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Editorial Results (free)

1. US new home sales jump in December as prices fall -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Sales of new single family homes in December rose to their highest level in 10 months as buyers snapped up cheaper homes in anticipation of higher interest rates.

The increase put the seasonally adjusted annual sales pace to 811,000 for the month, according to the Commerce Department, an 11.9% increase over November's figure, which was revised down to 725,000 from 744,000.

2. Tractor Supply distribution center planned for Maumelle -

MAUMELLE, Ark. (AP) — Brentwood-based Tractor Supply Co. has announced plans for a new distribution center in central Arkansas that is expected to create 450 jobs by the end of next year.

3. Metro breaks record for construction permits -

As growth continues throughout Davidson County, Metro Nashville Codes and Building Safety Administration issued more than 14,600 building permits in 2021 valued at nearly $5.5 billion, a $900 million increase compared to 2021.

4. Events -

Tennessee Local Food Summit. The 11th annual Tennessee Local Food Summit, held in partnership with The Nashville Food Project and other local food advocates, celebrates the history and heritage of food in Middle Tennessee. This year’s conference features conversations about food production in the coming years in Tennessee. Experts are invited to talk about the state’s agricultural history as well as the food traditions carried on from its melting pot of ancestors. With the aid of social media, video and in-person components, this year’s conference will be more accessible than ever to attendees. Friday: Virtual and in-person at Harding House Brewing Co., 904 51st Ave. N. Nashville; Saturday: Community Farm at Mill Ridge, 5904 California Ave. Free. Information

5. US warns that chip shortage could shut down factories -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. supply of computer chips has fallen to alarmingly low levels, raising the prospect of factory shutdowns, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday.

Companies that use semiconductors are down to less than five days of inventory — a sharp drop from 40 days in 2019, according to a department survey of 150 companies. The chips used in the production of automobiles and medical devices are especially scarce.

6. US unveils changes to attract foreign science, tech students -

The Biden administration on Friday announced policy changes to attract international students specializing in science, technology, engineering and math — part of the broader effort to make the U.S. economy more competitive.

7. New step to curb tech giants' power advanced by Senate panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has taken a new step toward reining in the market dominance of Big Tech.

Bipartisan legislation advanced by a Senate panel would bar the dominant online platforms from favoring their own goods and services over those of rivals. It could, for example, prevent Amazon from steering consumers to its own brands and away from competitors' products on its giant e-commerce platform.

8. Amazon plans a clothing store for a Southern California mall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon says it plans to open a clothing store in a Southern California mall later this year, a first for the online behemoth and a fresh challenge for already struggling traditional retailers.

9. Neal & Harwell elects 3 new partners -

William “Jay” J. Harbison II, Erik C. Lybeck and Mozianio “Trey” S. Reliford III have been elected partners at Neal & Harwell, PLC.

Harbison joined the firm in 2015, and his practice focuses on business and civil litigation. He is a graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Law.

10. December marks 3rd consecutive month of growth for US builders -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Construction of new homes in the U.S. rose for the third consecutive month in December and data released Wednesday suggests that the frantic pace of building will continue this year.

11. AT&T says it will delay some 5G after airlines raise alarms -

AT&T will postpone new wireless service near some airports planned for this week after the nation's largest airlines said the service would interfere with aircraft technology and cause massive flight disruptions.

12. Airlines again warn of potential disruption from 5G rollout -

The airline industry is raising the stakes in a showdown with AT&T and Verizon over plans to launch new 5G wireless service this week, warning that thousands of flights could be grounded or delayed if the rollout takes place near major airports.

13. JD, Shopify to help US merchants sell in China -

BEIJING (AP) — JD.com Inc., China's biggest online retailer, and Canadian e-commerce service Shopify announced a strategic cooperation Tuesday to give independent U.S. merchants access to JD.com's 550 million customers.

14. Indexes end mostly higher, but still log another losing week -

A late-afternoon recovery in technology stocks helped erase most of the market's losses Friday, though it wasn't enough to keep major indexes from posting their second straight losing week.

The S&P 500 eked out a 0.1% gain in the final minutes of trading after having been down about 1% earlier in the day. The tech-heavy Nasdaq came back from a 0.8% slide to post a 0.6% gain. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.6%.

