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Editorial Results (free)

1. Survey: Nashville hotels most expensive in U.S. -

A new survey by Cheaphotels.org lists Nashville as the most expensive city in the U.S. for hotel rates.

Only centrally located hotels rated 3 stars or more were considered for the survey.

2. McLeod joins Butler Snow’s Nashville office -

Robert R. McLeod has joined Butler Snow’s Nashville office and will practice with the firm’s pharmaceutical, medical device and health care litigation group.

Before joining Butler Snow, McLeod clerked for Judge Thomas W. Brothers.

3. Ronderos joins McGlinchey Stafford -

McGlinchey Stafford PLLC has added Joseph V. Ronderos Jr. to the firm’s national commercial litigation and financial services litigation practice groups in Nashville.

Licensed in Tennessee and Alabama, Ronderos primarily represents financial institutions including national and state banks, consumer finance companies and others in a wide variety of litigated matters in state and federal courts, with a focus on defending these clients against lender liability actions.

4. Vanderbilt baseball’s season in the sun -

This is a fantasy baseball story, one of how Vanderbilt boasts a field of dreams team of former players in the major leagues.

Fifteen Vanderbilt alums – more than enough to fill out a fantasy league lineup card – played on major league teams this just-concluded season, the most of any collegiate program in the nation.

5. Sorry parents: Switching jobs is just the way it’s done now -

I recently heard a saying that stuck with me: “Learning is the new loyalty.” Hearing this phrase, it felt like the record stopped. Everything was quiet for a moment while I contemplated just how much I agree.

6. Bradley welcomes Davis as litigation associate -

Judea S. Davis is joining Bradley Arant Boult Cummings as an associate in the Litigation Practice Group.

Previously, Davis clerked for Judge Michelle Childs of the U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina and Judge Garrison Hill of the South Carolina Court of Appeals. She served as a law fellow and law clerk for the Equal Justice Initiative, researching constitutional and criminal law issues and representing clients before the Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles.

7. Private education moves to SoBro -

Kalee Barbis isn’t doing things the same old way. As head of school at the new Templeton Academy, she even bucked the trend on location, choosing downtown Nashville.

Barbis, who looked at more than 30 properties, says the school needed a location that would help inform the student population and – to be truly diverse – be centrally located and near a bus stop, accessible to the East, West, North and South sides. Down to Germantown and its ultimate Second Avenue spot, she knew the area south of Broadway would be ideal.

8. Labor nominee says he won't be influenced by corporate work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's pick to lead Labor Department tried to assure senators Thursday that his years of legal work for corporate clients would not influence his actions as a Cabinet member.

9. Democrats to argue Republicans rushing top Labor nominee -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to run the Labor Department faces a Senate confirmation hearing, even as Democrats argue that they haven't had enough time to scour his record of legal work for corporate interests.

10. Grand Hyatt shows off its indoor spaces -

The 25-story Grand Hyatt Nashville, opening in the fall of 2020, has released updated renderings of its indoor event spaces.

Located on Broadway within the 17-acre, Nashville Yards development, the hotel will be surrounded by shopping, restaurants, bars and entertainment

11. Bone McAllester adds veteran attorney Sloan -

Doug Sloan is joining Bone McAllester Norton PLLC to lead the firm’s land use and zoning practice.

He has more than 15 years of experience in government relations and land use and zoning regulations.

12. Vaughn shrugs off doubters as he unleashes star within -

You can’t see it, but Ke’Shawn Vaughn confirms its existence, covered up by bulky shoulder pads and well beyond the scope of reality television star Dr. Pimple Popper.

It’s a chip on his shoulder. A big one. Usually hidden with a broad, endearing smile that belies just how much it drives the heralded running back going into his final season at Vanderbilt.

13. Women in Litigation taps Hollabaugh for Top 250 -

Lela M. Hollabaugh of Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP in Nashville has been selected for the Top 250 Women In Litigation 2019.

She is among the more than 225 litigators – comprising nearly half of the firm – who make up Bradley’s Litigation Practice Group.

14. Benchmark taps Floyd for 40 & Under list -

Benchmark Litigation has selected Lee Adair Floyd, an attorney at Butler Snow, for its 2019 40 & Under Hot List.

She was also recognized in the 2018 edition.

