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Editorial Results (free)

1. Washington orders Chinese phone carrier out of US market -

BEIJING (AP) — U.S. regulators are expelling a unit of China Telecom Ltd., one of the country's three major state-owned carriers, from the American market as a national security threat amid rising tension with Beijing.

2. Rangers beat Predators 3-1 on Lafrenière's third-period goal -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Alexis Lafrenière scored with 9:07 remaining in the third period to lift the New York Rangers over the Nashville Predators 3-1 on Thursday night.

Filip Chytil and Barclay Goodrow also scored and Igor Shesterkin made 28 saves for New York, winners of three straight. Shesterkin has stopped 99 of 102 shots in those three games.

3. Southwest: We won't put unvaccinated workers on unpaid leave -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines will let unvaccinated employees keep working past early December instead of putting them on unpaid leave if they apply for an exemption on medical or religious grounds.

4. Kraken post 1st NHL victory, spoiling Preds' opener 4-3 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Seattle Kraken wound up having to wait longer to play their first regular-season game on home ice than they did their first victory.

Brandon Tanev scored his second goal into an empty net with 1:21 left, and the Kraken beat the Nashville Predators 4-3 Thursday night for the first victory in the expansion franchise's second game.

5. Predators sign D Mattias Ekholm to 4-year, $25M deal -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Nashville Predators have signed defenseman Mattias Ekholm to a four-year, $25 million extension keeping him under contract through the 2025-26 season.

The Predators announced the contract Wednesday at a news conference.

6. Delta posts $1.2 billion Q3 profit, touts holiday bookings -

Delta Air Lines posted a $1.2 billion profit for the third quarter, helped by the latest installment of federal pandemic aid for the airline industry, and gave an upbeat forecast for the holiday-dominated fourth quarter.

7. Southwest Airlines flight cancellations continue into Monday -

Southwest Airlines canceled hundreds more flights Monday following a  weekend of major service disruptions.

According to Flightaware, the carrier has cancelled 348 flights Monday and delayed another 303 flights.

8. China plans to unveil drones, moon rocket at air show -

ZHUHAI, China (AP) — A military drone whose manufacturer says it can cruise for 20 hours at 15,000 meters (50,000 feet) was among Chinese warplanes, missiles and other weapons technology shown in public for the first time Tuesday at the opening of the country's biggest air show.

9. Pinnacles rates No. 6 on women’s workplace list -

Nashville’s Pinnacle Financial Partners remains one of the nation’s Best Large Workplaces for Women, earning the No. 6 spot on the latest list from Fortune magazine and Great Place to Work.

10. NTSB chief: focus on road safety must shift to entire system -

DETROIT (AP) — The new chairman of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board wants governments and businesses to change the way they look at highway safety, considering the whole system rather than individual driver behavior.

11. US investigating airlines over slow refunds during pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Transportation Department is detailing efforts it says it is making to help airline customers who were wrongfully denied refunds after flights were canceled or changed during the pandemic.

12. Magnet milestones move distant nuclear fusion dream closer -

SAINT-PAUL-LES-DURANCE, France (AP) — Teams working on two continents have marked similar milestones in their respective efforts to tap an energy source key to the fight against climate change: They've each produced very impressive magnets.

13. Please adjust your masks to full upright position -

While waiting at Gate C7 at the Nashville airport, a thought occurred to me: Might ours turn out to be one of those “unruly passenger gets duct-taped to the seat” kind of flights?

Such is among the possibilities for air journeys these days, a time when travel of any sort poses potential hazards not even contemplated a couple of short years ago.

14. Pilots' union sues Southwest over changes made in pandemic -

DALLAS (AP) — The pilots' union is suing Southwest Airlines, saying that rules the airline put into place before and during the pandemic have changed pay rates and working rules, in violation of federal labor law.

