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Editorial Results (free)

1. Former Juul exec alleges company shipped tainted products -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Juul Labs executive who was fired earlier this year is alleging that the vaping company knowingly shipped 1 million tainted nicotine pods to customers.

The allegation comes in a lawsuit filed Tuesday by lawyers representing Siddharth Breja, a one-time finance executive at the e-cigarette maker. The suit claims that Breja was terminated after opposing company practices, including shipping the contaminated flavored pods and not listing expiration dates on Juul products.

2. Thailand to seek talks with US on trade privileges loss -

NONTHABURI, Thailand (AP) — Thailand plans to seek talks with the United States on a decision to end preferential trade privileges on a range of Thai exports including seafood, officials said Monday.

3. Consumer watchdog agency probes Juul and 5 more vaping firms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal consumer watchdogs have ordered Juul and five other vaping companies to hand over information about how they market e-cigarettes, the government’s latest move targeting the industry.

4. Legendary drummer Jimmy Otey dies -

 James “Jimmy” Otey Jr., 73, of Nashville, best-known as a drummer for the likes of Little Richard and Ray Charles, died Thursday.

Mr. Otey, a multi-instrumentalist and showman, was a product of the old Jefferson Street rhythm & blues scene and went on to perform around the world.

5. Altered states from the comfort of home far away -

Nothing quite prepares you for the first time you try a really fresh and potent Sichuan peppercorn, because there’s nothing else in the world quite like it.

To call it electrifying is not just the hyperbole of food porn propaganda. It’s actually grounded in recent scientific studies that attempt to explain the biochemical mechanism of sanshool, the active ingredient in Sichaun peppercorns.

6. Market brings sweet and sour to neighborhood -

We’d already bought some two-toned hybrid squash, green beans and tomatoes, and just needed some corn to fill out the evening meal.

“Sweet corn?” asked Paul Lassiter, of Lost Weekend Farms.

7. How much pot in that brownie? Chocolate can throw off tests -

How much marijuana is really in that pot brownie? Chocolate can throw off potency tests so labels aren't always accurate, and now scientists are trying to figure out why.

In states where marijuana is legal, pot comes in cookies, mints, gummies, protein bars — even pretzels. These commercial products are labeled with the amount of high-inducing THC. That helps medical marijuana patients get the desired dose and other consumers attune their buzz.

8. Women in Litigation taps Hollabaugh for Top 250 -

Lela M. Hollabaugh of Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP in Nashville has been selected for the Top 250 Women In Litigation 2019.

She is among the more than 225 litigators – comprising nearly half of the firm – who make up Bradley’s Litigation Practice Group.

9. US manufacturing growth slows in June for 3rd consecutive month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory activity grew at a slower pace in June for the third straight month as measures of new orders and inventories fell.

The Institute for Supply Management, an association of purchasing managers, said Monday that its manufacturing index slipped to 51.7 last month from 52.1 in May. Any reading above 50 signals an expansion.

10. Senior EPA official steps down amid House ethics probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A top Environment Protection Agency official who helped lead the Trump administration's rollback of Obama-era restrictions of carbon emissions is resigning amid a congressional probe into whether he improperly aided former industry clients.

11. GM seeks to avoid Takata recalls for fourth consecutive year -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors is trying to avoid recalling potentially deadly Takata air bag inflators in thousands of full-size pickup trucks and SUVs for the fourth straight year, leaving owners to wonder if vehicles are safe to drive.

12. Bayer to invest $5.6 billion in new weed killing methods -

BERLIN (AP) — German chemical and pharmaceutical company Bayer says it plans to invest some 5 billion euros ($5.6 billion) over the next decade in developing "additional methods to combat weeds."

Friday's announcement came as Bayer is engaged in legal battles in the U.S. in which plaintiffs claim that subsidiary Monsanto's Roundup weed killer caused cancer. Rulings in three cases have gone against it.

13. Survey: US manufacturing growth slowed in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. manufacturers grew at a slower pace in May, as production levels fell slightly.

