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Editorial Results (free)

1. 'Buy now, pay later' catches on just in time for holidays -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — As Americans shop for the holidays, they will likely see a swarm of offers to get their gifts now but pay for them later in fixed monthly installments.

Fueled by several hot Silicon Valley startups as well as a push by the big credit card companies, "buy now, pay later" is now available for purchasing a $1,500 Peloton exercise bicycle as well as a $60 floral bouquet. Thousands of retailers, big and small, often have an option on their websites to pay for a purchase in installments at checkout. In the case of credit cards, customers are being allowed to create fixed payment plans days or even a few weeks after the purchase.

2. Report: Struggling Chinese developer makes bond payment -

BEIJING (AP) — A troubled Chinese developer whose struggle to avoid a multibillion-dollar debt default has rattled global financial markets wired $83.5 million on Friday to make an overdue payment to foreign bondholders, a government newspaper reported.

3. Nashville law firms announce merger -

MTR Family Law, PLLC, is merging with Gullett, Sanford, Robinson & Martin, PLLC, and establishing the new Family Law Practice Group of GSRM, effective Jan. 1.

“We feel privileged to combine two long-standing, Nashville-based law firms who share similar values, commitment to client service, and investment in the Nashville community,” says Phillip P. Welty, managing member, GSRM Law. “Our combined resources and experience will benefit our clients significantly. MTR Family Law has an excellent reputation. It is a win for all.”

4. Goldman Sachs' profits jump 60% helped by deal-making frenzy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs' profits jumped 60% in the third quarter, as the deal-making bonanza that dominated financial markets this summer brought in hundreds of millions of dollars in fee revenue for the investment bank.

5. Bank profits soar, helped by merger frenzy, fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's good to be a bank right now.

Four of the largest U.S. banks said their profits grew by double-digits last quarter, as a healthier U.S. economy has helped reduce the number of loans in default or that the bank won't likely recoup. The results for Citigroup, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Morgan Stanley also show that all four benefitted from various one-time boosts to their profits.

6. Modest gain breaks a 3-day losing streak for S&P 500 index -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Thursday, snapping a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 despite another choppy day of trading.

The benchmark index rose 0.3% after having been down 0.5% in the early going. It's still on pace for a 0.6% weekly loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ended flat, while the Nasdaq rose 0.7%.

7. Who’s paying for COVID? All of us -

We are tired. We locked ourselves down in March 2020 and waited almost a year for a lifesaving vaccine. We got our one or two doses (depending on the vaccine brand) as soon as we could. We stayed masked up and social distanced even after our jabs.

8. Stocks fall after Kabul bombing; traders also wait for Fed -

Technology and communication companies led a broad sell-off on Wall Street Thursday following deadly suicide attacks at the Kabul airport in Afghanistan.

The S&P 500 fell 0.6% a day after capping a five-day winning streak with an all-time high. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.5%, while the Nasdaq composite lost 0.6%. Despite the losses, the three major indexes are on track for weekly gains.

9. Dollar General thrives despite ‘retail apocalypse' -

Don’t blink! You might miss the grand opening of another Dollar General store. OK, that’s an exaggeration. But not by much.

In the 14 years since an investment group purchased the family owned business and took it public again two years later, the Goodlettsville-based chain has added nearly 10,000 stores to boast more retail locations than any other company in the United States – quickly closing on 18,000 stores in 46 states.

10. Citigroup profits soar due to fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup profits jumped more than five fold from a year earlier, helped by an improving economy that resulted in fewer bad loans on the bank's balance sheet.

Citi is the latest big bank to see profits soar this quarter, along with JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Goldman Sachs. All of them got a one-time boost to their bottom lines because they were able to reverse some of the billions of dollars set aside last year to guard against customer defaults.

11. Stock indexes notch more records ahead of earnings reports -

Banks led stocks to modest gains on Wall Street Monday, nudging the major stock indexes to more record highs ahead of a busy week of corporate earnings reports from big U.S. companies.

The S&P 500 gained 0.3% after bouncing back from an early stumble. The benchmark index, which has notched three straight weekly gains, hit a new high, as did the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite. The indexes have managed multiple new highs despite choppy trading in recent weeks.