15. USPS has shorted some workers' pay for years, CPI finds -

Nancy Campos' back ached as she loaded more than 100 Amazon packages onto her truck. The 59-year-old grandmother, a mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, had worked 13 days in a row without a lunch break, and now she was delivering on the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday to keep up with a never-ending flow of boxes.

16. Delta variant spreads, Southwest no longer sees profit in Q3 -

Southwest Airlines said Wednesday that it no longer expects to turn a profit in the third quarter as a surge in COVID-19 infections fueled by the highly contagious delta variant darkens the outlook for travel.

17. SoftBank profit declines following Sprint perk a year ago -

TOKYO (AP) — Japanese technology company SoftBank's fiscal first quarter earnings dropped 39% because of the absence of the cash benefit from the merger of Sprint, which boosted its profits a year ago.

18. Huawei revenue sinks as smartphones hurt by US sanctions -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei's revenue fell 29.4% from a year earlier in the first half of 2021 as smartphones sales tumbled under U.S. sanctions imposed in a fight with Beijing over technology and security.

19. Spirit cancels half its flights; American also struggling -

Spirit Airlines canceled nearly half its schedule for Tuesday, the third straight day of extremely high cancellation numbers at the budget airline.

By early afternoon, the low-cost carrier had canceled about 320 flights, or 47% of its schedule, according to the FlightAware tracking service. Dozens more flights were late. The blame appeared to lie at least partly with a technology outage affecting crew scheduling.

20. Air travel hits another pandemic high, flight delays grow -

DALLAS (AP) — Air travel in the U.S. is hitting new pandemic-era highs, and airlines are scrambling to keep up with the summer-vacation crowds.

Despite rising numbers of coronavirus infections fueled by the delta variant, the U.S. set another recent high mark for air travel Sunday, with more than 2.2 million people going through airport checkpoints, according to the Transportation Security Administration.

21. With taxpayers' help, Delta posts $652 million profit in 2Q -

Delta Air Lines is reporting a $652 million profit in the second quarter, helped by hordes of vacation travelers in the U.S. and money from taxpayers, positioning the airline for stronger results once business and international flying recover from the pandemic.

22. United sees more travel rebound, adds flights to warm spots -

United Airlines said Friday it will add nearly 150 flights this winter to warm-weather destinations in the U.S. and will also add flights to beach spots in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

23. Longtime Southwest CEO will step down next year -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines said Wednesday that longtime CEO Gary Kelly will step down in February and be succeeded by another veteran at the nation's fourth-largest airline.

24. UK pushes Pacific trade talks amid broader new focus on Asia -

BANGKOK (AP) — The U.K. launched negotiations Tuesday to join a trans-Pacific trade bloc as it looks to explore new opportunities following its departure from the European Union and strengthen its strategic interests in Asia.

25. Lucky number: Biden is 13th US president to meet the queen -

LONDON (AP) — Imagine trying to make an impression on someone who's met, well, almost everyone.

Such is the challenge for President Joe Biden, who is set to sip tea with Queen Elizabeth II on Sunday at Windsor Castle after a Group of Seven leaders' summit in southwestern England.

26. Travel numbers climb as Americans hit the road for holiday -

Americans hit the road in near-record numbers at the start of the Memorial Day weekend, as their eagerness to break free from coronavirus confinement overcame higher prices for flights, gasoline and hotels.

27. Aho, Nedeljkovic lift Hurricanes past Predators, 3-0 -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Alex Nedeljkovic stayed composed and steady all night in net. It's a good thing the Carolina Hurricanes' penalty kill did, too.

That's why they are up 2-0 in their first-round playoff series on the Nashville Predators.

28. Delta posts $1.2 billion loss, says it's flying into recovery -

Delta Air Lines lost $1.2 billion in the first quarter but executives said Thursday that the airline could be profitable by late summer if the budding recovery in air travel continues.