Attorneys named to the list have proven their eligibility as individuals at the partner level of their respective firms who are age 40 or younger. They have also had a hand in some of their firm’s most noteworthy recent cases and have earned praise from clients and peers regarding the quality of their work.

15. Bowden joins Stites & Harbison Nashville -

Elizabeth Anne Bowden has joined the Nashville office of Stites & Harbison, PLLC.

She is an attorney in the Creditors’ Rights & Bankruptcy Service Group. Her practice focuses on commercial transactions, litigation, banking, and bankruptcy and creditors’ rights.

16. Nashville attorneys selected for AHLA -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has announced two of the firm’s Nashville attorneys, Stephanie M. Hoffmann and Janus Pan have been selected to participate in the American Health Lawyers Association Leadership Development Program.

17. Sound investment? -

The founders of Nashville’s Live on the Green music festival weren’t sure what to expect. It was 2009, their first year, and startup festivals are a risky, expensive venture that can either be a talked-about triumph or a practically ignored footnote in any given summer’s agenda.

18. Schools get $3.7M for career and technical programs -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Career and technical education programs in Tennessee schools are receiving a boost.

The Tennessee Department of Education says 96 school districts across the state have been awarded a total of $3.7 million for career-focused programs.

19. Veteran attorney West moves to Miller & Martin -

Attorney Dudley West, formerly with White & Reasor, has joined Miller & Martin’s Nashville office.

West has a diverse civil practice with an emphasis on business litigation and real estate. He has handled numerous commercial real estate acquisitions, dispositions and other transactions, and represented clients in a wide variety of business, real estate and other civil litigation matters in state and federal courts.

20. Tia Rose finds her dream at Twin Kegs: ‘Dive bar with great food’ -

Dark brown eyes and hair showcasing her Italian heritage, the namesake of Rosie’s International Famous Twin Kegs scans her business, where she promises Woodbine’s (and she hopes Nashville’s) best burger-and-beer selection.

21. Bradley partner Lipshie named to Who’s Who list -

Samuel D. Lipshie, a partner in Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP’s Nashville office, has again been named by Who’s Who Legal as among the world’s leading sports and entertainment law practitioners. He is listed in the Who’s Who Legal: Sports & Entertainment 2019 directory.

22. Nashville companies partner on home health -

Ascension Saint Thomas and Nashville-based Contessa are joining together to offer Home Recovery Care, an emerging health care option that brings inpatient care to patients’ homes.

Home Recovery Care will be available for patients at Saint Thomas Midtown and West hospitals this fall, followed by Saint Thomas Rutherford and surrounding communities.

23. Events -

Williamson, Inc. Young Professionals Luncheon. This event is tailored to individuals who are interested in furthering their leadership aspirations, cultivating relationships and growing professionally. Network and connect to learn from some of the most experienced business leaders in Williamson County. Williamson County Association of Realtors, 1646 Westgate Circle, Ste. #104. Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Members $20, Non-members $30. Information

24. Texas billionaire H. Ross Perot dies aged 89 -

DALLAS (AP) — H. Ross Perot, the colorful, self-made Texas billionaire who rose from a childhood of Depression-era poverty and twice ran for president as a third-party candidate, has died. He was 89.

25. Why wealth gap has grown despite record-long economic growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As it enters its 11th year, America's economic expansion is now the longest on record — a streak that has shrunk unemployment, swelled household wealth, revived the housing market and helped fuel an explosive rise in the stock market.

26. CFMT’s grant applications available for nonprofits -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee is accepting applications for discretionary grants.

Nonprofit organizations working to improve the well-being of residents of Middle Tennessee are eligible and are encouraged to apply. Nonprofit grant guidelines and applications are available at www.cfmt.org. Deadline is Aug. 1.

27. Raines retiring as dean of Belmont’s business school -

Pat Raines, dean of Belmont University’s Jack C. Massey College of Business, has announced his retirement after 16 years of service to the school.

During Raines’ tenure, the school has received accolades from Princeton Review, BusinessWeek and Entrepreneurship magazine for having some of the top business programs in the country. The College of Business’s undergraduate enrollment has grown by more than 100%, and the graduate enrollment has increased by nearly 80%.

28. What getting a job and car insurance have in common -

If you’ve ever switched jobs, you know it can be hard – really hard. I’m not talking about getting the same job at a new company. Switching from one type of job to another can feel impossible.