12. Stocks close higher, capping a 3rd consecutive week of gains -

Stocks closed with solid gains on Wall Street Friday, ending a holiday-shortened week with their third straight weekly gain.

The S&P 500 rose 1.1% to another record high, led by banks and technology stocks.

13. All big banks pass latest Federal Reserve 'stress tests' -

NEW YORK (AP) — All 23 of the nation's biggest banks are healthy enough to withstand a sudden economic catastrophe, the Federal Reserve said Thursday as it released the results from its latest "stress tests," giving the banks the green light to resume paying out dividends to investors and buying back stock.

14. Kirkland installed as TMA president -

Dr. Ronald “Ron” H. Kirkland, a board-certified otolaryngologist from Jackson, has been installed as the 167th president of the Tennessee Medical Association, the statewide professional association for more than 9,500 member physicians and their patients.

15. Bank CEOs tell Congress they'll work to avoid foreclosures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chief executives of the nation's largest banks went in front of Congress for a second day Thursday, facing questions ranging from bitcoin to their efforts to keep Americans in their homes after government aid to pandemic-hit mortgage holders expires this summer.

16. Bank CEOs return to Congress at time of deep partisan divide -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEOs of the biggest banks went before Congress on Wednesday with plans to discuss how helpful Wall Street was for borrowers and businesses during the pandemic. Senators, reflecting the deep partisan divide between Democrats and Republicans, spent much of the hearing wanting to talk about political hot button issues like climate change, guns and voting rights.

17. Citigroup profit triples in 1Q, tops estimates; revenue down -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's profits more than tripled in the first quarter, the banking conglomerate said Thursday, helped by the release of billions of dollars from its loan-loss reserves.

The New York-based company said it earned a profit of $7.94 billion, or $3.62 per share, compared to a profit of $2.54 billion, or $1.06 a share, in the same period a year earlier. The bank's profits were well above the $2.60 per share that analysts had been looking for, according to FactSet.

18. Stocks end slightly below latest record highs as tech slips -

Stocks ended just below the latest record highs they hit last week as technology companies slipped.

The S&P 500 edged down less than 0.1% Monday and the tech-heavy Nasdaq gave up 0.4%.

Investors are continuing to focus on the economic recovery as well as concerns about inflation and rising bond yields.

19. Wall Street closing lower; bank stocks fall -

Wall Street closed out a choppy week of trading Friday with major stock indexes mostly lower and all finishing in the red for the week.

The S&P 500 ended 0.1% lower after reversing a small gain. The benchmark index, which hit an all-time high on Wednesday, posted its first weekly decline in three weeks. Losses by banks, industrial companies and technology stocks weighed on the market. They offset gains in companies that rely on consumer spending, health care and other sectors.

20. Stocks extend gains for fifth day, led by technology shares -

Stocks shook off an early stumble and closed broadly higher Monday, nudging some of the major U.S. indexes to more all-time highs as the market added to its recent string of gains.

The S&P 500 rose 0.7% after having been down 0.5% in the early going, extending its winning streak to a fifth day. Technology stocks, airlines, cruise operators and other companies that rely on consumer spending helped lift the market. Banks and energy stocks were the only laggards.

21. Stocks rally on Wall Street, S&P 500 has best day since June -

Wall Street kicked off March with a broad rally Monday that sent the Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 600 points higher and gave the S&P 500 its best day in nine months.

The S&P 500 climbed 2.4%, clawing back nearly all of its losses from last week. More than 90% of the stocks in the benchmark index rose, with technology, financial and industrial companies powering a big share of the S&P 500's gains. Small company stocks also had a strong showing as they continue to outpace the broader market this year.

22. Goldman Sachs' profits more than double, despite pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — Goldman Sachs said its profits more than doubled from a year earlier thanks to a surge in both trading and advising revenue.

The New York-based investment bank said it earned a profit of $4.36 billion, or $12.08 per share, up from a profit of $1.72 billion, or $4.69 a share, in the same period a year earlier. The earnings were significantly better than the $7.45-per-share profit that analysts were expecting.

