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Editorial Results (free)

1. Frustrated US diplomats fight back in impeachment probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three years of simmering frustration inside the State Department is boiling over on Capitol Hill as a parade of current and former diplomats testify to their concerns about the Trump administration's unorthodox policy toward Ukraine.

2. Trump portrays Mideast as a bloody sandbox, maligns Kurds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is surfacing cultural stereotypes as he depicts the Middle East as a blood-soaked sandbox where people "play" violently because that's "what they do" in that part of the world.

3. Study links Russian tweets to release of hacked emails -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. election has generally been seen as two separate, unrelated tracks: hacking Democratic emails and sending provocative tweets. But a new study suggests the tactics were likely intertwined.

4. Researchers: AI surveillance is expanding worldwide -

A growing number of countries are following China's lead in deploying artificial intelligence to track citizens, according to a research group's report published Tuesday.

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace says at least 75 countries are actively using AI tools such as facial recognition for surveillance.

5. Diplomats shaken by resignation of Britain's US ambassador -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The abrupt resignation of Britain's ambassador to the United States over leaked cables critical of the Trump administration may have jolted official Washington, but it's unlikely to have a lasting impact on the U.S.-British relationship or diplomatic practice.

6. Diplomats shaken for now after Britain's US ambassador quits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The abrupt resignation of Britain's ambassador to the United States over leaked cables critical of the Trump administration may have jolted official Washington, but it's unlikely to have a lasting impact on the U.S.-British relationship or diplomatic practice.

7. Facebook limits livestreaming ahead of tech summit in Paris -

PARIS (AP) — Facebook toughened its livestreaming policies Wednesday as it prepared to huddle with world leaders and other tech CEOs in Paris to find ways to keep social media from being used to spread hate, organize extremist groups and broadcast terror attacks.

8. US abstains from global pledge to curb online violence -

PARIS (AP) — The White House is not endorsing a global pledge to step up efforts to keep internet platforms from being used to spread hate, organize extremist groups and broadcast attacks, citing respect for "freedom of expression and freedom of the press."

9. AP FACT CHECK: Trump, Putin on 'no collusion'; economy myths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is still pulling numbers out of thin air on the economy.

Trump repeatedly asserted that the U.S. economy is perhaps the best "ever" and insisted that last quarter's gross domestic product was the highest in 14 years. Neither claim is true.

10. Ruta Sepetys: Seeker of lost stories -

Ruta Sepetys, a former manager of singers and songwriters and now a New York Times bestselling author, will tell you that she is a seeker of lost stories.

It was her family’s lost stories that kick-started her career as a one of the top historical fiction authors for young readers. Known as a crossover author because her books are read by both young readers and adults, Sepetys has displayed an ability to share these lost stories to readers across the world, something she says gives her immense joy.

11. Putin: NKorea ready to denuclearize — if it gets guarantees -

VLADIVOSTOK, Russia (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin said North Korean leader Kim Jong Un confirmed during their first summit Thursday he is willing to give up his nuclear weapons — but only if he gets an ironclad guarantee of security beforehand.

12. Tesla CEO plans to hand the car keys to robots next year -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Tesla CEO Elon Musk expects to start converting the company's electric cars into fully self-driving vehicles next year as part of an audacious plan to create a network of robotic taxis to compete against Uber and other ride-hailing services.

13. Tesla gears up for fully self-driving cars amid skepticism -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Tesla CEO Elon Musk appears poised to transform the company's electric cars into driverless vehicles in a risky bid to realize a bold vision that he has been floating for years.

14. Cumberland Trust adds trust administrator -

Nashville-based Cumberland Trust recently added David Liles to its estate administration team as a trust administrator. In his role, Liles supports the administration of post-mortem estates and helps clients and beneficiaries understand the steps of the estate settlement process.

15. Sanders pitches a tougher line than Trump on GM closures -

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sunday accused President Donald Trump of betraying the working people who put him in office and challenged him to deny federal contracts to General Motors until the company reopens shuttered plants.

