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Editorial Results (free)

1. Landquist takes office as TBA vice president -

Nashville attorney Edward D. Lanquist Jr. has been installed as vice president of the Tennessee Bar Association and will advance to the presidency in 2024.

Lanquist has been active in the Tennessee Bar Association and other legal and community organizations for many years, serving most recently as the TBA’s general counsel. He is on the faculty of the Nashville School of Law, is a past president of the Nashville Bar Association and past president of the Tennessee Intellectual Property Association. He holds engineering and law degrees from the University of Tennessee and is a co-founder of Patterson Intellectual Property Law.

2. Global pollution kills 9 million people a year, study finds -

A new study blames pollution of all types for 9 million deaths a year globally, with the death toll attributed to dirty air from cars, trucks and industry rising 55% since 2000.

That increase is offset by fewer pollution deaths from primitive indoor stoves and water contaminated with human and animal waste, so overall pollution deaths in 2019 are about the same as 2015.

3. Indexes end mixed, Netflix plunges on subscriber losses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's major stock indexes ended mixed Wednesday after another day of choppy trading, while Netflix lost more than a third of its value after reporting its first subscriber loss in more than a decade and predicting more grim times ahead.

4. Meharry’s Hildreth joins Reagan-Udall board -

The Reagan-Udall Foundation for the Food and Drug Administration has elected four new Board members, including James E.K. Hildreth, M.D., Ph.D., president and CEO of Meharry Medical College.

Hildreth is credited with groundbreaking work around AIDS and HIV and was the first African American to hold a full tenured professorship in basic research at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He has published more than 90 scientific articles and is the owner of 11 patents based on his research. He joins the board this month.

5. Federal judge strikes down CDC eviction moratorium -

BOSTON (AP) — A federal judge ruled Wednesday that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention exceeded its authority when it imposed a federal eviction moratorium.

The Justice Department said it would appeal the ruling from the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., meaning there won't likely be any immediate impact on the ban, which in March was extended through the end of June.

6. Tennessee to get $4.9M in national surgical mesh settlement -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's attorney general says the state will receive $4.9 million from a $188.6 million multistate settlement over deceptive marketing claims against a maker of surgical mesh products.

7. The superspreaders behind top COVID-19 conspiracy theories -

As the coronavirus spread across the globe, so too did speculation about its origins. Perhaps the virus escaped from a lab. Maybe it was engineered as a bioweapon.

Legitimate questions about the virus created perfect conditions for conspiracy theories. In the absence of knowledge, guesswork and propaganda flourished.

8. Virus will kill many more, White House projects as briefings resume -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration launched its new level-with-America health briefings Wednesday with a projection that as many as 90,000 more in the U.S. will die from the coronavirus in the next four weeks — a sobering warning as the government strains to improve delivery and injection of vaccines.

9. Fauci unleashed: Doc takes 'liberating' turn at center stage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Anthony Fauci is back. In truth, the nation's leading infectious-diseases expert never really went away. But after enduring nearly a year of darts and undermining comments from former President Donald Trump, Fauci now speaks with the authority of the White House again.

10. Businesses rethink political donations after Capitol siege -

Businesses are rethinking political contributions in the wake of the deadly Capitol siege by President Donald Trump's supporters on Wednesday.

Citigroup confirmed Sunday that it is pausing all federal political donations for the first three months of the year. Others, like Marriott, are only stopping donations to the 147 Republicans who opposed certifying President-elect Joe Biden's election.

11. Biden's health team offers glimpse of his COVID-19 strategy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden's choices for his health care team point to a stronger federal role in the nation's COVID-19 strategy, restoration of a guiding stress on science and an emphasis on equitable distribution of vaccines and treatments.

12. US hits record COVID-19 hospitalizations amid virus surge -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. hit a record number of coronavirus hospitalizations Tuesday and surpassed 1 million new confirmed cases in just the first 10 days of November amid a nationwide surge of infections that shows no signs of slowing.