23. Yellen pushes GOP senators on $1.9 trillion relief package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Janet Yellen, President-elect Joe Biden's choice as Treasury secretary, said Tuesday that the incoming administration would focus on winning quick passage of its $1.9 trillion pandemic relief plan, rejecting Republican arguments that the measure is too big given the size of U.S. budget deficits.

24. Stocks fall as economic pain deepens, rally runs out of gas -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street closed out its first losing week in three with another drop on Friday after reports showed the pandemic is deepening the hole for the economy, as Washington prepares to throw it another lifeline.

25. Wall Street distances itself from Trump, GOP after riots -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — A growing number of Wall Street banks and businesses have cut ties with President Donald Trump's campaign and financial arms, as well as the broader Republican Party, following last week's riots and insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

26. Pelosi says House will impeach Trump, pushes VP to oust him -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the House will proceed with legislation to impeach President Donald Trump as she pushes the vice president and the Cabinet to invoke constitutional authority to force him out, warning that Trump is a threat to democracy after the deadly assault on the Capitol.

27. Businesses rethink political donations after Capitol siege -

Businesses are rethinking political contributions in the wake of the deadly Capitol siege by President Donald Trump's supporters on Wednesday.

Citigroup confirmed Sunday that it is pausing all federal political donations for the first three months of the year. Others, like Marriott, are only stopping donations to the 147 Republicans who opposed certifying President-elect Joe Biden's election.

28. Americans can pay their credit card bills, but for how long? -

NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic hasn't stopped Americans from keeping up with their credit card payments, thanks in large part to government relief programs passed by Congress earlier this year.

29. Bank of America profit falls 15.6% in third quarter -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Consumer banking giant Bank of America says third-quarter profit declined 15.6% from a year earlier, but saw less need to put aside money to cover potentially bad loans, citing improvements in the U.S. economy.

30. JPMorgan puts $30B toward fixing banking's 'systemic racism' -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — JPMorgan Chase said Thursday it will extend billions in loans to Black and Latino homebuyers and small business owners in an expanded effort toward fixing what the bank calls "systemic racism" in the country's economic system.

31. Facebook says it will ban groups that openly support QAnon -

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Facebook said it will ban groups that openly support QAnon, the baseless conspiracy theory that paints President Donald Trump as a secret warrior against a supposed child-trafficking ring run by celebrities and "deep state" government officials.

32. Jane Fraser to become Citi CEO; 1st woman to lead major bank -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's Jane Fraser will become the first woman to ever lead a Wall Street bank when she succeeds CEO Michael Corbat in February.

33. Jane Fraser to become Citi CEO; 1st woman to lead major bank -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's Jane Fraser will become the first woman to ever lead a Wall Street bank when she succeeds CEO Michael Corbat in February.

34. Tesla announces plans to sell up to $5B in new stock shares -

DETROIT (AP) — A day after its 5-for-1 stock split took effect, Tesla is announcing plans to sell up to $5 billion worth of common shares.

The electric car and solar panel maker says in a filing with securities regulators that it intends to sell up to 10.03 million shares and use the proceeds for unspecified general corporate purposes.

35. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's baseless claim of 'deep state' at FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is leveling unfounded attacks on his Food and Drug Administration and distorting the science on effective treatments for COVID-19.

Heading this week into the Republican National Convention, he asserted that the agency is slow-walking vaccines and treatments for the coronavirus in a bid to undermine his November reelection effort. There's no evidence of that, and one of his former FDA commissioners on Sunday rejected the accusation as groundless.

36. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's flawed justification for postal cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is misrepresenting the U.S. Postal Service's financial problems as his postmaster general defends cuts that have slowed mail delivery in advance of the November election.

37. Wall Street slides, but tech strength helps avert a big loss -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most of Wall Street stumbled Thursday, but yet another rise for big technology stocks helped keep the market's losses in check.

The S&P 500 dropped 12.22 points, or 0.4%, to 3,246.22, with nearly three out of four stocks in the index falling. Among the hardest-hit were oil producers, banks and other companies that most need the economy to pull out of its recession. Treasury yields also sank in a sign of increased pessimism about the economy.