16. Autonomous car testing plan aims to boost public confidence -

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Companies testing autonomous vehicles in Pittsburgh will have to immediately report crashes resulting in any injuries as part of new guidelines announced Monday intended to boost public confidence in the testing after a deadly accident in Arizona last year.

17. AT&T shakes up WarnerMedia to emphasize streaming -

NEW YORK (AP) — Now that AT&T's $81 billion takeover of Time Warner is a done deal , the company is reorganizing its TV and movie businesses to emphasize streaming rather than cable TV networks.

18. US pulls out of Cold War-era nuclear treaty, blaming Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States announced Friday that it is pulling out of a landmark nuclear arms treaty with Russia, arguing that it should not be constrained by a deal Moscow is violating with "impunity" by deploying banned missiles. Democrats in Congress and some arms control advocates slammed the decision as opening the door to an arms race.

19. AP-NORC Poll: Most support gene editing to protect babies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say it would be OK to use gene-editing technology to create babies protected against a variety of diseases — but a new poll shows they'd draw the line at changing DNA so children are born smarter, faster or taller.

20. Still going strong as those who idolize him fade -

The gentle music giant, once a prospective Traveling Wilbury and a guy whose twangy guitar pulsates the heart of rock ’n’ roll, sits in his Franklin home and talks about – among other things – The Beatles’ so-called “White Album” that he got right from the source when it was released a half-century ago.

21. Tech execs at White House field ideas for US dominance -

Top executives from Google, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle and Qualcomm gathered Thursday at the White House amid strained ties between President Donald Trump's administration and the tech industry and an ongoing trade war with China.

22. Senate confirms Kansas bank regulator Bowman for Fed board -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday confirmed Michelle Bowman, a Kansas banking regulator, as a member of the Federal Reserve board.

23. Shareholders must vote on Musk's return as Tesla chairman -

If Tesla CEO Elon Musk wants to return as chairman, shareholders will have to vote on it.

The requirement is detailed in a court brief filed jointly on Thursday by Tesla and the Securities and Exchange Commission. The brief was required by a federal judge who must approve a securities fraud settlement reached with Musk and the company last month.

24. Trump to nominate economist Nellie Liang for Fed board seat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is set to nominate former Federal Reserve economist Nellie Liang to the central bank's board of governors, tapping an official who played a key role at the Fed in dealing with the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis.

25. With the fall of a kingmaker, CBS is punished on Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sizing up a future of a network without its kingmaker, Wall Street sent shares of CBS down sharply Monday, the first day of trading since the departure of Les Moonves.

CBS said late Sunday, as more allegations of sexual abuse surfaced, that Moonves would be replaced and that the company was shaking up its board of directors.

26. Legal Aid Society picks Family Law lead attorney -

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands, Tennessee’s largest non-profit law firm, has promoted Shaina Thompson to family law lead attorney for its Nashville office.

She will help victims of domestic violence gain independence from abusive situations. Beyond Orders of Protection and divorces, this includes helping victims with issues like denial of benefits, food stamps and/or housing.

27. China says US swinging 'big stick' of unfair trade tactics -

BEIJING (AP) — China on Thursday accused the United States of using bullying tactics and blackmail in threatening to impose tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars of Chinese imports, ramping up criticism that the measures levied in the name of balancing trade would harm both countries' companies and the world economy.

28. China says US swinging 'big stick' of unfair trade tactics -

BEIJING (AP) — China on Thursday accused the United States of using bullying tactics and blackmail in threatening to impose tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars of Chinese imports, ramping up criticism that the measures levied in the name of balancing trade would harm both countries' companies and the world economy.

29. Verizon, AT&T to end location data sales to brokers -

Verizon and AT&T have pledged to stop providing information on phone owners' locations to data brokers, stepping back from a business practice that has drawn criticism for endangering privacy.