CEO Ed Bastian said Thursday that ticket sales have been stronger in the last two weeks than at any time since the pandemic hit the U.S. last year. Right now it's mostly vacationers booking trips to mountains, beaches and resorts, but he expects business travel to come back by late summer or fall as more Americans are vaccinated against COVID-19.

29. How my travel credit card saved me $1,388 on vacation cancellation -

In 2020, I was looking forward to leaving Los Angeles for a socially distanced vacation in San Diego. I had stocked up on food, hand sanitizer, wipes and masks.

To stay safe and distant, I had booked two cottages near the beach with my travel credit card. My friend and his significant other would stay in one, and my roommate and I would take the other. That was the plan, until one friend tested positive for the coronavirus and had to isolate at home.

30. 2 new airlines await Americans looking to fly somewhere -

Americans are traveling in the greatest numbers in more than a year, and soon they will have two new leisure-oriented airlines to consider for those trips.

Both hope to draw passengers by filling in smaller strands on the spider web of airline routes crisscrossing the United States.

31. Frontier Airlines hopes IPO rides wave of travel recovery -

Frontier Airlines is betting that the budding recovery in leisure travel is for real.

Shares of the discount carrier began public trading Thursday, edging lower in midday trading. The Denver-based airline and its private owners sought to raise $570 million before costs from the IPO after pricing 30 million shares at $19, the low end of a $19 to $21 target. The stock opened at $18.61, then bumped up to $19.06 before dipping back down to $18.54.

32. Tolvanen's OT goal extends Predators' win streak to 6 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Eeli Tolvanen made sure Nashville's winning streak reached a season-best six games.

Tolvanen scored at 1:29 of overtime to give the Predators a 3-2 victory over the Dallas Stars on Tuesday night.

33. Egypt races to dislodge giant vessel blocking Suez Canal -

SUEZ, Egypt (AP) — Tugboats and a specialized suction dredger worked Friday to dislodge a giant container ship that has been stuck sideways in Egypt's Suez Canal for the past three days, blocking a crucial waterway for global shipping.

34. China-Europe sanctions fight shatters image of amicable ties -

BEIJING (AP) — China looked to Europe as an amicable partner as the continent's leaders resisted being drawn into President Donald Trump's conflicts with Beijing over trade, technology and human rights.

35. Jarnkrok scores twice, Predators edge Panthers 2-1 -

SUNRISE, Fla. (AP) — Calle Jarnkrok scored twice, leading the Nashville Predators to a 2-1 win over the Florida Panthers on Thursday night.

Juuse Saros stopped 40 shots and the Predators beat the Panthers for the first time in four games.

36. Johnson looks east to Asia as focus of post-Brexit strategy -

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Tuesday the U.K. will prioritize diplomatic engagement with Asian countries in the coming decade, as he unveiled a major shift in the country's foreign policy and defense priorities after Brexit.

37. Geekie scores twice as Hurricanes pound Predators 5-1 -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Morgan Geekie scored his first two goals of the season and the Carolina Hurricanes used a rapid-fire scoring spree in the first period to defeat the Nashville Predators 5-1 on Thursday night.

38. 5 things agents wish people knew about insurance -

Insurance is notoriously complicated, and few people have the time or desire to pore over their policies. But some basic knowledge can go a long way – and that’s where an insurance agent can help, by clearing up some of the most common misconceptions they encounter.

39. Americans vaccinated against COVID-19 still wait for advice -

More than 27 million Americans fully vaccinated against the coronavirus will have to keep waiting for guidance from federal health officials for what they should and shouldn't do.

The Biden administration said Friday it's focused on getting the guidance right and accommodating emerging science, but the delays add to the uncertainty around bringing about an end to the pandemic as the nation's virus fatigue grows.

40. Legislature keeps ‘vital’ bills on track -

Like many others – including our mail carrier, newspaper deliverer, trash collector and Gigamunch meal provider – lawmakers recently took a snow break from duties.

