high. The benchmark S&P 500 index briefly traded above 3,000 for the first time before pulling back to just below its most recent record high a week ago.

75. Trump v. Big Tech: Social media summit will snub tech titans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is gathering conservative groups at the White House this week for a "summit" on social media that will prominently snub the tech titans who run big platforms on Facebook, Twitter and Google.

76. Automakers urge California, US to restart mileage talks -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Major automobile manufacturers urged the Trump administration and California on Thursday to restart negotiations over vehicle mileage standards to prevent a lengthy legal battle, warning that moving ahead with two sets of standards would create instability in the auto market.

77. No end seen to struggle as Mississippi flood enters month 4 -

HOLLY BLUFF, Miss. (AP) — Larry Walls should have been out working in his fields last week. Instead, his John Deere tractor is parked on high ground, just beyond the reach of the ever-encroaching floodwaters in the southern Mississippi Delta.

78. Wobbly week for US stocks; 2nd weekly drop for S&P 500 -

Stocks fell broadly on Wall Street Friday as investor jitters over the heated trade war between the world's two biggest economies overshadowed encouraging developments in conflicts between the U.S. and other key trading partners.

79. Trump's escalating trade war sends stocks plunging -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged more than 600 points Monday as investors sought shelter from an escalating trade war between the U.S. and China.

The selling was widespread and heavy, handing the benchmark S&P 500 index its biggest loss since January. The sell-off extended the market's slide into a second week. The losses so far in May have now erased the market's gains from April.

80. US stocks slide after threat from Trump to raise tariffs -

Fresh market jitters over the possibility of an escalation in the costly trade war between the U.S. and China pulled stocks broadly lower on Wall Street Monday.

The decline, which gradually lost momentum after an initial steep slump, came a day after President Donald Trump threatened to raise tariffs on goods imported from China. Trump complained that the trade talks between the two countries are moving too slowly.

81. Stocks post strong finish as optimism over trade talks grows -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average surged more than 400 points Friday as renewed optimism over trade talks between the U.S. and China put investors in a buying mood.

The rally marked a turnaround from a day earlier, when disappointing holiday sales data led to a modest sell-off. Friday's gains helped push the benchmark S&P 500 index to its third-consecutive weekly gain.

82. Stocks sink on growth fears and possible snag in trade talks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell sharply Tuesday following new signs the global economy is weakening and reports of difficulties in trade talks between the U.S. and China. That broke a four-day winning streak for U.S. indexes.

83. Apple warning of weak sales in China sends US stocks sinking -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks went into a steep slide Thursday morning after Apple reported a slowdown in iPhone sales over the holidays in China, a hugely important market for the company.

The rare warning from Apple sent a shudder through markets and confirmed fears among investors that the world's second-largest economy was weakening.

84. Stocks jump as hopes rise for progress on China trade talks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rose late in the day Friday as investors welcomed signs of progress in resolving the trade dispute between the U.S. and China. The Wall Street Journal reported that the countries hope to have a resolution by November.

85. Health care and industrial stocks lead US indexes higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose Tuesday following strong results from industrial and health care companies as well as a report that the U.S. and China are trying to restart trade talks. Small companies rallied.

86. US stock indexes end mostly higher on solid earnings reports -

The major U.S. stock indexes finished mostly higher Tuesday as investors welcomed strong corporate earnings reports from Google parent Alphabet and other companies.

Gains by technology companies and health care stocks outweighed losses in consumer goods manufacturers, retailers and other sectors.

87. Stocks skid as trade war worsens with new tariff threats -

NEW YORK (AP) — Global stock indexes sank Wednesday after the Trump administration released a list of $200 billion in goods that could be hit with tariffs and China said it would retaliate. The dollar spiked and big exporters plunged.

88. US stocks snap higher despite escalating US-China trade tiff -

The trade dispute between the U.S. and China escalated Friday, but Wall Street focused on a solid jobs report instead.

