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Editorial Results (free)

1. The US economy's second quarter went from solid to stellar -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy staged a far bigger rebound last quarter than first thought, outpacing the rest of the developed world and bolstering confidence that it will remain sturdy in coming months despite global headwinds.

2. US economy surged at 3.7 percent rate in April-June quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy posted a much bigger rebound in growth during the spring than previously reported, thanks to improvements in a number of areas including consumer spending and business investment.

3. How China's tremors could weaken the world's major economies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — China is exporting something new to the world economy: Fear.

Global investors are quaking over the prospect of a devastating slump in the world's second-biggest economy. And they're fast losing confidence that China's policymakers, seemingly so sure-footed in the past, know how to solve the problem.

4. Dubai, Saudi markets lose 7 percent after oil price dip -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Stock markets in Saudi Arabia and Dubai closed around 7 percent lower on Sunday on the back of a further slide in oil prices.

Dubai's main index closed 6.96 percent lower on its opening day of trading for the week. Saudi Arabia's Tadawul, the region's largest index, lost 6.86 percent. Other Mideast indexes, which trade from Sunday to Thursday, also tumbled. Egypt's main index, the EGX30, dropped 5.4 percent while Abu Dhabi's index dropped 5 percent.

5. Tesla's loss triples in 2Q as it lowers delivery forecast -

DETROIT (AP) — Tesla Motors' upcoming Model X SUV cast a long shadow over the company's second-quarter results.

Tesla's net loss nearly tripled to $184 million in the April-June period as it invested in tooling and factory capacity for the new SUV, which is scheduled to go on sale next month.

6. Q&A: What stock market tumble means for China, rest of world -

BEIJING (AP) — China's stock market tumbled this week despite a massive government intervention aimed at halting a slide in prices that began last month. At its peak in early June, the Shanghai Composite Index had risen about 150 percent from late 2014. After dropping 30 percent over several weeks, government support measures calmed the market. But on Monday the sell-off resumed, with the Shanghai index suffering a drop of 8.5 percent, its biggest daily fall since February 2007. Here's what the sell-off means for China's economy and other countries.

7. China manufacturing slumps to 15-month low -

HONG KONG (AP) — China's manufacturing slumped to a 15-month low in July in a fresh sign of deterioration in the world's second biggest economy, a survey showed Friday.

The manufacturing index based on a survey of factory purchasing managers fell to 48.2 this month from 49.4 in June. It uses a 100-point scale on which numbers above 50 indicate expansion.

8. Yellen: First Fed rate hike likely later this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Wednesday she is encouraged by signs that the economy is reviving after a brutal winter. And if the improvements stay on track, the Fed will likely start raising interest rates later this year.

9. US unemployment falls to 7-year low, but wages are flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. unemployment fell to a seven-year low of 5.3 percent and employers hired at a solid pace in June, but other gauges of the job market drew a bleaker picture: A wave of people stopped looking for work, and paychecks failed to budge.

10. Volvo chooses South Carolina for new $500 million auto plant -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Volvo Cars will build a $500 million plant in South Carolina that will eventually employ up to 4,000 people, the company announced Monday.

The company said its first American plant about 30 miles from the Port of Charleston is expected to make about 100,000 vehicles a year, initially.

11. Stronger US economy and dollar tighten Latin American ties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In Mexico City, an auto parts company expects to ride a resurgent U.S. auto industry to $1 billion in annual revenue by 2016.

In Bogota, Colombia, a company that makes plastic water valves is hoping an expansion into the United States will super-charge its exports.

12. Why 5.5 percent unemployment isn't as great as it seems -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Unemployment in the U.S. has dropped to a seven-year low of 5.5 percent — the level normally considered the mark of a healthy job market. Yet that number isn't as encouraging as it might sound.

13. US stocks fall, pulling market further below record highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks sank Wednesday, pulling indexes further below record highs hit earlier in the week. The drop was modest but broad: nine of the 10 sectors in the Standard & Poor's 500 index lost ground.

14. AP survey: Why the outlook for global economy has brightened -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From the United States to Asia to Europe, a global economy that many had feared was faltering appears poised for a resurgence on the strength of cheap oil and falling interest rates.

