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Editorial Results (free)

1. Think your home value is soaring? Talk to a farmer -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Fourth-generation corn and soybean farmer Jeff Frank doesn't feel rich, but simply based on the skyrocketing value of his land in northwest Iowa, it's an apt way to describe him, even if he laughs at the idea.

2. Intel building $20B Ohio chip facility amid global shortage -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Chip maker Intel said it will invest $20 billion to build a new factory in Ohio, an attempt to help alleviate a global shortage of chips powering everything from phones to cars to home appliances while also signaling the giant company's commitment to manufacturing crucial technology products in the U.S.

3. Architect group honors Lodge at Fall Creek Falls -

The Lodge at Fall Creek Falls was recently recognized with a Citation Award for exceptional work in architecture by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Middle Tennessee chapter.

“Our team is honored to be recognized for this project,” says Ron Lustig, ESa principal and lead architect for the project. “Creating these beautiful spaces that will be experienced by both Tennesseans and visitors to our state was an honor.”

4. Neal & Harwell elects 3 new partners -

William “Jay” J. Harbison II, Erik C. Lybeck and Mozianio “Trey” S. Reliford III have been elected partners at Neal & Harwell, PLC.

Harbison joined the firm in 2015, and his practice focuses on business and civil litigation. He is a graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Law.

5. Push to stop House map carving Nashville has legal obstacles -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Democrats and voting rights organizations have blasted Tennessee Republicans for what they say is a brazen effort to dilute the state's Black vote by carving up booming Nashville into three likely GOP-controlled congressional districts. But their legal path for getting the new Republican-authored U.S. House map altered faces significant obstacles.

6. Beijing residents disappointed Olympics will be closed event -

BEIJING (AP) — With just over two weeks before the opening of the Beijing Winter Olympics, residents of the Chinese capital say they're disappointed at not being able to attend events because of coronavirus restrictions that have seen parts of the city placed under lockdown.

7. Russia shortens COVID-19 isolation to 7 days as cases surge -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian authorities are shortening the required isolation period for people infected with COVID-19 from 14 to seven days as the country faces another surge of COVID-19 cases, this time driven by the highly contagious omicron variant.

8. Felony charges are 1st in a fatal crash involving Autopilot -

DETROIT (AP) — California prosecutors have filed two counts of vehicular manslaughter against the driver of a Tesla on Autopilot who ran a red light, slammed into another car and killed two people in 2019.

9. After Biden's first year, the virus and disunity rage on -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From the inaugural platform, President Joe Biden saw American sickness on two fronts — a disease of the national spirit and the one from the rampaging coronavirus — and he saw hope, because leaders always must see that.

10. Snow, ice blast through South with powerful winter storm -

ATLANTA (AP) — A dangerous winter storm combining high winds and ice swept through parts of the U.S. Southeast on Sunday, knocking out power, felling trees and fences and coating roads with a treacherous, frigid glaze.

11. South prepares for weekend threat of debilitating snow, ice -

ATLANTA (AP) — Weather forecasters' predictions of debilitating snow and ice as far south as Georgia sent parts of the region into a tizzy Friday with shoppers scouring store shelves for storm supplies and road crews trying to prevent a repeat of past wintertime debacles.

12. US House map splitting Nashville advances in state Senate -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A proposed U.S. House map that carves up fast-growing, Democratic-leaning Nashville into three different congressional districts advanced another step Thursday over strenuous objections from Democrats that it unfairly dilutes Black representation in Tennessee.

13. China faces omicron test weeks ahead of Beijing Olympics -

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Most access to a major city adjacent to Beijing was suspended Thursday as the government tried to contain an outbreak of the coronavirus's easily transmitted omicron variant ahead of next month's Winter Olympics in the Chinese capital.

14. Tennessee GOP release new US House map; Dems promise to sue -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Republicans on Wednesday released their plan to split fast-growing Nashville into multiple congressional seats, sparking alarm among Democratic leaders who warned that the new map unfairly affects Black voters and will face legal challenges.

15. Hotchkiss among 4 new McGlinchey members -

McGlinchey Stafford has named three new members, including Lynette Hotchkiss in its Nashville office.

Hotchkiss, who specializes in consumer financial services compliance, joined McGlinchey in 2020 and has previous experience as general counsel and other in-house roles at banks, and as a senior regulator within the federal government.

