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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks rise on Wall Street, but remain lower for the week -

Technology companies helped lift stocks Thursday, ending a five-day losing streak for the S&P 500, though the major indexes remain on pace for a weekly loss.

The S&P 500 rose 0.8%, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq composite closed 1.1% higher. The Dow Jones Industrial Average added 0.5%.

2. US stocks rise, strong earnings send retailers higher -

Stocks on Wall Street closed broadly higher Tuesday, as solid company earnings helped lift several retailers ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S.

The S&P 500 rose 1.4%, more than making up for its losses last week. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 1.2% and the Nasdaq composite gained 1.4%.

3. What to know if you've applied for student loan forgiveness -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Joe Biden's plan to provide up to $20,000 in federal student loan forgiveness has been blocked by two federal courts, leaving millions of borrowers wondering what happens next. The Justice Department on Friday asked the Supreme Court to reverse one of the lower court decisions, warning that many Americans will face financial hardship if the plan remains blocked.

4. How steep fed rate hikes affect your finances -

NEW YORK (AP) — Mortgage rates continue to jump, home sales slump and credit cards and auto loans increase. Savings rates are slightly juicier, though.

As the Federal Reserve steadily increases interest rates, many economists say they fear that a recession remains inevitable in the coming months — and with it, job losses that could cause hardship for households already hurt worst by inflation.

5. EXPLAINER: How to navigate Affordable Care Act enrollment -

NEW YORK (AP) — The vast majority of Americans will find multiple options for health insurance coverage for 2023 on HealthCare.gov after open enrollment began Tuesday under the Affordable Care Act.

6. Salary transparency laws aim to combat pay disparities -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starting this week, job-seekers in New York City will have access to a key piece of information: how much money they can expect to earn for an advertised opening.

New York will require employers as of Nov. 1 to disclose "a good faith salary range for every job, promotion, and transfer opportunity advertised," according to the city's Commission on Human Rights.

7. How Social Security works and what to know about its future -

NEW YORK (AP) — Tens of millions of older Americans will see a major increase in benefits this January when a new cost-of-living adjustment (or COLA) is added to Social Security payments.

The 8.7% raise is meant to help them with higher prices for food, fuel, and other goods and services. The average recipient will see an increase of more than $140 per month, according to government estimates.

8. Hot inflation slows 3Q earnings growth forecasts -

Wall Street expects the latest round of quarterly profits to show burn marks from the hottest inflation in four decades, and the damage could linger into 2023.

Analysts have been trimming their forecasts, especially in the retail and communications sectors, as inflation drives up costs and saps consumer spending on everything from food to clothing. Companies within the broad S&P 500 index are expected to notch earnings growth of roughly 2.6%, down from June projections of 9.5% growth. That would be the S&P's slowest growth since the third quarter of 2020, according to an analysis from FactSet.

9. Stocks rally, bonds soar in relief after UK calms markets -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks on Wall Street soared to their first gain in more than a week as some calm returns to financial markets around the world. The S&P 500 jumped 2% Wednesday for its best day in seven weeks. That snapped Wall Street's longest losing streak since the coronavirus crash in February 2020. Bond markets globally also relaxed after the Bank of England moved forcefully to get a budding financial crisis there under control. Treasury yields fell sharply, easing some of the pressure that has sent stocks down more than 20% on Wall Street this year.

10. How steep Fed rate hikes affect your finances -

NEW YORK (AP) — Mortgage rates have jumped, home sales have slumped and credit cards and auto loans have gotten pricier. Savings rates are slightly juicier, though.

As the Federal Reserve has rapidly increased interest rates, many economists say they fear that a recession is inevitable in the coming months — and with it, job losses that could cause hardship for households already hurt worst by inflation.

11. How to get a student loan refund if you paid during pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — When President Joe Biden announced a plan to forgive student loan debt, many borrowers who kept making payments during the pandemic wondered if they'd made the right choice.

Borrowers who paid down their debt during a pandemic freeze that started in March 2020 can in fact get a refund — and then apply for forgiveness – but the process for doing that hasn't always been clear.