15. US factory output rises 0.3 percent in December -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory production rose in December as manufacturers churned out more furniture, computers and clothing, offsetting a decline in autos.

Factory production increased 0.3 percent last month, the Federal Reserve said Friday, its fourth straight gain. The increase comes after output jumped 1.3 percent in November and finally surpassed its pre-recession peak.

16. Dismal report on US retail spending hits the stock market -

NEW YORK (AP) – A dismal report on retail spending in the U.S. and signs of slowing global growth drove stocks lower and sent yields on government bonds plunging as investors sought safety.

U.S. stocks fell from the start of trading on a report that consumers pulled back on spending last month and on a slump in European markets. At one point, the Dow Jones industrial average shed nearly 350 points.

17. Streak of solid hiring bolsters confidence about 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) â?? U.S. employers are showing more confidence than they have since the Great Recession began and will probably propel the economy in 2015 to its fastest growth in a decade.

December's job gains capped a stellar year for hiring that saw nearly 3 million jobs created, the most since 1999. The acceleration put further distance between the steadily strengthening American economy and struggling nations overseas.

18. Why the US will power the world economy in 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is back, and ready to drive global growth in 2015.

After long struggling to claw its way out of the Great Recession, the world's biggest economy is on an extended win streak that is edging it closer to full health. But the new year doesn't look quite so bright in other major countries.

19. Hemlock permanently closing $1.2B plant in Tennessee -

CLARKSVILLE (AP) — Hemlock Semiconductor Group is permanently closing its idled polysilicon plant in Clarksville, citing global trade disputes that have led to an oversupply of the compound used in solar energy panels.

20. Fed likely to note gains but signal no rate hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A resurgent U.S. economy has emerged from a long struggle with high unemployment and weak growth. And the Federal Reserve seems poised to recognize the sustained improvement.

In a statement it will issue after a policy meeting ends Wednesday, the Fed may no longer say it plans to keep a key interest rate near zero for a "considerable time." If so, the Fed would be signaling that it's moving closer to raising rates — eventually.

21. Job gains put US on pace for best growth since '99 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The resurgence in U.S. hiring accelerated in November and put 2014 on track to be the healthiest year for job growth since 1999.

The gain of a robust 321,000 jobs — the most in nearly three years — put further distance between a strengthening American economy and struggling nations throughout the developed world. The job market still isn't yet fully healthy. But its steady improvement raises the likelihood that the Federal Reserve will start raising interest rates from record lows by mid-2015.

22. US hiring was likely solid for 10th straight month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers are thought to have hired at another robust pace in November in the latest sign that the United States is outshining struggling economies throughout the developed world.

23. US services firms growing more quickly -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. services firms expanded at a faster pace in November, a signal that overall economic growth should remain robust.

The Institute for Supply Management said Wednesday that its services index rose to 59.3 last month, up from 57.1 in October. The first gain in two months pulls the index close to the eight-year high of 59.6 reached in August. Any reading over 50 indicates expansion.

24. Energy companies lead an advance in US stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Energy and health-care companies led major stock indexes higher on Tuesday, even as crude oil resumed its slide. General Motors rose after reporting stronger sales, and Biogen, a biotech company, soared following news that its drug for Alzheimer's disease showed promise.

25. Survey: US businesses add 230,000 jobs in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. companies added 230,000 jobs in October, the most in four months and a sign that businesses are still willing to hire despite signs of slowing growth overseas.

Payroll processer ADP said Wednesday that the job gains were slightly ahead of the 225,000 added in September, which was revised up from an initial estimate of 213,000. Job gains above 200,000 are usually enough to lower the unemployment rate.

26. World Trade Center reopens for business -

NEW YORK (AP) — Thirteen years after the 9/11 terrorist attack, the resurrected World Trade Center is again opening for business — marking an emotional milestone for both New Yorkers and the nation.

27. US economy grew at 3.5 percent rate in Q3 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a solid annual rate of 3.5 percent in the July-September quarter, propelled by solid gains in business investment, export sales and the biggest jump in military spending in five years.

28. Economy 101: 5 things to know about US growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Is the U.S. economy accelerating — finally? If it is, which sorts of Americans stand to benefit most? And why is it doing better than other major economies?

