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Editorial Results (free)

1. Official: China's economy reviving as anti-virus curbs ease -

BEIJING (AP) — China's factory and consumer activity fell even more than expected in April under anti-virus controls, official data showed Monday, but a Cabinet official said the economy is reviving as anti-virus curbs ease and its commercial capital of Shanghai reopens.

2. This Earth Day, Biden faces 'headwinds' on climate agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One year ago, Joe Biden marked his first Earth Day as president by convening world leaders for a virtual summit on global warming that even Russian President Vladimir Putin and China's Xi Jinping attended. Biden used the moment to nearly double the United States' goal for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, vaulting the country to the front lines in the fight against climate change.

3. Baker Donelson elects 3 Nashville shareholders -

Baker Donelson has elected 11 new shareholders across the firm, including Bert Chollet, Andrew J. Droke and Ryan M. Richards of the Nashville office.

Chollet, a member of Baker Donelson’s construction group, provides clients in all areas of the construction industry with a full range of services in connection with projects throughout the U.S. and abroad.

4. Energy shift creates opening for 'world's largest batteries' -

LUDINGTON, Mich. (AP) — Sprawled like a gigantic swimming pool atop a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan is an asphalt-and-clay pond holding enough water to produce electricity for 1.6 million households.

5. Biden to require US-made steel, iron for infrastructure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is taking a key step toward ensuring that federal dollars will support U.S. manufacturing — issuing requirements for how projects funded by the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package source their construction material.

6. China's economy grows still-weak 4.8% in January-March -

BEIJING (AP) — China's economic growth edged up to a still-weak 4.8% over a year earlier in the first three months of 2022 as industrial cities shut down to fight coronavirus outbreaks, threatening to disrupt global trade and manufacturing.

7. US seeks new lithium sources as demand for batteries grows -

NEWRY, Maine (AP) — The race is on to produce more lithium in the United States.

The U.S. will need far more lithium to achieve its clean energy goals — and the industry that mines, extracts and processes the chemical element is poised to grow. But it also faces a host of challenges from environmentalists, Indigenous groups and government regulators.

8. Official guilty of illegally entering Capitol grounds Jan. 6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday convicted an elected official from New Mexico of illegally entering restricted U.S. Capitol grounds but acquitted him of engaging in disorderly conduct during the riot that disrupted Congress from certifying Joe Biden's presidential election victory.

9. Capitol riot trial opens for Cowboys for Trump founder -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An elected official from New Mexico headed to trial Monday with a judge — not a jury — set to decide if he is guilty of charges that he illegally entered the U.S. Capitol grounds on the day a pro-Trump mob disrupted the certification of Joe Biden's presidential election victory.

10. China tries to calm markets by pledging support for economy -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government tried Wednesday to reassure jittery investors by promising support for real estate and technology companies after regulatory crackdowns caused stock prices to plunge.

11. Chinese virus cases climb, raise threat of trade disruption -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese authorities on Tuesday tightened anti-virus controls at ports, raising the risk of trade disruptions after some auto and electronics factories shut down as the government fights coronavirus outbreaks.

12. China's premier promises 13 million jobs to reverse slump -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government hopes to generate as many as 13 million new jobs this year to help reverse a painful economic slump but faces "many difficulties and challenges," the country's No. 2 leader said Friday.

13. AP FACT CHECK: Biden's State of Union is off on guns, EVs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden related a faulty Democratic talking point about guns in his first State of the Union speech, made his plan on electric vehicles sound more advanced than it is and inflated the sweep of his infrastructure package. On several fronts, he presented ambitions as achievements.

14. State of the Union comes amid war abroad, discord in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing disquiet at home and danger abroad, President Joe Biden will deliver his first State of the Union address at a steeply challenging moment for the nation, aiming to navigate out of the  pandemic, reboot his stalled domestic agenda and confront Russian aggression.

15. Low-fare airline Swoop adds Nashville flights -

Swoop, Canada’s leading ultra-low-fare airline, is expanding its presence in the United States by adding non-stop flights to five new destinations this summer: Nashville, New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

16. Xi urges Hong Kong to get control as COVID-19 cases surge -

HONG KONG (AP) — Hospitals in Hong Kong were struggling Wednesday to keep up with an influx of new coronavirus patients amid record numbers of new infections as the city doggedly adheres to its "zero-COVID" strategy, and China's leader Xi Jinping said the local government's "overriding task" was to control the situation.