38. Bank of America sees recessionary impacts 'deep into 2022' -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America's second-quarter profits were sawed in half and the consumer banking giant set aside billions of dollars to cover potentially bad loans caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

39. Wall Street rebounds after yet another yo-yo day of trading -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rebounded on Tuesday, and the S&P 500 more than made up all its losses from the day before, after stocks pinballed through another day of erratic trading.

The S&P 500 climbed 1.3%, led by energy producers and other companies whose profits would benefit greatly from a strengthening economy. It was a sharp turnaround from the morning, when the index was down 0.9%, and from Monday's last-hour slide after California shut bars and reinstated other restrictions amid a jump in coronavirus counts.

40. Banks set aside billions, bracing for more economic pain -

NEW YORK (AP) — With tens of millions of Americans out of work and many businesses shut down or operating under restrictions due to the coronavirus, three of the nation's biggest banks set aside nearly $30 billion in the second quarter to cover potentially bad loans that were fine only a few months ago.

41. China's trade rises as economy recovers from virus slump -

BEIJING (AP) — China's trade improved in June in a fresh sign the world's second-largest economy is recovering from the coronavirus pandemic. But its exporters face threats including tension with Washington and a possible downturn in U.S. and European demand.

42. JPMorgan profit hit hard by pandemic, as consumers struggle -

NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic is weighing heavily on the financial health of JPMorgan Chase, as the nation's largest financial company set aside billions in the second quarter to cover potential losses from all the businesses and consumers who are unable to pay their debts due to the slumping economy.

43. Wall Street rallies as optimism returns to cap erratic week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Optimism returned to Wall Street on Friday, and stocks rallied to cap a shaky week dogged by worries that rising coronavirus counts may halt the economy's recent upswing.

The S&P 500 climbed 1%, and the biggest gains came from cruise ship operators, airlines, banks and other companies that most need the economy to continue to reopen and strengthen.

44. Most of Wall Street wilts amid worries on virus, economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most of Wall Street wilted Thursday on worries that the economy's recent improvements may be set to fade as coronavirus cases keep climbing.

The S&P 500 lost 0.6%, with three in four stocks within the index falling. The sharpest drops hit oil companies, airlines and other stocks whose fortunes are most closely tied to a reopening and strengthening economy. Treasury yields also sank in another sign of increased caution.

45. China reopens but businesses struggle to lure back consumers -

BEIJING (AP) — The Daronghe restaurant in Chengdu in China's west has reopened but, with business down by half, its staff of 150 come to work on alternate days.

Three months after China declared victory over the coronavirus and started to reopen its economy, the restaurant is among thousands of small businesses that are struggling to lure back skittish consumers nervous about the virus and possible job losses.

46. Banks lead gains for stocks on Wall Street in jumpy trading -

Financial companies led stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday as traders welcomed news that the Federal Reserve and other regulators are removing some limits on the ability of banks to make investments.

47. House demands coronavirus loan info from Treasury, banks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House subcommittee investigating billions of dollars in coronavirus aid is demanding that the Trump administration and some of the nation's largest banks turn over detailed information about companies that applied for and received federal loans intended for small businesses.

48. Brands weigh in on national protests over police brutality -

As thousands of protesters take to the streets in response to police killings of black people, companies are wading into the national conversation but taking care to get their messaging right.

Netflix's normally lighthearted Twitter account took on a more somber tone on Saturday: "To be silent is to be complicit. Black lives matter. We have a platform, and we have a duty to our Black members, employees, creators and talent to speak up." That got retweeted over 216,000 times and "liked" over a million times.

49. Wall Street closes higher on economic revival hopes -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street Wednesday, extending the market's gains into a third day on hopes for a coming economic revival as larger swaths of the country relax stay-at-home mandates imposed due to the coronavirus pandemic and clear the way for more businesses to reopen.

50. Tech stocks keep rallying, help keep Wall Street steady -

Wall Street was split on Monday, as continued gains for technology and health care stocks helped cover up for more prevalent losses elsewhere.

The S&P 500 ended the day at a virtual standstill, up just 0.52 points at 2,930.32, despite a lot of movement going on underneath. It rallied back from an earlier loss of 0.9% in the morning.

51. Stocks sink following grim data on economic hit from virus -

NEW YORK (AP) — Selling swept Wall Street Wednesday after a dismal lineup of reports made clear how historic the coronavirus crunch has been for the economy.