15. December retail sales slide 1.9% amid shortages, omicron -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans, beset by product shortages, rising prices and the arrival of omicron, sharply cut their spending in December after a burst of early spending in the fall that helped bolster the holiday season.

16. Hotchkiss among 4 new McGlinchey members -

McGlinchey Stafford has named three new members, including Lynette Hotchkiss in its Nashville office.

Hotchkiss, who specializes in consumer financial services compliance, joined McGlinchey in 2020 and has previous experience as general counsel and other in-house roles at banks, and as a senior regulator within the federal government.

17. November trade deficit hits near record-high $80.2 billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit surged to a near-record high of $80.2 billion in November as exports slowed at the same time that imports jumped sharply.

The November deficit was 19.3% higher than the October deficit of $67.2 billion and was just below the all-time monthly record of $81.4 billion set in September, the Commerce Department reported Thursday.

18. First Hispanic director of the Census Bureau sworn in -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Robert Santos was sworn in Wednesday as the head of the nation's largest statistical agency, becoming the first Hispanic director of the U.S. Census Bureau.

19. Top Davidson County commercial sales for 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

20. Belle Meade property going on auction block -

Luxury real estate auction house Platinum Luxury Auctions will begin the new year with an auction of a Belle Meade home that listed earlier for $9.5 million.

The property, 1310 Chickering Road in Belle Meade, is scheduled for auction Jan. 22.

21. Presnell sworn in as Trial Advocates president -

Todd Presnell, a partner in the Nashville office of Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP, has been sworn in as president of the Tennessee Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates.

A member of the firm’s litigation practice group, Presnell has an active trial practice, serves in discovery-counsel roles and leads and advises on internal corporate investigations. He represents major corporations, small businesses, governmental entities, tax-exempt organizations and individuals in litigation matters and has served as lead counsel in federal and state courts throughout the country.

22. Cautious optimism for tourism in 2022 -

Two years ago, Tennessee’s tourism economy was roaring. State and local officials touted record-breaking numbers, and 2019’s many successes were well positioned to carry into 2020 and beyond.

23. Scientist, enforcer, high-flyer: 3 women put a mark on tech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three bright and driven women with ground-breaking ideas made significant — if very different — marks on the embattled tech industry in 2021.

Frances Haugen, Lina Khan and Elizabeth Holmes — a data scientist turned whistleblower, a legal scholar turned antitrust enforcer and a former Silicon Valley high-flyer turned criminal defendant — all figured heavily in a technology world where men have long dominated the spotlight. Think Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk.

24. Biden: More competition in meat industry can ease food costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden met virtually with independent farmers and ranchers on Monday to discuss initiatives to reduce food prices by increasing competition within the meat industry, part of a broader effort to show his administration is trying to combat inflation.

25. Second Avenue reopens but with interruptions -

Second Avenue, the site of the 2020 Christmas morning bombing, reopened to traffic and pedestrians Monday morning, though it won’t soon be back to normal.

Second Avenue North at Commerce Street is open to one lane, northbound, for vehicle traffic and one pathway for pedestrians. But city officials warn there will still be periodic closures for construction purposes over the coming months, and safety fencing will remain between construction and reopened pathways.

26. China pursues tech 'self-reliance,' fueling global unease -

BEIJING (AP) — To help make China a self-reliant "technology superpower," the ruling Communist Party is pushing the world's biggest e-commerce company to take on the tricky, expensive business of designing its own processor chips — a business unlike anything Alibaba Group has done before.

27. COVID-19 variant disrupts holiday travel but not shopping -

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — The latest COVID-19 variant is upending holiday plans for tens of thousands of travelers — but it didn't do much damage to holiday shopping.

Airlines canceled hundreds more flights Sunday, citing staffing problems tied to COVID-19, as the nation's travel woes extended beyond Christmas, with no clear indication when normal schedules would resume.

28. Second Avenue to reopen one year after Christmas bombing -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The downtown Nashville street where a bomb went off on Christmas morning 2020 is set to reopen to traffic and pedestrians Monday morning, though it won't soon be back to normal.