Not to worry: Even before the freeze arrived, they had produced hundreds of bills, “the public welfare requiring it,” as the boilerplate legislative language asserts.

41. Openings begin March 4 at Fifth + Broadway -

Brookfield Properties’ mixed-use project Fifth + Broadway in downtown Nashville will begin its first tenant openings March 4.

The event culminates a multiyear effort by the company and local developer Pat Emery on the former site of the Nashville Convention Center.

42. Pentagon rethinking how to array forces to focus on China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration faces a conundrum as it rethinks the positioning of military forces around the world: How to focus more on China and Russia without retreating from longstanding Mideast threats — and to make this shift with potentially leaner Pentagon budgets.

43. American Airlines lost $8.9 billion in a year of pandemic -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines lost $2.2 billion in the fourth quarter as people stayed put in the pandemic, sending the carrier's revenue plunging by nearly two-thirds from the same period a year ago.

44. Adams and Reese taps new partner in charge -

Edward H. L. Playfair has been appointed partner in charge of Adams and Reese’s Nashville office.

Playfair, who also serves as the firm’s Intellectual Property Team leader, serves clients’ intellectual property needs across the nation and around the world. He joined Adams and Reese in 2009 and previously practiced international law in the United Kingdom and is admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of England and Wales.

45. Twitter launches crowd-sourced fact-checking project -

Twitter is enlisting its users to help combat misinformation on its service by flagging and notating misleading and false tweets.

The pilot program unveiled Monday, called Birdwatch, allows a preselected group of users — for now, only in the U.S. — who sign up through Twitter. Those who want to sign up must have a U.S.-based phone carrier, verified email and phone number, and no recent Twitter rule violations.

46. EXPLAINER: Biden's Iran problem is getting worse by the day -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden has an Iran problem. And, it's getting more complicated by the day.

Thanks to provocative moves by Iran and less-than-coherent actions by the outgoing Trump administration, the president-elect is facing an increasingly uncertain situation when it comes to Iran, a decades-long American nemesis that has been a target of blame for much of the Middle East's instability.

47. Extraordinary warning to Trump by 10 former Pentagon chiefs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an extraordinary rebuke of President Donald Trump, all 10 living former secretaries of defense are cautioning against any move to involve the military in pursuing claims of election fraud, arguing that it would take the country into "dangerous, unlawful and unconstitutional territory."

48. Nashville bombing spotlights vulnerable voice, data networks -

The Christmas Day bombing in downtown Nashville led to phone and data service outages and disruptions over hundreds of miles in the southern U.S., raising new concerns about the vulnerability of U.S. communications.

49. Cut off: Britain hit with travel bans over new virus strain -

LONDON (AP) — Trucks waiting to get out of Britain backed up for miles and people were left stranded at airports Monday as dozens of countries around the world slapped tough travel restrictions on the U.K. because of a new and seemingly more contagious strain of the coronavirus in England.

50. Waiting for passengers, American puts Boeing Max in the air -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is taking its long-grounded Boeing 737 Max jets out of storage, updating key flight-control software, and flying the planes in preparation for the first flights with paying passengers later this month.

51. Holiday air travel surges despite dire health warnings -

Nearly 1.2 million people passed through U.S. airports Sunday, the greatest number since the pandemic gripped the country in March, despite pleas from health experts for Americans to stay home over Thanksgiving.

52. As virus cases spike, financial outlook for airlines dims -

With coronavirus cases spiking in the U.S. and Europe, the financial outlook of the world's airlines is getting worse.

Airlines will lose more than $157 billion over this year and next because of the pandemic, their main trade group said on Tuesday,

53. International flyers may soon need to get virus vaccinations -

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — International air travel could come booming back next year but with a new rule: Travelers to certain countries must be vaccinated against the coronavirus before they can fly.

54. Norwegian Air seeks bankruptcy protection, to restructure -

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Low-cost carrier Norwegian Air Shuttle said Wednesday it is seeking restructuring and bankruptcy protection in Ireland, where its fleet is held, saying the decision was "in the interest of its stakeholders."