The Institute for Supply Management, an association of purchasing managers, says that its manufacturing index slipped to 52.1 last month, down from 52.8 in April.

14. Is it 'molecules of freedom' or just natural gas? -

It's hard to generate interest in a news release about liquefied natural gas exports, but a high-ranking Trump administration official succeeded by calling the stuff "molecules of U.S. freedom."

Words matter after all.

15. US stocks close lower, on track for 1st monthly loss of 2019 -

Another round of selling gripped Wall Street on Wednesday as nervous investors fled health care, technology and other high-risk stocks in favor of the safety of bonds.

The broad sell-off, which lost some momentum in the last hour of trading, keeps the market on track for its fourth consecutive weekly loss and its first monthly drop this year.

16. Engineer, 96, recalls in early Oak Ridge, ‘beautiful women’ -

Some “Secret City” memories stand out more than others for Monroe Malow. The 96-year-old retired chemical engineer, who now resides in a senior assisted-living home just outside of Nashville, was brought to Oak Ridge from New York in the early 1940s to work on the top-secret Manhattan Project.

17. Research on children's health risks in doubt over EPA funds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Long-running research projects credited with pivotal discoveries about the harm that pesticides, air pollution and other hazards pose to children are in jeopardy or shutting down because the Environmental Protection Agency will not commit to their continued funding, researchers say.

18. Saudis blame Iran for drone attack amid calls for US strikes -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Saudi Arabia accused Tehran of being behind a drone strike that shut down a key oil pipeline in the kingdom, and a newspaper close to the palace called for Washington to launch "surgical" strikes on Iran, raising the specter of escalating tensions as the U.S. boosts its military presence in the Persian Gulf.

19. Jury: Monsanto to pay $2 billion in weed killer cancer case -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A jury on Monday ordered agribusiness giant Monsanto Co. to pay a combined $2.055 billion to a couple claiming that the company's popular weed killer Roundup Ready caused their cancers.

20. Newell joins Fifth Third as wealth management adviser -

Paul M. Newell II has joined the private banking team at Fifth Third Bank as a vice president and wealth management adviser.

Newell brings five years of experience in financial services and wealth planning with day-to-day plan implementation; estate planning and business planning. His experience spans a variety of financial services roles from client adviser to branch manager and personal banker.

21. Earth, meet Polo: Ralph Lauren unveils plastic bottle shirt -

NEW YORK (AP) — Earth, meet Polo. Polo Ralph Lauren on Thursday launched a version of its iconic polo shirt made entirely of recycled plastic bottles and dyed through a process that uses zero water.

22. Earth, meet Polo: Ralph Lauren unveils plastic bottle shirt -

NEW YORK (AP) — Earth, meet Polo. Polo Ralph Lauren on Thursday launched a version of its iconic polo shirt made entirely of recycled plastic bottles and dyed through a process that uses zero water.

23. Next 440 makeover will kick asphalt -

What’s old is new again as the state is busily grinding I-440’s grooved concrete into rubble, which will then form the base of the roadway’s new asphalt surface.

Yes, asphalt. As in old technology.

24. Fuel pipeline near BNA damaged during drilling -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A spokeswoman for the Tennessee Department of Transportation says a fuel pipeline near the Nashville International Airport has been damaged by TDOT workers conducting "exploratory drilling."

25. Eastman cutting jobs in state, blaming US-China trade dispute -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Eastman Chemical Co. says it is cutting an undisclosed number of jobs globally, citing "the ongoing U.S.-China trade dispute" and an economic slowdown in Europe.

26. Honda to recall around 1M vehicles with dangerous air bags -

DETROIT (AP) — A type of Takata air bag inflator once thought to be safe has now come under scrutiny after a crash and explosion in Maryland injured the driver of a Honda minivan.

The incident forced Honda on Tuesday to recall about 1.2 million vehicles in North and Central America from the 2001 to 2016 model years that were not included in the massive string of Takata recalls for air bags that can hurl shrapnel into the passenger compartment.

27. Higher education: Colleges add cannabis to the curriculum -

Grace DeNoya is used to getting snickers when people learn she's majoring in marijuana.