Such are the questions surrounding a report coming Thursday on economic expansion in the July-September quarter. It's likely to be the fourth quarter in the past five in which annual growth reached at least 3 percent — a level that would be the envy of most other big economies.

29. Samsung expects lowest profit in over 3 years -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The world's biggest smartphone maker is suffering a stunning financial decline in the face of intense competition from Apple Inc. and upstart Chinese brands.

30. Why global turmoil hasn't sunk US markets. Yet. -

NEW YORK (AP) — Europe appears on the brink of another recession. Islamic militants have seized Iraqi territory. Russian troops have massed on the Ukraine border, and the resulting sanctions are disrupting trade. An Ebola outbreak in Africa and Israel's war in Gaza are contributing to the gloom.

31. US companies falling behind as Africa surges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Africa's economy rises, American businesses are at risk of being left behind.

"We are missing the boat" was the sour warning former President Bill Clinton issued Tuesday at an otherwise upbeat U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit here.

32. IMF cuts US and global growth forecasts for 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The International Monetary Fund foresees the global economy expanding less than it had previously forecast, slowed by weaker growth in the United States, Russia and developing economies.

33. IMF cuts US and global growth forecasts for 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The International Monetary Fund foresees the global economy expanding less than it had previously forecast, slowed by weaker growth in the United States, Russia and developing economies.

34. Stocks decline in afternoon trading; Mattel down -

U.S. financial markets veered lower in afternoon trading Thursday, giving back gains from a day earlier. Economic data were mixed and company earnings reports were mostly disappointing. Investors also monitored developments in Ukraine following reports that a passenger plane was shot down over the eastern part of the country.

35. June jobs report shows US recovery is accelerating -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A surprisingly robust job market is energizing the 5-year-old U.S. recovery and driving the economy closer to full health.

Employers added 288,000 jobs in June and helped cut the unemployment rate to 6.1 percent, the lowest since 2008. It was the fifth straight gain above 200,000 — the best such stretch since the late 1990s tech boom.

36. US employers add 217K jobs; rate stays at 6.3 pct -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 217,000 jobs in May, a substantial gain for a fourth straight month, fueling hopes that the economy will accelerate after a grim start to the year.

Monthly job growth has averaged 234,000 for the past three months, up sharply from 150,000 in the previous three. The unemployment rate, which is derived from a separate survey, remained 6.3 percent in May. That's the lowest rate in more than five years.

37. US factory orders up for third month in April -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Orders to U.S. factories rose for a third consecutive month in April, adding to evidence that manufacturing is regaining momentum after a harsh winter.

Orders increased 0.7 percent in April, pushed higher by a surge in demand for military hardware, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. That followed a 1.5 percent increase in March and a 1.7 percent climb in February.

38. Manufacturers see better times for economy, jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies are finally starting to spend some of the cash they've been sitting on, and that could mean a stronger economy and more jobs are on the way.

Industrial companies such as General Electric, Honeywell and Caterpillar have been posting strong financial results in recent weeks and telling investors that orders are strong. That means other large companies are investing in expensive equipment they need to grow their business, economists say.

39. Oil down despite China stimulus, supply drop -

LONDON (AP) — The price of oil drifted lower Thursday even after China introduced measures to underpin growth and U.S. crude inventories unexpectedly declined.

Benchmark U.S. crude for May delivery was down 53 cents to $99.09 a barrel at 0900 GMT in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract shed 12 cents to close at $99.62 on Wednesday.

40. Events -

Benefits of Captive Companies in Tennessee. Join Baker Donelson for a special luncheon featuring Michael A. Corbett and Julie McPeak, who will talk about the cost, investment, advantages and upkeep of a captive. Hosted by insurance regulatory attorneys David Broemel and Lee Harrell. Tax attorney Scott Smith also will be on hand to answer any questions about federal and state tax issues and planning opportunities involving captive insurance companies. Today, 11:30 a.m., lunch and registration. Noon-1 p.m., program. Baker Donelson Center, 211 Commerce Street, First Floor Special Events Center, Nashville. Information: rsvp@bakerdonelson.com.

41. Stocks gain after reports on housing, Ukraine -

NEW YORK (AP) — Encouraging news on the economy gave the stock market a boost on Tuesday.