29. Heinrichs named president at Tennessee Bank & Trust -

Brian Heinrichs has been named president and chief banking officer of Tennessee Bank & Trust, effective July 1. Dan Andrews, Jr. will continue in his position as chairman and chief executive officer.

30. Reliford joins Bradley as litigation associate -

Kristina Allen Reliford has joined Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP as an associate in the Litigation Practice Group.

Reliford has broad litigation experience representing clients in both state and federal court. Her practice includes complex contract disputes, fraud, trade secret misappropriation, and securities and government investigation matters.

31. Stallings’ value to UT felt beyond the diamond -

Garrett Stallings spotted the little boy in the orange Tennessee shirt as he was walking off the field.

The Vols had just outlasted Texas A&M in 14 innings at Blue Bell Park in College Station and were packing up to make the trip back to Knoxville.

32. MedEquities Trust bought by Omega -

Nashville-based MedEquities Realty Trust, Inc. has been acquired by Omega Healthcare Investors.

Omega has announced the completion of the acquisition of all of the outstanding shares of MedEquities. The transaction represents an enterprise value of approximately $600 million for MedEquities and further diversifies Omega’s assets and operators.

33. Baker Donelson makes Douse a shareholder -

Baker Donelson has elected 11 new shareholders across the firm, including Chris Douse in the Nashville office.

Douse is a member of the firm’s Corporate Finance & Securities Group, where he focuses his practice on mergers and acquisitions, public and private equity and debt offerings, corporate governance, commercial finance and other general business law matters.

34. Nursing schools face shortage of trained instructors -

Nurses are needed, but nursing school enrollment is not growing fast enough to keep up with demand, American Association of Colleges of Nursing report shows.

The problem: There aren’t enough nursing school professors, and a significant percentage of the nursing workforce is getting ready to retire.

35. Casada chief of staff resigns amid allegations -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Republican Tennessee House speaker's chief of staff resigned Monday amid allegations that he sent sexually explicit and racist text messages, and after admitting he used cocaine inside a legislative office building when he held a previous job.

36. Jack’s white sauce wins top barbecue prize -

Music City White Sauce, a specialty at Jack’s Bar-B-Que, has won first place at the National Barbecue & Grilling Association Awards.

The annual awards recognize the commercial side of barbecue.

37. The Jerry Stackhouse file -

Age: 44 (Nov. 5, 1974)

Hometown: Kinston, North Carolina

Family: Wife Ramirra, children Jaye, Alexis and Antonio.

Education: Kinston HS and Oak Hill (Virginia) Academy. Earned his BA at the University of North Carolina in 1999 in African-American studies. He completed the Business of Entertainment, Media and Sports program at the Harvard Business School executive education program in 2017.

38. Transportation study targets south corridor -

The Greater Nashville Regional Council, WeGo Public Transit and Tennessee Department of Transportation have kicked-off the South Corridor Study to find public transportation options for the corridor stretching through Davidson, Williamson and Maury counties.

39. First Tennessee names SVP, private client services manager -

First Tennessee has hired Debra Hooper as senior vice president and private client services manager. Hooper will be based in the Brentwood office and report directly to executive vice president Andrew Kintz.

40. Now is the best time in years to get that new job -

I can’t say this enough: The job market is excellent! It’s the strongest job market we’ve seen in 50 years. Fifty years!

Lately, there have been more open jobs than people looking for a job. The national unemployment rate has dropped to less than 3.8 percent. That’s pretty incredible.

41. Government strategist named VU vice chancellor -

Daniel Culbreath, a government strategist and policy expert who previously worked for the Tennessee General Assembly’s senior leadership, has been named assistant vice chancellor for state government relations at Vanderbilt University.

42. GSRM Law welcomes Bashinsky as associate -

The law firm of Gullett Sanford Robinson & Martin PLLC has hired Lisa Bashinsky as an associate attorney. Bashinsky will practice in the firm’s Business and Corporate section, with a focus on providing legal representation to businesses, entrepreneurs, individuals and professionals with their business transactions and commercial needs.

43. Creswell named GNR Realtor of the Year -

Denise Creswell with Pilkerton Realtors has been named the 2018 Realtor of the Year by Greater Nashville Realtors.