"My friends make good-natured jokes about getting a degree in weed," said DeNoya, one of the first students in a new four-year degree program in medicinal plant chemistry at Northern Michigan University. "I say, 'No, it's a serious degree, a chemistry degree first and foremost. It's hard work. Organic chemistry is a bear.'"

28. High-stakes trial over Roundup cancer claim to begin -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A jury in federal court in San Francisco will decide whether Roundup weed killer caused a California man's cancer in a trial starting Monday that plaintiffs' attorneys say could help determine the fate of hundreds of similar lawsuits.

29. Driver hurt by air bag shrapnel as investigation drags on -

DETROIT (AP) — Nearly four years ago, the U.S. government's highway safety agency began investigating air bag inflators made by ARC Automotive of Tennessee when two people were hit by flying shrapnel after crashes.

30. EPA outlines plan for dealing with toxic chemicals in water -

Under strong pressure from Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday that it will move ahead this year with a process that could lead to setting a safety threshold for a group of highly toxic chemicals in drinking water.

31. EPA decision soon on chemical compounds tied to health risks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chemical compounds are all around you. They're on many fabrics, rugs and carpets, cooking pots and pans, outdoor gear, shampoo, shaving cream, makeup and even dental floss. Increasing numbers of states have found them seeping into water supplies.

32. The secret life of Nashville drumming legend Jimmy Otey -

Before he was a successful chemical engineer and beloved MTA bus driver, Jimmy Otey was playing the drums for Little Richard in the legendary Cavern in Liverpool, England, when he noticed some “nice guys,” a former house band in the club, looking on.

33. Waller elects 5 partners in 3 practice areas -

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP has elected five partners from the firm’s Healthcare Compliance and Operations, Finance and Restructuring Corporate, and Litigation & Dispute Resolution practices.

34. Trump plan to reclassify nuke waste alarms environmentalists -

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The Trump administration wants to reclassify some radioactive waste left from the production of nuclear weapons to lower its threat level and make disposal cheaper and easier.

35. Free flu shot events planned statewide -

Tennessee’s county health departments are holding special “FightFluTN” events Dec. 5 to provide flu shots at no charge to increase the number of people vaccinated in Tennessee.

The Tennessee Department of Health urges all Tennesseans who have not yet received a flu shot this flu season to get one as soon as possible, as seasonal influenza is spreading across the state.

36. Young Leaders Council honors Snitker, Day -

Ron Snitker, executive director of business development at Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP, has been named the 2018 Young Leader of the Year, and Jaynee Day, president & CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee, received the 2018 Hero of the Year Award from Young Leaders Council, a Nashville-based nonprofit organization that has trained more than 2,500 men and women to effectively participate on the boards of nonprofit agencies since 1985.

37. Stocks skid as oil plunge continues; tech sector also falls -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are falling Friday as technology and internet companies take steep losses.

Energy companies are also lower as crude oil heads for its 10th drop in a row. The price of oil has been falling steadily since early October and is now trading at its lowest price since March, causing steep losses for energy companies in recent weeks.

38. Carlene Carter finally home, ready for a pony -

Carlene Carter doesn’t resemble the scarred survivor who occupies part of her soul as she sits on the sun-drenched porch overlooking a rented corner of East Nashville and welcomes her fourth husband, Joe Breen – a Julliard-trained classical singer, filmmaker, Broadway veteran and soap opera actor – as he returns from a neighborhood stroll with their two rescue mutts.

39. Water out of thin air: California couple's device wins $1.5M -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — It started out modestly enough: David Hertz, having learned that under the right conditions you really can make your own water out of thin air, put a little contraption on the roof of his office and began cranking out free bottles of H2O for anyone who wanted one.

40. Experts: Bomber likely left behind a mass of forensic clues -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Investigators examining the explosive devices sent to high-profile targets in Washington and New York will be working to glean forensic clues to help identify who sent them, gathering fingerprints and DNA evidence while tracking the origin of the packages and the components used to make the bombs.

