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Editorial Results (free)

1. Biden's dilemma: Satisfying Manchin risks losing other Dems -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's Washington's enduring question: What does Joe Manchin want?

But increasingly the answer is crystal clear. The conservative West Virginia Democrat wants to dismantle President Joe Biden's proposed climate change strategies and social services expansion in ways that are simply unacceptable for most in his party.

2. How lawmakers are investigating the Jan. 6 riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee tasked with investigating the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol has been ramping up its efforts in recent weeks, issuing subpoenas to nearly 20 individuals, including four of former President Donald Trump's advisers and associates.

3. Farmers, John Deere suppliers worry about strike's impact -

WATERLOO, Iowa (AP) — Farmers and Deere & Co. suppliers are worried about what the strike at the tractor maker's factories will mean for their livelihoods.

4. Facebook plans to hire 10,000 in Europe to build 'metaverse' -

LONDON (AP) — Facebook said it plans to hire 10,000 workers in the European Union over the next five years to work on a new computing platform that promises to connect people virtually but could raise concerns about privacy and the social platform gaining more control over people's online lives.

5. UK: 43,000 may have received false negative COVID results -

LONDON (AP) — British health officials said Friday that 43,000 people may have been wrongly told they don't have the coronavirus because of problems at a private laboratory.

The U.K. Health Security Agency said the Immensa Health Clinic Ltd. lab in the central England city of Wolverhampton has been suspended from processing swabs after the false negatives.

6. US wholesale prices rose record 8.6% over 12 months -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation at the wholesale level rose 8.6% in September compared to a year ago, the largest advance since the 12-month change was first calculated in 2010.

The Labor Department reported Thursday that the monthly increase in its producer price index, which measures inflationary pressures before they reach consumers, was 0.5% for September compared to a 0.7% gain in August.

7. Modest gain breaks a 3-day losing streak for S&P 500 index -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Thursday, snapping a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 despite another choppy day of trading.

The benchmark index rose 0.3% after having been down 0.5% in the early going. It's still on pace for a 0.6% weekly loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ended flat, while the Nasdaq rose 0.7%.

8. Nashville International ranks No. 9 in U.S. -

Condé Nast Traveler has announced the results of its annual Readers’ Choice Awards with Nashville International Airport named as the Ninth Best Airport in the U.S.

More than 800,000 Condé Nast Traveler readers submitted responses rating their travel experiences across the globe to provide a full snapshot about the places they can’t wait to return to next. The Readers’ Choice Awards are the longest-running and most prestigious recognition of excellence in the travel industry.

9. Top Davidson County residential sales for September 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

10. IMF head pledges renewed efforts to protect data integrity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The embattled head of the International Monetary Fund, who successfully fought to keep her job following a data-manipulation scandal, is pledging renewed efforts to bolster data integrity while focusing on the main job of helping countries recover from a devastating global pandemic.

11. White House: LA port going 24/7 to ease shipping backlog -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said Wednesday it has helped broker an agreement for the Port of Los Angeles to become a 24-hour, seven-days-a-week operation, part of an effort to relieve supply chain bottlenecks and move stranded container ships that are driving prices higher for U.S. consumers.

12. EXPLAINER: Why Social Security COLA will jump next year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rising inflation is expected to lead to a sizeable increase in Social Security's annual cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA, for 2022. Exactly how much will be revealed Wednesday morning after a Labor Department report on inflation during September, a data point used in the final calculation.

13. IMF foresees a slight drop in global growth from pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The International Monetary Fund is slightly downgrading its outlook for the global recovery from the pandemic recession, reflecting the persistence of supply chain disruptions in industrialized countries and deadly disparities in vaccination rates between rich and poor nations.

14. IMF board confident about leader despite data-rigging claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The International Monetary Fund expressed "full confidence" in its managing director Tuesday in response to allegations that while she was a World Bank official, she and others pressured staffers to change business rankings in an effort to placate China.