12. EXPLAINER: What to know about 'buy now, pay later' -

NEW YORK (AP) — Since the start of the pandemic, the option to "buy now, pay later" has skyrocketed in popularity, especially among young and low-income consumers who may not have ready access to traditional credit.

13. Stocks charge higher on Wall Street, erasing weekly losses -

Stock indexes on Wall Street closed solidly higher Wednesday, placing the market on pace to break a 3-week losing streak.

The S&P 500 rose 1.8% Wednesday, its biggest single-day gain in four weeks, with roughly 95% of the stocks in the benchmark index closing higher.

14. 5 tips to make the search for a new apartment easier -

NEW YORK (AP) — Finding a new place can be challenging, and skyrocketing rents have made it especially hard this year. But there are things you can do to make the process easier.

Whether it's your first or 10th time renting, here are five things to think about when looking for a new place to call home:

15. Rents are starting to come down, but the trend may not hold -

NEW YORK (AP) — Rents are starting to come down after spiking to record levels this past summer, but experts are uncertain if the slowdown will continue.

Christopher Mayer, professor of real estate at Columbia Business School, said people looking for an apartment now might have a better experience than they did in May or June.

16. Stocks sink after Fed's Powell says rates will stay high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are ending sharply lower after the head of the Federal Reserve dashed Wall Street's hopes that it may soon ease up on rate hikes in its effort to tame inflation. The S&P 500 lost 3.4% Friday, its biggest drop in two months, after Jerome Powell said the Fed will likely need to keep interest rates high enough to slow the economy for some time in order to beat back the high inflation sweeping the country. Tech stocks led the way lower, pulling the Nasdaq composite down even more. Higher rates help corral inflation, but they also hurt asset prices.

17. What's a Pell grant? How it affects student loan forgiveness -

New York (AP) — President Joe Biden's student loan forgiveness program announced on Wednesday aims to provide $10,000 in student debt cancellation for millions of Americans.

But for federal Pell grant recipients, that amount is even higher: $20,000

18. Tips for saving on your commute amid high inflation -

NEW YORK (AP) — Gas prices are falling but still higher than they were a year ago. And inflation has made most everything else more expensive. If you're looking to save money on your commute, here are some tips:

19. EXPLAINER: How is inflation affecting commuting costs? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Gas prices have fallen from the record highs they reached earlier this summer, but they're still much higher than a year ago. And with inflation driving up the cost of pretty much everything else, finding the funds to cover your commute may be increasingly tricky.

20. Hourly workers still have leverage as US hiring booms -

New York (AP) — Chelsie Church was working as a manager at a Colorado Taco Bell when she found out workers at a nearby Pizza Hut were earning more than $1 an hour more than she was.

Her attempts to negotiate a raise were unsuccessful, so she kept hunting for another job, eventually finding one at Laredo's Tacos, a chain connected to 7-Eleven.

21. How the Federal Reserve's rate hikes affect your finances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Higher mortgage rates have sent home sales tumbling. Credit card rates have grown more burdensome, and so have auto loans. Savers are finally receiving yields that are actually visible, while crypto assets are reeling.

22. Work at a school or nonprofit? You could erase student loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Melissa Martinez applied to have her student loan debt forgiven more than a decade ago, the U.S. Department of Education told her she was ineligible.

23. What to know about public service loan forgiveness -

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 145,000 U.S. borrowers have had the remainder of their student loan debt canceled through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, and officials say many more likely qualify.

24. Stocks rally, driving Wall Street to a rare winning week -

Stocks racked up more gains on Wall Street Friday, as the S&P 500 had its best day in two years and just its second winning week in the last 12 to provide a bit of relief from the market's brutal sell-off this year.

25. This is how a higher Fed rate could affect your finances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Record-low mortgages are long gone. Credit card rates will likely rise. So will the cost of an auto loan. Savers may finally see a noticeable return.