41. Austrian kangaroo skin? The customer is always right, right? -

The tall, lean young man stands at the intersection of Lower Broadway and Fifth, waiting in the massive Saturday afternoon crowd for his chance to cross from the Tootsie’s side of the street over to the side highlighted by Ernest Tubb Record Shop.

42. Lawyer: Tennessee rejects inmate's request for electrocution -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The state of Tennessee has denied the request by Tennessee inmate Edmund Zagorski to die in the electric chair, his attorney says, and plans to proceed with plans to execute him Thursday by lethal injection.

43. Tennessee inmate asks for electrocution after court ruling -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee inmate set to be executed this week is asking the state to die by electric chair over lethal injection, calling the move the "lesser of two evils."

Attorney Kelley Henry confirmed Monday that Edmund Zagorski made the request roughly two hours before the Tennessee Supreme Court ruled the state's three-drug lethal injection protocol is constitutional. The decision paved the way for the execution of Zagorski on Thursday.

44. Proposed rule change worries some about radiation regulation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The EPA is pursuing rule changes that experts say would weaken the way radiation exposure is regulated, turning to scientific outliers who argue that a bit of radiation damage is actually good for you — like a little bit of sunlight.

45. Global stocks dip on report China calls off US trade talks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Global stocks took small losses Monday after China reportedly pulled out of trade talks with the U.S. Industrial companies and banks suffered some of the worst declines among American stocks.

46. Four leaders look to future of state’s job growth -

The Ledger asked four career development leaders in Tennessee for their advice about how to approach the job market. We also asked them about promising careers and what issues are important to tackle as the state adds jobs, new industries and more education and training.

47. Tennessee’s hottest jobs -

Since bouncing back from the Great Recession, Tennessee’s economy has been in the midst of a prolonged expansion. The recovery, now in its eighth year, could soon become the longest since the end of World War II.

48. Trump, others dispute book's description of unhinged leader -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An incendiary tell-all book by a reporter who helped bring down President Richard Nixon set off a firestorm in the White House, with its descriptions of current and former aides calling President Donald Trump an "idiot" and a "liar," disparaging his judgment and claiming they plucked papers off his desk to prevent him from withdrawing from a pair of trade agreements.

49. Stocks rise as US, Mexico announce preliminary trade deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks posted solid gains on Monday after the White House said it reached a preliminary agreement with Mexico on replacing NAFTA. The Nasdaq composite index topped 8,000 for the first time.

50. Big oil asks government to protect it from climate change -

PORT ARTHUR, Texas (AP) — As the nation plans new defenses against the more powerful storms and higher tides expected from climate change, one project stands out: an ambitious proposal to build a nearly 60-mile "spine" of concrete seawalls, earthen barriers, floating gates and steel levees on the Texas Gulf Coast.

51. Court orders ban on harmful pesticide, says EPA violated law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration endangered public health by keeping the widely used pesticide chlorpyrifos on the market despite extensive scientific evidence that even tiny levels of exposure can harm babies' brains.

52. New Russia sanctions over poisoning of former spy, daughter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — New sanctions against Russia will be imposed later this month for illegally using a chemical weapon in an attempted assassination of a former spy and his daughter in Britain earlier this year, the United States said.

53. New Russia sanctions over poisoning of former spy, daughter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — New sanctions against Russia will be imposed later this month for illegally using a chemical weapon in an attempted assassination of a former spy and his daughter in Britain earlier this year, the United States said.

54. US-China trade worries send global stocks lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — World stocks indexes are falling Thursday after the Trump administration said it will consider an even higher tax rate of 25 percent on $200 billion in imports from China, raising the stakes in the trade war between the two largest economies. In the U.S. most groups of stocks are lower, with energy and basic materials companies taking some of the worst losses.

55. Unpopular bill? Just rebrand it with TRUMP attached -

Using what could be the political acronym of the year, two Republican state lawmakers with expertise in pain treatment are playing on the popularity of President Donald Trump to pass medical pot legislation.

56. Sides trade blame in Tennessee lethal injection drugs trial -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Attorneys for the state and lawyers representing 33 death row inmates traded blame in court Monday at the outset of a trial over Tennessee's new lethal injection procedure.