15. As Shatner heads toward the stars, visions of space collide -

"Risk is our business," James T. Kirk once said. "That's what this starship is all about. That's why we're aboard her."

More than a half-century later, the performer who breathed life into the fabled Enterprise captain is, at age 90, making that kind of risk his own business and heading toward the stars under dramatically different circumstances than his fictional counterpart. And in doing so, William Shatner is causing worlds to collide, or at least permitting parallel universes to coexist — the utopian spacefaring vision of "Star Trek" and the evolving, increasingly commercial spot that "space" holds in the American psyche.

16. Microsoft: Russia behind 58% of detected state-backed hacks -

BOSTON (AP) — Russia accounted for most state-sponsored hacking detected by Microsoft over the past year, with a 58% share, mostly targeting government agencies and think tanks in the United States, followed by Ukraine, Britain and European NATO members, the company said.

17. Inflation knocks businesses off balance as recovery slows -

Companies will soon start reporting their latest quarterly financial results and investors have been warned that inflation is going to sting.

Retailers, auto makers and a wide range of manufacturers have all warned investors that a supply chain crunch and higher raw materials costs are adding to expenses and hurting profits. A COVID-19 resurgence during the third quarter threw many industries off-balance just as they were regaining their footing from the pandemic slump.

18. Russia's infections reach the highest level so far this year -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's daily coronavirus infections soared Thursday to their highest level so far this year as authorities have struggled to control a surge in new cases amid a slow pace in vaccinations and few restrictions in place.

19. VUMC helps develop first COVID-19 pill -

U.S.-based pharmaceutical giant Merck& Co. is seeking authorization for the first oral antiviral pill to treat COVID-19, after a Vanderbilt University Medical Center clinical trial showed it cut the risk of hospitalization or death in half when given to high-risk people during infection.

20. Coronavirus deaths in Russia surpass 900 a day for 1st time -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's daily coronavirus death toll surpassed 900 on Wednesday for the first time in the pandemic, a record that comes amid the country's low vaccination rate and the government's reluctance to impose tough restrictions to control new cases.

21. IMF says trimming global growth forecast due to rising risks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the International Monetary Fund says the agency is trimming its forecast for global growth this year.

IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva on Tuesday cited rising risks from inflation, debt and a divergence in growth prospects between nations with access to coronavirus vaccines and those in need of shots.

22. IMF says trimming global growth forecast due to rising risks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the International Monetary Fund says the agency is trimming its forecast for global growth this year.

IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva on Tuesday cited rising risks from inflation, debt and a divergence in growth prospects between nations with access to coronavirus vaccines and those in need of shots.

23. Biden lifts abortion referral ban on family planning clinics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration reversed a ban on abortion referrals by family planning clinics, lifting a Trump-era restriction as political and legal battles over abortion grow sharper from Texas to the U.S. Supreme Court.

24. Fed watchdog to investigate officials' financial trades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An independent investigator will look into whether Federal Reserve officials broke the law with financial trades last year that have come under congressional scrutiny and sharp criticism from outside the central bank.

25. Recovery hampered as inflation hits new highs in US, Europe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation has reached new highs in the United States and Europe as rising energy prices and supply bottlenecks restrain an economic recovery from the pandemic in both economies.

26. Shortages, shipping, shutdowns hit Asian factory output -

Shortages of power, computer chips and other parts, soaring shipping costs and shutdowns of factories to battle the pandemic are taking a toll on Asian economies.

Data released Thursday showed Japan's factory output slowed while China's manufacturing outlook weakened.

27. S&P 500 clings to a modest gain as other indexes end mixed -

Wall Street capped a wobbly day of trading Wednesday with a mixed finish for the major stock indexes, as technology and communication companies weighed on the market for a second straight day.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after shedding most of a 0.8% gain. The modest gain came a day after the benchmark index posted its worst drop since May. The index is on pace for its first first monthly loss since January.

28. Powell defends Fed policies, says inflation might persist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell on Wednesday defended the ultra-low interest rate policies he has pursued since the pandemic decimated the economy more than 18 months ago.