16. Hurdles ahead for city’s political convention hopes -

Having made it a couple of weeks into 2022 without any major new attacks on democracy (fingers crossed), let us briefly turn our attention to 2024 politics: How does the prospect of tens of thousands of ardent Republicans or Democrats swarming through Nashville strike you?

17. It’ll be your best vacation ever! -

The two words that sum up travel in 2022 are “cautiously optimistic.’’ To be sure, travel is one of the top priorities for many of the pandemic weary. An Expedia report on 2022 travel trends found that more than 68% of American travelers are planning a big trip for their first foray out, whether it be travel to a foreign country or upgrading to luxury accommodations in the United States.

18. Biden pays silent tribute as Reid lies in state at Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The late Sen. Harry Reid was remembered Wednesday at the U.S. Capitol as a "legendary leader," a hardscrabble Democrat who rose from poverty in a dusty Nevada mining town to deliver landmark legislation from the chamber's most powerful position.

19. Second Starbucks store near Buffalo votes to unionize -

A second Starbucks store near Buffalo, New York, has voted to unionize, one of a growing number of the coffee chain's stores seeking to organize workers.

Workers at the store, in the suburb of Cheektowaga, voted 15-9 in favor of representation by Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union. The National Labor Relations Board confirmed the vote Monday.

20. Treasury broadens COVID relief uses for states, localities -

State and local governments will have greater flexibility to spend $350 billion of federal COVID-19 aid under new rules from President Joe Biden's administration.

The revised rules mean that most cities and counties will be free to spend their entire allotment on any government services without having to prove they lost revenue during the pandemic. The rules also allow spending on more types of construction and a wider range of high-speed internet projects, among other things.

21. Winter storm blanketing parts of South with snow, ice -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A winter storm blanketed parts of the South with snow, freezing rain and sleet Thursday, tying up roads in Tennessee and Kentucky as the system tracked a path through Appalachia toward the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast.

22. Belle Meade property going on auction block -

Luxury real estate auction house Platinum Luxury Auctions will begin the new year with an auction of a Belle Meade home that listed earlier for $9.5 million.

The property, 1310 Chickering Road in Belle Meade, is scheduled for auction Jan. 22.

23. Presnell sworn in as Trial Advocates president -

Todd Presnell, a partner in the Nashville office of Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP, has been sworn in as president of the Tennessee Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates.

A member of the firm’s litigation practice group, Presnell has an active trial practice, serves in discovery-counsel roles and leads and advises on internal corporate investigations. He represents major corporations, small businesses, governmental entities, tax-exempt organizations and individuals in litigation matters and has served as lead counsel in federal and state courts throughout the country.

24. Cautious optimism for tourism in 2022 -

Two years ago, Tennessee’s tourism economy was roaring. State and local officials touted record-breaking numbers, and 2019’s many successes were well positioned to carry into 2020 and beyond.

25. Omicron upends return to US schools and workplaces -

Some school systems around the U.S. extended their holiday break Monday or switched back to online instruction because of the explosion in COVID-19 cases, while others pressed ahead with in-person classes amid a seemingly growing sense that Americans will have to learn to co-exist with the virus.

26. Troubled Chinese developer told to demolish resort -

BEIJING (AP) — A troubled Chinese real estate developer that is struggling with $310 billion in debt announced Tuesday it has been ordered to demolish a 39-building resort complex in a new blow to its finances.

27. CFMT grants boost nonprofit agencies in area -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, a charitable organization dedicated to enriching the quality of life in Middle Tennessee and beyond, announces $2,664,888 in grants to 439 local nonprofit organizations as part of the 2021 annual grantmaking process.

28. Second Avenue reopens but with interruptions -

Second Avenue, the site of the 2020 Christmas morning bombing, reopened to traffic and pedestrians Monday morning, though it won’t soon be back to normal.

Second Avenue North at Commerce Street is open to one lane, northbound, for vehicle traffic and one pathway for pedestrians. But city officials warn there will still be periodic closures for construction purposes over the coming months, and safety fencing will remain between construction and reopened pathways.

29. Healthy choice: UT doctor selected as best in SEC -

No matter the time of day or amount of work he’s accumulated, Dr. Chris Klenck is always available. Every athlete or coach at the University of Tennessee knows they can walk into his office on campus or call, and Klenck will provide his undivided attention.