Federal public defender Kelley Henry said the three-drug combination that the state plans to use can feel like chemical waterboarding, liquid fire, being buried alive or exposure to sarin gas.

57. Chinese exporters scramble to cope with US tariffs -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese exporters were scrambling Monday to cope with a plunge in U.S. sales while China's state press shrugged off the impact of Washington's tariff hikes in a spiraling technology dispute.

58. Medical milestone: US OKs marijuana-based drug for seizures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Monday approved the first prescription drug made from marijuana, a milestone that could spur more research into a drug that remains illegal under federal law, despite growing legalization for recreational and medical use.

59. You don’t miss your water until your well runs dry -

As people and businesses pour into Tennessee, state leaders are working on a plan to keep its taps flowing.

The water management plan, TNH2O, is a legacy project for Governor Bill Haslam, who assembled a high-level group in January to ensure the state’s water supply can flow in abundance and to the right places as population growth, development and new business transform the face of Tennessee over coming decades.

60. Trump plays down need for preparation for Kim summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Heading into his North Korea summit with characteristic bravado, President Donald Trump says that "attitude" is more important than preparation as he looks to negotiate an accord with Kim Jong Un to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.

61. Conservative icon David Koch leaving business, politics -

NEW YORK (AP) — Billionaire conservative icon David Koch is stepping down from the Koch brothers' network of business and political activities.

The 78-year-old New York resident is suffering from deteriorating health, according to a letter that older brother Charles Koch sent to company officials Tuesday morning.

62. Ex-chemical industry lawyer to lead Superfund task force -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A lawyer tapped to lead a task force at the Environmental Protection Agency overseeing cleanups at the nation's most polluted places worked until recently for a top chemical and plastics manufacturer with a troubled legacy of creating some of those toxic sites.

63. State election systems still waiting for security checkups -

With the midterm congressional primaries about to go into full swing, the Department of Homeland Security is playing catch-up in helping to ensure that state election systems are secure against cybertampering by the Russians or others bent on mischief.

64. Report: Millions of tweets spread anti-Semitic messages -

Millions of anti-Semitic messages on Twitter have spread negative stereotypes and conspiracy theories about Jews across the social media platform, according to a report Monday by the Anti-Defamation League.

65. Sell-off in industrial, tech stocks sends Dow down 400 -

NEW YORK (AP) — After a strong start, U.S. stocks abruptly sold off Tuesday after machinery maker Caterpillar said it doesn't expect to top its first-quarter profit for the rest of the year. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged as much as 619 points as investors feared that rising oil prices and other costs will slow down growth in company profits.

66. AP-NORC Poll: Americans expect Russia tension will get worse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans largely fear the country's relationship with Russia and China will get worse in the coming year, and despite signs of diplomatic progress with Kim Jong Un on nuclear weapons, nearly half say the same about North Korea.

67. US experts back marijuana-based drug for childhood seizures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A panel of government health advisers is recommending approval of a medicine made from the marijuana plant to treat childhood epilepsy, moving the medication closer to the U.S. market.

68. Procter & Gamble pays $4.2 bln for unit of Germany's Merck -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — German pharmaceutical and chemical company Merck says it has agreed to sell its global consumer health business to Procter & Gamble for 3.4 billion euros ($4.2 billion) in cash.

69. US stocks add to gains as company earnings reports impress -

Technology companies led U.S. stocks solidly higher Tuesday, giving the market its second straight gain.

Consumer-services companies, retailers and health care stocks accounted for a big slice of the broad rally. Banks declined, and oil prices recovered from an early slide.

70. US to hit Russia with new sanctions for aiding Syria's Assad -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley has indicated new economic sanctions will be announced Monday against Russia for enabling the government of Syrian leader Bashar Assad to continue using chemical weapons.

71. Tech, health care stocks are big gainers as US indexes rally -

Investors shrugged off geopolitical jitters Monday, sending U.S. stocks broadly higher and extending the market's gains from last week.

