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Editorial Results (free)

1. Robinson: 'We want to build our own legacy' in Nashville -

During his four seasons as general manager of the Tennessee Titans, Jon Robinson has been at the forefront of significant changes and upgrades regarding Nashville’s NFL club.

The job is not finished yet as Robinson continues to work along with Coach Mike Vrabel, owner Amy Adams Strunk and others in the organization to build a championship caliber team.

2. CFMT’s grant applications available for nonprofits -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee is accepting applications for discretionary grants.

Nonprofit organizations working to improve the well-being of residents of Middle Tennessee are eligible and are encouraged to apply. Nonprofit grant guidelines and applications are available at www.cfmt.org. Deadline is Aug. 1.

3. Beloved toy store FAO Schwarz makes its comeback -

NEW YORK (AP) — Three years after it closed its beloved toy store on Fifth Avenue, FAO Schwarz is making a return to New York.

A new FAO opens Friday in Manhattan's Rockefeller Center, about 10 blocks from its former home near Central Park.

4. Good for business? Nike gets political with Kaepernick ad -

NEW YORK (AP) — Why do it? Nike has touched off a furor by wading into football's national anthem debate with an ad featuring Colin Kaepernick, the former 49ers quarterback who was the first athlete to kneel during "The Star-Spangled Banner" to protest police brutality against blacks and hasn't played a game since 2016.

5. Does the pope own the Vatican brand? Spain, so far, says yes -

MADRID (AP) — A Vatican crackdown on the commercial use of its name and official emblems has encountered resistance from a Spanish website that refuses to give up referencing the seat of the Catholic Church in its masthead.

6. Companies face mounting pressure to pick sides in gun debate -

NEW YORK (AP) — As the gun debate heats up following the massacre at a Florida high school, companies are under growing pressure to pick a side: whether to stand by the National Rifle Association or walk away.

7. At 70, John Prine is the hippest songwriter in Nashville -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The first time a new country songwriter named Kacey Musgraves saw one of her songwriting heroes, John Prine, she had an unusual proposition when she approached.

"I said, 'Hey, my name is Kacey and I am a really big fan. I don't want to offend you or anything, but is there any way you might want to burn one with me?'" Musgraves recalled saying after one of his shows in Nashville, Tennessee.

8. Shunned by radio, women in Nashville embrace outlaw status -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As a member of the country trio Pistol Annies, singer-songwriter Angaleena Presley often got questions about the lack of women on country radio, which she responded to with a safe sound bite about musical trends being cyclical and being hopeful for change.

9. Pro- or anti-Trump? Businesses pushed to pick a side -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Uber's CEO quit President Donald Trump's business council. Nordstrom stopped selling Ivanka Trump's fashion. Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Toyota, meanwhile, suffered through the discomfort of being on the receiving end of Trump Twitter tirades.

10. Trump brand loses luster with affluent -

NEW YORK (AP) — Event planner Beth Bernstein decided she had had enough with Donald Trump after his 2005 hot-mic boasts about groping women came to light earlier this month. She removed photos of weddings she had thrown at a Trump hotel in Chicago from her website, wrote to hotel staff to remove her from the list of "preferred vendors" and posted a sort of call to arms on her blog.

11. How the FBI might hack into an iPhone without Apple's help -

NEW YORK (AP) — For more than a month, federal investigators have insisted they have no alternative but to force Apple to help them open up a phone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters.

That changed Monday when the Justice Department said an "outside party" recently showed the FBI a different way to access the data on the phone used by Syed Farook, who with his wife killed 14 people in the Dec. 2 attack.

12. Apple adds more swagger with $3B Beats acquisition -

CUPERTINO, Calif. (AP) — Apple is buying more flair, swagger and song-picking savvy with its $3 billion acquisition of Beats Electronics, a headphone and music streaming specialist founded by rapper Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine, one of the first recording executives to roll with the hip-hop culture.

13. How Jack White changed Nashville’s music industry -

The change in the Nashville music scene in the few scant years since Jack White and his Third Man team settled here is palpable.

In some cases, it’s simply sonic. Get away from the steel guitars and fiddles of the PG-rated honky-tonk Disney World that is Lower Broadway, visitors are as likely to hear rock guitars and drums as they are to hear the rootsier sounds of country or even Americana.

14. Chew on this: Gum loses its pop -

NEW YORK (AP) — Gum seems as appealing as that sticky wad on the bottom of a shoe these days.

It's not that Americans still don't ever enjoy a stick of Trident or Orbit, the two most popular brands. They just aren't as crazy about chomping away on the stuff as they once were, with U.S. sales tumbling 11 percent over the past four years.

15. Fashion guru Libby Callaway: Why Nashville tops New York -

Libby Callaway breezed into Barista Parlor on a recent Thursday wrapped in an oversized Michaele Vollbracht scarf that she picked up at a vintage shop in Kansas City.

Fresh from “vacation,” a solo road trip to Idaho where her sister lives, she ordered a cup of tea and took a quick breather. The vacation comes in quotes because balancing her client list along with her many creative projects might mean taking a phone call from fashion designer Billy Reid in the middle of the desert. “You have to pull over at the only rest stop for 60 miles and deal with what’s happening.”

16. Late to the Chinese market, Ford aims to catch up -

CHONGQING, China (AP) — Dave Schoch has one of the toughest jobs at Ford Motor Co.: catching the competition in the world's biggest car market.

17. Microsoft's 'Surface' tablet aims for productivity -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Microsoft unveiled a new tablet computer, Surface, that attempts to take advantage of one of the few criticisms of Apple's iPad — that it is better for consuming content than creating it.

18. 'We've got something special here' -

MANCHESTER – Coffee County Mayor David Pennington might enjoy a Bonnaroo Burger at his family’s landmark restaurant, but he probably won’t be spending much time with Flogging Molly, The Beach Boys, Alice Cooper or others performing for the 80,000 sometimes-mud-encased or sweat-drenched masses huddled at Great Stage Park this week.

19. Target's blunder with designer continues -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target is a victim of its own success.

The discounter drummed up so much hype around its exclusive, limited-time line by upscale Italian designer Missoni that its website crashed and was down most of the day on Sept. 13 when the collection was launched, angering customers. More than a week later, some shoppers who bought the Missoni for Target line are posting on social media websites Facebook and Twitter that they won't shop at Target again because their online orders are being delayed — or worse, canceled — by the retailer.

20. Music City’s roots -

While some national writers have dubbed Nashville “the Silicon Valley of Music,” it’s not.

It’s Music City, a brand worn proudly, with a rich heritage to back it up, unlike that San Francisco Bay boomtown populated by start-ups, coders, guys with pocket-protectors and unshaven techno-visionaries.