The data has apparently allowed outside companies to pinpoint the location of wireless devices without their owners' knowledge or consent.  Verizon said that about 75 companies have been obtaining its customer data from two little-known California-based brokers that Verizon supplies directly — LocationSmart and Zumigo

30. Senate panel approves nominations for 2 Fed board seats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday approved President Donald Trump's nomination of Columbia University professor Richard Clarida to be the vice chairman of the Federal Reserve. The panel also approved the nomination of Kansas bank commissioner Michelle Bowman to fill another vacancy on the Fed's seven-member board.

31. Obama-era license aimed to let Iran convert money in dollars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration secretly sought to give Iran access — albeit briefly — to the U.S. financial system by sidestepping sanctions kept in place after the 2015 nuclear deal, despite repeatedly telling Congress and the public it had no plans to do so.

32. Fed keeps key rate steady but notes rising inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is keeping its benchmark interest rate unchanged but says that inflation is climbing after years of being stuck below the Fed's target level.

The Fed on Wednesday left its key short-term rate at 1.5 percent to 1.75 percent, the level it set in March after its sixth increase since December 2015. The Fed is gradually tightening credit to control inflation against the backdrop of a tight labor market and a pickup in consumer prices.

33. Fed is set to leave rates alone but to hike later in year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is all but sure to leave interest rates unchanged this week, though steady economic growth and inflation pressures will likely keep the Fed on a path toward further rate hikes later this year.

34. Putin: Russia list is a hostile move driven by Trump foes -

MOSCOW (AP) — Mixing irony with scorn, President Vladimir Putin on Thursday described a new list including Russian officials and tycoons under a U.S. sanctions law as a hostile and "stupid" move spearheaded by President Donald Trump's political foes, but he said the Kremlin will refrain from retaliation for now.

35. Quarles lays out road map for bank regulations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve's top official on financial regulation is putting forward a wide-ranging agenda for improving the way the nation's banks are regulated, saying he wants to focus on "efficiency, transparency and simplicity."

36. Senate committee approves nomination of Powell for Fed chair -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Banking Committee has voted for a second time to approve President Donald Trump's nomination of Jerome Powell to be the next chairman of the Federal Reserve.

The approval Wednesday was by voice vote, with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, voting no. The re-vote was needed because the full Senate did not take up Powell's nomination last year. The term of current Fed Chair Janet Yellen ends on Feb. 3.

37. Senate panel approves Jerome Powell as Fed chairman -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday approved President Donald Trump's selection of Jerome Powell to be the next chairman of the Federal Reserve.

The committee vote was 22-1 with all Republicans and every Democrat except Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., supporting the nomination.

38. Trump to nominate economics professor to Federal Reserve -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump intends to nominate Marvin Goodfriend, a Carnegie Mellon University economics professor, for a seat on the Federal Reserve Board, the latest step in the administration's effort to put its stamp on the nation's central bank.

39. Big question for US cities: Is Amazon's HQ2 worth the price? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of cities are working frantically to land Amazon's second headquarters, raising a weighty question with no easy answer:

Is it worth it?

Amazon is promising $5 billion of investment and 50,000 jobs over the next decade and a half. Yet the winning city would have to provide Amazon with generous tax breaks and other incentives that can erode a city's tax base.

40. Fed Vice Chairman Fischer to resign for 'personal reasons' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer will resign next month for personal reasons, leaving a fourth vacancy on the seven-member Fed governing board.

Fischer is a widely-respected economist who taught at MIT and was head of the Bank of Israel for eight years. His unexpected departure adds to a leadership vacuum at the top of the Fed as it navigates a difficult path. Fischer, 73, was a close confidant of Fed Chair Janet Yellen, whose own term ends in February

41. High-tech US plants offer jobs even as the laid-off struggle -

NORWOOD, Ohio (AP) — Herbie Mays is 3M proud, and it shows — in the 3M shirt he wears; in the 3M ring he earned after three decades at the company's plant in suburban Cincinnati; in the way he shows off a card from a 3M supervisor, praising Mays as "a GREAT employee."