Technology companies, health care stocks and industrial firms accounted for much of the rally as traders focused on the latest company earnings and deal news. Oil prices fell after surging last week ahead of the U.S.-led missile attack on Syria's chemical weapons program.

72. Trump plans to talk to allies before Syria strike decision -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has put off a final decision on possible military strikes against Syria after tweeting earlier that they could happen "very soon or not so soon at all." The White House said he would consult further with allies.

73. Trump: Syria attack 'very soon or not so soon at all!' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Thursday that an attack on Syria could take place "very soon or not so soon at all," arguing he had never signaled the timing of retaliation for a suspected chemical weapons attack that he had suggested was imminent a day earlier.

74. Trump: Syria attack 'very soon or not so soon at all!' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Thursday that an attack on Syria could take place "very soon or not so soon at all," arguing he had never signaled the timing of retaliation for a suspected chemical weapons attack that he had suggested was imminent a day earlier.

75. Trump seethes over FBI raid, ponders firing those he blames -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was so incensed by the FBI's raid of his personal attorney's office and hotel room that he's privately pondered firing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and publicly mused about ousting special counsel Robert Mueller.

76. As Russia warns against US strike, Trump threatens missiles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rebuffing Russian warnings against U.S. military strikes in Syria, President Donald Trump said Wednesday that missiles "will be coming" in response to Syria's suspected chemical attack that killed at least 40 people.

77. Banks and technology stocks fall; oil rises to 3-year high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies including banks and technology and health care firms fell Wednesday after U.S. stocks had surged the day before. Oil prices hit a three-year high after President Donald trump tweeted that the U.S. will launch missiles at targets in Syria.

78. Trump threatens Syria strike, cancels summit travel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After threatening a military strike against Syria, President Donald Trump on Tuesday cancelled plans to travel to South America later this week, choosing to stay in the United States to manage the response to an apparent chemical weapons attack.

79. Trump confers with military on suspected gas attack in Syria -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump plans to confer with senior military leaders Monday, after he threatened a "big price to pay" for a suspected poison gas attack in Syria that killed women and children.

80. Legal Aid Society names Waller executive director -

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands has named attorney DarKenya W. Waller as its new executive director. Waller, who previously served as managing attorney of the firm’s Nashville office, replaces Gary Housepian, who served as executive director for the last decade.

81. California judge rules that coffee requires cancer warning -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Coffee sellers in California should have to post warnings because the brew may contain an ingredient that's been linked to cancer, a judge has ruled.

The culprit is a chemical produced in the bean roasting process that is a known carcinogen and has been at the heart of an eight-year legal struggle between a tiny nonprofit group and Big Coffee.

82. 180 Health Partners plans to go nationwide -

Nashville-based 180 Health Partners has raised an $8 million Series B financing round led by Spring Mountain Capital for the purpose of a national expansion. The company provides immediate and realistic accessibility to medical and behavioral health care to pregnant mothers caught up in the nation’s opioid crisis.

83. Butler Snow adds health care specialist -

Butler Snow has hired Tara L. Blake for the firm’s Nashville office, and more specifically the firm’s pharmaceutical, medical device and health care litigation group.

Blake focuses her practice on insurance and financial services litigation, specifically defending insurers and financial service providers against complex, bad-faith, class actions and punitive damages claims.

84. US sets new record for censoring, withholding gov't files -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government censored, withheld or said it couldn't find records sought by citizens, journalists and others more often last year than at any point in the past decade, according to an Associated Press analysis of new data.

85. What swamp? Lobbyists get ethics waivers to work for Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his appointees have stocked federal agencies with ex-lobbyists and corporate lawyers who now help regulate the very industries from which they previously collected paychecks, despite promising as a candidate to drain the swamp in Washington.

86. What swamp? Lobbyists get ethics waivers to work for Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his appointees have stocked federal agencies with ex-lobbyists and corporate lawyers who now help regulate the very industries from which they previously collected paychecks, despite promising as a candidate to drain the swamp in Washington.