Markets are already bracing for what's forecast to be the worst downturn since the Great Depression, but Wednesday's data was even more dispiriting than expected, including a record drop for U.S. retail sales. Adding to the gloom: More banks made moves in anticipation that households and companies will be forced to default on billions of dollars of debt as businesses remain shut and millions of workers lose their jobs.

52. Banks brace for big loan defaults by US, global customers -

NEW YORK (AP) — The major banks in the U.S. are anticipating a flood of loan defaults as households and business customers take a big financial hit from the coronavirus pandemic.

JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Citigroup and Goldman Sachs raised the funds set aside for bad loans by nearly $20 billion combined in the first quarter, earnings reports released over the past two days show. And Wall Street expects that figure may go even higher next quarter, a possibility bank executives acknowledged on earnings conference calls.

53. New Trump advisory groups to consult on reopening US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he's enlisting advisers from nearly all sectors of American commerce, the medical field and elected office to help shape his plans to reopen the coronavirus-battered economy.

54. Hurry up and wait? Why relief to small businesses has lagged -

NEW YORK (AP) — Speed is of the essence if a federal relief program for small businesses is going to be effective in combating the damage wrought by the coronavirus lockdowns.

Yet, days into the program, many Main Street businesses are still waiting for the cash infusion necessary to stay alive. Others say they haven't even been able to apply for loans under what's called the Paycheck Protection Program.

55. Hurry up and wait? Why relief to small businesses has lagged -

NEW YORK (AP) — Speed is of the essence if a federal relief program for small businesses is going to be effective in combating the damage wrought by the coronavirus lockdowns.

Yet, days into the program, many Main Street businesses are still waiting for the cash infusion necessary to stay alive. Others say they haven't even been able to apply for loans under what's called the Paycheck Protection Program.

56. With billions at stake, banks try to save stunned borrowers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Tarred as villains during the 2008 financial meltdown, banks of all sizes are trying to help out Americans reeling from the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

Banks are scrambling to put into place loan forgiveness and relief programs, working to keep their customers from panicking or falling into financial ruin. They have a vested interest preventing millions of people and businesses from defaulting on hundreds of billions of loans at once, something that would do significant damage to the banks' own finances.

57. Stocks drop as recession fears take hold; Dow loses 1,300 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks tumbled more than 5% on Wall Street Wednesday, and the Dow erased virtually all its gains since President Donald Trump's 2017 inauguration. Even prices for investments seen as safe during downturns fell as the coronavirus outbreak chokes the economy and investors rush to raise cash.

58. Major banks to face profit hit from low rates -

The nation's largest banks face a hit to their profits as the Federal Reserve slashes interest rates and bond yields continue sliding amid the coronavirus pandemic, which is putting the brakes on the economy as businesses and travel shut down.

59. Virus seizes markets; it's no longer business as usual -

Global markets and businesses big and small opened the week to a landscape seemingly altered by the coronavirus pandemic. National retail chains have closed all stores. Banks are taking steps to keep cash on hand, lots of it. Markets in Asia, Europe and the U.S. are plunging. Following is a quick look at how the outbreak is impacting the financial and business sector, as well as millions of workers and customers.

60. Weathering the stock markets: one investor's strategy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Buy and hold — and don't sell when the stock market plunges.

That's the strategy many market pros use, and it has served me well through more than three decades as an investor — and as a financial journalist who needed to know daily what was happening in the markets. I've stuck with that strategy through gyrations as bad or even worse than what we've seen the past two weeks.

61. China manufacturing slumps as anti-virus controls bite -

BEIJING (AP) — China's manufacturing plunged in February as anti-virus controls shut down the world's second-largest economy, but companies are confident activity will revive following government stimulus efforts, according to two surveys.

62. China struggles to revive manufacturing amid virus outbreak -

BEIJING (AP) — Factories that make the world's smartphones, toys and other goods are struggling to reopen after a virus outbreak idled China's economy. But even with the ruling Communist Party promising help, companies and economists say it may be months before production is back to normal.

63. Report: Auto tariffs could mean $4B loss to state -

Middle Tennessee State University’s Business and Economic Research Center has released an automobile tariffs study for the state.