55. Trump bans US investment in Chinese military-linked firms -

BEIJING (AP) — U.S. President Donald Trump has stepped up a conflict with China over security and technology by barring Americans from investing in companies that U.S. officials say are owned or controlled by the Chinese military.

56. Japan's SoftBank back in the black as investments improve -

TOKYO (AP) — Japanese technology company SoftBank Group Corp. said Monday it bounced back to profitability in the last quarter as its investments improved in value.

57. JetBlue is the latest airline to retreat from blocking seats -

The days of airlines blocking seats to make passengers feel safer about flying during the pandemic are coming closer to an end.

JetBlue is the latest to indicate it is rethinking the issue. A spokesman for the carrier said Thursday that JetBlue will reduce the number of seats it blocks after Dec. 1 to accommodate families traveling together over the holidays.

58. American, Southwest, Alaska add to airline loss parade in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in additional losses as the pandemic chokes off air travel, but a recent uptick in passengers, however modest, has provided some hope.

59. American, Southwest add to parade of airline losses in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in losses as the pandemic causes a massive drop in air travel.

American Airlines on Thursday reported a loss of $2.4 billion and Southwest Airlines lost $1.16 billion in the third quarter, typically a very strong period of air travel that includes most of the summer vacation season.

60. United loses $1.8 billion, aims to shift focus to recovery -

United Airlines financial hole grew deeper over the summer as a modest recovery in air travel slowed down, pushing the carrier to a loss of $1.84 billion in the typically strong third quarter.

The airline said Wednesday that revenue plummeted 78% from a year earlier. The loss was worse than analysts had expected.

61. CEO says Southwest needs union pay cuts to avoid furloughs -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines will cut pay for nonunion workers in January and says union workers must also accept less pay or face furloughs next year as the pandemic continues to hammer the airline business.

62. Trump seizes on small election issues to spread concern -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nine ballots discarded in Pennsylvania. A mail carrier who altered a handful of affidavit ballot applications. People being sent double ballots.

In the run up to Election Day, President Donald Trump is seizing on small, potentially routine voting issues to suggest the election is rigged. But there is no evidence there is any widespread voter fraud as the president has suggested.

63. Records: Mail delivery lags behind targets as election nears -

The slice of Michigan that covers Detroit, its suburbs and towns dependent on the auto industry is coveted political terrain in one of this year's most important presidential swing states. It also has another distinction as home to one of the worst-performing U.S. Postal Service districts in the country.

64. Records: Mail delivery lags behind targets as election nears -

The slice of Michigan that covers Detroit, its suburbs and towns dependent on the auto industry is coveted political terrain in one of this year's most important presidential swing states. It also has another distinction as home to one of the worst-performing U.S. Postal Service districts in the country.

65. European Union's top court supports net neutrality rules -

LONDON (AP) — The European Union's highest court has given its support to the bloc's rules that stop internet providers from charging customers for preferential access to their networks.

The European Court of Justice on Tuesday issued its first interpretation of the EU's net neutrality rules since they were adopted in 2015.

66. Thai court allows Thai Airways to file for reorganization -

BANGKOK (AP) — Thailand's Central Bankruptcy Court on Monday gave the go-ahead to financially ailing Thai Airways International to submit a business reorganization plan and appointed seven planners to oversee it.

67. Study: Electronics could stop 40% of big truck rear crashes -

DETROIT (AP) — Safety features such as automatic emergency braking and forward collision warnings could prevent more than 40% of crashes in which semis rear-end other vehicles, a new study has found.

68. Thousands of chicks arrive dead to farmers amid USPS turmoil -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — At least 4,800 chicks shipped to Maine farmers through the U.S. Postal Service have arrived dead in the recent weeks since rapid cuts hit the federal mail carrier's operations, U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree said.