29. Markets 2021: Stocks soar, IPOs explode, crypto goes wild -

Wall Street delivered another strong year for investors in 2021, as a resurgence in consumer demand fueled by the reopening of the global economy pumped up corporate profits.

As of Dec. 22, the S&P 500 had risen 25%, its third-straight annual increase. Along the way, the benchmark index set 67 all-time highs.

30. Consumer prices up 5.7% over past year, fastest in 39 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer prices rose 5.7% over the past year, the fastest pace in 39 years, as a surge in inflation confronts Americans with the holiday shopping season under way.

The November increase, reported Thursday by the Commerce Department, followed a 5.1% rise for the 12 months ending in October and kept up a trend of annual price gains running well above the 2% inflation target set by the Federal Reserve.

31. Johnson named president of Nashville Bar Association -

Nashville Metropolitan Chief Public Defender Martesha L. Johnson has been named 2022 president of the Nashville Bar Association. The Nashville native has served as assistant public defender for nine years before becoming the first African American and second woman to be elected to her current role, where she has been for three years.

32. Should rebuilding historic downtown include renaming? -

Lower Broad gets most of the media fanfare and tourist buzz. But Second Avenue, with its stretch of handsome, Victorian-era buildings, is the historic heart of Nashville.

“That’s where the city was founded,” the local historian Carole Bucy told The Tennessean back in January. “It’s the oldest history we’ve got.”

33. US consumer confidence rises despite omicron, higher prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer confidence rose this month as Americans shrugged off concerns about rising prices and COVID'-19's highly contagious omicron variant.

The Conference Board, a business research group, said Wednesday that its consumer confidence index — which takes into account consumers' assessment of current conditions and the their outlook for the future — rose to 115.8 in December, the highest reading since July. In November, it registered 111.9.

34. US economy grew at 2.3% rate in Q3, up from earlier estimate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a 2.3% rate in the third quarter, slightly better than previously thought, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. But prospects for a solid rebound going forward are being clouded by the rapid spread of the latest variant of the coronavirus.

35. UK offers 1 billion pounds to businesses hurt by omicron -

LONDON (AP) — Britain announced 1 billion pounds ($1.3 billion) in grants and loans to help the hospitality industry survive the onslaught of the omicron variant of COVID-19, bowing to days of pressure from pubs, restaurants and other businesses that have seen their income plunge following public health warnings.

36. China vows to respond after US enacts Xinjiang sanctions -

BEIJING (AP) — China will take all necessary measures to safeguard its institutions and enterprises, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Friday after the U.S. Senate passed a law barring imports from the Xinjiang region unless businesses can prove they were made without forced labor.

37. Biden's highway safety pick vows to reduce US traffic deaths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to run the nation's highway safety agency pledged Thursday to attack a crisis of fatal car crashes by implementing safety rules to deter impaired driving while scrutinizing fast-emerging automated technologies, such as in Tesla vehicles, that could put people at risk.

38. Congress approves import ban targeting forced labor in China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators gave final congressional approval Thursday to a bill barring imports from China's Xinjiang region unless businesses can prove they were produced without forced labor, overcoming initial hesitation from the White House and what supporters said was opposition from corporations.

39. US home construction rebounds a strong 11.8% in November -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — New home construction in the U.S. rebounded 11.8% in November as strong demand continues to boost builder confidence even with the slower winter season approaching.

The double-digit percentage increase last month left home construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.68 million units, an 8.3% increase from the rate at this time last year, the Commerce Department reported Thursday. October's home construction number was revised downward slightly to 1.5 million units from 1.52 million units.

40. US imposes sanctions against China over abuse of Uyghurs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration said Thursday it is imposing new sanctions on several Chinese biotech and surveillance companies and government entities for actions in Xinjiang province, the latest step against Beijing over human rights abuses of Uyghur Muslims in the country's western region.

41. Postal hike doesn't stop catalogers from stuffing mailboxes -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A big postal rate increase over the summer hasn't stopped catalog retailers from stuffing mailboxes this holiday season.

The U.S. Postal Service says more than 300 million catalogs flooded into people's mailboxes last month, and the overall number of catalogs has grown 12% over last year, officials said.