The new Global Commerce report on “The Impact of Automotive Tariffs on the Tennessee Economy” looks at the impact on the Tennessee economy under a range of possible tariffs imposed on automotive imports.

64. Stocks tumble as virus fears spark sell-off; Dow falls 453 -

U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday, sending the Dow Jones Industrial Average down by more than 450 points, as investors grappled with fresh worries about the spread of a new virus in China that threatens global economic growth.

65. Stocks cling to tiny gains as investors parse trade signals -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mixed Tuesday, shedding most of their gains from earlier in the day, after a published report revealed that an interim trade deal between the U.S. and China does not remove tariffs on Chinese goods.

66. Banks post big profits, but lower interest rates are a worry -

NEW YORK (AP) — So far, it appears 2019 was another record year for Wall Street.

Trading of stocks and bonds rebounded after a terrible end to 2018 and consumers spent tons of money on their credit cards, buoyed by a strong job market and steady economic growth. On Tuesday, JPMorgan Chase reported a record annual profit, while Citigroup posted its best results since before the Great Recession.

67. Citigroup profits rise 15%, helped by trading like JPMorgan -

NEW YORK (AP) — Citigroup's fourth-quarter profits rose by 15%, as the banking conglomerate benefited from a boost in trading similar to competitor JPMorgan Chase.

The New York-based bank said Tuesday that it earned a profit of $4.98 billion, or $2.15 per share, compared with a profit of $4.3 billion, or $1.65 per share, in the same period a year earlier. The results topped analysts' expectations for a profit of $1.81 a share, according to FactSet.

68. Stocks climb ahead of trade deal, sending S&P 500 to record -

Technology companies led stocks to broad gains on Wall Street Monday, driving the S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite indexes to more record highs.

Financial, communications services and industrial stocks also notched solid gains. Health care stocks were the only decliners. Bond prices fell, sending yields higher, and the price of gold fell, signs that investors were favoring higher-risk holdings.

69. Stocks close out best year since 2013; S&P 500 soars 28.9% -

Wall Street closed the books Tuesday on a blockbuster 2019 for stock investors, with the broader market delivering its best returns in six years.

The S&P 500 finished with a gain of 28.9% for the year, or a total return of 31.5%, including dividends. The Nasdaq composite rose 35.3%. For both indexes it was the best annual performance since 2013. Technology stocks helped power those gains by vaulting 48%.

70. Slight gains on Wall Street are enough for more record highs -

Wall Street extended its milestone-shattering run Tuesday with modest gains for stocks, nudging the major indexes to more record highs.

The S&P 500 had its fifth gain in a row. The benchmark index and the Nasdaq closed at new highs for the fourth straight day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also closed at a record high, it's second milestone this week.

71. US stocks fall for 3rd consecutive day over more trade worries -

Stocks closed broadly lower and bond prices rose sharply on Wall Street Tuesday after President Donald Trump cast doubt over the potential for a trade deal with China this year.

Technology companies, banks and industrial stocks accounted for much of the sell-off, which extended the S&P 500's losing streak to a third day. Utilities and real estate stocks rose as traders favored less-risky assets.

72. Dow hits record as stock market rally extends into 5th week -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average returned to a record on Monday, joining other market gauges at all-time highs, as the stock market's rally carried into a fifth week.

Oil producers, banks and other stocks that do well when the economy is strengthening again led the way. It's a notable shift in leadership following months of struggles for what Wall Street calls "cyclical" stocks, which lagged due to worries about trade wars and the slowing global economy.

73. Stocks end broadly lower, led by banks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing modestly lower on Wall Street, but the S&P 500 was still on track for a weekly gain after closing at record highs twice this week.

Banks fell more than the rest of the market Thursday as bond yields plunged, making it harder for banks to make money from mortgages and other loans. Citigroup lost 1.5%.

74. Iconic AmEx 'Green Card' turns 50, gets a needed revamp -

NEW YORK (AP) — For 50 years, the American Express "Green Card" has been everywhere its card members wanted to be.

Launched in 1969, the Green Card gave travelers a sense of importance they didn't feel carrying travelers' cheques. For many people, it was their first AmEx card. Over time, however, the Green Card became neglected in favor of its fancier siblings, the Gold and Platinum Cards.