17. EXPLAINER: A scarcity of chips feeds frustration, inflation -

Even coming off its fastest annual growth in 37 years, the U.S. economy is still bogged down by a persistent shortage of the computer chips essential to the technology that connects, transports and entertains us.

18. States get go-ahead to build electric car charging stations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — States are getting the go-ahead to build a nationwide network of electric vehicle charging stations that would place new or upgraded ones every 50 miles (80 kilometers) along interstate highways as part of the Biden administration's plan to spur widespread adoption of the zero-emission cars.

19. China's pandemic Olympics begins with lockdown and boycotts -

BEIJING (AP) — The country where the coronavirus outbreak emerged two years ago launched a locked-down Winter Olympics on Friday, proudly projecting its might on the most global of stages even as some Western governments mounted a diplomatic boycott over the way China treats millions of its own people.

20. Huge demand at Caterpillar, but global supply constrains -

Caterpillar's sales surged in the final quarter of the year despite ongoing disruptions in the global supply chain that have hit almost every sector of the economy.

Executives said Friday that demand for construction equipment remains elevated, but supply issues and cooling construction in China depressed the company's stock.

21. Intel building $20B Ohio chip facility amid global shortage -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Chip maker Intel said it will invest $20 billion to build a new factory in Ohio, an attempt to help alleviate a global shortage of chips powering everything from phones to cars to home appliances while also signaling the giant company's commitment to manufacturing crucial technology products in the U.S.

22. After Biden's first year, the virus and disunity rage on -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From the inaugural platform, President Joe Biden saw American sickness on two fronts — a disease of the national spirit and the one from the rampaging coronavirus — and he saw hope, because leaders always must see that.

23. Chinese anti-virus lockdowns add to concerns over economy -

BEIJING (AP) — China's lockdowns of big cities to fight coronavirus outbreaks are prompting concern about more disruptions to global industries after two makers of processor chips said their factories were affected.

24. Troubled Chinese developer told to demolish resort -

BEIJING (AP) — A troubled Chinese real estate developer that is struggling with $310 billion in debt announced Tuesday it has been ordered to demolish a 39-building resort complex in a new blow to its finances.

25. Biden signs $768.2 billion defense spending bill into law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed the National Defense Authorization Act into law Monday, authorizing $768.2 billion in military spending, including a 2.7% pay raise for service members, for 2022.

26. China economy slows as virus outbreaks disrupt recovery -

BEIJING (AP) — China reported Wednesday that its economy slowed in November, buffeted by coronavirus outbreaks, weak demand and supply chain disruptions.

Retail sales were weaker than in October and inflationary pressures are complicating efforts to boost growth at a time when tighter limits on borrowing by developers are crimping construction and sales in the all-important property sector.

27. US orders arms embargo on Cambodia, cites Chinese influence -

BANGKOK (AP) — The U.S. has ordered an arms embargo on Cambodia, citing deepening Chinese military influence, corruption and human rights abuses by the government and armed forces in the Southeast Asian country.

28. Chinese central banker says market can handle developer debt -

BEIJING (AP) — Financial markets can cope with the impact of a Chinese real estate developer that is struggling to avoid defaulting on $310 billion in debt, the central bank governor said Thursday, in a new effort to assure the public the economy can be shielded from fallout.

29. Thinking bigger -

Predicting U.S. retail spending and consumer confidence trends right now is a headache-inducing exercise.

Breathless headlines predict nightmarish inventory shortfalls, lack of workers and soaring prices for the 2021 holiday shopping season. They are followed by counterpoint data showing consumers shopping and spending with gusto despite those headwinds.

30. EXPLAINER: Chinese builder's debt struggle rattles investors -

BEIJING (AP) — Global investors are watching nervously as one of China's biggest real estate developers tries to avoid a default on its $310 billion mountain of debt.

Evergrande Group, which is scrambling to turn assets into cash, rattled financial markets Friday when it warned it might run out of money. It said missing a payment on bonds or other debts might trigger an avalanche of demands to pay other debts immediately.

31. Biden: Infrastructure bill will ease economy woes, just wait -

BALTIMORE (AP) — President Joe Biden touted his $1 trillion infrastructure plan Wednesday as an eventual fix for the nation's inflation and supply chain woes — if Americans just have the patience to wait for the construction to begin.

32. What a difference a year makes in new build prices -

When preparing to take the real estate examination, students learn of the term force majeure, a little used procedure in the world of real estate. Force majeure would fall into the “Let the buyer beware” category, though both these terms have more relevance than they have had in the past 40 years.