The unusually large t hree-quarter point hike in its benchmark short-term rate that the Federal Reserve announced Wednesday won't, by itself, have a huge effect on most Americans' finances. But combined with earlier rate hikes and additional large increases to come, economists and investors foresee the fastest pace of rate increases since 1989.

26. Indexes end mixed, Netflix plunges on subscriber losses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's major stock indexes ended mixed Wednesday after another day of choppy trading, while Netflix lost more than a third of its value after reporting its first subscriber loss in more than a decade and predicting more grim times ahead.

27. Wall Street losses mount amid simmering Ukraine crisis -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's losses mounted Wednesday as world leaders waited to see if Russian President Vladimir Putin orders troops deeper into Ukraine.

The S&P 500 fell 1.8% to an 8-month low, deepening the benchmark index's "correction," or a loss of 10% from its recent peak. More than 85% of stocks in the S&P 500 fell, with technology companies weighing down the index most.

28. Stocks end a turbulent week with biggest gains of the year -

Wall Street ended a volatile week of trading Friday with a late-afternoon buying spree that gave the major stock indexes their biggest gains of the year and snapped a three-week losing streak.

The S&P 500 rose 2.4%, with nearly all of it coming in the last hour of trading. The Dow Jones Industrial Average added 1.7% and the Nasdaq jumped 3.1%.

29. S&P 500 clings to a modest gain as other indexes end mixed -

Wall Street capped a wobbly day of trading Wednesday with a mixed finish for the major stock indexes, as technology and communication companies weighed on the market for a second straight day.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after shedding most of a 0.8% gain. The modest gain came a day after the benchmark index posted its worst drop since May. The index is on pace for its first first monthly loss since January.

30. Stocks end the week higher as US jobs report calms Fed fears -

Wall Street closed out a week of mostly choppy trading with broad gains Friday, pushing the S&P 500 to its second straight weekly gain.

The S&P 500 rose 0.9% and finished with a 0.6% gain for the week. Technology stocks were biggest gainers and did the most to drive the broader market higher. Microsoft rose 2.1% and Apple added 1.9%. Communication stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending also made solid gains. Only utilities closed lower.

31. Stocks climb after three days of losses, led by Big Tech -

Wall Street put the brakes on a three-day losing streak with a broad stock market rally Thursday powered by Big Tech companies and banks.

The S&P 500 notched a 1.2% gain, clawing back almost half of its loss from a day earlier, when it had its biggest one-day drop since February. Even so, the benchmark index is on track for a 2.8% weekly decline, which would be its largest since January. The other major indexes were also on pace for sharp weekly declines, despite recouping some of their losses.

32. Stocks rise as lower bond yields help lift tech companies -

Technology companies led stocks to more gains on Wall Street Thursday, nudging the S&P 500 to an all-time high for the third time this week.

The benchmark index rose 0.4% and is on track for its third straight weekly gain. Stocks within the S&P 500 were about evenly split between gainers and losers, with technology companies driving much of the rally. Those gains were tempered mainly by a slide in energy stocks and real estate companies.

33. A late slide, led by Big Tech, leaves US stock indexes lower -

A late-afternoon burst of selling on Wall Street erased an early gain for stocks Wednesday, pulling the market further below the all-time high it reached just a week ago.

The S&P 500 dropped 0.5% after having been up 0.8% in the early going. Technology and communication services companies accounted for the heaviest selling, outweighing gains in financial, energy and industrial stocks. Bond yields mostly fell after rising earlier this week.

34. Overstimulated? Stocks soar 75% in historic 12-month run -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was one year ago that the terrifying free fall for the stock market suddenly ended, ushering in one of its greatest runs.

On March 23, 2020, the S&P 500 fell 2.9%. In all, the index dropped nearly 34% in about a month, wiping out three years' worth of gains for the market.

35. Investing ABCs: Teaching your kids about money and markets -

The recent stock market mania over the video game company GameStop, which this week was scrutinized by Congress, has provided a teachable moment for kids.