42. Airlines face shortage of pilots, other workers, execs say -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Airlines are having trouble hiring pilots, flight attendants and other personnel, and that's part of what is causing canceled flights and scrapping of service to some airports, executives told legislators on Wednesday.

43. Modest 0.3% rise in retail sales, but optimism still buoyed -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans slowed their spending from October to November but still continued to shop ahead of the critical holiday season, brushing off rising prices and shortages.

Retail sales rose a modest, seasonally adjusted 0.3% in November compared with the previous month when sales jumped 1.8%, the U.S. Commerce Department said Wednesday.

44. China economy slows as virus outbreaks disrupt recovery -

BEIJING (AP) — China reported Wednesday that its economy slowed in November, buffeted by coronavirus outbreaks, weak demand and supply chain disruptions.

Retail sales were weaker than in October and inflationary pressures are complicating efforts to boost growth at a time when tighter limits on borrowing by developers are crimping construction and sales in the all-important property sector.

45. Harris announces private investments in Central America -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Kamala Harris on Monday announced $1.2 billion in commitments from international businesses to support the economies and social infrastructure of Central American nations, as she works to address what the White House terms the "root causes" of migration to the United States.

46. Biden admin reveals 60 finalists for $1B in economic grants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo on Monday announced 60 finalists for $1 billion in economic development grants tied to the Biden administration's coronavirus relief package and aimed at improving job training and regional industry partnerships.

47. US orders arms embargo on Cambodia, cites Chinese influence -

BANGKOK (AP) — The U.S. has ordered an arms embargo on Cambodia, citing deepening Chinese military influence, corruption and human rights abuses by the government and armed forces in the Southeast Asian country.

48. Italy fines Amazon $1.3B, alleging harm to outside sellers -

MILAN (AP) — Italy's anti-trust authority on Thursday fined Amazon 1.13 billion euros ($1.3 billion), accusing the company of exploiting its dominant position against independent sellers on its website in violation of European Union competition rules.

49. Instagram CEO faces senators amid anger over potential harm -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEO of Facebook's Instagram is facing lawmakers angry over revelations of how the popular photo-sharing platform can harm some young users and demanding that the company commit to making changes.

50. Explainer: What caused Amazon's outage? Will there be more? -

Explainer: What caused Amazon's outage? Will there be more?

By MATT O'BRIEN and FRANK BAJAK AP Technology Writers

Robotic vacuum cleaners halted in their tracks. Doorbell cameras stopped watching for package thieves, though some of those deliveries were canceled anyway. Netflix and Disney movies got interrupted and The Associated Press had trouble publishing the news.

51. US trade deficit narrows in October as exports rebound -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit narrowed to $67.1 billion in October, the lowest in six months, after hitting a record high in September. A big rebound in exports helped to offset a much smaller rise in imports.

52. NYC to impose vaccine mandate on private sector employers -

NEW YORK (AP) — From big Wall Street banks to corner grocery stores, all private employers in New York City will have to require their workers to get vaccinated against COVID-19, the mayor announced Monday in the most sweeping vaccine mandate of any state or big city in the U.S.

53. Hong Kong loses shine amid tough coronavirus restrictions -

HONG KONG (AP) — The bustling, cosmopolitan business hub of Hong Kong may be losing its shine among foreign companies and expatriates with its stringent anti-pandemic rules requiring up to 21 days of quarantine for new arrivals.

54. Toyota to build $1.3B battery plant near Greensboro, N.C. -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Toyota is preparing to build a $1.3 billion electric vehicle battery plant near Greensboro, North Carolina, that will employ at least 1,750 people, government officials said Monday.

55. AP Source: NSO Group spyware used to hack State employees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The phones of 11 U.S. State Department employees were hacked using technology from Israel's NSO Group, the world's most infamous hacker-for-hire company, a person familiar with the matter said Friday.

56. EXPLAINER: 5 key takeaways from the November jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first glance, the November jobs report was a sour one.

U.S. employers added just 210,000 jobs. That was the lowest monthly gain since December — and not even half the total that economists had expected. It meant that hiring had decelerated even before the new omicron variant of the coronavirus has done any measurable damage to economy.

57. US jobless rate sinks to 4.2% as many more people find jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's unemployment rate tumbled last month to its lowest point since the pandemic struck, even as employers appeared to slow their hiring — a mixed picture that pointed to a resilient economy that's putting more people to work.