30. US home prices surge 18.4% in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices surged again in October as the housing market continues to boom in the wake of last year's coronavirus recession.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index, out Tuesday, climbed 18.4% in October from a year earlier. The gain marked a slight deceleration from a 19.1% year-over-year increase in September but was about in line with what economists had been expecting.

31. In abortion rights debate, Biden doesn't often use the word -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden insists that he strongly believes in the rights spelled out in the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that are now under the most dire threat in decades.

But he barely even uses the word "abortion" and when his administration has been asked about what it can do to protect reproductive rights, the response has mostly been that Congress must write the landmark court decision into law, a strategy that is highly likely to fail.

32. China puts city of 13 million in lockdown ahead of Olympics -

BEIJING (AP) — China plunged a city of 13 million people into lockdown on Thursday to stamp out an increase in coronavirus infections, as the country doubles down on its "zero tolerance" policy just weeks before it is set to host the Winter Olympics.

33. Events -

Music City Bowl. Tennessee Volunteers vs Purdue Boilermakers. Thursday, Dec. 30. Nissan Stadium, 2 p.m. Information

FRIDAY, DEC. 31

New Year’s Eve Live: Nashville’s Big Bash

This year’s event, which will anchor CBS’ five-hour national TV special, will be hosted by radio and TV personality Bobby Bones and co-hosted by Rachel Smith of “Entertainment Tonight.” Headliners include Dierks Bentley, Zac Brown Band, Sam Hunt and Fisk Jubilee Singers. Gates for the live show at Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park will open at 4 p.m. Proof of vaccination or negative test within 72 hours will be required for entry into Bicentennial Mall. Information

34. Monarch, GBT buy 8 acres in Midtown -

Monarch Alternative Capital LP, an investment firm with approximately $9.5 billion of assets under management, has purchased the 8-acre Beaman Toyota dealership property on Broadway.

In partnership with Nashville-based GBT Realty, Monarch plans to create a development in Midtown to address the city’s increasing real estate needs.

35. Biden pivots to home tests to confront omicron surge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fighting the omicron variant surging through the country, President Joe Biden announced the government will provide 500 million free rapid home-testing kits, increase support for hospitals under strain and redouble vaccination and boosting efforts.

36. Biden pledges 500M free virus tests to counter omicron -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fighting the omicron variant surging through the country, President Joe Biden announced Tuesday that the government would provide 500 million free rapid tests, increase support for hospitals under strain and redouble vaccination and boosting efforts.

37. COVID-19 fears dash hopes for the holiday season — again -

Lines again stretch around blocks at some COVID-19 testing sites. Refrigerated mobile morgues are on order, and parts of Europe are re-tightening borders amid a winter spike in coronavirus infections.

38. US home construction rebounds a strong 11.8% in November -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — New home construction in the U.S. rebounded 11.8% in November as strong demand continues to boost builder confidence even with the slower winter season approaching.

The double-digit percentage increase last month left home construction at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.68 million units, an 8.3% increase from the rate at this time last year, the Commerce Department reported Thursday. October's home construction number was revised downward slightly to 1.5 million units from 1.52 million units.

39. How a Kennedy built an anti-vaccine juggernaut amid COVID-19 -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Robert F. Kennedy Jr. strode onto the stage at a Southern California church, radiating Kennedy confidence and surveying the standing ovation crowd with his piercing blue Bobby Kennedy eyes. Then, he launched into an anti-vaccine rant. Democrats "drank the Kool-Aid," he told people assembled for a far right conference, branded as standing for "health and freedom."

40. NYC weighs cutting off natural gas hookups for new buildings -

NEW YORK (AP) — New York City lawmakers are poised to decide Wednesday whether to prohibit most new buildings from using natural gas, a move that would make the nation's most populous city a showcase for a climate-change-fighting policy that has been both embraced and blocked around the country.

41. One year of vaccines: Many lives saved, many needlessly lost -

One year ago, the biggest vaccination drive in American history began with a flush of excitement in an otherwise gloomy December. Trucks loaded with freezer-packed vials of a COVID-19 vaccine that had proved wildly successful in clinical trials fanned out across the land, bringing shots that many hoped would spell the end of the crisis.

42. Long queues form as UK starts booster blitz against omicron -

LONDON (AP) — Long lines formed at vaccination centers in Britain as people heeded the government's call for all adults to get booster shots to protect against the omicron variant of the coronavirus, which the prime minister said Monday has caused at least one death.

