» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'Cargill' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:1
Shelby Public Records:122
Editorial:35
West Tennessee:22
Middle Tennessee:247
East Tennessee:119
Other:9

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Fisk University, its president part ways -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A small university in Nashville, Tennessee, said it has parted ways with its president of less than two years.

Fisk University's Board of Trustees did not give a reason for Vann R. Newkirk's departure in a statement Saturday.

2. Billions pour into bioplastics as markets begin ramping up -

CLEVELAND (AP) — In a world increasingly troubled by the persistent harm that plastic — manufactured in petrochemical plants — has had on the environment, companies are investing billions of dollars to ramp up production of plastics made from natural, renewable materials that can be safely composted or can biodegrade under the right conditions.

3. Feds sue poultry producers, alleging unfair worker practices -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department filed a lawsuit Monday against some of the largest poultry producers in the U.S. along with a proposed settlement seeking to end what it claims have been longstanding deceptive and abusive practices for workers.

4. Report criticizes meat industry, USDA response to pandemic -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — At the height of the pandemic, the meat processing industry worked closely with political appointees in the Trump administration to stave off health restrictions and keep slaughterhouses open even as COVID-19 spread rapidly among workers, according to a Congressional report released Thursday.

5. Russia's war heats up cooking oil prices in global squeeze -

ISTANBUL (AP) — For months, Istanbul restaurant Tarihi Balikca tried to absorb the surging cost of the sunflower oil its cooks use to fry fish, squid and mussels.

But in early April, with oil prices nearly four times higher than they were in 2019, the restaurant finally raised its prices. Now, even some longtime customers look at the menu and walk away.

6. Not all Western companies sever ties to Russia over Ukraine -

A shrinking number of well-known companies are still doing business in Russia, even as hundreds have announced plans to curtail ties.

Burger King restaurants are open, Eli Lilly is supplying drugs, and PepsiCo is selling milk and baby food, but no more soda.

7. Meatpacker Tyson: Mandate led 96% of workers to get vaccine -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Meatpacking giant Tyson Foods says more than 96% of its workers have been vaccinated ahead of the company's Nov. 1 deadline for them to do so.

The company based in Springdale, Arkansas, said the number of its 120,000 workers who have been vaccinated has nearly doubled since it announced its mandate on Aug. 3. At that point, only 50% of Tyson workers had been vaccinated.

8. With chicken prices soaring, Sanderson Farms sold for $4.5B -

Sanderson Farms, one of nation's third largest poultry producer, is being acquired for $4.53 billion as the price of chicken soars.

Cargill and privately held Continental Grain formed a joint venture to acquire Sanderson and will pay $203 per share in cash for a company that last year processed more than 4.8 billion pounds of meat.

9. High court backs Nestle, Cargill in child slave labor suit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday sided with food giants Nestle and Cargill in a lawsuit that claimed they knowingly bought cocoa beans from farms in Africa that used child slave labor.

10. US bans second Malaysian palm oil giant over forced labor -

The U.S. said it will ban all shipments of palm oil from one of the world's biggest producers after finding indicators of forced labor and other abuses on plantations that feed into the supply chains of some of America's most famous food and cosmetic companies.

11. Tyson Foods to open medical clinics at some meat plants -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Tyson Foods is planning to open medical clinics at several of its U.S. plants to improve the health of its workers and better protect them from the coronavirus.

The Springdale, Arkansas-based company, which processes about 20% of all beef, pork and chicken in the U.S., said its plan to open the clinics near its plants was in the works before the coronavirus struck this year, but that they will undoubtedly help the company respond to the pandemic.

12. Court could end claims Nestle, Cargill abetted child labor -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court will consider ending a lawsuit that claims Nestle and Cargill facilitated the use of child slave labor on cocoa farms in Ivory Coast, a case that could further limit access to U.S. courts by victims of human rights abuses abroad.

13. Court could end claims Nestle, Cargill abetted child labor -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court will consider ending a lawsuit that claims Nestle and Cargill facilitated the use of child slave labor on cocoa farms in Ivory Coast, a case that could further limit access to U.S. courts by victims of human rights abuses abroad.

14. JBS shuts down Minnesota pork plant hit by COVID-19 outbreak -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — JBS USA said it is temporarily shutting down its big pork processing plant in southwestern Minnesota because of an outbreak of COVID-19 among workers, the latest closure of a major U.S. food processing plant due to the pandemic.

15. Virus closes some meat plants, raising fears of shortages -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Some massive meat processing plants have closed at least temporarily because their workers were sickened by the new coronavirus, raising concerns that there could soon be shortages of beef, pork and poultry in supermarkets.