Stocks also rose on expectations that the conflict between Russia and the West wouldn't escalate further. Russia's President Vladimir Putin is preparing to complete the annexation of the Black Sea peninsula of Crimea, but he said Tuesday that he won't take over other areas of Ukraine.

42. Analysis: Tax overhaul bill headed for the shelf -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ordinarily, the late-winter introduction of major legislation by the chairman of a powerful committee might signal a major push in Congress for an election-year accomplishment.

That's not the case with tax reform, which now takes its place in the "do not disturb" corner with immigration legislation, trade bills and an increase in the federal minimum wage.

43. US service sector expands on gain in new orders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. service companies expanded at a slightly faster pace in January. New orders, sales and hiring showed strength in a sign that financial firms, retailers and information technology companies foresee stronger growth.

44. After tough January, stock extend slide -

For investors, February is starting out just as rough as January.

U.S. stocks tumbled on Monday, pushing the Dow Jones industrial average down more than 320 points after reports of sluggish U.S growth added to investor worries about the global economy. The slump follows the Dow's worst January performance since 2009.

45. Caterpillar 4Q results, 2014 outlook tops forecast -

NEW YORK (AP) — Caterpillar used a combination of cost-cutting and strong sales of construction equipment to deliver a fourth-quarter profit that topped Wall Street estimates and gave the sagging stock market some needed support.

46. China's economy grows 7.7 percent in 2013 -

BEIJING (AP) — China's economic growth decelerated in the final quarter of 2013 and appears set to slow further, adding to pressure on its leaders to shore up an expansion as they try to implement sweeping reforms.

47. Senate easily passes $1.1 trillion spending bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sent President Barack Obama a $1.1 trillion government-wide spending bill Thursday, easing the harshest effects of last year's automatic budget cuts after tea party critics chastened by October's partial shutdown mounted only a faint protest.

48. Factory, construction growth boost 2014 outlook -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Expectations are rising for a stronger U.S. economy in 2014 after reports Thursday showed solid growth in manufacturing and construction spending at the end of last year.

Factory activity in December stayed near a 2 ½ -year high. Americans are buying more cars and homes, increasing demand for steel, furniture and other manufactured goods. Manufacturers have boosted hiring to meet that demand and may add jobs at a healthier pace this year.

49. Caterpillar 3Q earnings tumble 44 percent -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Caterpillar's mining business is down in a hole.

Its third-quarter earnings plunged 44 percent and it cut its forecast, again. It said revenue will be almost $11 billion lower than last year, a drop of 17 percent. Most of the decline is in its mining gear business, where revenue is expected to fall 40 percent.

50. An attempt to legalize hemp farming in Tennessee is getting pushback, despite its economic potential -

In Tennessee, the idea of hemp is hot. For at least a couple of legislators and an equal number of grassroots advocates in the state, hemp could be the second coming of corn in terms of its potential as a crop with a diversity of uses.

51. Bank of America sells China bank stake for $1.47B -

HONG KONG (AP) — Bank of America sold a $1.47 billion stake in China Construction Bank on Wednesday, the latest foreign institution to shed its investment in a Chinese lender after initial optimism about the potentially lucrative market wore off.

52. An early gain fades on Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — An early rally on Wall Street fizzled, leaving the stock market slightly higher in midday trading Thursday.

Miners and other companies that make basic materials surged after news that China's trade rebounded in July, signaling the end of a six-month slowdown for the world's second-largest economy.

53. US employers add 162K jobs, rate falls to 7.4 pct. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 162,000 jobs in July, a modest increase and the fewest since March. At the same time, the unemployment rate fell to a 4½-year low of 7.4 percent, a hopeful sign.

54. Caterpillar 2Q profit falls 43 pct; cuts outlook -

PEORIA, Illinois (AP) — Caterpillar says its second-quarter profit fell 43 percent as dealers cut inventories more than it had anticipated and the company cut its profit and revenue outlook for the year.

55. Grim Caterpillar outlook tugs stocks mostly lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — A gloomy outlook from Caterpillar, the world's largest construction equipment company, tugged the stock market lower Wednesday.

The meager drop gave the stock market two consecutive days of losses, the first time that's happened all month.

56. Weak China data, falling US stocks push oil lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — Weak manufacturing data from China and falling U.S. stock markets pushed oil to its biggest one-day decline in five weeks Wednesday.