87. Castañeda appointed to oversight commission -

Tennessee Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally recently appointed Stites & Harbison, PLLC attorney Rebecca McKelvey Castañeda to the Tennessee Post-Conviction Defender Oversight Commission. She will serve a one-year term.

88. Trump EPA moves to roll back more rules on fuels pollution -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said Thursday it is rewriting Obama-era rules governing pollution from oil and gas operations and coal ash dumps, moves that opponents say will significantly weaken protections for human health and the environment.

89. AP Exclusive: Transport safety rules sidelined under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On a clear, dry June evening in 2015, cars and trucks rolled slowly in a herky-jerky backup ahead of an Interstate 75 construction zone in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Barreling toward them: an 18-ton tractor-trailer going about 80 mph.

90. Ross Bryan Associates board adds 2, promotes 2 -

Michael Paris and Brent Thornton have joined the board of directors of Ross Bryan Associates as vice presidents. Current board members Steven Qualls and Kurt Boyd have been named associate principals.

91. 14 automakers list more models in Takata recall -

DETROIT (AP) — U.S. safety regulators have released models from 14 different automakers that are being recalled to replace potentially deadly Takata air bag inflators.

Documents posted Thursday by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration include many made by Ford, Nissan, Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari, Daimler Vans, Toyota, Tesla, BMW, Fiat Chrysler, Mazda, Subaru, Jaguar-Land Rover, McLaren and Volkswagen. Toyota , Ford and Honda released some of their models last week.

92. VU, UT researchers offer hope for Alzheimer’s grip -

Few diseases are feared more than Alzheimer’s, a progressive brain disorder that steals memories, leaves no survivors and has no cure or real treatment.

But some of Tennessee’s top minds are working urgently on a way to treat the minds of the 5.2 million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer’s – including 110,000 in this state.

93. Patterson names Levy managing shareholder -

Ryan Levy has been named managing shareholder at Patterson Intellectual Property Law. He also serves as the co-chair of the firm’s Litigation Practice Group.

Levy focuses on intellectual property litigation with an emphasis on patent litigation. He has represented international and domestic companies as both plaintiff and defendant in matters involving chemical formulations and related properties; large-scale industrial equipment; processes for roadway design; automotive equipment; and various software ranging from web-based protocols to automated detection systems.

94. Attack of the killer house: You won’t see it coming -

Your house may be trying to kill you. In order to understand how, it is time to revert to high school chemistry class or wherever the periodic table may have been first introduced to you.

While radon is often mentioned when discussing home inspections, many fail to recognize the gas for what it is. Radon is a bona fide chemical element with its own symbol and everything.

95. In a milestone year, gene therapy finds a place in medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

96. In a milestone year, gene therapy finds a place in medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

97. AP finds climate change risk for 327 toxic Superfund sites -

TARPON SPRINGS, Fla. (AP) — Anthony Stansbury propped his rusty bike against a live oak tree and cast his fishing line into the rushing waters of Florida's Anclote River.

When he bought a house down the street last year, Stansbury says he wasn't told that his slice of paradise had a hidden problem. The neighborhood is adjacent to the Stauffer Chemical Co. Superfund site, a former chemical manufacturing plant that is on the list of the nation's most polluted places. That 130-acre lot on the river's edge is also located in a flood zone.

98. WGU students say mentors are their key to success -

Every morning, Western Governors University course mentor Linda Knieps checks her roster of students to learn what they’ve been accomplishing. One may have aced an exam; another, not so much.

99. US industrial output climbed a healthy 0.9 pct. in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. industrial production jumped a solid 0.9 percent in October as factory activity recovered from the impact of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

The Federal Reserve said Thursday that manufacturing activity surged 1.3 percent last month. Many of the gains came from a sharp increase in the production of chemical and petroleum and coal products. Motor vehicles and metals also posted decent gains.

100. GOP senators advance Trump EPA nominees over Dems' objection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate committee voted along party lines Wednesday to advance President Donald Trump's picks for key posts at the Environmental Protection Agency over the objections of Democrats who pointed to the nominees' past work for corporate clients they would now regulate.