13. Doctors may be better equipped to handle latest virus surge -

NEW YORK (AP) — The latest surge in U.S. coronavirus cases appears to be much larger than the two previous ones, and it is all but certain to get worse — a lot worse. But experts say there are also reasons to think the nation is better able to deal with the virus this time.

14. US cuts World Health Organization ties over virus response -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Friday that the U.S. will be terminating its relationship with the World Health Organization, saying it had failed to adequately respond to the coronavirus because China has "total control" over the global organization.

15. Chinese grad students may be next hit by US-China tensions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration may soon expel thousands of Chinese graduate students enrolled at U.S. universities and impose other sanctions against Chinese officials in the latest signs of tensions between Washington and Beijing that are raging over trade, the coronavirus pandemic, human rights and the status of Hong Kong.

16. US adds new sanction on Chinese tech giant Huawei -

BOSTON (AP) — The U.S. government imposed new restrictions on Chinese tech giant Huawei on Friday, limiting its ability to use American technology to design and manufacture semiconductors produced for it abroad.

17. Layoffs and pay cuts are now striking more white collar jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — First, it was bars, restaurants, hotels. And clothing stores, movie theaters, entertainment venues. And countless small businesses, from bookstores to barber shops.

Now, the record-setting flood of layoffs unleashed by the viral outbreak is extending beyond the services industries that bore the initial brunt and are still suffering most. White collar employees, ranging from software programmers and legal assistants to sales associates and some health care workers, are absorbing layoffs or salary cuts. So are workers in other occupations, like construction and real estate.

18. Doctors try 1st CRISPR editing in the body for blindness -

Scientists say they have used the gene editing tool CRISPR inside someone's body for the first time, a new frontier for efforts to operate on DNA, the chemical code of life, to treat diseases.

A patient recently had it done at the Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland for an inherited form of blindness, the companies that make the treatment announced Wednesday. They would not give details on the patient or when the surgery occurred.

19. Stocks cling to tiny gains as investors parse trade signals -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mixed Tuesday, shedding most of their gains from earlier in the day, after a published report revealed that an interim trade deal between the U.S. and China does not remove tariffs on Chinese goods.

20. Slight gains on Wall Street are enough for more record highs -

Wall Street extended its milestone-shattering run Tuesday with modest gains for stocks, nudging the major indexes to more record highs.

The S&P 500 had its fifth gain in a row. The benchmark index and the Nasdaq closed at new highs for the fourth straight day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also closed at a record high, it's second milestone this week.

21. VUMC’s Roden wins Schottenstein Prize -

Dan Roden, M.D., senior vice president for personalized medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, has been awarded the 2019 Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Prize in Cardiovascular Sciences by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center’s Heart and Vascular Center.

22. Survey: Nashville hotels most expensive in U.S. -

A new survey by Cheaphotels.org lists Nashville as the most expensive city in the U.S. for hotel rates.

Only centrally located hotels rated 3 stars or more were considered for the survey.

23. Stocks skid as tensions flare ahead of US-China trade talks -

Stocks closed broadly lower on Wall Street Tuesday as tensions between the U.S. and China flared ahead of negotiations aimed at resolving the costly trade war between the world's two biggest economies.

24. AP FACT CHECK: Trump on NKorea, wages, climate; Dem misfires -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Straining for deals on trade and nukes in Asia, President Donald Trump hailed a meeting with North Korea's leader that he falsely claimed President Barack Obama coveted, asserted a U.S. auto renaissance that isn't and wrongly stated air in the U.S. is the cleanest ever as he dismissed climate change.

25. Tech companies lead US stocks broadly higher; oil slumps -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street for the second straight day Wednesday, extending Tuesday's strong gains as investors bet an interest rate cut could be ahead.

Technology, industrial and health care companies accounted for much of the broad gains, which were tempered by a slide in energy stocks following a 3.4% plunge in the price of U.S. crude oil.