Benchmark crude for September delivery dropped $1.84, or 1.7 percent, to close at $105.39 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. That's the biggest percentage decline since June 21.

57. Ford raises profit forecast on strong 2Q results -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Ford Motor Co. reported better-than-expected earnings for the second quarter and raised its profit and sales forecasts for the year as strong U.S. pickup truck demand and growing sales in China offset persistent — but narrowing — losses in Europe.

58. US economy looks weaker after subpar retail sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy appears to be weaker than many economists had thought after a report Monday showed consumers spent cautiously in June at retail businesses.

Americans bought more cars and trucks, furniture and clothes. But they cut back almost everywhere else. They spent less at restaurants and bars, reduced purchases at home improvement stores, and bought fewer computers and electronics.

59. US manufacturing gauge sinks to June 2009 level -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A measure of U.S. manufacturing fell in May to its lowest level since June 2009 as slumping overseas economies and weak business spending reduced new orders and production.

The Institute for Supply Management said Monday that its index of manufacturing activity fell to 49 last month from 50.7 in April. That's the lowest level in nearly four years and the first time the index has dipped below 50 since November. A reading under 50 indicates contraction.

60. GM profit falls 14 pct in 1Q; Europe loss narrows -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors' net income fell 14 percent in the first quarter, as it earned less money in North America while preparing to launch a redesigned version of its best-selling vehicle, the Silverado pickup.

61. Oil sinks on China manufacturing and US supplies -

NEW YORK (AP) — The price of oil dropped more than 2 percent Wednesday, following disappointing economic news from the world's two biggest oil-consuming nations and a large increase in U.S. crude supplies.

62. US economy accelerates at 2.5 percent rate in Q1 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans shrugged off higher taxes to lift the U.S. economy at the start of the year. Government spending fell, though, and the impact of the tax increases along with federal budget cuts could slow growth later this year.

63. Barge Waggoner promotes quartet of vice presidents -

Award-winning architecture and engineering firm Barge Waggoner Sumner and Cannon, Inc. appointed four new vice presidents at its recent annual stockholders’ meeting:

64. Ford's first quarter profit up 15 pct to $1.6B -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Ford Motor Co. reported a better-than-expected $1.6 billion profit in the first quarter as growing demand in the U.S. and China for its new vehicles helped overcome steep losses in Europe and South America.

65. Report: US footing greater bill for overseas bases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is footing more of the bill for overseas bases in Germany, Japan and South Korea even as the military reduces the number of American troops in Europe and strategically repositions forces in Asia, a congressional report says.

66. Stock market rebounds from worst day of the year -

NEW YORK (AP) — Strong housing and earnings reports helped stocks rebound from their worst day of the year.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 157.58 points, or 1.1 percent, on Tuesday, to 14,756.78, winning back more than half of the 265 points it lost a day earlier. The Standard & Poor's 500 index logged its second-best day of the year.

67. US adds 236K jobs, unemployment falls to 7.7 pct. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A burst of hiring last month added 236,000 U.S. jobs and reduced the unemployment rate to 7.7 percent from 7.9 percent in January. The robust gains suggested that the economy can strengthen further despite higher taxes and government spending cuts.

68. Caterpillar 4Q profits cut in half; 2013 uncertain -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Caterpillar's fourth-quarter profit was cut in half by a deal in China that went bad and by slower growth around most of the world. It said results for this year depend on how the global economy behaves in the second half.

69. AP IMPACT: Recession, tech kill middle-class jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Five years after the start of the Great Recession, the toll is terrifyingly clear: Millions of middle-class jobs have been lost in developed countries the world over.

And the situation is even worse than it appears.

70. Hemlock laying off workers, production pushed back -

CLARKSVILLE (AP) — Hemlock Semiconductor is laying off three-fourths of its employees in Clarksville shortly before the planned start of production at its new $1.2 billion plant.

Officials of the Michigan-based company met with The Leaf-Chronicle (http://leafne.ws/WX8wuq) on Monday and said the company is laying off 300 of its 400 employees in Clarksville and 100 workers at its Michigan plant.

71. Lawmakers release documents on Wal-Mart bribery -

NEW YORK (AP) — Lawmakers are making public emails that show that Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s CEO found out in 2005 that the retailer was handing out bribes in Mexico.