The Realtor of the Year award is presented annually to the association’s member who has made the most significant contribution to their clients, the real estate profession and the community. Creswell was awarded the honor for her commitment to professionalism, clients and the real estate industry at the association’s annual Awards of Excellence Gala on March 9. The 2017 recipient, Amy Cannon, presented Creswell with the award.

44. Choosing their own path -

Many children today don’t have much to say about how their days are structured. Aside from a strict school schedule, most of their activities are dictated, scheduled and organized by their parents.

45. Entrance exam cheaters exploited rules for disabled students -

A college entrance exam policy aimed at helping students with disabilities was exploited to enable cheating in what is being described as the biggest school admissions scandal ever prosecuted by federal authorities, according to court papers made public Tuesday.

46. A hot US job market is coaxing people in from the sidelines -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A surprisingly strong burst of job growth over the past year has led many economists to wonder: Where are all the workers coming from?

As recently as last spring, analysts had worried that hiring would slow as the pool of unemployed shrank. Many employers have complained for years that they could no longer find enough people to fill their open jobs.

47. Elliott Davis names Schmitz market leader -

Elliott Davis, a business solutions firm with nine offices across the Southeast, has hired James (Jim) Schmitz as market leader for the firm’s Nashville office. Schmitz retired last year as Middle Tennessee president of Regions Bank.

48. Reliford joins Neal & Harwell -

Attorney Mozianio “Trey” S. Reliford has joined Neal & Harwell, PLC, as an associate. He has experience in the areas of complex white collar and regulatory defense, securities, antitrust, employment and intellectual property law.

49. Sticking to the script -

Bill Lee the governor sounds a lot like Bill Lee the candidate as he works to implement the policies he brought to Tennessee voters since the Republican businessman announced that he would seek the state’s top job.

50. Shellaway named VU vice chancellor, general counsel -

Ruby Z. Shellaway, an attorney who has held key roles in higher education, federal government and in the private sector, has been named vice chancellor, general counsel and university secretary at Vanderbilt University.

51. Touting Turner: Various reaction to his hiring -

Some of the comments about Vanderbilt’s hiring of Malcolm Turner as athletics director:

“Malcolm is the real deal. His experience at the highest levels of the sports industry will be an incredible asset to the Commodores. I think his extensive background in marketing, management and development, coupled with his operational know-how, will translate well to college athletics, and he’ll be able to have a big impact on our program out of the gates. I look forward to partnering with him to build on our successes and history of excellence and to continue to develop our students as top-notch athletes and successful leaders.”

52. An unconventional pick for unique university -

Malcolm Turner has known one precious mentor all of his life. Another was part of his life for an all-too-brief span.

But there is no question both have been important role models in helping determine what Turner, 47, hopes to accomplish as Vanderbilt’s new athletics director.

53. Six mistakes you’re making on LinkedIn -

You’ve decided you want to get a job. The first thing you may want to do is update your LinkedIn profile.

But this is the problem. You’re doing a few things wrong. Those things are going to slow down your search, and you don’t even know it.

54. Polly is chair of 2019 Campaign for Equal Justice -

Erin Palmer Polly, an attorney at Butler Snow LLP in Nashville and immediate past president of the Nashville Bar Association, will serve as the chair for its 2019 Campaign for Equal Justice, an annual initiative that raises funds for the Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands.

55. Texas official named Tennessee's new education commissioner -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's newly elected Gov. Bill Lee unveiled one of his most high-profile cabinet positions Thursday, announcing the appointment of an education commissioner touted for her education reform work.

56. Franklin Synergy opens new location -

Franklin Synergy Bank will open its newest branch in Franklin, 5040 Carothers Parkway, Suite 109 in the Carothers Crossing development.

The bank continues to expand the bank’s Middle Tennessee footprint. “Franklin Synergy Bank’s expansion in Franklin is an investment in our community,” says Richard Herrington, Franklin Synergy Bank Chairman and CEO. “While it adds to our convenient locations for our local clients, it also enhances our position as a key player in the development of the communities we serve.”

57. Stites & Harbison welcomes Schwegler -

Michael Schwegler has joined Stites & Harbison’s Real Estate & Banking Service Group as a member of the firm.

Schwegler represents lenders, creditors and businesses in commercial and consumer lending transactions, consumer finance regulation and compliance, real estate, workouts, bankruptcy and commercial litigation matters. He has extensive experience handling commercial lending and real estate transactions.