The Associated Press talked to a few parents and financial experts for their tips on talking with kids about investing and the often confusing behavior of financial markets. Here's a summary of what they had to say.

36. S&P 500 closes wobbly week at new record high -

Technology companies led a late-afternoon rally on Wall Street Friday that capped a week of wobbly trading with the major stock indexes hitting all-time highs.

The S&P 500 rose 0.5% after spending most of the day wavering between small gains and losses. The gain nudged the benchmark index to a record high for the second day in a row. The tech-heavy Nasdaq composite and the Dow Jones Industrial Average also set new highs.

37. Bezos, Bloomberg among top 50 US charity donors for 2020 -

As the world grappled with COVID-19, a recession and a racial reckoning, the ultrawealthy gave to a broader set of causes than ever before — bestowing multimillion-dollar gifts on food pantries, historically Black colleges and universities and organizations that serve the poor and the homeless, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy's annual rankings of the 50 Americans who gave the most to charity last year.

38. Family of novice investor who killed himself sue Robinhood -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The family of a novice stock trader who killed himself after mistakenly believing he lost more than $700,000 are suing Robinhood Financial, claiming the popular stock-trading platform's business practices "directly" led to their son's death.

39. Robinhood raises $3.4B from investors amid surge in trading -

Popular online trading platform Robinhood said Monday that it has lined up $3.4 billion to help meet its funding requirements amid a spike in trading on Wall Street fueled by small investors driving up shares in GameStop and other stocks.

40. Amazon's Bezos tops list of richest charitable gifts in 2020 -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The world's richest person made the single-largest charitable contribution in 2020, according to The Chronicle of Philanthropy's annual list of top donations, a $10 billion gift that is intended to help fight climate change.

41. 751,000 seek US jobless benefits as virus hobbles economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell slightly last week to 751,000, a still-historically high level that shows that many employers keep cutting jobs in the face of the accelerating pandemic.

42. 751,000 seek US jobless benefits as virus hobbles economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell slightly last week to 751,000, a still-historically high level that shows that many employers keep cutting jobs in the face of the accelerating pandemic.

43. S&P 500 sinks 3.5%, Dow down 934 pts. amid shutdown fears -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank 943 points Wednesday as surging coronavirus cases forced more shutdown measures in Europe and raised fears of more restrictions in the U.S.

The S&P 500 slid 3.5%, its third straight loss and its biggest drop since June. The benchmark index is already down 5.6% this week, on track for its biggest weekly decline since March. That's when the market was in the midst of selling off as strict lockdowns around the world choked the economy into recession.

44. Wall Street closing sharply lower as tech sector takes hit -

Wall Street racked up more losses Wednesday as stocks closed broadly lower, wiping out the market's gains from the day before.

The S&P 500 fell 2.4% after giving up an earlier gain. The selling, which accelerated in the afternoon, was widespread, though technology stocks accounted for the biggest losses. The decline deepens the benchmark index's September slide to 7.5% after a five-month rally.

45. Wall Street falls just short of record for S&P 500, again -

NEW YORK (AP) — Another afternoon fade for stocks left Wall Street just shy of a record on Thursday, after the S&P 500 briefly crossed above its all-time closing high for the second straight day.

The S&P 500 dipped 6.92 points, or 0.2%, to 3,373.43. At one point during the day, it climbed above 3,386.15. That's the record closing level it set in February, before investors appreciated how much devastation the new coronavirus would cause for the global economy.

46. Stocks close mostly higher after a choppy day of trading -

Wall Street capped a choppy day of trading Wednesday with more gains for stocks as investors sized up a mix of company earnings reports and another flare-up in tensions between Washington and Beijing.

47. Stocks rally worldwide on hopes for coming economic recovery -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rose again Tuesday, part of a strong and worldwide rally for markets, after a big rebound in buying at U.S. stores and online raised hopes that the economy can escape its recession relatively quickly.

48. Buying the plunge: Individual investors remain optimistic -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The lure of snapping up stocks at bargain prices has been too strong to pass up for many people, even as uncertainty over the coronavirus pandemic clouds the market and global economic outlook.