43. Second Avenue tops ‘Nashville Nine’ list -

The 2021 Nashville Nine, a list of the city’s historic properties endangered by demolition, neglect or development, is topped by 170, 172, 174 and 176 Second Avenue North, all damaged by the Christmas Day 2020 bombling.

44. Wagon Wheel Title adds 2 attorneys -

Wagon Wheel Title & Escrow has added two commercial attorneys to its team, Jatin A. Shah and Quinton Horner.

Specializing in real estate transactions and lease negotiation and review, Shah graduated from New York’s Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center before continuing on to the SMU Dedman School of Law, where he earned his LL.M.

45. Thinking bigger -

Predicting U.S. retail spending and consumer confidence trends right now is a headache-inducing exercise.

Breathless headlines predict nightmarish inventory shortfalls, lack of workers and soaring prices for the 2021 holiday shopping season. They are followed by counterpoint data showing consumers shopping and spending with gusto despite those headwinds.

46. Biden has new brand for infrastructure deal he's promoting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Move over, BIF and BBB. Now there's BBA.

President Joe Biden, trying to rebound from sagging poll numbers, is rebranding his bipartisan infrastructure package as "Building a Better America" ahead of a Wednesday trip to Kansas City, Missouri, to promote the deal.

47. Flood insurance costs rise in areas once deemed lower risk -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the past year, the southwestern Louisiana city of Lake Charles weathered two hurricanes, intense rainfall that sent water gushing down streets and a deep freeze that burst pipes.

48. NYC to impose vaccine mandate on private sector employers -

NEW YORK (AP) — From big Wall Street banks to corner grocery stores, all private employers in New York City will have to require their workers to get vaccinated against COVID-19, the mayor announced Monday in the most sweeping vaccine mandate of any state or big city in the U.S.

49. Treasury wants more oversight of all-cash real estate deals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is looking to expand reporting requirements on all-cash real estate deals to help crack down on bad actors' use of the U.S. market to launder money made through illicit activity.

50. Mexico threatens legal action on US electric vehicle subsidy -

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The Mexican government threatened legal action Thursday over provisions of U.S. President Joe Biden's Build Back Better Act that would give subsidies of up to $12,500 for purchases of union-made, American-made electric vehicles.

51. Saints, sinners share space on Music City streets -

On a small plot of land at the intersection of Ewing and Sixth Avenues and Lafayette Street in Nashville sits the Church of the Holy Trinity, where it has ministered to an Episcopal flock since 1853.

52. US home prices register 19.1% annual gain in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices rose briskly in September, another sign that the housing market is booming in the aftermath of last year's coronavirus recession.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price climbed 19.1% in September from a year earlier. The strong price gains marked a deceleration from August's 19.6% year-over-year increase. Still, September prices in all 20 cities set new records.

53. Oral history of deadly Gatlinburg fire going online -

GATLINBURG (AP) — An oral history of a deadly wildfire that began in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and devastated Gatlinburg in 2016 will be easily accessible to the public beginning on Tuesday.

54. Amazon workers in Alabama get a do-over in union election -

NEW YORK (AP) — A new union election for Amazon workers in Bessemer, Alabama will be held based on objections to the first vote that took place in April.

The move is a major blow to Amazon, which had spent about a year aggressively campaigning for warehouse workers in Bessemer to reject the union, which they ultimately did by a wide margin.

55. Coal-fired power plants to close after new wastewater rule -

Climate change isn't what's driving some U.S. coal-fired power plants to shut down. It's the expense of stricter pollution controls on their wastewater.

Dozens of plants nationwide plan to stop burning coal this decade to comply with more stringent federal wastewater guidelines, according to state regulatory filings, as the industry continues moving away from the planet-warming fossil fuel to make electricity.

56. Bass, Berry & Sims bolsters health care practice -

Bass, Berry & Sims has added seven experienced health care attorneys to its national health care practice, including Travis Lloyd as a member in Nashville. The other six will be based in the firm’s Washington D.C. office.

57. In the chips: UT’s Taylor, fans benefit from cookie deal -

As soon as the ball nestled into Alontae Taylor’s arms, Robin and Mike Maddux jumped from their seats inside Neyland Stadium and headed for the exits.

The game wasn’t over, but they knew things were about to get wild.