29. US general: Afghan collapse rooted in 2020 deal with Taliban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senior Pentagon officials said Wednesday the collapse of the Afghan government and its security forces in August could be traced to a 2020 U.S. agreement with the Taliban that promised a complete U.S. troop withdrawal.

30. A potential Powell renomination for Fed faces some dissent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Resistance to the potential renomination of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell intensified this week, with Sen. Elizabeth Warren becoming the first senator to publicly oppose him and many progressive groups pushing for some alternative leader at the Fed.

31. Small towns brace for change, prosperity with Ford's arrival -

STANTON (AP) — Lesa Tard expects to serve up more hot wings and cheeseburgers when the clean energy revolution comes to Stanton with Ford's plans to build a factory to produce electric pickups. So she's making plans to expand along with the tiny West Tennessee town.

32. Predators say changes mean a reset not rebuild for franchise -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Nashville Predators believe general manager David Poile has found the right combination that means a reset and not a complete rebuild for the franchise.

Forward Filip Forsberg is all-in on the changes.

33. Biden caught between allies, critics on border policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is caught between a hard place and an even harder one when it comes to immigration.

Biden embraced major progressive policy goals on the issue after he won the Democratic nomination, and he has begun enacting some. But his administration has been forced to confront unusually high numbers of migrants trying to enter the country along the U.S.-Mexico border, and the federal response has inflamed both critics and allies.

34. Lagarde: European Central Bank won't overreact to fleeting inflation -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe's current burst of inflation is temporary and won't lead the European Central Bank to "overreact" by withdrawing stimulus or raising interest rates, ECB President Christine Lagarde said Tuesday.

35. Green energy takes hold in unlikely places with Ford project -

GLENDALE, Ky. (AP) — When Ford revealed plans to ramp up its commitment to the fledgling electric vehicle sector, the automaker chose to create thousands of jobs and pump billions in investments into two states where Republican leaders have vilified the push for green energy and defended fossil fuels.

36. 2 top Fed officials retire in wake of trading disclosures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a rare moment of ethical controversy for the Federal Reserve, two top officials resigned Monday in the wake of revelations about their financial trading that exposed potential shortcomings in the Fed's rules on investments.

37. Joint Chiefs chairman calls Afghan war a 'strategic failure' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The top U.S. military officer called the 20-year war in Afghanistan a "strategic failure" and acknowledged to Congress that he had favored keeping several thousand troops in the country to prevent a collapse of the U.S.-supported Kabul government and a rapid takeover by the Taliban.

38. Biden nominates 9 candidates for federal prosecutor posts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is nominating nine lawyers to run U.S. attorney's offices across the country, a diverse group of candidates in the latest round of picks for the top law enforcement positions.

39. Powell says spike in inflation lasting longer than expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell is preparing to tell Congress that the current spike in U.S. inflation has proven to be larger and more long-lasting than expected.

40. Rowdy celebrations erupt in Norway as COVID restrictions end -

HELSINKI (AP) — Police in Norway on Sunday reported dozens of disturbances and violent clashes including mass brawls in the Nordic country's big cities after streets, bars, restaurants and nightclubs were filled with people celebrating the end of COVID-19 restrictions that lasted for more than a year.

41. US long-term mortgage rates up slightly; 30-year at 2.88% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term mortgage rates rose slightly this week continuing a months-long trend of little movement. They remained under 3%.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the average rate for a 30-year mortgage edged up to 2.88% from 2.86% last week. That's very close to where the benchmark rate stood at this time last year, 2.90%. It peaked this year at 3.18% in April.

42. Bank of England keeps rates on hold, warns over inflation -

LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England kept its main interest rate at the record low of 0.1% while warning Thursday that inflation is set to be double its target rate by the end of this year, largely due to a sharp spike in energy prices.

43. Under pressure, Powell says Fed to revamp its trading rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Wednesday that the central bank will overhaul its financial ethics policies in response to growing questions about investing and trading decisions by high-ranking Fed officials that raise potential conflicts of interest.