49. Stocks drop again on worries about slow recovery for economy -

Wall Street's earlier bets that the economy can make a relatively quick rebound from the coronavirus pandemic suddenly don't look so good.

The S&P 500 fell 1.7% Wednesday for its second straight loss, with the biggest hits targeting companies that most need a healthy economy for their profits to grow. Treasury yields also sank in a sign of pessimism after Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell warned about the threat of a prolonged recession.

50. Stocks sink following grim data on economic hit from virus -

NEW YORK (AP) — Selling swept Wall Street Wednesday after a dismal lineup of reports made clear how historic the coronavirus crunch has been for the economy.

Markets are already bracing for what's forecast to be the worst downturn since the Great Depression, but Wednesday's data was even more dispiriting than expected, including a record drop for U.S. retail sales. Adding to the gloom: More banks made moves in anticipation that households and companies will be forced to default on billions of dollars of debt as businesses remain shut and millions of workers lose their jobs.

51. Stocks skid as physical, economic toll of virus worsens -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street and markets around the world fell sharply Wednesday as the economic and physical toll caused by the coronavirus outbreak mounts — and as experts say they still can't predict when it will end.

52. Worst day on Wall Street since 1987; Dow drops 2,300 pts. -

NEW YORK (AP) — The escalating coronavirus emergency Thursday sent stocks to their worst losses since the Black Monday crash of 1987, extending a sell-off that has now wiped out most of Wall Street's big run-up since President Donald Trump's election.

53. `It gets worse': Stocks plummet again over coronavirus fears -

NEW YORK (AP) — The deepening coronavirus crisis sent stocks into another alarming slide Thursday, extending a sell-off that has wiped out most of the big run-up on Wall Street since President Donald Trump's inauguration.

54. Dow drops 7.8%, 2,013 points as free-fall slams markets -

Stocks took their worst one-day beating on Wall Street since the global financial crisis of 2008 as a collapse in oil prices Monday combined with mounting alarm over what the coronavirus could do to the world economy.

55. Report says Intuit nearing $7 billion deal for Credit Karma -

NEW YORK (AP) — Intuit Inc. is reportedly close to a $7 billion deal to acquire personal-finance portal Credit Karma Inc. and beef up its position in the consumer-finance market.

56. Morgan Stanley to buy E-Trade for $13 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investment bank Morgan Stanley announced it would buy the online brokerage E-Trade for roughly $13 billion, one of the biggest deals on Wall Street since the financial crisis.

57. Morgan Stanley buying E-Trade for about $13 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investment bank Morgan Stanley announced it would buy the online brokerage E-Trade for roughly $13 billion, one of the biggest deals on Wall Street since the financial crisis.

58. Stocks fall on Apple revenue warning; Dow drops 165 -

U.S. stock indexes closed with mostly modest losses Tuesday as the market gave up some of its solid gains from the past two weeks.

Banks and technology stocks accounted for most of the decline. The Nasdaq eked out a tiny gain that was good enough to nudge it to another record high.

59. Stocks indexes gain on Wall Street a day after a big drop -

Stocks closed broadly higher on Wall Street Tuesday, reversing a big slice of the market's losses from a sharp sell-off the day before.

The rebound ended a five-day losing streak for the Dow Jones Industrial Average fueled largely by fears that the spread of a new virus in China could hamper global economic growth. The outbreak has killed more than 100 people, putting a chill on travel and tourism in China.

60. US stocks pull back from records following jobs report -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks fell from their record heights on Friday after a report showed hiring was a touch weaker than expected last month.

Employers added 145,000 jobs across the country in December, short of the 160,000 that economists forecast. But the growth was solid enough to bolster Wall Street's view that the job market is holding up and households can continue to spend, preserving the largest part of the economy. The bond market also rallied after the report showed workers' wages aren't rising much, which lessens the threat of inflation.