16. Are gun shops 'essential' businesses during a pandemic? -

In some parts of the U.S., authorities say gun shops aren't essential businesses and should close during stay-at-home orders meant to slow the coronavirus. In other places, officials are stopping background checks for concealed carry permits. Elsewhere, city leaders have invoked emergency powers allowing bans on gun sales.

17. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for September 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

18. Cargill to spend $30M for ideas to end Brazil deforestation -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Cargill Inc. said Thursday the Minnesota-based agribusiness giant will spend $30 million to fund new ideas for ending deforestation in Brazil, and called on its peers, governments and organizations to work together to come up with real solutions.

19. China cutting US soybean purchases in face of tariffs threat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the threat of tariffs and counter-tariffs between Washington and Beijing looming, Chinese buyers are canceling orders for U.S. soybeans, a trend that could deal a blow to American farmers if it continues.

20. Tax law gives unexpected break to farmers who sell to co-ops -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Key senators and farm groups are trying to fix a provision in the federal tax overhaul that gave an unexpected tax break to farmers who sell their crops to cooperatives rather than regular companies.

21. More sausage to be made in Nashville -

Cargill’s North America protein business is investing $146 million to expand the company’s Nashville facility.

The investment will include construction of a state-of-the-art dried sausage production facility and will create more than 100 jobs, which doubles the facility’s current employment. Sausage production is scheduled to begin in Nashville during the first half of 2019.

22. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for October 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, October 2017, for Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports. Due to technical issues, Davidson County sales are unavailable for October.

23. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for May 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, May 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

24. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for 2016 -

Top commercial real estate sales, 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

25. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for Nov. 2016 -

Top commercial real estate sales, November 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

26. ‘Comfy’ foods a perfect way to beat the chill -

All the snowy, cold weather we’ve had left me in search of warm, cozy recipes. And just watching the news of all the blizzards in the rest of the States leaves me bundled up by the fire.

This past week, I made a large pot of chili, a large pot of beef-barley vegetable soup, and a casserole of creamy, cheesy enchiladas, all great dishes for staying inside and watching the snow and ice, hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes. And there was plenty of all of that throughout the world.

27. US companies in Cuba for week-long celebration of commerce -

HAVANA (AP) — A weeklong celebration of commerce is underway in one of the world's last communist countries, with hundreds of international corporations including some big U.S. firms flocking to Havana to try to do business with a government basking in expectations of growth set off by detente with Washington.

28. Top residential real estate transactions for June 2015 -

Top residential real estate transactions, June 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

29. Working 9-to-5 becoming a less popular way to make a living -

NEW YORK (AP) — If you want an income, or you're an employer looking for help, it may be time to scrap the idea of the traditional 9-to-5 arrangement.

For workers, it's become easier and less risky to go solo. Affordable health insurance plans, which kept many workers shackled to traditional jobs, are more accessible because of the Affordable Care Act. And companies are increasingly open to hiring freelancers and independent contractors. Many say independent workers bring fresh ideas without the long-term commitment.

30. US companies eager to embrace Cuba face hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cargill aims to sell more corn and soybeans. MasterCard covets another site for Americans to swipe credit cards. Marriott sees beachfront property that needs hotels.

And outside Orlando, Florida, Danny Howell just knows there would be demand for his classic Chevrolet parts.

31. Money men tally cost of climate change -

NEW YORK (AP) — Climate change is likely to exact enormous costs on U.S. regional economies in the form of lost property, reduced industrial output and more deaths, according to a report backed by a trio of men with vast business experience.

32. Tyson enters meat brawl with Hillshire bid -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hillshire Brands is at the center of a barnyard brawl.

Tyson Foods, the largest U.S. meat processor, on Thursday made a $6.2 billion offer for the maker Jimmy Dean sausages and Ball Park hot dogs, topping a bid made two days earlier by rival poultry producer Pilgrim's Pride. Based in Greeley, Colorado, Pilgrim's Pride is owned by Brazilian meat giant JBS.

33. US business leaders assess Cuba business climate -

HAVANA (AP) — The head of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce toured an auto repair cooperative and talked with newly minted private entrepreneurs Wednesday as part of the first American trade mission of its kind to Cuba in 15 years.

34. King & Ballow adds 2 new attorneys -

Robert Crump and Allison Champagne have joined King & Ballow in the litigation and the litigation, entertainment and intellectual property sections, respectively.

35. Stocks rise for third day after acquisition flurry -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are having their longest rally since early July. A $19 billion corporate buying spree and encouraging economic news form Japan sent the Dow Jones industrial average up 213 points and erased its losses from last week.