58. Biden, allies increasingly pushing back at GOP's virus barbs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden looked out over an audience of government scientists and framed his latest plan for fighting COVID-19 as an opportunity to at last put an end to divisiveness over the virus, calling the politicization of the issue a "sad, sad commentary."

59. From Square to Block: Another tech company changes its name -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — There's a new Silicon Valley corporate name change on the block.

A month after Facebook renamed itself Meta, Square Inc., the payments company headed by former Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, is changing its name to Block Inc.

60. Tennessee halts exemptions to COVID law after court rulings -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee on Wednesday halted dozens of exemptions that allowed businesses and public entities to require people to take COVID-19 preventive measures in spite of a state law severely limiting them, citing court rulings that blocked some of President Joe Biden's vaccine mandates.

61. California judge weighs legality of women board member law -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — When then-California Gov. Jerry Brown signed the nation's first law requiring women on boards of publicly traded companies, he suggested it might not survive legal challenges.

62. Haugen urges lawmakers to avert impasse on social media laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ex-Facebook employee and whistleblower Frances Haugen implored lawmakers Wednesday to avert the usual congressional stalemates as they weigh proposals to curb abuses on social media platforms by limiting the companies' free-speech protections against legal liability.

63. Events -

Coping with COVID-19 State Regulations. The General Assembly recently passed updated COVID-19 state regulations. Join the Nashville Chamber to learn how companies and employers should deal with – and understand – the newly passed state legislation. Participants also will learn how the new state regulations will interact with the executive orders signed by President Joe Biden and how your business might be impacted moving forward. Speakers: Martha L. Boyd, shareholder, Baker Donelson, and Mary Leigh Pirtle, member, Bass Berry and Sims. Thursday, 8:30-9:30 a.m. This virtual event is complimentary to attend but pre-registration is required. The Zoom link to join will be sent in advance of the event. Information

64. US home prices register 19.1% annual gain in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose briskly in September, another sign that the housing market is booming in the aftermath of last year's coronavirus recession.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price climbed 19.1% in September from a year earlier. The strong price gains marked a deceleration from August's 19.6% year-over-year increase. Still, September prices in all 20 cities set new records.

65. Shoppers are back in store, online, but virus impact lingers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans are spending freely and going back to store shopping, knocking out some of the momentum in online sales from last year when Americans were making many of their purchases exclusively via the internet.

66. Stocks edge higher after another choppy day on Wall Street -

Wall Street capped another wobbly day of trading Wednesday with an uneven finish for the major stock indexes ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after wavering between small gains and losses most of the morning. The benchmark index regained its footing in the final hour of trading.

67. US new homes sales rise 0.4% in October as prices climb -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. sales of new homes edged up 0.4% last month, coming in below expectations as housing prices continued to climb.

The Commerce Department reported Wednesday that sales of new single-family homes rose to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 745,000 last month from 742,000 in September. Economists had expected October new home sales to come in at a 795,000 annual pace. And the September sales rate was revised sharply lower from 800,000 in Commerce's original report.

68. Consumer spending rebounds despite rising October inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer spending rebounded by a solid 1.3% in October despite inflation that over the past year has accelerated faster than it has at any point in more than three decades.

69. US GDP slowed sharply in Q3, big rebound expected in Q4 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy slowed to a modest annual rate of 2.1% in the July-September quarter according to the government's second read of the data, slightly better than its first estimate. But economists are predicting a solid rebound in the current quarter as long as rising inflation and a recent uptick in COVID cases do not derail activity.

70. Samsung says it will build $17B chip factory in Texas -

Samsung said it plans to build a $17 billion semiconductor factory outside of Austin, Texas, amid a global shortage of chips used in phones, cars and other electronic devices.

"This is the largest foreign direct investment in the state of Texas, ever," Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said in announcing the project Tuesday.

71. Apple says it is suing Israeli hacker-for-hire company -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Tech giant Apple announced Tuesday it is suing Israel's NSO Group, seeking to block the world's most infamous hacker-for-hire company from breaking into Apple's products, like the iPhone.