61. US stocks move broadly lower to start holiday-shortened week -

Stocks closed broadly lower on Wall Street Monday, erasing some of the major indexes' recent gains, though the market remains on track to end the year with its best performance since 2013.

The pullback ended a two-day winning streak by the S&P 500. The benchmark index has risen five straight weeks, notching multiple all-time highs along the way. It's on track to end December with its fourth consecutive monthly gain.

62. US stocks fall for 3rd consecutive day over more trade worries -

Stocks closed broadly lower and bond prices rose sharply on Wall Street Tuesday after President Donald Trump cast doubt over the potential for a trade deal with China this year.

Technology companies, banks and industrial stocks accounted for much of the sell-off, which extended the S&P 500's losing streak to a third day. Utilities and real estate stocks rose as traders favored less-risky assets.

63. US stocks jump to records as tech, small companies lead way -

NEW YORK (AP) — A flurry of buyout deals and rising optimism about U.S.-China trade talks sent stocks back to record heights Monday, the latest bit of fuel for a market that's been climbing since early last month.

64. This stock trade isn't free: Schwab scoops up rival for $26B -

NEW YORK (AP) — Charles Schwab is buying rival TD Ameritrade in a $26 billion stock swap, a blockbuster agreement brought about by massive disruption in the online brokerage industry.

Bowing to competitive pressure, brokerages have made it free for customers to trade U.S. stocks online. A combination of two of the biggest players in the industry would allow Schwab to save billions of dollars and make up for revenue lost from no longer charging investors such commissions.

65. Stocks close with modest losses amid US-China trade anxiety -

Stocks closed modestly lower on Wall Street Thursday after a mostly listless day of trading handed the market its third straight drop.

Losses in technology stocks, companies that rely on consumer spending and other sectors outweighed gains elsewhere in the market.

66. Stocks sink as US manufacturing shrinks again amid trade war -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks sank to their worst loss in five weeks on Tuesday after a surprisingly limp report on the nation's manufacturing stirred worries about the economy's strength.

The report showed that manufacturing weakened in September for the second straight month as President Donald Trump's trade war with China dragged on confidence and factory activity. It dashed economists' expectations that August's contraction had been an aberration, and stocks and bond yields immediately reversed course to drop sharply lower following the report.

67. Schwab drops stock trading commissions as fee war escalates -

NEW YORK (AP) — Charles Schwab is dropping commissions for online trading of U.S. stocks and exchange-traded funds, the latest slash in an industry battle that's drastically cut the cost of investing.

68. US stocks fall; S&P 500 ends with 2nd straight weekly loss -

Wall Street capped a choppy week with a second straight weekly loss for the S&P 500 Friday as worries about a potential escalation in the trade war between the U.S. and China erased early gains.

69. US stocks' mixed finish nudges S&P 500 to a 2nd weekly gain -

Major U.S. stock indexes finished little changed Friday after a day of mostly quiet trading capped the S&P 500's second straight weekly gain.

The market shook off an early stumble thanks largely to gains in health care stocks, makers of consumer products and retailers. Technology, communications and utilities stocks fell, as did bond yields and gold prices.

70. US stocks fall again, joining worldwide sell-off, on tariffs -

Investors rattled by President Donald Trump's latest escalation in his trade war with China drove another round of selling on Wall Street Friday.

The latest losses, which eased somewhat in the final hour of trading, had the market on track to close out its worst week of the year just seven days after the benchmark S&P 500 hit an all-time high.

71. Dow Jones industrials cross 27,000 points for first time -

A turbulent day on Wall Street ended in the record books Thursday as the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed above 27,000 for the first time and the S&P 500 index hit another all-time high.

The milestones came on a day when the S&P 500 briefly moved above 3,000 for the second straight day before an early rally lost some of its momentum.

72. Stocks move lower on economic data, Powell remarks -

Technology and internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

73. Salesforce buying Tableau Software in $15.7B all-stock deal -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Customer-management software developer Salesforce is buying Tableau Software in an all-stock deal valued at $15.7 billion.