44. China's Ant Group shares credit data with central bank -

BEIJING (AP) — China's central bank will soon have access to private credit information of hundreds of millions of users of Ant Group's online credit service, in a move signaling more regulatory oversight of the financial technology sector.

45. Bank of England keeps rates on hold, warns over inflation -

LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England kept its main interest rate at the record low of 0.1% while warning Thursday that inflation is set to be double its target rate by the end of his year largely as a result of a sharp spike in energy prices.

46. Stocks hold their gains on Wall Street after Fed statement -

Stocks held on to their gains on Wall Street Wednesday after the Federal Reserve signaled it may begin easing its extraordinary support measures for the economy later this year.

The central bank said it may start raising its benchmark interest rate sometime next year, earlier than it envisioned three months ago.

47. Fed: On track to slow support for economy later this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell signaled Wednesday that the Fed plans to announce as early as November that it will start withdrawing the extraordinary support it unleashed after the coronavirus paralyzed the economy 18 months ago.

48. COVID-19 creates dire US shortage of teachers, school staff -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — One desperate California school district is sending flyers home in students' lunchboxes, telling parents it's "now hiring." Elsewhere, principals are filling in as crossing guards, teachers are being offered signing bonuses and schools are moving back to online learning.

49. Biden follows through on pledge to take in more refugees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration said the U.S. would take in 125,000 refugees and their families next year, fulfilling an earlier pledge to raise a cap that had been cut to a historic low under his predecessor.

50. Global protest seeks to turn up heat on leaders over climate -

BERLIN (AP) — Youth activists are hoping to turn up the heat on governments Friday with the first large-scale international protest against climate change in six months.

Greta Thunberg and fellow activists said Monday they plan to stage demonstrations in cities around the world, weeks before leaders gather for a U.N. summit in Glasgow.

51. Fed likely to signal a coming pullback in economic support -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is expected this week to send its clearest signal yet that it will start reining in its ultra-low-interest rate policies later this year, a first step toward unwinding the extraordinary support it's given the economy since the pandemic struck 18 months ago.

52. Pentagon reverses itself, calls deadly Kabul strike an error -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon retreated from its defense of a drone strike that killed multiple civilians in Afghanistan last month, announcing Friday that a review revealed that only civilians were killed in the attack, not an Islamic State extremist as first believed.

53. Stocks fall on Wall Street, giving up the week's gains -

Wall Street capped an up-and-down week of trading Friday with a broad sell-off that wiped out the major indexes' gains for the week.

The S&P 500 lost 0.9% and posted its second straight weekly loss. Roughly 80% of the stocks in the benchmark index fell. Technology and communication companies accounted for much of the pullback. Industrial and financial stocks also were big drags on the index. Only the index's health care sector managed a gain.

54. MassMutual fined for failing to monitor GameStop saga star -

NEW YORK (AP) — Massachusetts regulators are fining MassMutual $4 million and ordering it to overhaul its social-media policies after accusing the company of failing to supervise an employee whose online cheerleading of GameStop's stock helped launch the frenzy that shook Wall Street earlier this year.

55. Fed reviews ethics polices after prolific trading uncovered -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is reviewing the ethics policies that govern the financial holdings and activities of its senior officials in the wake of recent disclosures that two regional Fed presidents engaged in extensive trading last year.

56. Drought haves, have-nots test how to share water in the West -

MADRAS, Ore. (AP) — Phil Fine stands in a parched field and watches a harvester gnaw through his carrot seed crop, spitting clouds of dust in its wake. Cracked dirt lines empty irrigation canals, and dust devils and tumbleweeds punctuate a landscape in shades of brown.

57. Job market disconnect raises concerns over economic recovery -

The gulf between record job openings and a lack of people taking those jobs is forcing Wall Street to reassess the pace of the economic recovery.

Jobs were gutted during the pandemic and employment growth has been a closely watched gauge for investors. Increasing employment eventually results in increased consumer spending, which is the biggest driver of economic growth. Without the former, analysts have said, it will take longer than expected for the economy to operate at some semblance of a pre-pandemic normal.