58. GOP embraces natural immunity as substitute for vaccines -

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Republicans fighting President Joe Biden's coronavirus vaccine mandates are wielding a new weapon against the White House rules: natural immunity.

They contend that people who have recovered from the virus have enough immunity and antibodies to not need COVID-19 vaccines, and the concept has been invoked by Republicans as a sort of stand-in for vaccines.

59. Tennessee gov apeals to officers resisting vaccine mandates -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's Republican governor has sought to capitalize on rising law enforcement tensions with city leaders surrounding COVID-19 vaccine mandates, offering to help pay unvaccinated out-of-state officers to relocate and join the Tennessee Highway Patrol.

60. US overdose deaths topped 100,000 in one year, officials say -

NEW YORK (AP) — An estimated 100,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in one year, a never-before-seen milestone that health officials say is tied to the COVID-19 pandemic and a more dangerous drug supply.

61. Events -

Williamson County Real Estate Summit. Speakers: Lawrence Yun, chief economist of the National Association of Realtors. Williamson County Residential Real Estate panel and conversation, moderated by Bo Patten, CEO of the Williamson County Association of Realtors. Retail trends and the future of the Factory at Franklin, Elam Freeman, founder and principal, Ojas Partners. State of Commercial Real Estate, moderated by Elizabeth McCreary, Williamson, Inc. chief economic development officer. Virginia Springs II, 5501 Virginia Way, Brentwood. Tuesday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Fee: $55 members, $65 non-members, $750 Company table of 10. Information

62. LifePoint Health launches 25m Health incubator -

LifePoint Health has announced a joint venture with New York-based venture studio 25madison and Apollo Global Management that will be seeded initially with $20 million to launch 25m Health, a first-of-its-kind health tech startup incubator in Nashville.

63. Connell named fellow for two attorney groups -

Virginia (Ginger) J. Connell has been accepted as a fellow of the International Academy of Family Lawyers and the Nashville Bar Foundation.

IAFL is a worldwide association of practicing lawyers who are recognized by their peers for their experience and expertise in family law. Membership is by invitation.

64. Another COVID toll: $2 billion for funeral costs -

Pulverized homes, splintered trees and decimated buildings over a mile-long debris trail. Scorched earth or waist-high floodwaters. Those images of natural disasters come to mind when the Federal Emergency Management Agency rushes in the help Americans in times of need.

65. Former New Orleans mayor Landrieu to manage Biden's $1T plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has chosen as supervisor of his $1 trillion infrastructure plan Mitch Landrieu, who as New Orleans mayor pushed the city into recovery after the devastation from Hurricane Katrina.

66. Biden: Infrastructure bill will ease economy woes, just wait -

BALTIMORE (AP) — President Joe Biden touted his $1 trillion infrastructure plan Wednesday as an eventual fix for the nation's inflation and supply chain woes — if Americans just have the patience to wait for the construction to begin.

67. Democrats sell infrastructure bill, push for Biden backup -

STILWELL, Kan. (AP) — Traffic whizzing behind her, Rep. Sharice Davids gathered reporters at a transportation facility along U.S. 69 in eastern Kansas this week to celebrate the surge of federal money headed in her state's direction.

68. Littler selects Strawn as managing shareholder -

Littler, an employment and labor law practice representing management, has appointed Bradley Strawn as regional office managing shareholder of the firm’s Nashville office, succeeding Jennifer Robinson, who has stepped down to focus on her practice.

69. Events -

Hospitality Link. Industry Update and Networking Happy Hour presented by Infinity Hospitality. Panel discussion on the state of Nashville’s hospitality industry. Networking mixer including complimentary beverages and light bites to follow the presentation. Complimentary event, but pre-registration is required. Mask wearing is requested when not eating or drinking. Panelists include Adam Mansell, Tennessee Department of Travel and Tourism; Beth Morrow, Lipscomb University Hospitality and Entertainment; Nathaniel Beaver, Infinity Hospitality. Moderator: Sherry Franklin, Renaissance Nashville Hotel. The Bell Tower, 400 4th Ave. S., Nashville. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m.

70. Rare Starbucks union vote set to begin in Buffalo -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Never in its 50-year history has Starbucks relied on union workers to serve up frothy lattes as its U.S. cafes. But some baristas aim to change that.

Workers at three separate Starbucks stores in and around Buffalo, New York, are expected to begin voting by mail this week on whether they want to be represented by Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union.