69. American Airlines will drop flights to 15 cities in October -

American Airlines will drop flights to 15 smaller U.S. cities in October when a federal requirement to serve those communities ends.

The airline blamed low demand during the coronavirus pandemic, which has triggered a massive slump in air travel and huge losses for the carriers. Airlines and their labor unions are seeking billions in new taxpayer relief.

70. Thousands of chicks arrive dead to farmers amid USPS turmoil -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — At least 4,800 chicks shipped to Maine farmers through the U.S. Postal Service have arrived dead in recent weeks after rapid cuts hit the federal mail carrier's operations, U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree said.

71. American Airlines will drop flights to 15 cities in October -

American Airlines will drop flights to 15 smaller U.S. cities in October when a federal requirement to serve those communities ends.

The airline blamed low demand during the coronavirus pandemic, which has triggered a massive slump in air travel. Airlines and their labor unions are seeking billions in taxpayer relief.

72. GM calls Preds' series loss unacceptable, promises changes -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The NHL's winningest general manager is not happy with the Nashville Predators' diminishing returns, and David Poile made it clear Thursday that change is coming.

"Bottom line, this is unacceptable," Poile said in a video conference call. "And this is how we have to view this result is that we have to be better, and it's not acceptable."

73. Virgin Atlantic airline files for US bankruptcy protection -

NEW YORK (AP) — Virgin Atlantic, the airline founded by British businessman Richard Branson, filed Tuesday for protection in U.S. bankruptcy court as it tries to survive the virus pandemic that is hammering the airline industry.

74. Dutch KLM group to cut 4,500-5,000 jobs due to pandemic -

AMSTELVEEN, The Netherlands (AP) — Dutch carrier KLM said Friday it will cut between 4,500 and 5,000 jobs because of the coronavirus crisis.

The company said in a statement that in addition to 1,500 job losses, some 1,500 temporary contracts won't be renewed and 2,000 jobs will be suppressed via a voluntary departure scheme. The group also expects "natural attrition through retirement" to help cut an extra 500 jobs.

75. Ryanair expects air travel to be depressed for 2-3 years -

LONDON (AP) — European budget airline Ryanair said Monday that the COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on its earnings, with lockdown restrictions leading to a 99% drop in passengers in the first quarter, and warned travel is likely to remain subdued for years.

76. Watchdogs eye $700M relief loan to struggling trucking firm -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional watchdogs are questioning the government's decision to award a $700 million coronavirus relief loan to a struggling trucking company on grounds its operations are critical for maintaining national security.

77. "Growth has stalled": Surge in US infections hits Delta -

Delta Air Lines lost $5.7 billion during a brutal three-month stretch in which the coronavirus pandemic brought travel to a near standstill, and any hoped-for recovery has been smothered by a resurgence of infected Americans.

78. US to reject nearly all Chinese claims in South China Sea -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials say the Trump administration is poised to escalate its actions against China by stepping squarely into one of the most sensitive regional issues dividing them and rejecting outright nearly all of Beijing's significant maritime claims in the South China Sea.

79. Closing bars to stop coronavirus spread is backed by science -

Authorities are closing honky tonks, bars and other drinking establishments in some parts of the U.S. to stem the surge of COVID-19 infections — a move backed by sound science about risk factors that go beyond wearing or not wearing masks.

80. Closing bars to stop coronavirus spread is backed by science -

Authorities are closing honky tonks, bars and other drinking establishments in some parts of the U.S. to stem the surge of COVID-19 infections — a move backed by sound science about risk factors that go beyond wearing or not wearing masks.

81. Dodging virus, Navy ships break record for staying at sea -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The two U.S. warships in the Middle East weren't aiming to break a record.

But when the coronavirus made ship stops in foreign countries too risky, the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower and the USS San Jacinto were ordered to keep moving and avoid all port visits.