75. Iconic AmEx 'Green Card' turns 50, gets a needed revamp -

NEW YORK (AP) — For 50 years, the American Express "Green Card" has been everywhere its card members wanted to be.

Launched in 1969, the Green Card gave travelers a sense of importance they didn't feel carrying travelers' cheques. For many people, it was their first AmEx card. Over time, however, the Green Card became neglected in favor of its fancier siblings, the Gold and Platinum Cards.

76. Solid company earnings power broad rally for US stocks -

Stocks notched solid gains on Wall Street Tuesday as investors welcomed surprisingly good quarterly results from some of the nation's biggest companies.

Strong earnings from UnitedHealth Group, JPMorgan Chase and other companies helped power the market's broad gains, erasing modest losses from a day earlier.

77. Stocks notch their first gain of the week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are closing broadly higher on Wall Street, giving the market its first gain this week.

Technology companies and banks led the way higher Wednesday. Microsoft rose 1.9% and Citigroup climbed 1.6%.

78. US stocks notch solid gains as job report allays worries -

Wall Street ended a choppy week of trading with a broad rally that drove the Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 370 points higher.

The gains Friday also gave the S&P 500 index its best day in seven weeks, though the benchmark index still finished with its third straight weekly loss.

79. US stocks rebound on housing data, Trump trade deal remark -

U.S. stocks finished broadly higher Wednesday after President Donald Trump indicated that a deal to resolve the long-running, costly trade dispute with China could happen soon.

Trump's remarks, in addition to a sharp increase in sales of new U.S. homes, helped reverse an early slide for stocks.

80. Stocks drop as Dems eye Trump inquiry -

Stocks dropped on Wall Street Tuesday as House Democrats met to consider a potential impeachment probe of President Donald Trump and a report showed a drop in consumer confidence.

After a higher open, stocks declined as the Conference Board, a business research group, reported its consumer confidence index fell to 125.1 in September from a revised reading of 134.2 in August. That's worrisome because consumer spending has underpinned the economy during a slowdown in manufacturing.

81. Stocks mostly lower as tech shares drop -

The S&P 500 notched its third straight weekly gain Friday, even as the major U.S. stock indexes ended the day mostly lower.

A slide in technology stocks, along with losses in consumer-focused and real estate companies, offset solid gains elsewhere in the market, including big Wall Street banks and industrial stocks.

82. Stocks notch gains, erase prior day's losses for S&P 500 -

Technology companies led stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Wednesday, erasing the S&P 500's losses from a day earlier.

Traders pivoted to riskier holdings as encouraging developments overseas helped alleviate investors' anxiety over the global economy. Lawmakers in Britain were seeking a less chaotic exit from the European Union and political tensions in Hong Kong eased.

83. US stocks slide as bond yields surge on trade war worries -

Stocks capped a wobbly day on Wall Street with broad losses Tuesday as anxious investors shifted money to U.S. government bonds, gold and other traditional safe-haven assets.

The selling, which erased some of the market's gains from a strong rally a day earlier, came as long-term bond yields once again fell below short-term ones, a rare phenomenon that has correctly predicted previous recessions.

84. Princeton Review taps MTSU for best listing -

The Princeton Review has named Middle Tennessee State University one of the best places for an undergraduate degree.

It is the first time MTSU was awarded a spot in the review’s guide, “The Best 385 Colleges,” an honor given to roughly 13% of the nation’s approximately 3,000 four-year institutions.

85. Technology companies drive a broad rally on Wall Street -

Technology companies powered a rally on Wall Street Monday that gave the market its third straight gain.

The surge in tech stocks followed a decision by the U.S. to give Chinese telecom giant Huawei another 90 days to buy equipment from American suppliers. Chipmakers including Qualcomm, Intel and Micron, all rose.

86. Stocks fall sharply after bond market warns of recession -

Stocks fell sharply Wednesday after the bond market raised another warning flag on the economy.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury briefly dropped below the two-year Treasury's yield Wednesday morning for the first time since 2007. The so-called inversion has correctly predicted many past recessions and is the loudest warning bell yet about a possible recession ahead.