33. Is it green, or forever toxic? Nuclear rift at climate talks -

SOULAINES-DHUYS, France (AP) — Deep in a French forest of oaks, birches and pines, a steady stream of trucks carries a silent reminder of nuclear energy's often invisible cost: canisters of radioactive waste, heading into storage for the next 300 years.

34. Amid US sanctions, Huawei highlights uses for 5G technology -

BEIJING (AP) — China's Huawei Technologies Co. is providing smart services and 5G technology to industries such as healthcare, creating new revenue streams that might offset the damage to its smartphone business from U.S. sanctions.

35. China and Serbia praise 'steel friendship' amid growing ties -

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Serbian officials praised their "steel friendship" with China during talks on Thursday with China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi amid fears in the West that by heavily investing in the Balkan state, Beijing is trying to exert its political influence in that part of Europe.

36. Washington orders Chinese phone carrier out of US market -

BEIJING (AP) — U.S. regulators are expelling a unit of China Telecom Ltd., one of the country's three major state-owned carriers, from the American market as a national security threat amid rising tension with Beijing.

37. Report: Struggling Chinese developer makes bond payment -

BEIJING (AP) — A troubled Chinese developer whose struggle to avoid a multibillion-dollar debt default has rattled global financial markets wired $83.5 million on Friday to make an overdue payment to foreign bondholders, a government newspaper reported.

38. Tesla hits record profit despite parts shortage, ship delays -

DETROIT (AP) — Record electric vehicle sales last summer amid a shortage of computer chips and other materials propelled Tesla Inc. to the biggest quarterly net earnings in its history.

39. Fears of global shockwaves from Chinese builder's debts ease -

BEIJING (AP) — Fears that a Chinese real estate developer's possible default on multibillion-dollar debts might send shockwaves through global financial markets appeared to ease Thursday as creditors waited to see how much they might recover.

40. Chinese builder in debt jam says it will make bond payment -

BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese real estate developer whose struggle to avoid defaulting on billions of dollars of debt has rattled global markets says it will pay interest due Thursday to bondholders in China but gave no sign of plans to pay on a separate bond abroad.

41. EXPLAINER: Why is Chinese builder's debt struggle rattling investors? -

BEIJING (AP) — Global investors are watching nervously as one of China's biggest real estate developers struggles to avoid defaulting on tens of billions of dollars of debt, fueling fears of possible wider shock waves for the financial system.

42. World Bank cancels business report after investigation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The World Bank is canceling a prominent report on business conditions around the world after investigators found staff members were pressured by the bank's leaders to alter data about China and some other governments.

43. Crushed by pandemic, conventions mount a cautious return -

In pre-COVID times, business events __ from small academic conferences to giant trade shows like CES __ routinely attracted more than 1 billion participants each year. The pandemic brought those global gatherings to a sudden halt, emptying convention centers and shuttering hotels.

44. Magnet milestones move distant nuclear fusion dream closer -

SAINT-PAUL-LES-DURANCE, France (AP) — Teams working on two continents have marked similar milestones in their respective efforts to tap an energy source key to the fight against climate change: They've each produced very impressive magnets.

45. Universal Studios sets opening for first theme park in China -

BEIJING (AP) — Universal Studios announced Monday that its first theme park in China will open in the country's capital in September.

The company set the opening date for Sept. 20, according to a statement and video posted on the Chinese social media site WeChat.

46. Hydrogen-powered vehicles: A realistic path to clean energy? -

CANTON, Ohio (AP) — Each morning at a transit facility in Canton, Ohio, more than a dozen buses pull up to a fueling station before fanning out to their routes in this city south of Cleveland.

The buses — made by El Dorado National and owned by the Stark Area Regional Transit Authority — look like any others. Yet collectively, they reflect the cutting edge of a technology that could play a key role in producing cleaner inter-city transportation. In place of pollution-belching diesel fuel, one-fourth of the agency's buses run on hydrogen. They emit nothing but harmless water vapor.

47. Fewer working-age people may slow economy. Will it lift pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As America's job market rebounds this summer and the need for workers intensifies, employers won't likely have a chance to relax anytime soon. Worker shortages will likely persist for years after the fast-reopening economy shakes off its growing pains.

48. Biden to launch task force on bottlenecks in supply chains -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After completing a review of supply chains, the Biden administration announced Tuesday that it was forming a task force to address the bottlenecks in the semiconductor, construction, transportation and agriculture sectors.