58. Biden $3.5T plan tests voter appeal of expansive gov't role -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's "build back better" agenda is poised to be the most far-reaching federal investment since FDR's New Deal or LBJ's Great Society — a prodigious effort to tax the rich and shift money into projects and programs touching the lives of nearly every American.

59. Nashville health group pushes vaccines for all -

The Nashville Health Care Council board of directors has issued a statement urging every person to get vaccinated against COVID-19, and it invited top executives of health care companies nationwide to sign on to the statement.

60. Top Davidson County commercial sales for August 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, July 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

61. Largest colleges push student vaccines with mandates, prizes -

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — At most of the largest U.S. public universities, students are under no obligation to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Some schools do require vaccines, but with leniency for those who opt out. Still others have expelled students who do not comply.

62. UK posts the biggest jump in annual inflation on record -

LONDON (AP) — Consumer prices in the U.K. rose at their fastest recorded rate during August as global supply shortages and higher wages accentuated the uptick from pandemic-related discounts a year ago, official figures showed Wednesday.

63. Blinken defense of Afghan policy clouded by al-Qaida warning -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Tuesday sought to parry bipartisan congressional criticism of the Biden administration's Afghanistan withdrawal, as new intelligence estimates warned that al-Qaida could soon again use Afghan soil to plot attacks on the United States.

64. Study: Pentagon reliance on contractors hurt US in 9/11 wars -

Up to half of the $14 trillion spent by the Pentagon since 9/11 went to for-profit defense contractors, a study released Monday found. It's the latest work to argue the U.S. reliance on private corporations for war-zone duties that used to be done by troops contributed to mission failure in Afghanistan.

65. US steps up effort to unite families separated under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is expanding its effort to find and reunite migrant families who were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border under President Donald Trump as part of a zero-tolerance policy on illegal crossings.

66. US producer prices jump an unprecedented 8.3% in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation at the wholesale level climbed 8.3% last month from August 2020, the biggest annual gain since the Labor Department started calculating the 12-month number in 2010.

The Labor Department reported Friday that its producer price index — which measures inflationary pressures before they reach consumers — rose 0.7% last month from July after increasing 1% in both June and July.

67. Pitt defense will be tested by Tennessee's up-tempo offense -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Volunteers are about to see if the Pitt Panthers can handle their speed.

Tennessee ran 94 plays in the Vols' 38-6 win over Bowling Green in the opener, while Pittsburgh's defense was on the field for 54 snaps in a 51-7 rout of UMass. Pittsburgh and coach Pat Narduzzi is familiar with what Vols coach Josh Heupel's up-tempo approach from his days at Central Florida.

68. CBS to broadcast 5-hour Nashville New Years Eve 'Bash' -

CBS will ring in the New Year by presenting "New Year’s Eve Live: Nashville’s Big Bash," marking the first time for Music City to anchor an entire New Year’s Eve national TV special, the Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp announced today.

69. US, Mexico restart high-level economic talks after 4 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and Mexico restarted high-level economic talks Thursday after a four-year pause as top advisers to presidents Joe Biden and Andrés Manuel López Obrador expressed eagerness to make headway on issues important to both nations such as infrastructure, trade and migration.

70. European Central Bank easing support as recovery strengthens -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank will dial back some of its massive emergency pandemic support for the economy amid signs of increasing business activity and consumer readiness to spend as the 19 countries that use the euro rebound from the coronavirus recession.

71. Magnet milestones move distant nuclear fusion dream closer -

SAINT-PAUL-LES-DURANCE, France (AP) — Teams working on two continents have marked similar milestones in their respective efforts to tap an energy source key to the fight against climate change: They've each produced very impressive magnets.

72. Nashville airport breaks ground on new hotel, garage -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Nashville International Airport has broken ground on a new 14-story hotel that is scheduled to open in late 2023.

Officials gathered at the groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday for what will be a Hilton-branded hotel and a parking garage directly adjacent to the terminal.