Tableau uses self-service analytics to help people with any skill level work with data. Among the companies that use Tableau's services are Charles Schwab, Verizon and Netflix. Once the transaction closes, Tableau will operate independently and stay headquartered in Seattle.

74. Tech rebound powers US stocks higher, snaps 2-day S&P slump -

Technology companies helped power stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Tuesday, snapping the market's two-day losing streak.

The rally followed the U.S. government's decision to temporarily ease off proposed restrictions on technology sales to Chinese companies. The news gave a boost to technology sector stocks, which took steep losses a day earlier when the Trump administration announced curbs on technology sales, aimed primarily at Chinese telecom gear maker Huawei.

75. US stocks post solid finish on encouraging economic data -

Stocks closed solidly higher on Wall Street Monday after a batch of encouraging global economic data kept investors in a buying mood.

Financial and technology companies powered much of the rally, which extended the market's gains from last week, when the benchmark S&P 500 closed out its best quarter in nearly a decade.

76. Health care, tech lead losses for stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks gave up an early rally and ended broadly lower on Wall Street, led by declines in health care companies.

UnitedHealth Group sank 4.1 percent Monday, the biggest loss among the 30 stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

77. US stocks eke out gains after bumpy day caps solid week -

Stocks capped a bumpy day of trading Friday with modest gains, extending the market's winning streak to its third straight day.

Gains in technology companies, energy stocks and banks outweighed losses in retailers and elsewhere in the market.

78. US stocks waver as signs of future profit growth wobble -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes spent Wednesday drifting and finished with small gains. While big companies continue to report strong profit growth, investors aren't sure how much longer it will last.

79. Wall Street ends higher with help from tech and health care -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks couldn't hang on to a big gain Wednesday, but they still finished broadly higher as technology and health care companies rose. That helped reverse some of the market's big losses from the week before.

80. Renewed jitters over trade send Dow 799 points lowers -

Stocks slumped on Wall Street Tuesday as traders worried that the U.S. and China made less progress than originally thought on defusing their dispute over trade. Bond prices surged, sending yields sharply lower as investors turned to lower-risk assets.

81. Tech giants slide, pulling US stock market sharply lower -

A broad sell-off in technology companies pulled U.S. stocks sharply lower Monday, knocking more than 600 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

The wave of selling snared big names, including Apple, Amazon and Goldman Sachs. Banks, consumer-focused companies, and media and communications stocks all took heavy losses. Crude oil prices fell, erasing early gains and extending a losing streak to 11 days.

82. Dow hits another all-time high on mixed day for US stocks -

Wall Street capped a milestone-setting week Friday with a mixed finish for the major U.S. stock indexes and the second all-time high in two days for the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

An afternoon sell-off erased modest gains for the S&P 500 that had the benchmark index on track to eke out its own record high for much of the day.

83. Stocks end losing streak as industrials, retailers rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks broke a four-day losing streak Monday as industrial companies and retailers rose. Technology companies recovered some of their steep losses from last week.

Transportation and other industrial companies continued their recent rally and retailers like Nike, Home Depot and Walmart all climbed. While technology companies rose overall, Apple fell after saying a new round of bigger U.S. tariffs could push it to raise prices.

84. S&P 500 touches all-time high as earnings drive stock gains -

The S&P 500 index briefly traded at an all-time high Tuesday just as the U.S. stock market's bull run came closer to becoming the longest on record.

The market's benchmark index eked out a slight gain, closing a little below the high mark it set in January. The rally pushed the Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks to a record high.

85. US stocks rebound as tech and household goods companies rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied Tuesday as retailers, technology and household goods companies all made solid gains and helped the market shake off a weak start. Netflix slumped after investors were disappointed with the streaming video company's subscriber growth.

86. US stocks finish lower in light trading ahead of US holiday -

U.S. stocks closed lower Tuesday following a swift sell-off in the final minutes of a shortened trading session ahead of the Independence Day holiday.

The losses snapped a three-day winning streak for the stock market, wiping out modest gains from earlier in the day.