71. Casinos have best quarter ever; 2020 total exceeded already -

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The nation's commercial casinos won nearly $14 billion in the third quarter of this year, marking the industry's best quarter ever, and pushing U.S. casino revenue past what it was for all of 2020, according to figures released Tuesday.

72. Oklahoma court overturns $465M opioid ruling against J&J -

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned a $465 million opioid ruling against drugmaker Johnson & Johnson, finding that a lower court wrongly interpreted the state's public nuisance law in the first case of its kind in the U.S. to go to trial.

73. Colin Powell remembered as a model for future generations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Colin L. Powell, the trailblazing soldier-diplomat who rose from humble beginnings to become the first Black secretary of state, was remembered by family and friends Friday as a principled man of humility and grace whose decorated record of leadership can serve as a model for generations to come.

74. 'Burned out'? Why won't more women return to the job market? -

NEW YORK (AP) — There was a time when Naomi Peña could seemingly do it all: Work a full-time job and raise four children on her own.

But when the viral pandemic struck early last year, her personal challenges began to mount and she faced an aching decision: Her children or her job?

75. All eyes on vulnerable House Democrats after election losses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For many House Democrats, 2021 is looking a lot like 2009, a year when a Republican elected governor in Virginia foreshadowed a dreadful blowout in the next year's midterm elections.

76. US government works to 'cocoon' old nuclear reactors -

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Costs to clean up a massive nuclear weapons complex in Washington state are usually expressed in the hundreds of billions of dollars and involve decades of work.

But one project on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation is progressing at a much lower price.

77. Youngkin's Virginia win jolts Democrats, tight race in NJ -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Republican Glenn Youngkin won the Virginia governor's race early Wednesday, tapping into culture war fights over schools and race to unite former President Donald Trump's most fervent supporters with enough suburban voters to become the first GOP candidate to win statewide office in a dozen years.

78. Robots hit the streets as demand for food delivery grows -

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Robot food delivery is no longer the stuff of science fiction. But you may not see it in your neighborhood anytime soon.

Hundreds of little robots — knee-high and able to hold around four large pizzas — are now navigating college campuses and even some city sidewalks in the U.S., the U.K. and elsewhere. While robots were being tested in limited numbers before the coronavirus hit, the companies building them say pandemic-related labor shortages and a growing preference for contactless delivery have accelerated their deployment.

79. Governors and more: What to watch in Tuesday's elections -

It may be an odd-numbered year but Tuesday's elections aren't sleepy, local contests. Voters in Virginia are weighing in on a governor's race that could rattle President Joe Biden and Democrats in Washington. In Minneapolis, a city still shaken by George Floyd's murder will vote on whether to disband its police department and create a new public safety agency. School board races across the country have become the new battlegrounds for partisan debates over race.

80. Vaccine reluctance in Eastern Europe brings high COVID cost -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Truck driver Andriy Melnik never took the coronavirus seriously. With a friend, he bought a fake vaccination certificate so his travel documents would appear in order when he hauled cargo to other parts of Europe.

81. The Terminators: They’ll be back to kill more deals -

The 2021 real estate market is a paradoxical mélange of sales juxtaposed with contract terminations, some houses selling in minutes while some homes linger on the market for months.

Buyers are forced to walk the tightrope of impetuosity and patience, waiting for the perfect – or almost acceptable – home while pulling the trigger the second the property enters the market.

82. Stars aligning for Titans -

With back-to-back home wins against what was supposed to be two of the best teams the AFC has to offer – Buffalo and Kansas City – you can expect the Tennessee Titans to begin getting some long-sought – at least in the eyes of fans – national recognition.

83. US home prices surged in August at near-record pace -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices jumped in August by a near-record amount from a year earlier, as Americans eager to buy a home drove up prices on a dwindling number of properties.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index soared 19.7% in August compared with a year ago. That increase is just below July's 20% jump, which was the largest gain on records dating back to 2000. Home prices are now at all-time highs in all 20 cities in the index.

84. Group asks NLRB to OK union vote at Amazon's NY warehouse -

NEW YORK (AP) — Union organizers at an Amazon distribution center in New York formally asked federal labor officials on Monday to authorize a vote that could establish the first union at the nation's largest online retailer.

85. Where are the workers? Cutoff of jobless aid spurs no influx -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Earlier this year, an insistent cry arose from business leaders and Republican governors: Cut off a $300-a-week federal supplement for unemployed Americans. Many people, they argued, would then come off the sidelines and take the millions of jobs that employers were desperate to fill.