58. Public pressure pushes health care to top priority -

Bill Lee waltzes into the governorship later this month with more goodwill on his side than most politicians have the right to expect.

The Republican, who takes the reigns Jan. 19, is inheriting a state with an unemployment rate under 4 percent, an improving education system, companies such as Amazon bringing in thousands of jobs and an approval rating of 57 percent, a Vanderbilt poll taken in December shows.

59. Centerstone’s Stoll wins community service award -

Becky Stoll, vice president for crisis and disaster management at Centerstone, has won the 2018 Dorothea Dix Community Service Award presented by the Tennessee Association of Mental Health Organizations.

60. Living life without fear: What have you got to lose? -

As we approach the New Year, the conversation will inevitably turn to setting goals. They might be related to career, family, fitness or other personal pursuits. It’s interesting to think about what goals will be achieved and which will eventually be shelved.

61. Banker Ayers to receive 2019 Horatio Alger Award -

The Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, Inc., a nonprofit educational organization honoring the achievements of outstanding individuals and encouraging youth to pursue their dreams through higher education, has selected James W. Ayers, executive chairman of the board, FirstBank, as a recipient of its 2019 award.

62. Bass, Berry & Sims welcomes 13 attorneys -

Bass, Berry & Sims has 13 new attorneys in Nashville. The following seven attorneys counsel clients on corporate and securities issues including mergers and acquisitions, capital markets transactions, private equity financings, and securities regulations matters and filings:

63. Bradley partner named top life sciences lawyer -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP partner Lela M. Hollabaugh has been named by Who’s Who Legal as one of the world’s leading life sciences attorneys and is listed in the Product Liability chapter of the 2019 edition of Who’s Who Legal: Life Sciences.

64. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's mangled truths on Russia probe, Cohen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump can't seem to get his facts straight when it comes to the Russia investigation.

Facing pressure as his former advisers are caught lying by special counsel Robert Mueller, Trump is launching fresh attacks on the probe as politically biased and Mueller as hopelessly "conflicted." This runs counter to ethics experts in Trump's Justice Department who concluded that Mueller — a Republican — could fairly lead the probe into possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election.

65. Climate change is more extensive and worse than once thought -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Climate scientists missed a lot about a quarter century ago when they predicted how bad global warming would be.

They missed how bad wildfires, droughts, downpours and hurricanes would get. They missed how much ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland would melt and contribute to sea level rise. They missed much of the myriad public health problems and global security issues.

66. Community Foundation awards $2.72M+ to 453 organizations -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, a charitable organization dedicated to enriching the quality of life in 40 Middle Tennessee counties and beyond, announces $2,726,800 in grants to 453 local nonprofit organizations as part of the 2018 annual grantmaking process.

67. Bradley welcomes 8 associates in Nashville -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has added eight attorneys in the firm’s Nashville office as associates. They are:

Elliot A. Bertasi is a member of the Healthcare Practice Group. Prior to law school, he worked for the U.S. Agency for International Development in Washington, D.C., and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He earned his J.D. from Duke University School of Law, where he was executive editor of the Alaska Law Review and co-director of the Street Law Society. He is a graduate of the University of Tennessee.

68. Tennessee Board of Regents appoints presidents of 2 colleges -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Board of Regents says it has appointed presidents at Northeast State Community College and the Tennessee College of Applied Technology in Knoxville

The board said in a news release Tuesday that Bethany H. Flora will be the next president of Northeast State in Blountville. Kelli A. Chaney has been named president of TCAT Knoxville.

69. LinkedIn focuses on employee engagement -

I recently had the opportunity to attend Talent Connect, LinkedIn’s annual human resources event, which showcased everything LinkedIn’s been working on in 2018 and its plans for the future.

70. Stewart succeeds Whisenant as WSW managing partner -

WSW CPAs founder Bob Whisenant, a veteran of 46 years in the industry, is stepping aside as managing partner on Jan. 1. Taking over those duties will be WSW partner Geoffrey Stewart.

Whisenant will remain as partner emeritus, continuing to serve clients and mentor staff. His career began with CPA Jack Grannis in 1972, and he was later managing partner for Horne LLP’s Tennessee Office. Horne is a national accounting firm with a regional presence.