42. Patent attorney launches intellectual law practice -

Patent attorney A.J. Bahou has opened Bahou Law, PLLC. Bahou is experienced in trials and mediations, and is a registered patent attorney who practices in the area of electrical and computer engineering technologies, Blockchain, data privacy, cyber security, health care and intellectual property law, including litigation management of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets.

43. Printer’s Alley hotel to open in late 2017 -

A new Art-Deco-era designed boutique hotel, with specialty shops, a working printing press and bars and restaurants, will open in downtown Nashville in late 2017 near historic Printer’s Alley.

44. Fed is set to raise rates this week despite political tumult -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Washington political world is in disarray. Britain's election tumult has scrambled the outlook for Europe. And economies in the United States and abroad are plodding along at a pace that hardly suggests robust health.

45. Senate hearing to focus on Russian disinformation tactics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some tactics Russia used to meddle in last year's presidential election would give shivers to anyone who believes in American democracy, the Senate intelligence committee's top Democrat says.

46. Meharry names senior VP, medical school dean -

Meharry Medical College has appointed Veronica Thierry Mallett M.D., MMM, as its senior vice president for health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine, effective March 2017.

Mallett is a researcher and educator, known for her work in women’s health and reducing health disparities.

47. Trump is a mixed blessing for Chinese leaders -

BEIJING (AP) — Donald Trump is a mixed blessing for Chinese leaders.

Trump's threats to tear up trade deals and hike tariffs on Chinese goods look ominous. If carried out, they could chill thriving commercial ties at a time when Beijing is struggling to shore up economic growth.

48. Long-time Franklin CFO, assistant administrator retires -

Russ Truell, Franklin’s assistant city administrator and chief financial officer, has announced his retirement effective December 15.

Truell has worked for the city for the last 13 years and oversees Water Management, Sanitation and Environmental Services, Finance, Information Technology, Municipal Court, Purchasing and Transit.

49. Uber riders in Pittsburgh get a taste of driverless future -

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Taylor Pollier got an offer from Uber he couldn't refuse — to be part of an experiment with a car of the future.

Uber on Wednesday became the first company to make self-driving cars available to the general public in the U.S. through a test program in Pittsburgh. The ride-hailing service selected a group of customers, including Pollier, to take free rides in autonomous Ford Fusions, with human drivers as backups.

50. Uber gives riders a preview of the driverless future -

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Uber riders in Pittsburgh can get a glimpse of the future by summoning a car capable of handling most of the tasks of driving on its own.

Starting Wednesday morning, a fleet of self-driving Ford Fusions will pick up Uber riders who opted to participate in a test program. While the vehicles are loaded with features that allow them to navigate on their own, an Uber engineer will sit in the driver's seat and seize control if things go awry.

51. Events -

Nashville Originals’ Restaurant Week. A biannual event sponsored by Nashville Originals, Restaurant Week is a way to enjoy Nashville’s unique local dining establishments. Participating downtown restaurants include Capitol Grille, 55 South, Americano, blvd, Caffe Nonna, Cork & Cow, Elliston Place Soda Shop, Fleet Street Pub, Flyte, Germantown Café, Harvest at Homestead, Jimmy Kelly’s Steakhouse, Midtown Cafe, Midtown Cafe, Nonna’s Pizzeria and Wine Bar, Pineapple Room Restaurant at Cheekwood, Puckett’s Boat House, Puckett’s Franklin, Puckett’s 5th & Church, Red Pony, Rumours East, Scout’s Pub, Table 3, Tin Angel, Watermark, Wild Iris. Participating restaurants will feature special prices and menus throughout the week and across mealtimes. Through Sunday. Complete list of participating restaurants at http://nashvilleoriginals.com

52. Events -

Chamber East Networking Coffee. Join business and community leaders in East Nashville for the Chamber East monthly networking coffee and community update. Studio 615, 272 Broadmoor Drive, Nashville. Wednesday, 8:15-9:30 a.m. Information: nashvillechamber.com

53. Business attorney joins Bone McAllester Norton -

Bone McAllester Norton has added W. Justin Adams, an experienced business lawyer and litigator who represents companies and individuals in corporate, health care and employment transactions and disputes, often in the role of outside general counsel.