72. Events -

Members Connect Leads Exchange. Expand your network and build new business relationships at this Williamson Chamber event. Each attendee will have the opportunity to introduce themselves and their business to the group. Bring business cards, brochures and product samples to share with other participants. Party Room at Chuy’s Fine Tex-Mex, 100 East Park Lane, Brentwood. Wednesday, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Registration required. Information

73. No need for horse, buggy to take a drive back in time -

With COVID concerns and restrictions putting a crimp in the foreign travel to which we aspire, we recently decided instead to take a trip back in time.

Destination: 1840 or thereabouts.

This did not involve a Hot Tub Time Machine (though I wouldn’t mind having one). We just climbed into my Jeep and headed northeast a couple of hundred miles to the restored village in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, once home to a colony of Shakers.

74. Dems confident on methane fee as budget bill moves to Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Democratic plan to impose a fee on methane emissions from oil and gas wells has cleared a key hurdle, but it faces strong opposition from the oil and gas industry and criticism by centrist Sen. Joe Manchin.

75. Stocks end mostly lower, but tech gains push Nasdaq higher -

Wall Street closed out a week of choppy trading with stocks mostly lower Friday, though gains for several tech companies pushed the Nasdaq composite to another record high and its first close over 16,000 points.

76. Macy's, Kohl's post strong results heading into holidays -

NEW YORK (AP) — Department store chains Macy's and Kohl's delivered strong results for the fiscal third quarter as shoppers go back to buying dresses and other goods that fell to the bottom of the shopping list when the pandemic struck.

77. US home construction dips 0.7% in October, but permits jump -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Construction of new homes in the U.S. fell 0.7% in October, but a big jump in the number of permits last month points to anticipation by builders that supply chain problems that have dogged them for much of the year will soon ease.

78. Japan, US set framework for talks on trade, broader ties -

TOKYO (AP) — U.S. Trade Representative Katharine Tai and Japan's trade and industry minister agreed Wednesday to work to resolve a dispute over American tariffs on steel and aluminum as part of a framework for cooperation in wider areas.

79. Defying inflation, Americans ramped up spending last month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many Americans have taken a darker view of the economy as inflation has worsened. Yet so far, they appear no less willing to spend freely at retailers — an encouraging sign for the crucial holiday shopping season.

80. Home Depot sales continue to surge in hot housing market -

Home Depot's sales continued to climb through third quarter with the U.S. housing market red hot.

Revenue rose 9.8% to $36.82 billion, exceeding the $34.97 billion Wall Street had expected, according to a survey by Zacks Investment Research. Sales at stores open at least a year, a key gauge of a retailer's health, jumped 6.1%, also better than expected. Those sales rose 5.5% in U.S. stores.

81. US stock indexes end wobbly day mostly lower on Wall Street -

Stocks closed mostly lower after wobbling most of Monday on Wall Street as the market comes off its first weekly loss in six weeks and investors move past the recent round of mostly solid corporate earnings.

82. Stocks close higher, but indexes still end week in the red -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street on Friday, but the market still ended the week lower as inflation worries weighed on investors' moods earlier in the week.

The S&P 500 index added 33.58 points, or 0.7%, to end at 4,682.85. While it closed higher, the benchmark index still ended the week down 0.3%. It was the first weekly loss for the S&P 500 in six weeks.

83. Gov. Lee plans to sign bill to limit COVID rules -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee said Wednesday he plans to sign a wide-reaching bill strictly limiting what governments and companies can require to address the COVID-19 pandemic, despite opposition from prominent business interests.

84. Events -

Hospitality Link. Industry Update and Networking Happy Hour presented by Infinity Hospitality. Panel discussion on the state of Nashville’s hospitality industry. Networking mixer including complimentary beverages and light bites to follow the presentation. Complimentary event, but pre-registration is required. Mask wearing is requested when not eating or drinking. Panelists include Adam Mansell, Tennessee Department of Travel and Tourism; Beth Morrow, Lipscomb University Hospitality and Entertainment; Nathaniel Beaver, Infinity Hospitality. Moderator: Sherry Franklin, Renaissance Nashville Hotel. The Bell Tower, 400 4th Ave. S., Nashville. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m.