71. Lee is now member-in-charge at Frost Brown Todd -

Frost Brown Todd has named Thomas H. Lee member-in-charge of the firm’s Nashville office. Lee succeeds Mekesha Montgomery, who led FBT’s Nashville team of attorneys for the past seven years and will now become chair of the firm’s Manufacturing Industry Team while continuing to chair the Member Personnel Committee.

72. Events -

Bass Learning Center College and Career Fair. More than 50 vendors representing various colleges, businesses and hiring agencies will be on site at Bass Learning Center, 5200 Delaware Avenue. 9 a.m.-noon. Information: www.mnps.org

73. Stites & Harbison hires construction specialist -

Stites & Harbison, PLLC has added attorney Jamie Little, who will serve as counsel to the firm in the Construction Service Group.

Little has more than 10 years of legal experience and routinely represents owners, general contractors, subcontractors, design professionals and suppliers with contract drafting, contract negotiation, contract disputes, payment disputes and lien enforcement.

74. MTSU positions itself as center for First Amendment study -

Since joining Middle Tennessee State University five years ago, Ken Paulson has transformed its College of Media and Entertainment. As dean of the college, he has expanded its curriculum, attracted new talent, added innovative new programs and even changed its name.

75. Quinn moves practice to Neal & Harwell -

Attorney John E. Quinn, previously a partner at Manier & Herod, has joined Neal & Harwell, PLC, as of counsel.

His practice is in the defense of all aspects of civil litigation, including commercial, professional negligence, personal injury, products liability, employment and insurance litigation. He has extensive trial experience and has conducted more than 50 trials in both state and federal courts, as well as arbitrations in Tennessee and Europe.

76. Former state ABC leader joining Adams and Reese -

Clayton Byrd, executive director of the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission, will leave the ABC to join Adams and Reese as special counsel, beginning Oct. 15. Byrd will head the firm’s Tennessee alcoholic beverage practice and serve as part of the firm’s Tennessee Government Relations team.

77. Boyd’s gubernatorial campaign haunts UT presidency debate -

Randy Boyd probably knows the age-old sermon about reaping what you sow. But after a highly successful business career in which he made millions selling electric fences – enough money to throw away millions in a failed gubernatorial bid – he must have forgotten that timeless teaching from the Bible.

78. Few men enter teaching: Why it matters -

Alvin Haney has just begun his 26th year at Meigs Magnet Middle School, teaching 7th grade science and coaching track. Of the more than 30 teachers at the school, Haney is one of six males – a high number when considering the national average.

79. Prep schools confront Kavanaugh fallout -

Brad Gioia hasn’t had to ask himself whether he should bring up the subject of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s contentious journey to the Supreme Court – or the cauldron of troublesome societal and behavioral issues associated with it – within the walls of Montgomery Bell Academy.

80. Hundreds of US teacher candidates shake up midterm elections -

Last September, school speech therapist Kathy Hoffman was settling into the new academic year, working with youngsters in her small classroom behind a playground at Sahuaro Ranch Elementary School in a blue-collar neighborhood outside Phoenix.

81. Little scrutiny in DeVry sale, as DeVos targets protections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A little-known venture capitalist is on the verge of acquiring one of the biggest for-profit colleges in the country, a transaction that would put him in control of a troubled national chain that's more than 60 times the size of the tiny California school he currently owns.

82. Bradley partner receives M&A advisor award -

David W. Stempel, a partner in Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP’s Nashville office, is among the winners of the M&A Advisor’s ninth annual Emerging Leaders Awards.

The awards recognize and celebrate the achievements of young M&A, financing and turnaround professionals who have reached a significant level of success and made a notable contribution to their industry and community.

83. Bass, Berry & Sims adds pair to Healthcare Group -

Bass, Berry & Sims has added Gina R. Shockley and Marc A. Rigsby to its Healthcare Practice Group.

Shockley joins the firm as counsel focusing in the area of pharmaceutical supply chains. Rigsby joins as an associate in the health care group’s regulatory team.

84. It’s not a slump if you’re still hitting home runs -

There are hundreds, maybe even a few thousand people migrating here from the Northeast as a result of the new federal tax law limiting deductions on property taxes to $10,000 and mortgages to $1 million.

85. Siloam Health expands board of directors -

Siloam Health, a faith-based, charitable health center for the uninsured, especially the immigrant and refugee community, has added four health, community and religious leaders to its board of directors.