49. Gibson Garage opens June 9 with concert -

Gibson, the iconic, American instrument brand based in Nashville, is debuting the Gibson Garage, which it bills as the “ultimate guitar experience.”

The 8,000-square-foot shop will officially open to the public June 9 at historic Cummins Station, located on 209 10th Avenue South.

50. Oat milk maker Oatly to raise $1.4 billion in public debut -

Oatly, the world's largest oat milk company, will raise $1.4 billion in an initial public offering Thursday on the Nasdaq stock exchange, capitalizing on a global surge in demand for its products.

Oatly priced its shares at $17 apiece ahead of the IPO, giving the company a valuation of nearly $10 billion. It will trade under the ticker symbol "OTLY."

51. Union, automakers headed for fight over battery plant wages -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The United Auto Workers union is calling on General Motors to pay full union wages at electric vehicle battery factories, thrusting what had been a festering conflict into the spotlight.

52. Biden announces huge infrastructure plan to 'win the future' -

PITTSBURGH (AP) — President Joe Biden outlined a huge $2.3 trillion plan Wednesday to reengineer the nation's infrastructure in what he billed as "a once-in-a-generation investment in America" that would undo his predecessor's signature legislative achievement — giant tax cuts for corporations — in the process.

53. Eager to build infrastructure, Biden plans to tax business -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden wants $2 trillion to reengineer America's infrastructure and expects the nation's corporations to pay for it.

The president was traveling to Pittsburgh on Wednesday to unveil what would be a hard-hatted transformation of the U.S. economy as grand in scale as the New Deal or Great Society programs that shaped the 20th century.

54. China-Europe sanctions fight shatters image of amicable ties -

BEIJING (AP) — China looked to Europe as an amicable partner as the continent's leaders resisted being drawn into President Donald Trump's conflicts with Beijing over trade, technology and human rights.

55. US-China tensions threaten global climate change efforts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's hopes for curbing climate change hinge on action by two giant nations whose relations are deteriorating: China and the United States. The two countries both say they are intent on retooling their economies to burn less climate-wrecking coal, oil and gas. But tensions between them threaten their ultimate success.

56. Senate confirms Raimondo as Biden commerce secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to confirm Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo to serve as President Joe Biden's commerce secretary and help guide the economy's recovery during and after the coronavirus pandemic.

57. More policy, less pomp as Biden and Trudeau meet virtually -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's first bilateral meeting with Canada's Justin Trudeau since taking office was high on policy, low on pomp and featured a very large swipe at Biden's predecessor as the coronavirus forced the two leaders to convene virtually Tuesday rather than gathering with customary Oval Office fanfare.

58. Vigorous preparation returns as Biden calls other leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new-old ritual is taking shape in the Biden White House, one that starts with bulky briefing packages, war-gaming the "what-ifs," and Oval Office discussions about how to talk to this or that particular U.S. ally or adversary.

59. Longtime Reagan Secretary of State George Shultz dies at 100 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, a titan of American academia, business and diplomacy who spent most of the 1980s trying to improve Cold War relations with the Soviet Union and forging a course for peace in the Middle East, has died. He was 100.

60. Biden's Commerce pick, Raimondo, voices tough line on China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to oversee the Commerce Department took a tough line on China in her confirmation hearing Tuesday, though she stopped short of singling out which Chinese companies should remain on a list that limits their access to advanced U.S. technology.

61. Trump remains defiant amid calls to resign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump enters the last days of his presidency isolated and shunned by former allies and members of his own party as he faces a second impeachment and growing calls for his resignation after his supporters launched an assault on the nation's Capitol in an effort to disrupt the peaceful transfer of power.

62. Trump lashes out at GOP after override vote on defense bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump lashed out at congressional Republicans on Tuesday after the House easily voted to override his veto of a defense policy bill.

A total of 109 Republicans, including Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, a member of GOP leadership, joined with Democrats on Monday to approve the override, which would be the first of Trump's presidency. The Senate is expected to consider the measure later this week.

63. Trump vetoes defense bill, setting up possible override vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday vetoed the annual defense policy bill, following through on threats to veto a measure that has broad bipartisan support in Congress and potentially setting up the first override vote of his presidency.

64. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

65. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

66. Senate sends Trump defense bill he has vowed to veto -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Friday approved a wide-ranging defense policy bill, sending it to President Donald Trump, despite his threat to veto the bill because it does not clamp down on big tech companies he claims were biased during the election.