72. World's longest fast train line opens in China -

BEIJING (AP) — China on Wednesday opened the world's longest high-speed rail line that more than halves the time required to travel from the country's capital in the north to Guangzhou, an economic hub in southern China.

73. Illegal immigration drops after decade-long rise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — New census data released Thursday affirm a clear and sustained drop in illegal immigration, ending more than a decade of increases.

The number of illegal immigrants in the U.S. dropped to an estimated 11.1 million last year from a peak of 12 million in 2007, part of an overall waning of Hispanic immigration. For the first time since 1910, Hispanic immigration last year was topped by immigrants from Asia.

74. Obama pipeline decision may preview energy policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a decision President Barack Obama put off during the 2012 campaign, but now that he's won a second term, his next move on a proposed oil pipeline between the U.S. and Canada may signal how he will deal with climate and energy issues in the four years ahead.

75. Consumers give US economy a lift before election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A flurry of reports Thursday showed that U.S. consumers are growing more confident and spending more, boosting a still-weak economy just five days before the presidential election.

76. US Steel 3Q profit doubles despite revenue drop -

U.S Steel doubled its third-quarter net income as a tax benefit helped balance pressure from price decreases and a challenging global economy.

The Pittsburgh manufacturer said Tuesday that it earned $44 million, or 28 cents per share, in the quarter that ended Sept. 30. That compares with $22 million, or 15 cents per share, a year ago.

77. Oil below $92 amid US supplies rise, China growth -

The price of oil slipped below $92 a barrel Thursday as traders weighed signs of economic recovery in the U.S. and China against an increase in U.S. crude supplies.

By early afternoon in Europe, benchmark oil for November delivery was down 21 cents at $91.91 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract gained 3 cents to settle at $92.12 a barrel on Wednesday.

78. IMF offers bleak assessment of stalled recovery -

TOKYO (AP) — Plagued by uncertainty and fresh setbacks, the world economy has weakened further and will grow more slowly over the next year, the International Monetary Fund says in its latest forecast.

79. Stocks rise following expansion in manufacturing -

U.S. stocks mostly rose on Monday as growth in manufacturing provided more evidence that the economy may be picking up, or at least not getting any worse.

The gains came after news that U.S. manufacturing grew in September for the first time in four months.

80. Stocks end lower ahead of Fed meeting -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks slipped on Wall Street as troubling economic news from China and the U.S. outweighed optimism about more stimulus from the Federal Reserve.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 52.35 points to close at 13,254.29 on Monday. The Standard & Poor's 500 slipped 8.84 points to 1,429.08 and the Nasdaq composite fell 32.40 points to 3,104.02.

81. US service firms grew at faster pace in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. service companies grew at a faster pace in August than July and stepped up hiring, further evidence that the economy may be improving.

The Institute for Supply Management said Thursday that its index of non-manufacturing activity increased in August to 53.7, up from a July reading of 52.6. Any reading above 50 indicates expansion.

82. Survey: US manufacturing shrinks for third month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory activity shrank for the third straight month in August as new orders, production and employment all fell. The report adds to other signs that manufacturing is struggling around the globe.

83. Stocks end mixed on weak US economic reports -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks zigged and zagged after reports that the U.S. economy is weakening at a time when China and Europe are also slowing.

The Dow Jones industrial average closed down 54.90 points at 13,035.94 on Tuesday. Heavy equipment maker Caterpillar was the weakest stock in the Dow average, slipping 3 percent, or $2.67, to $82.66. The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 1.64 points to 1,404.94.

84. Stocks climb from lows after Fed signals help -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investors drew some comfort Wednesday from signals that the Federal Reserve is worried about the slow pace of the U.S. economic recovery feels more urgency about providing help.

85. Chinese companies pull out of US stock markets -

BEIJING (AP) — Just a few years after Chinese companies lined up to sell shares on Wall Street, a growing number are reversing course and pulling out of U.S. exchanges.

This week, Focus Media Holding Ltd., announced its chairman and private equity firms want to buy back its U.S.-traded shares and take the Shanghai-based advertising company private. The deal would value Focus Media at $3.5 billion, according to financial information firm Dealogic.