73. Fed survey finds growth 'downshifted' in summer due to COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. economic activity "downshifted" in July and August due to rising concerns about COVID's delta variant, as well as supply chain problems and labor shortages, the Federal Reserve's latest survey of the nation's business conditions revealed.

74. Amazon Air cargo comes to Nashville -

The first Amazon Air cargo aircraft arrived at Nashville International Airport last week, beginning daily flights to the airport and adding to the company’s presence in the region.

“This operation reinforces Amazon’s investment in the region and BNA’s vital role in the economic development of the area,” says Doug Kreulen, BNA president and CEO. “We value their commitment and look forward to a strong partnership.”

75. Bradley attorneys appointed to ABA leadership positions -

Seven Bradley Arant Boult Cummings attorneys have been appointed to new leadership roles with the American Bar Association, including Junaid Odubeko, a partner in the firm’s Nashville office.

76. China chases 'rejuvenation' with control of tycoons, society -

BEIJING (AP) — An avalanche of changes launched by China's ruling Communist Party has jolted everyone from tech billionaires to school kids. Behind them: President Xi Jinping's vision of making a more powerful, prosperous country by reviving revolutionary ideals, with more economic equality and tighter party control over society and entrepreneurs.

77. Lawmakers: Ida damage shows need for infrastructure upgrades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shaken by haunting images of surging rivers, flooded roads and subways and other damage caused by the remnants of Hurricane Ida, lawmakers from both parties are vowing to upgrade the nation's aging infrastructure network.

78. US-built databases a potential tool of Taliban repression -

BOSTON (AP) — Over two decades, the United States and its allies spent hundreds of millions of dollars building databases for the Afghan people. The nobly stated goal: Promote law and order and government accountability and modernize a war-ravaged land.

79. How 9/11 changed air travel: more security, less privacy -

DALLAS (AP) — Ask anyone old enough to remember travel before Sept. 11, 2001, and you're likely to get a gauzy recollection of what flying was like.

There was security screening, but it wasn't anywhere near as intrusive. There were no long checkpoint lines. Passengers and their families could walk right to the gate together, postponing goodbye hugs until the last possible moment. Overall, an airport experience meant far less stress.

80. After unrelenting summer, Biden looks to get agenda on track -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The collapse of the Afghan government, a surge of COVID-19 cases caused by the delta variant, devastating weather events, a disappointing jobs report. What next?

After a torrent of crises, President Joe Biden is hoping to turn the page on an unrelenting summer and refocus his presidency this fall around his core economic agenda.

81. Lawmakers vow action after Ida floods Gulf Coast, Northeast -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shaken by haunting images of surging rivers, flooded roads and subways and other damage caused by the remnants of Hurricane Ida, lawmakers from both parties are vowing to upgrade the nation's aging infrastructure network.

82. Pulisic returns as US held to 1-1 qualifying draw vs Canada -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Two games into World Cup qualifying, a rebuilt U.S. soccer team is in trouble.

Three starters are hurt. Key midfielder Weston McKennie didn't dress because he violated team COVID protocols.

83. US hiring slows as delta variant weakens travel and tourism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers added just 235,000 jobs in August, a surprisingly weak gain after two months of robust hiring and the clearest sign to date that the delta variant's spread has discouraged some people from flying, shopping and eating out.

84. Milley: US coordination with Taliban on strikes 'possible' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Army Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said it's "possible" the United States will seek to coordinate with the Taliban on counterterrorism strikes in Afghanistan against Islamic State militants or others.

85. Tennessee kicks off Josh Heupel era hosting Bowling Green -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — The Josh Heupel era at Tennessee begins Thursday night, and the Volunteers' latest new head coach finally will debut his high-octane offense against Bowling Green.

"We are excited to go out and show the work we have put in during the last seven to eight months to go play some football," Heupel said.

86. AP FACT CHECK: Biden skirts broken promise on Afghan exit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden glossed over his broken promise to keep U.S. troops in Afghanistan until the last Americans are out and offered the faint assurance — even with the last U.S. planes gone — that it's never too late for U.S. citizens to leave.