67. After delay, Senate moves toward approval of defense bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Friday moved toward a vote on a wide-ranging defense policy bill that President Donald Trump has threatened to veto because it doesn't clamp down on big tech companies he claims were biased during the election.

68. In break with Trump, McConnell urges passage of defense bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a rare break with President Donald Trump, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is urging passage of a wide-ranging defense policy bill that Trump has threatened to veto.

McConnell, R-Ky., said Thursday that it was important for Congress to continue a nearly 60-year streak of passing the National Defense Authorization Act, which affirms 3% pay raises for U.S. troops and authorizes billions in military programs and construction.

69. S&P DJ removing Chinese companies from index after US order -

BEIJING (AP) — S&P DJ Indices is removing 21 Chinese companies from its indexes, or groups of stocks and bonds used to track financial market movements, after Americans were barred from investing in them as part of a feud with Beijing over technology and security.

70. US adds Chinese chipmaker, oil giant to security blacklist -

BEIJING (AP) — The U.S. government has stepped up a feud with Beijing over security by adding China's biggest maker of processor chips and a state-owned oil giant to a blacklist that limits access to American technology and investment.

71. US to block goods from Chinese company over rights abuses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. said Wednesday it would block imports from a major Chinese producer of cotton goods because of its reliance on workers detained as part of a crackdown on ethnic minorities in China's northwest.

72. US to block goods from Chinese company over rights abuses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. said Wednesday it would block imports from a major Chinese producer of cotton goods because of its reliance on workers detained as part of a crackdown on ethnic minorities in China's northwest.

73. China aims to make 1 billion COVID-19 vaccine doses a year -

BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese health official said Friday that the country's annual production capacity for coronavirus vaccines will top 1 billion doses next year, following an aggressive government support program for construction of new factories.

74. Wall Street posts solid gains after surge in corporate deals -

Wall Street kicked off the week with a broad rally Monday, clawing back much of the stock market's losses from last week.

The S&P 500 rose 1.3%, led by gains in technology, health care and financial stocks. Small company stocks were among the biggest gainers. The rally reversed a big slice of the index's 2.5% slide last week, when the S&P 500 posted its biggest weekly decline since June. Treasury yields were mostly higher.

75. Wiseman Ashworth names Marsicano, Bills members -

Michele T. Marsicano and Anthony C. Bills have been named members at Wiseman Ashworth Law Group.

Marsicano heads the firm’s Health Care Operations and Behavioral Health Practice Group, working collaboratively with health care providers and institutions, families, agencies and the courts. She also regularly advocates for physicians and health care institutions before the Health Related Boards, as well as in court.

76. Biden seizes on Bolton book to hit Trump's record on China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — John Bolton's claim in an explosive new book that President Donald Trump urged China's Xi Jinping to help him win reelection could undermine his campaign's effort to portray Democratic rival Joe Biden as soft on Beijing.

77. Wall Street dips as global rally eases off the accelerator -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks mostly fell in another day of wobbly trading on Wall Street Wednesday, as markets eased off the accelerator following their big rally.

The S&P 500 dipped 0.4% to break a three-day winning streak, after bouncing between small gains and losses for much of the day. Stocks in Asia and Europe made modest gains, while Treasury yields edged lower.

78. Apple pinched by pandemic; profit, iPhone sales decline -

BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — Apple's profit dipped slightly while revenues rose in the January-March quarter, reflecting early fallout from a coronavirus pandemic that shut down its factories and then forced hundreds of Apple retail stores to close.

79. Nations, US states each chart their own path on reopening -

LONDON (AP) — Nations and U.S. states have begun easing coronavirus lockdowns, each pursuing their own approach but all with a common goal: restarting their economies without triggering another surge of infections.

80. Skeletal flights for airlines; economic signals flash red -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

81. Emerging economic data reveals devastation; job losses grow -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

82. States confront practical dilemmas on reopening economies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Setting the stage for a possible power struggle with President Donald Trump, governors around the U.S. began sketching out plans Tuesday to reopen their economies in a slow and methodical process so as to prevent the coronavirus from rebounding with tragic consequences.

83. States confront practical dilemmas on reopening economies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Setting the stage for a possible power struggle with President Donald Trump, governors around the U.S. began collaborating on plans Tuesday to reopen their economies in what is likely to be a drawn-out, step-by-step process to prevent the coronavirus from rebounding with disastrous results.

84. Little virus that can topple skyscrapers -

Imagine building a big, brand-new house without hardwood floors for the dining room and den. Or no carpet for the bedrooms. Without ceramic tile in the kitchen or foyer.