86. Bid to unionize Amazon workers in New York nears milestone -

NEW YORK (AP) — A bid to unionize Amazon workers at a distribution facility in New York City neared an important milestone, as organizers prepared to deliver hundreds of signatures to the National Labor Relations Board as soon as Monday for authorization to hold a vote.

87. Biden ties legislative agenda to MLK push for racial justice -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday tied his legislative priorities on voting rights, police reform and climate change to Martin Luther King Jr.'s push for racial justice as he marked the 10th anniversary of the opening of the civil rights leader's memorial on the National Mall.

88. Titans banged up, resilient, ready to build off 34-31 win -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans just passed their biggest test this season even with an injury report that grows with each passing game.

Call it poise, resiliency or the old cliche of next man up, it certainly helps having the NFL's best rusher in Derrick Henry and a defense with a growing knack for goal-line stands.

89. Colin Powell: A trailblazing legacy, blotted by Iraq war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A child of working-class Jamaican immigrants in the Bronx, Colin Powell rose from neighborhood store clerk to warehouse floor-mopper to the highest echelons of the U.S. government. It was a trailblazing American dream journey that won him international acclaim and trust.

90. Reaction to Colin Powell's death from US and world figures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — World figures are reacting to the death of Colin Powell, a Vietnam War veteran who rose to the rank of four-star general and became the first Black chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and then secretary of state. Powell died Monday of COVID-19 complications at age 84.

91. US, Israel say they are exploring a 'Plan B' for Iran -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and Israel said Wednesday they are exploring a "Plan B" for dealing with Iran if the Islamic Republic does not return in good faith to negotiations to salvage the languishing landmark 2015 nuclear deal.

92. Who’s paying for COVID? All of us -

We are tired. We locked ourselves down in March 2020 and waited almost a year for a lifesaving vaccine. We got our one or two doses (depending on the vaccine brand) as soon as we could. We stayed masked up and social distanced even after our jabs.

93. Big boost for Social Security benefits as inflation rises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of retirees on Social Security will get a 5.9% boost in benefits for 2022. The biggest cost-of-living adjustment in 39 years follows a burst in inflation as the economy struggles to shake off the drag of the coronavirus pandemic.

94. Small businesses navigate ever-changing COVID-19 reality -

NEW YORK (AP) — For a brief moment this summer, it seemed like small businesses might be getting a break from the relentless onslaught of the pandemic. More Americans, many of them vaccinated, flocked to restaurants and stores without needing to mask up or socially distance.

95. Biden to restore 3 national monuments cut by Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will restore two sprawling national monuments in Utah that have been at the center of a long-running public lands dispute, and a separate marine conservation area in New England that recently has been used for commercial fishing. Environmental protections at all three monuments had been stripped by former President Donald Trump.

96. VUMC helps develop first COVID-19 pill -

U.S.-based pharmaceutical giant Merck& Co. is seeking authorization for the first oral antiviral pill to treat COVID-19, after a Vanderbilt University Medical Center clinical trial showed it cut the risk of hospitalization or death in half when given to high-risk people during infection.

97. Soaring home prices juice average US homeowner equity growth -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Soaring home prices have pushed up average homeowner equity growth to the highest level in more than a decade, though recent signs of a cooling U.S. housing market point to more moderate gains in the second half of the year.

98. Health workers once saluted as heroes now get threats -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — More than a year after U.S. health care workers on the front lines against COVID-19 were saluted as heroes with nightly clapping from windows and balconies, some are being issued panic buttons in case of assault and ditching their scrubs before going out in public for fear of harassment.

99. Record July jump in US home prices sidelines more buyers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. home prices soared in July by a record amount from a year earlier as buyers desperate for homes bid up prices amid a limited supply.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index surged 19.9% in July compared with a year ago, the largest gain on records dating back to 2000. In 17 of the 20 cities, prices rose more quickly in July than in June. And prices reached all-time highs in 19 of 20 cities. The one exception was Chicago, where prices are just 0.3% below their 2006 peak.

100. Pinnacles rates No. 6 on women’s workplace list -

Nashville’s Pinnacle Financial Partners remains one of the nation’s Best Large Workplaces for Women, earning the No. 6 spot on the latest list from Fortune magazine and Great Place to Work.