54. Coming later today: Apple's next big software improvements -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — With sales of Apple's flagship iPhone slowing , the spotlight is on the company's hunt for its next big thing. Apple's annual software developers conference, which kicks off Monday, will be its next big opportunity to show the world what's coming next.

55. Demand for the new Tesla is wild, but limited to tech fans -

DETROIT (AP) — Demand for Tesla's new Model 3 has been eye-popping, with consumers pre-ordering about $13.7 billion worth of the electric sedans nearly two years before they go on sale.

Yet experts aren't yet ready to proclaim it's a tipping point with mainstream America moving from burning gasoline to charging batteries.

56. Autonomous cars aren't perfect, but how safe must they be? -

DETROIT (AP) — As autonomous car technology rapidly progresses, makers of the cars face the difficult question of how safe they must be before they're ready to move people on highways and city streets.

57. In California tests, self-driving cars still need human help -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Futuristic self-driving cars traveling along California roads have needed plenty of old-fashioned human intervention to stay safe.

California's Department of Motor Vehicles on Tuesday released reports filed by seven companies the agency gave permission to test prototype vehicles in public. The documents summarized instances in which a human driver had to take over due to technology problems or other safety concerns.

58. Belmont’s Littlejohn named Professor of the Year -

Belmont’s Ronnie Littlejohn, professor of philosophy and director of the University’s Asian Studies program, has been named as the 2015 Tennessee Professor of the Year, an award selection determined by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).

59. Tech companies face rocky road on the way to making cars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Silicon Valley may think it can build a better car. But should it?

As tech giants like Google and Apple look to automobiles as the next frontier for innovation, they face a looming reality: Cars are a lot harder to manufacture and sell than smartphones.

60. AP analysis: VW evasion likely led to dozens of deaths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Volkswagen's pollution-control chicanery has not just been victimless tinkering, killing between five and 20 people in the United States annually in recent years, according to an Associated Press statistical and computer analysis.

61. Toyota to invest $50M in car-tech research at Stanford, MIT -

EAST PALO ALTO, Calif. (AP) — Toyota is investing $50 million with Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in hopes of gaining an edge in an accelerating race to phase out human drivers.

62. Events -

Boost Your Business Nashville. A boot camp-style event to help the region’s small businesses grow. Facebook is teaming with other small business advocates – Mailchimp, Shopify, Visa and Zenefits – as well as author and small business marketing expert Mari Smith. The event will include a keynote from Facebook’s director of small business, Jonathan Czaja, a panel featuring local small businesses and breakout sessions led by Facebook, Mailchimp, and Shopify. Two sessions today: 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 1-5:30 p.m. $25. Marathon Music Works, 1402 Clinton St., Nashville. Information: https://boostyourbusiness-nashville.eventfarm.com

63. High-tech cars bring Detroit, Silicon Valley face to face -

PALO ALTO, California (AP) — The office has all the trappings of a high-tech startup. There's a giant beanbag in the foyer and erasable, white board walls for brainstorming. Someone's pet dog lounges happily on the sunny balcony.

64. Events -

Live On The Green. The free concert series at Public Square Park in downtown Nashville begins Thursday with Lord Huron, Shakey Graves and Elliot Root. The stage is set up on the steps of the Plaza and the crowd gathers in the grassy area of Public Square Park to watch performances from local, regional and national artists. Information: liveonthegreen.net. Schedule:

65. The tortoise and the hare of sales -

The goal of business development is to create strategic business relationships, which drive revenue and help a company grow.