85. White House rushes with infrastructure fixes for US economy -

BALTIMORE (AP) — The Biden administration is relying on infrastructure dollars to help fix the clogged ports and blanket the nation with internet access — but a series of initiatives rolled out on Tuesday show that the urgent pace might not be fast enough to address the immediate needs of an economy coping with a supply chain squeeze and a shift to remote work.

86. TN business groups want some COVID legislation reversed in '22 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee business leaders unhappy with recent efforts by the Republican-led Legislature to unravel COVID-19 prevention requirements hope to convince lawmakers to revisit some changes when they reconvene in January.

87. Biden faces fresh challenges after infrastructure victory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He has been here before.

President Joe Biden doesn't need to look any further back than his time as vice president to grasp the challenges that lie ahead in promoting his new $1 trillion infrastructure deal to the American people and getting the money out the door fast enough that they can feel a real impact.

88. US trade deficit hits record of $80.9 billion in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit hit an all-time high of $80.9 billion in September as American exports fell sharply while imports, even with supply chain problems at American ports, continue to climb.

89. Analyst who aided Trump-Russia dossier charged with lying -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Russian analyst who contributed to a dossier of Democratic-funded research into ties between Russia and Donald Trump was arrested Thursday on charges of lying to the FBI about his sources of information, among them an associate of Hillary Clinton.

90. Events -

CMA Awards. The 55th CMA Awards honors the best in country music with star-studded performances, presenters and more. Two-Time CMA Entertainer of the Year and “American Idol” judge Luke Bryan will host this year’s event broadcasting live from Bridgestone Arena. Wednesday, 7 p.m.

91. Democratic chair issues subpoenas to oil executives -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairwoman of the House Oversight Committee issued subpoenas Tuesday to top executives of ExxonMobil, Chevron and other oil giants, charging that the companies have not turned over documents needed by the committee to investigate allegations that the oil industry concealed evidence about the dangers of global warming.

92. American distillers look to rebuild business in Europe -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — American whiskey producers raised a glass to celebrate a trans-Atlantic agreement to end retaliatory tariffs that sank their sales in Europe. Now comes the challenge of rebuilding brands that were stymied in those ultra-competitive markets during the lengthy trade dispute.

93. Canadian snowbirds primed to flock south as US opens border -

PHOENIX (AP) — Canadians Ian and Heather Stewart are savoring the idea of leaving behind this winter's subzero temperatures when the U.S. reopens its borders to nonessential land travel next week and they launch a long-delayed drive to their seasonal home in Fort Myers, Florida.

94. Dems see progress in adding drug cost curbs to budget bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats have made significant progress toward adding compromise provisions curbing prescription drug prices to their massive social and environment package, two congressional aides said Sunday.

95. Wall Street closes at new highs after day of choppy trading -

Stocks are ending higher Friday as Wall Street closed out a milestone-setting week.

Health care, communication services and technology companies rose. The three major indexes all set records: The S&P 500 rose 0.2%, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 0.3% and Nasdaq closed 0.3% higher.

96. US consumer spending up a modest 0.6% with inflation high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers slowed their spending to a gain of just 0.6% in September, a cautionary sign for an economy that remains in the grip of a pandemic and a prolonged bout of high inflation.

97. Tennessee GOP lawmakers sprint in bid to curb COVID rules -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republican lawmakers in Tennessee could be voting within days on whether to ban most businesses from solely requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccination for their customers and workers and severely limit when companies and government entities — including schools — can require masks.

98. US economy slowed to a 2% rate last quarter in face of COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hampered by rising COVID-19 cases and persistent supply shortages, the U.S. economy slowed sharply to a 2% annual growth rate in the July-September period, the weakest quarterly expansion since the recovery from the pandemic recession began last year.

99. New home sales jumped 14% in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new homes jumped 14% in September to the fastest pace in six months as strong demand helped offset rising prices.

The Commerce Department reported Tuesday that sales of new single-family homes rose to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 800,000 units last month which was well above what economists had bee expecting.

100. Senators put YouTube, TikTok, Snap on defensive on kids' use -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators put executives from YouTube, TikTok and Snapchat on the defensive Tuesday, questioning them about what they're doing to ensure young users' safety on their platforms.