86. US service firms grew slightly faster in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. service companies, which employ 90 percent of Americans, grew at a slightly faster pace in July.

The Institute for Supply Management reported Friday that its index of non-manufacturing activity picked up slightly last month with a reading of 52.6. That was up from June's reading of 52.1, which had been the lowest since January 2010.

87. US hiring picks up in July with 163,000 jobs added -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy generated 163,000 jobs in July after three months of weak hiring, a sign it is resilient enough to pull out of a midyear slump and grow modestly as the rest of the world slows down.

88. Oil prices rise on surprise supply drop -

NEW YORK (AP) — The price of oil climbed to near $89 per barrel Wednesday after the government said supplies have dropped more than analysts expected.

Benchmark U.S. crude rose by 77 cents to $88.83 per barrel in New York, while Brent crude added $1.36 to $106.26 per barrel in London.

89. Oil rises on expectations for economic stimulus -

NEW YORK (AP) — The price of oil climbed for a fourth day on expectations of more efforts by government officials and central bankers to help the global economy.

China is planning to pump billions of dollars into housing projects and other infrastructure to support its construction industry. The European Central Bank hinted that more support could be in the works for Europe's debt-ridden nations, while the leaders of Germany and France vowed to do everything they can to keep the eurozone intact.

90. Caterpillar shares jump as 2Q profit grows 67 pct -

Caterpillar Inc. says its second-quarter profit soared 67 percent because of growing demand for its construction and mining equipment, and the company boosted its outlook for the year.

91. Stocks slide on Wall Street for sixth straight day -

U.S. stocks slid for a sixth day Thursday as concern spread that weaker global economic growth and the European debt crisis will hurt U.S. corporate earnings. The Dow Jones industrial average was headed for its longest losing streak since mid-May.

92. US stocks plunge after weak June jobs report -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investors abandoned stocks Friday after the U.S. government reported that only 80,000 jobs were created in June, the third straight month of weak hiring.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 124.20 points to close at 12,772.47. The loss wiped out the Dow's gain for the week.

93. US manufacturing shrinks for first time in 3 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. manufacturing shrank in June for the first time in nearly three years, adding to signs that economic growth is weakening.

Production declined, and the number of new orders plunged, according to a monthly report released Monday by the Institute for Supply Management.

94. Anti-Muslim group attacks Tenn. economic official -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A group that has attacked the construction of a mosque in Murfreesboro is now taking aim at a recent hire by Gov. Bill Haslam based on her religion.

The Tennessean reports (http://tnne.ws/Mrtu2Q ) the Center for Security Policy and the 8th District Tea Party Coalition have urged their members to put pressure on the state to dump Samar Ali, an attorney appointed last month as the new international director for the state's Economic and Community Development office.

95. US economic outlook worsens after jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The faltering U.S. job market has prompted economists to take a much dimmer view of the country's growth prospects. That's a shift from just a few weeks ago, when many were upgrading their forecasts.

96. Global economy at risk as US, Europe and Asia slow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The global economy's foundations are weakening, one by one.

Already hobbled by Europe's debt crisis, the world now risks being hurt by slowdowns in its economic powerhouses.

97. A mixed close on Wall Street as calm returns -

Calm returned to the stock market Monday after a spasm of fearful selling last week. Major indexes closed mixed after trading modestly lower for most of the day.

The Dow Jones industrial average opened at its lowest level since December after a 275-point sell-off on Friday ignited by grim economic signals, especially a dismal report on the U.S. labor market.

98. China promises support for 7 emerging industries -

BEIJING (AP) — China's Cabinet said Wednesday it has approved plans to promote development of seven emerging industries including clean energy as it tries to restructure the economy and boost growth.

99. A rare gain for the Dow on hopes for China growth -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market is desperately looking for good news.

On Tuesday, oil prices fell, the euro sank to a 22-month low, and the yield on the U.S. government's 10-year Treasury note fell near a historic low after a report suggested that Spain will have more trouble repaying its debts.

100. Typical CEO made $9.6M last year, AP study finds -

NEW YORK (AP) — Profits at big U.S. companies broke records last year, and so did pay for CEOs.

The head of a typical public company made $9.6 million in 2011, according to an analysis by The Associated Press using data from Equilar, an executive pay research firm.