After a wobbly start, U.S. stocks mounted a broad rally, shaking off two consecutive weekly losses.

89. Trade tremors: How tariffs, tough talk has unsettled markets -

NEW YORK (AP) — Fears of a trade war have given a boost to some of the smallest companies on the market as well as some of the biggest technology companies, but they've squeezed almost everything in the middle.

90. US stock indexes cap choppy trading week with a mixed finish -

Despite a choppy week of trading and a mixed finish for U.S. stocks, the market extended its recent streak of relative calm Friday.

The S&P 500, the market's benchmark index, notched its 10th day in a row without a gain or drop of 1 percent or more. That's the longest stretch going back to January 26, when the market broke four and a half months of calm with a 1.2 percent gain, which also marked a record high.

91. Nashville transit decision guide -

Ralph Schulz got stuck in traffic. It was on a Thursday, around 1 p.m., and he says it took him 23 minutes to drive along Broadway for two blocks, between Third and Fifth avenues.

There were no accidents or special events. But there were delivery trucks, a pedal tavern, a John Deere tractor pulling a cart and other cars.

92. US stocks keep climbing as trade war fears recede -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks in the U.S. are rising Thursday morning and major indexes in Europe are jumping as global markets continue a rally that began late the previous day. Wall Street is getting more optimistic that a trade dispute between the U.S. and China, the two largest economies in the world, will be resolved without too much pain. Some of the biggest gains are going to technology companies, retailers and banks.

93. Stocks surge as market escapes early plunge on trade fears -

NEW YORK (AP) — After an early jolt, stocks rallied and finished higher Wednesday as investors bet that back-and-forth tariff threats between the U.S. and China won't blossom into a bigger dispute that damages global commerce.

94. Stocks end sluggish week with small gains -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market eked out a small gain but still ended the week lower after several days of losses.

Energy companies rose Friday along with the price of crude oil. ConocoPhillips gained 1.7 percent.

95. Construction workers hold all the cards in this building boom -

Wondering why the contractor you hired to work on your house never showed up or why your car keeps hitting potholes on Interstate 440 and other roads across Nashville?

The answer is visible above the city’s skyline, where cranes loom over high-rise buildings that seem to be going up in every direction.

96. US stocks edge higher as winning streak enters its 6th day -

NEW YORK (AP) — An early afternoon slump wiped out some big gains for stocks Friday, but major indexes are mostly higher as the market heads for its sixth gain in a row. Investors were fleeing the market early this month, but a combination of lower prices and rising company profits have them hurrying to buy stocks again.

97. US stocks mostly slip away from their latest record highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks mostly slipped away from their latest record highs Wednesday as the two former halves of Hewlett-Packard both tumbled, while falling interest rates helped phone companies but hurt banks.

98. Global stocks advance but trading slows ahead of US holiday -

NEW YORK (AP) — With the Thanksgiving holiday approaching, U.S. stocks are little changed Wednesday morning after they finished at all-time highs the day before. The price of oil is rising on reports OPEC might extend its cuts in production, and energy companies are also up. Technology companies are taking small losses as the two former halves of Hewlett-Packard both tumble.

99. A midday rally fades as sporting goods stocks are penalized -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks slumped in the final minutes of trading Friday and ended a rough week with more losses. Bad news from sporting goods retailers weighed on the market.

A day before, stocks had taken their biggest loss in three months. They opened lower after retailers Foot Locker and Hibbett Sports gave dour quarterly reports. The losses eased and stocks briefly turned higher following reports that President Donald Trump's chief strategist, Steve Bannon, left his White House post. Investors felt that makes it a bit more likely the administration can achieve at least some of its pro-business agenda.

100. Stocks climb, S&P 500 touches record after better jobs data -

NEW YORK (AP) — Yet another sign that the job market continues to improve is driving stocks and bond yields higher on Thursday. The Standard & Poor's 500 index is on track for its first up day in three and is close to its record high.