87. Heavy rain from Ida forces Bonnaroo music fest to cancel -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Heavy rains from Hurricane Ida have forced Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Tennessee to cancel as organizers say the waterlogged festival grounds are unsafe for driving or camping.

88. Ida rains temporarily hamper cleanup after Tennessee floods -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Rain from Tropical Depression Ida temporarily hampered cleanup efforts Tuesday for a rural Tennessee community ravaged by recent deadly flooding, but the extra dousing brought on no new flooding so far, authorities said.

89. Analysis: War is over but not Biden's Afghanistan challenges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the final stream of U.S. cargo planes soaring over the peaks of the Hindu Kush, President Joe Biden fulfilled a campaign promise to end America's longest war, one it could not win.

90. As US military leaves Kabul, many Americans, Afghans remain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the final five U.S. military transport aircraft lifted off out of Afghanistan, they left behind up to 200 Americans and thousands of desperate Afghans who couldn't get out and now must rely on the Taliban to allow their departure.

91. Europe sees higher inflation on fleeting factors like oil -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Consumer prices spiked higher than expected in Europe in August, boosted in large part by more expensive fuel. Economists say the jump is temporary, but it could raise questions about how persistent higher inflation might turn out to be.

92. Last troops exit Afghanistan, ending America's longest war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States completed its withdrawal from Afghanistan late Monday, ending America's longest war and closing a chapter in military history likely to be remembered for colossal failures, unfulfilled promises and a frantic final exit that cost the lives of more than 180 Afghans and 13 U.S. service members, some barely older than the war.

93. Heupel names Michigan transfer Joe Milton Vols' starting QB -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — Tennessee coach Josh Heupel has named Joe Milton as the Volunteers' starting quarterback four days before the season opener against Bowling Green.

Milton, who arrived on campus this spring after three years at Michigan, beat out Harrison Bailey, who started three games for the Vols last season, and Hendon Hooker, who transferred from Virginia Tech in early January about 10 days before coach Jeremy Pruitt was fired.

94. US flies more evacuees out as withdrawal deadline nears -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's 20-year war in Afghanistan entered its final hours Monday with the last Americans seeking to be evacuated and the U.S. military preparing to end its airlift and depart the Taliban-controlled capital.

95. Wall Street rallies back to records following Fed speech -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied to more record highs Friday after the head of the Federal Reserve said it's still far from pulling interest rates off the record low that has helped the market soar, even if it does begin dialing back its support for the economy later this year.

96. Powell: Fed on track to slow aid for economy later this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve will start dialing back its ultra-low-rate policies this year as long as hiring continues to improve, Chair Jerome Powell said Friday, signaling the beginning of the end of the Fed's extraordinary response to the pandemic recession.

97. Biden promise to strike extremists faces new Afghan reality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — By promising to strike the extremists who killed 13 Americans and dozens of Afghans, President Joe Biden now confronts the reality of finding and targeting them in an unstable country without U.S. military and intelligence teams on the ground and no help from a friendly government in Kabul.

98. Stocks fall after Kabul bombing; traders also wait for Fed -

Technology and communication companies led a broad sell-off on Wall Street Thursday following deadly suicide attacks at the Kabul airport in Afghanistan.

The S&P 500 fell 0.6% a day after capping a five-day winning streak with an all-time high. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.5%, while the Nasdaq composite lost 0.6%. Despite the losses, the three major indexes are on track for weekly gains.

99. Dilemma for Fed chief: High inflation and a surging virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Not long ago, anticipation was high that Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell might begin to sketch out a plan this week for the Fed to start pulling back on its support for an economy that has been steadily strengthening.

100. Biden to meet with governors willing to help Afghan refugees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A world away from the evacuation violence in Afghanistan, President Joe Biden was meeting Thursday with a bipartisan group of governors from across the U.S. who have said they want to help resettle Afghans fleeing their now Taliban-ruled country.