82. US naval buildup in Indo-Pacific seen as warning to China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first time in nearly three years, three American aircraft carriers are patrolling the Indo-Pacific waters, a massive show of naval force in a region roiled by spiking tensions between the U.S. and China and a sign that the Navy has bounced back from the worst days of the coronavirus outbreak.

83. California welcomes back tourists -

SAN DIEGO (AP) — There will be no packed double-decker safari buses with tour guides rolling through the San Diego Zoo, nor animal shows that draw crowds — nor breakfast buffets at hotels.

Instead, hotels are adorning lobbies with hand sanitizing dispensers and will be limiting how many people lounge by pools. And the zoo is putting entertainers on its double-decker buses to hold moving shows while people stand on green circles to keep them six feet apart. Every visitor over the age of two will be required to wear face coverings.

84. Amusement parks opening with temperature checks at the gate -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

85. Hong Kong OKs $5 billion bailout for Cathay Pacific Airways -

HONG KONG (AP) — Financially battered Hong Kong airline Cathay Pacific Airways has become the latest airline to get government support to survive the coronavirus pandemic.

The Hong Kong government on Tuesday approved a 39 billion Hong Kong dollar ($5 billion) recapitalization plan that calls for a new government-controlled entity called Aviation 2020 to buy $2.6 billion of an up to 33 billion Hong Kong dollars ($4.3 billion) share offering by Cathay Pacific.

86. New wing & a prayer: BNA building for uncertain times -

Nashville International Airport should be enjoying its best year ever in 2020. After all, 2019 was a record year for the airport, as was 2018.

In fact, BNA has had seven record-breaking years in a row, with more than 18 million passengers traveling to and from Nashville last year, an increase of 14% compared to 2018. And 2019 and 2018 were the only other years the airport exceeded 1 million passengers every month.

87. French virus tracing app goes live amid debate over privacy -

PARIS (AP) — France is rolling out an official coronavirus contact-tracing app aimed at containing fresh outbreaks as lockdown restrictions gradually ease, becoming the first major European country to deploy the smartphone technology amid simmering debate over privacy fears.

88. Transportation sector is bleeding jobs, more cuts on the way -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

89. Retailers reopening more stores, tourism expanding -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

90. Retailers reopening more stores, tourism expanding -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

91. Job cuts continue as financial aid lends support -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

92. Kroger says isn't pulling back bonuses; airlines see uptick -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

93. Retailers face reckoning as April's sales drop sets a record -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Friday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

94. Trump administration ease rules limiting truck driver hours -

The Trump administration eased rules Thursday that limit working hours for truck drivers, and the changes brought immediate protests from labor and safety groups.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration extended the maximum working day for short-haul drivers from 12 hours to 14 hours and applied the longer hours to more drivers by expanding the geographic definition of short-haul driving.

95. Vast cutbacks in jobs and spending before any summer rebound -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

96. Senate fails to override Trump veto on Iran conflict -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has failed in its bid to block President Donald Trump from engaging in further military action against Iran without first seeking approval from the legislative branch.

The Senate fell short on Thursday of the votes needed to override Trump's veto of a bipartisan resolution that asserted congressional authority on use of military force. Trump rejected the measure Wednesday, calling it "insulting" and an attempt to divide the Republican party ahead of the presidential election.

97. Travel crushed by virus; mortgage availability worsens -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

98. Trump vetoes measure to restrain his actions against Iran -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday vetoed a resolution that said he must get a nod from Congress before engaging in further military action against Iran. Trump called it "insulting" to the presidency.

99. Here come COVID-19 tracing apps - and privacy trade-offs -

As governments around the world consider how to monitor new coronavirus outbreaks while reopening their societies, many are starting to bet on smartphone apps to help stanch the pandemic.

But their decisions on which technologies to use — and how far those allow authorities to peer into private lives — are highlighting some uncomfortable trade-offs between protecting privacy and public health.

100. It keeps getting worse for imperiled airlines -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.