Even the most seasoned business development pros often confuse business development with sales. Our sights become so focused on closing a deal that we miss critical opportunities to gain the trust we need to win that new business. You can reach low-hanging fruit quickly and easily, but reaching prime coconuts requires more effort.

66. Events -

Free House-Flipping Workshop. The Flipping Network will present a free, two-hour workshop for investors and Realtors on how to get started finding, fixing and flipping houses. Featured speaker will be Lloyd Segal, author of “Flipping Houses.” Today, 6-8 p.m., Hilton Garden Inn, 1715 Broadway, Nashville. Reservations are required. Information: www.FlippingWorkshops.com.

67. Self-driving cars getting dinged in California -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Four of the nearly 50 self-driving cars now rolling around California have gotten into accidents since September, when the state began issuing permits for companies to test them on public roads.

68. UN: World not close to avoiding dangerous warming -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The world still isn't close to preventing what leaders call a dangerous level of man-made warming, a new United Nations report says. That's despite some nations' recent pledges to cut back on carbon dioxide emissions.

69. Tesla's 'D' adds all-wheel drive, safety features -

HAWTHORNE, Calif. (AP) — Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk unveiled a new version of the luxury electric car maker's Model S sedan that includes all-wheel drive and self-driving "auto pilot" features.

70. MTSU to offer Carnegie courses -

MURFREESBORO (AP) — Middle Tennessee State University's Jennings A. Jones College of Business has entered an exclusive partnership with Dale Carnegie Training to help students develop "soft skills" such as communication and problem solving.

71. Lanquist named fellow of American Bar Foundation -

Edward D. Lanquist Jr., managing shareholder at Waddey Patterson, has been selected as a fellow of the American Bar Foundation.

Established in 1955, the Fellows of the American Bar Foundation is an honorary organization of attorneys, judges, legal scholars and law faculty who have been elected by their peers to become members. Members have demonstrated outstanding achievements in and dedication to their communities and to the highest principles of the legal profession.

72. Study: Keystone carbon pollution more than figured -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The much-debated Keystone XL pipeline could produce four times more global warming pollution than the State Department calculated earlier this year, a new study concludes.

The U.S. estimates didn't take into account that the added oil from the pipeline would drop prices by about $3 a barrel, spurring consumption that would create more pollution, the researchers said.

73. Events -

Live on the Green. Spanish Gold, The Weeks, City and Colour kick off the concert series at 6 p.m. Thursday. Since its inception in 2009, more than 200,000 fans from 29 states and 10 countries have attended the free outdoor music festival. It also has hosted more than 70 artists, including Alabama Shakes, Local Natives, Band of Horses, Matt & Kim, Michael Franti & Spearhead, Matt Nathanson, The Wallflowers, Citizen Cope, Dr. John, The Wailers and more. This year’s lineup:

74. Events -

Summer of Street Food. A gathering of 15 to 20 local food trucks. This event will take place every other Thursday through August 21. Trucks will be parked on Deaderick Street between 4th Avenue North and 5th Avenue North. Information: www.nashvillefoodtruckassociation.com.

75. Cyber case puts more strain on US-China relations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The indictment of five Chinese military officials on cyber espionage charges will intensify friction between Beijing and Washington that has been growing as China gets bolder in asserting its territorial claims in disputed seas in East Asia.

76. Big climate report: Warming is big risk for people -

If you think of climate change as a hazard for some far-off polar bears years from now, you're mistaken. That's the message from top climate scientists gathering in Japan this week to assess the impact of global warming.

77. Apple's Mac still influences, 30 years after debut -

NEW YORK (AP) — Look around. Many of the gadgets you see drew inspiration from the original Mac computer.

Computers at the time typically required people to type in commands. Once the Mac came out 30 years ago Friday, people could instead navigate with a graphical user interface. Available options were organized into menus. People clicked icons to run programs and dragged and dropped files to move them.