87. Investing gets even cheaper: Vanguard cuts ETF commissions -

NEW YORK (AP) — The cost of investing keeps dropping as savvier investors push companies to lower or do away with high fees and commissions.

On Monday, industry giant Vanguard said it will stop charging commissions for online trades of most of its competitors' exchange-traded funds. Vanguard already lets customers make online trades of 77 of its own ETFs without commissions, but it plans to extend the practice to nearly 1,800 ETFs from BlackRock's iShares, Charles Schwab, State Street Global Advisors and other rivals in August.

88. Stocks skid as trade worries pull technology companies lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks skidded Monday as investors grew concerned that technology companies could be pulled into the broadening trade dispute between the U.S. and China. Indexes in Europe and Asia also fell.

89. Apple leads tech higher as stocks recover from an early loss -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks clawed back early losses Tuesday as Apple led a rally in technology companies. Smaller, more domestically-focused companies also climbed. The late push offset a slump in household goods makers and industrial companies.

90. US stocks rally; Dow surges 669, clawing back lost ground -

News that the U.S. and China are open to negotiating to avert a trade war put investors in a buying mood Monday, giving the market its best day in more than two years and erasing about half of its huge losses last week.

91. Technology companies lead modest pullback in US stocks -

A broad sell-off handed the U.S. stock market its biggest loss in more than four months Monday, pulling the major indexes below their recent record highs.

Technology stocks, the biggest gainers in 2017, accounted for much of the slide. Energy companies also fell as crude oil prices finished lower. Utilities and other rate-sensitive sectors declined as bond yields hit their highest level in almost four years.

92. Can anything stop the stock market's relentless rise? -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's been 365 days since the Dow Jones industrial average first crossed 20,000, and it's already up another 30-plus percent as the stock market's relentless rise to records keeps going.

93. Can anything stop the stock market's relentless rise? -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's been 365 days since the Dow Jones industrial average first crossed 20,000, and it's already up another 30-plus percent as the stock market's relentless rise to records keeps going.

94. Tech and consumer-focused companies rise; Netflix leaps -

NEW YORK (AP) — Technology and consumer-focused companies led U.S. stocks to more records Tuesday. Netflix, at the center of both groups, soared after saying it gained more than 8 million subscribers at the end of 2017.

95. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for November 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

96. Actively managed funds catch up, a bit, to index funds -

NEW YORK (AP) — At last, a bit of redemption for the stock pickers.

Nearly half of all actively managed U.S. stock funds did better than a composite of index funds in the 12 months through June, according to Morningstar. Only about a quarter of those funds could make that claim at the end of 2016.

97. Tech companies lead broad slide in US stocks; oil rises -

Technology companies were leading a broad slide in U.S. stocks in early trading Thursday as investors pored over the latest batch of corporate earnings reports. Banks and retail chains were also among the big decliners. Simmering tensions between the U.S. and North Korea were also weighing on the market. Oil prices were headed higher.

98. Investing costs fall again: Fidelity, Schwab cut commissions -

NEW YORK (AP) — It keeps getting cheaper to invest.

Fidelity on Tuesday became the latest company to cut its fees in an ongoing industry battle that's helped mom-and-pop investors keep more of their own dollars. Rival Charles Schwab matched the price cut in a matter of hours.

99. Stocks edge lower, breaking a 12-day win streak for the Dow -

A slide led by Target and other big retailers pulled U.S. stock indexes lower Tuesday, snapping a 12-day winning streak for the Dow Jones industrial average.

Industrial stocks and phone companies were also among the big decliners. Energy companies fell as crude oil prices edged lower. Utilities stocks eked out a gain.

100. US stock indexes extend climb into record heights -

US stock indexes extend climb into record heights

By ALEX VEIGA, AP Business Writer

Miners and other raw materials companies led a broad rally in U.S. stocks late Friday afternoon, steering the major indexes toward record highs for the second day in a row. Rising crude oil prices also gave energy companies a big boost. Investors kept their focus on strong company earnings and corporate deal news.