86. Finding a niche: physical therapy assistant -

Several institutions in the state, including Chattanooga State Community College, Roane State Community College in Oak Ridge, South College in Knoxville and Volunteer State Community College, offer accredited two-year degrees that train students to be physical therapy assistants, often called a PTA.

87. Four leaders look to future of state’s job growth -

The Ledger asked four career development leaders in Tennessee for their advice about how to approach the job market. We also asked them about promising careers and what issues are important to tackle as the state adds jobs, new industries and more education and training.

88. Tennessee’s hottest jobs -

Since bouncing back from the Great Recession, Tennessee’s economy has been in the midst of a prolonged expansion. The recovery, now in its eighth year, could soon become the longest since the end of World War II.

89. Sherrard Roe hires Wood as associate -

Attorney Talley K. Wood has joined Sherrard Roe Voigt & Harbison as an associate, announced founding member Tom Sherrard.

Wood was previously an associate at Bass, Berry & Sims, PLC, in the Corporate & Securities practice. She is a member of the American Health Lawyers Association.

90. For-profit colleges have allies now, but complaints persist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A lawsuit against Ashford University describes an admissions office with a cutthroat sales culture more akin to a used-car lot than a place of higher learning, peddling "false promises and faulty information" to lure students eligible for federal financial aid.

91. MLK, MTSU grad helps ensure safe environment for construction workers -

If you’ve work on a construction site in Middle Tennessee, there’s a good chance you’ve seen Kaylah White.

White, the executive director of the Middle Tennessee Branch of the Associated General Contractors of Tennessee, will visit or contact any of the organization’s 192 members’ offices, project sites or company events to provide information on worker safety, OSHA and codes compliance, networking or anything else needed to grow the business.

92. Homeless champion chosen for Kraft Award -

Charles Strobel, founding director of Room in the Inn, will be honored with the 25th annual Joe Kraft Humanitarian Award.

Established in 1993, the Joe Kraft Humanitarian Award recognizes community leaders who embody the strength of character and unwavering integrity of the late Joe Kraft.

93. Legal Aid Society picks Family Law lead attorney -

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands, Tennessee’s largest non-profit law firm, has promoted Shaina Thompson to family law lead attorney for its Nashville office.

She will help victims of domestic violence gain independence from abusive situations. Beyond Orders of Protection and divorces, this includes helping victims with issues like denial of benefits, food stamps and/or housing.

94. DeVos rules would cut estimated $13B in student loan relief -

Students who are defrauded by their schools would have a harder time getting their federal loans erased under new rules proposed by the Trump administration Wednesday.

The proposal, which aims to replace a set of Obama-era rules that were never implemented, drew applause from the for-profit industry but sharp criticism from advocacy groups that represent student borrowers.

95. What statewide candidates have to say about education -

Gov. Haslam and the General Assembly have invested in education during the last eight years. Has that been a good investment and should it continue? What do the candidates propose for the next four to eight years?

96. Green & Little selects Green as vice president -

Green & Little, L.P., real estate investment and development firm based in Gallatin, has named Anderson Green as vice president. Green oversees day-to-day business operations at the asset management level and will be more involved in the overall strategic direction for Green & Little. He has been with the company since 2014.

97. What statewide candidates have to say about rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

98. When your job is what you love ... -

So many amazing and innovative things began in a garage. Grunge music. The Apple computer. Disney. Amazon. And 20 years ago, the beginnings of Nashville’s now-exploding brewery scene.

When Carl Meier moved to Nashville in 1999 from upstate New York, his wife was working on her master’s degree at Vanderbilt, leaving him with some time on his hands. With her encouragement, he joined a local homebrew club, the Music City Brewers, to meet some new friends who shared his love for home brewing.

99. US Army quietly discharging immigrant recruits -

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Some immigrant U.S. Army reservists and recruits who enlisted in the military with a promised path to citizenship are being abruptly discharged, the Associated Press has learned.

100. Seivers in College Football Hall of Fame? Yeah, sure, why not? -

Don’t look for any campaign propaganda to be mailed out. There won’t be any personal stumping. Heck, Larry Seivers even refused to fluff up his own bio. If the former University of Tennessee two-time All-America wide receiver finds his way into the College Football Hall of Fame, it will happen because of the numbers and the memories that made him one of the game’s best in the 1970s.