78. Study: Temperatures go off the charts around 2047 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Starting in about a decade, Kingston, Jamaica, will probably be off-the-charts hot — permanently. Other places will soon follow. Singapore in 2028. Mexico City in 2031. Cairo in 2036. Phoenix and Honolulu in 2043.

79. ACA: What you need to know before Oct. 1 -

On October 1, a new shopping website will launch in Tennessee. Much like Amazon.com, it will offer a place where consumers can compare products from different sellers and buy the one that best suits their needs.

80. Nashville Symphony facing financial hurdle -

NASHVILLE (AP) - When Nashville's symphony hall opened in 2006, across the street from the Country Music Hall of Fame and just a short block from the honky-tonks of lower Broadway, the building was praised for its beauty and sound and the potential to upgrade the city's music image.

81. Analysis: Economy, military shape US Iran strategy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama may have to decide this year whether to use military force to fulfill his vow to prevent Iran from being able to build nuclear weapons, foreign policy experts say.

82. 'Tennessee Waltz' singer Patti Page dies at 85 -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Unforgettable songs like "Tennessee Waltz" and "(How Much Is That) Doggie in the Window" made Patti Page the best-selling female singer of the 1950s and a star who would spend much of the rest of her life traveling the world.

83. Stocks drop as consumers get nervous, cliff nears -

NEW YORK (AP) — The market sent a gloomy message Thursday: The economy is still far from repaired, the "fiscal cliff" negotiations far from sealed.

Stocks were down for the fourth day in a row, falling decisively after a report that consumer confidence has plunged to its lowest level since August.

84. Obama proposes $1B for science, math teachers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration unveiled plans Wednesday to create an elite corps of master teachers, a $1 billion effort to boost U.S. students' achievement in science, technology, engineering and math.

85. Warming gas levels hit 'troubling milestone' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's air has reached what scientists call a troubling new milestone for carbon dioxide, the main global warming pollutant.

Monitoring stations across the Arctic this spring are measuring more than 400 parts per million of the heat-trapping gas in the atmosphere. The number isn't quite a surprise, because it's been rising at an accelerating pace. Years ago, it passed the 350 ppm mark that many scientists say is the highest safe level for carbon dioxide. It now stands globally at 395.

86. Guitar picking master Doc Watson dies in NC at 89 -

You could hear the mountains of North Carolina in Doc Watson's music. The rush of a mountain stream, the steady creak of a mule in leather harness plowing rows in topsoil and the echoes of ancient sounds made by a vanishing people were an intrinsic part of the folk musician's powerful, homespun sound.

87. Embracing rejection: It happens to everyone, so learn to deal -

When asked what contributed most to his NBA career, Michael Jordan said he missed more shots than he made, which is why he had the opportunity to make more memorable shots. No one remembers how many shots you missed. Similarly, sales is a numbers game.

88. Fantasy camp for those who love to fly -

ABOARD AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT 9454 (AP) — Eric Mueller's vacation started when his plane filled with smoke. Soon, people slid down an emergency chute, inflated life vests and climbed into a raft.

89. Dwindling time, rising tension make Iran top fear -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The prospect of conflict with Iran has eclipsed Afghanistan as the key national security issue with head-spinning speed. After years of bad blood and an international impasse over Iran's disputed nuclear program, why does the threat of war seem so suddenly upon us?

90. Research shows hands-free phones just as risky -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When someone is talking to you, your brain is listening, processing and thinking about what's being said — even if you're in the driver's seat trying to concentrate on traffic.

That's why drivers get distracted during cellphone conversations, even when using hands-free phones, researchers say. It's also part of the reason why the National Transportation Safety Board made a recommendation this week it knows a lot of drivers won't like — that states ban hands-free, as well as hand-held, cellphone use while driving.

91. Skeptic finds he now agrees global warming is real -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A prominent physicist and skeptic of global warming spent two years trying to find out if mainstream climate scientists were wrong. In the end, he determined they were right: Temperatures really are rising rapidly.