That’s one small example of how the global COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the Tennessee construction industry’s supply chain from China and other parts of the world. Every aspect of building a home or office is disrupted – from materials to workforce to selling that real estate.

85. Hunt for medical gear to fight virus becomes all-consuming -

PARIS (AP) — The hunt for masks, ventilators and other medical supplies consumed the U.S. and Europe on Monday, as new coronavirus infections soared and political paralysis stalled efforts for a quick aid package from Congress.

86. Analysis: Trump's virus playbook offers US vs world strategy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a "foreign" virus, he says — one that can be fought by closing the nation's borders to dangerous foreigners carrying scary disease.

President Donald Trump has turned to a familiar playbook as he tries to grapple with the spiraling coronavirus outbreak, blaming immigrants for the country's problems and casting the global health pandemic as another case of the U.S. against the world.

87. SEC decides remainder of tournament will not be played -

How does Nashville find the sweet spot between hoops and health? That was the dilemma this week as the clock ticked down for the start of the SEC Men’s Basketball Championship amid a steady stream of news on the spread of COVID-19.

88. SEC tourney still on as COVID-19 disrupts Nashville tourism -

How does Nashville find the sweet spot between hoops and health? That was the dilemma this week as the clock ticked down for the start of the SEC Men’s Basketball Championship amid a steady stream of news on the spread of COVID-19.

89. US job market looked robust before virus outbreak escalated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring in the United States jumped in February as employers added 273,000 positions, evidence that the job market was in strong shape before the coronavirus began to sweep through the nation.

90. To gauge economic damage from virus, watch for US jobs data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Companies and consumers have scrapped travel plans, and factories have endured broken supply chains from the coronavirus outbreak. If employers were to respond by slashing jobs, it would significantly escalate the economic damage.

91. US stocks brush off latest loss, return to record heights -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks shook off their latest virus-induced loss and returned to record heights Wednesday, with several familiar faces doing the heaviest lifting.

Technology stocks helped lead the market higher, as they've been doing for years, and Apple rallied to recover most of its loss from the prior day. It dropped Tuesday after warning that revenue this quarter would fall short of forecasts due to the viral outbreak centered in China.

92. Hiring surges in January as Americans flood into job market -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring jumped last month as U.S. employers added a robust 225,000 jobs, bolstering an economy that faces threats from China's viral outbreak, an ongoing trade war and struggles at Boeing.

93. January US jobs report might provide clarity amid disruptions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With China's viral outbreak disrupting trade and Boeing's troubles weighing on American factories, the January U.S. jobs report on Friday may provide timely evidence of the U.S. economy's enduring health.

94. Playle joins Waller’s health care real estate practice -

Angela M. Playle has joined Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP after serving as senior vice president and deputy general counsel at HCP, Inc., a real estate investment trust now known as Healthpeak Properties.

95. Survey: US companies added 291,000 jobs in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. companies added 291,000 jobs in January, a big increase from December, but much of that strength likely reflected unusually warm weather during the month.

Payroll processor ADP said Wednesday that the January job gain, which was larger than had been expected, compared to a revised December figure of 193,000.

96. Trump's economy: Solid and steady but vulnerable to threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A portrait of a robust U.S. economy is sure to take center stage Tuesday night when President Donald Trump gives his third State of the Union address. It is an economy that has proved solid and durable, yet hasn't fulfilled many of Trump's promises.

97. Belmont to merge with Watkins College of Art -

Belmont University and Watkins College of Art have announced their intent to merge, with Watkins College of Art beginning a transition to Belmont’s campus following the completion of this academic year.

98. Tech, communications stocks push US indexes to more records -

Wall Street capped a milestone-setting week Friday with a few more as modest gains nudged the major stock indexes to all-time highs.

The benchmark S&P 500 index also notched its second-straight weekly gain.

99. Starbucks expands presence in low-income communities -

DETROIT (AP) — Starbucks is expanding a program that tries to help low-income communities by opening coffee shops and hiring local workers.

The Seattle-based company plans to open or remodel 85 stores by 2025 in rural and urban communities across the U.S. That will bring to 100 the total number of community stores Starbucks has opened since it announced the program in 2015. Each store will hire local staff — including construction crews and artists — and will have dedicated community event spaces.

100. European Central Bank sees a few upbeat signs in eurozone -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Top officials at the European Central Bank say economic growth remains weak though they see a few upbeat signs after the U.S. and China moved toward lowering trade tensions.