87. Dow slumps nearly 400 points as trade war anxiety lingers -

Stocks fell sharply on Wall Street Monday, knocking nearly 400 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

The benchmark S&P 500 had its worst day in a week as the sell-off put the market deeper into the red for August. The selling was widespread, with technology companies and banks accounting for a big share of the decline.

88. S&P 500 notches another record after a muted, mixed day -

NEW YORK (AP) — A wobbly day of trading ended with meager gains for U.S. stock indexes on Monday, enough to nudge them further into record territory, as the curtain rose on what's expected to be the weakest earnings reporting season in years.

89. Stocks climb to records on hopes for lower interest rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — The major U.S. stock indexes closed at record highs on Friday, with the S&P 500 ending above 3,000 for the first time. The market was driven higher by technology, consumer discretionary and industrial company stocks, which more than offset the drop in drugmakers.

90. VU’s Anderson moves to Bass, Berry & Sims -

Bass, Berry & Sims has formed a higher-education practice group with the addition of former Vanderbilt University General Counsel Audrey Anderson.

As chair of the group, Anderson will lead a multidisciplinary team of attorneys in a range of legal matters needed by academic institutions. Anderson will practice in the firm’s Nashville and Washington, D.C. offices.

91. Deutsche Bank cuts mark end to failed bid for global scale -

BERLIN (AP) — The radical and painful restructuring of Germany's Deutsche Bank, which is cutting 18,000 jobs, is the end of a long, failed attempt to compete with the global investment banking giants that left it overextended.

92. Stocks move lower on economic data, Powell remarks -

Technology and internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

93. Banks, tech stocks drag market to 2nd straight loss -

Stocks closed modestly lower on Wall Street Wednesday, handing the market its second straight loss.

Banks and technology companies accounted for much of the slide as investors shifted money into U.S. bonds, precious metals and other holdings considered safe havens after more than a week of aggressive buying.

94. US stocks climb after US suspends tariffs on Mexican goods -

Technology companies and banks helped power stocks higher on Wall Street Monday as investors welcomed news that the U.S. and Mexico averted a trade war and potentially damaging tariffs.

The latest gains extend the market's winning streak to a fifth day. That follows the strongest week for stocks since November in what has been a marked turnaround for the market after escalating trade tensions fueled a turbulent skid in May.

95. US stock market notches best week since late November -

Wall Street turned the page on a painful May in the stock market by notching its best week since late November.

Stocks climbed for a fourth consecutive day Friday, capping a week of gains that reversed most of the losses in May, when President Donald Trump's tariff threats escalated trade wars with China and Mexico.

96. Dow jumps over 500 points amid hopes of Fed rate cut -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average jumped more than 500 points Tuesday as investors welcomed signs that the Federal Reserve may cut interest rates to help buttress U.S. economic growth in the face of escalating trade wars.

97. Stocks end rocky month lower as Trump widens trade war -

Wall Street is no fan of Tariff Man. The stock market stumbled Friday to its first losing month of 2019 in May, primarily due to President Donald Trump's decision to broadly wield his tariff powers, first against China over trade and then against Mexico over immigration.

98. EU fines banks over $1 billion over foreign exchange cartel -

BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union regulators have fined five banks a total of more than 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion) for colluding in the trade of large sums of foreign currency.

The European Commission said Thursday that investigators found that some bank employees in charge of spot trading in 11 currencies "exchanged sensitive information and trading plans." They also sometimes coordinated strategies through online professional chat rooms.

99. EU fines banks over $1 billion over foreign exchange cartel -

BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union regulators have fined five banks a total of more than 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion) for colluding in the trade of large sums of foreign currency.

The European Commission said Thursday that investigators found that some bank employees in charge of spot trading in 11 currencies "exchanged sensitive information and trading plans." They also sometimes coordinated strategies through online professional chat rooms.

100. US stocks extend gains after recovering from early slide -

Stocks reversed an early slide on Wall Street and finished broadly higher Wednesday, giving the market its second straight gain in a week of bumpy trading.

Big technology and communications companies, including Microsoft, Apple and Google parent Alphabet, led the rally as the market shrugged off an initial stumble. Banks took heavy losses following a sharp drop in bond yields.