26. Energy companies lead modest gains for US stock indexes -

U.S. stock indexes finished modestly higher Monday, extending the market's solid gains from a rally last week.

Energy companies notched the biggest gains after the price of U.S. crude oil closed above $59 a barrel for the first time since November. Smaller company stocks fared better than the rest of the market.

27. AP FACT CHECK: Trump myths on dipping oil prices, cold snaps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is wrong when he suggests global warming can't be happening if it's really cold outside.

He points to a "brutal and extended cold blast" in the Eastern U.S. during Thanksgiving week and wonders aloud to his Twitter followers, "Whatever happened to Global Warming?" In fact, he is confusing short-term weather patterns with longer-term climate change. A scientific report put out Friday by his own administration rejects as folly any notion that a particular plunge in temperatures can cast doubt on whether Earth is warming.

28. Start at the top as you look for a new workplace -

It’s often said that employees quit bosses, not jobs. Can you relate?

If you’ve ever left a job, there’s a good chance you might agree with this idea.

If you’re looking for a new job, one of the first things to consider is the management for which you’ll be working. Finding the right environment is just as important – if not more so – than finding the perfect title.

29. Stock markets rise slightly ahead of Trump-Kim meeting -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. and global markets rose modestly on Monday, as investors made preparations for President Donald Trump's meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore.

European investors also focused on Italy's new government, and its future using the euro.

30. State's jobless rate hold steady in April, jobs added -

BOSTON (AP) — The unemployment rate in Massachusetts remained steady at 3.5 percent in April while estimates showed the state adding more than 6,000 jobs.

That's according to the latest monthly report from the state Office of Labor and Workforce Development released Friday. The national unemployment rate stood at 3.9 percent in April.

31. S&P 500 keeps climbing as calm continues to reign for stocks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks pushed further into record territory Tuesday, and the Standard & Poor's 500 index's immaculate start to the year extended to a sixth day.

Health care stocks and banks led the way, as calm continues to reign over markets around the world. The strong gains overshadowed weakness for dividend-paying stocks and other areas of the market hurt by rising interest rates after 10-year Treasury yields hit their highest level since March.

32. Tax on medical devices to resume after 2-year suspension -

BOSTON (AP) — While much of corporate America will enjoy a tax cut in the new year, one industry is getting a tax increase it has fought hard but so far unsuccessfully to avoid.

A 2.3 percent excise tax on medical device manufacturers went back into effect Monday after a two-year hiatus. It was originally imposed in 2013 as one of several taxes and fees in the Affordable Care Act that pay for expanded health insurance under the law.

33. Health care divide leaves tax on path to reinstatement -

BOSTON (AP) — The industry that makes medical devices from artificial hips to miniature pumps for IV drips is looking for a fallback plan to repeal a widely reviled sales tax that almost met its end in GOP health care legislation.

34. Brain disease seen in most football players in report -

CHICAGO — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

35. Stocks end mixed as investors seek safety; industrials slide -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks wobbled Thursday as investors changed course and tempered their expectations for faster economic growth. Industrial companies, which have surged over the last few months, finished lower as Wall Street focused on gold, bonds, and companies that pay big dividends.

36. Medical benefits of dental floss unproven -

HOLMDEL, N.J. (AP) — It's one of the most universal recommendations in all of public health: Floss daily to prevent gum disease and cavities.

Except there's little proof that flossing works.

Still, the federal government, dental organizations and manufacturers of floss have pushed the practice for decades. Dentists provide samples to their patients; the American Dental Association insists on its website that, "Flossing is an essential part of taking care of your teeth and gums."

37. FDA approves first dissolving stent for US patients -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A medical implant that slowly dissolves into the body could be the answer to long-standing safety concerns with devices used to treat clogged arteries.

But not so fast, say experts.

38. Doeg elected vice chair of Launch Tennessee -

Bruce Doeg of Baker Donelson has been named vice chairman of Launch Tennessee.

LaunchTN is a public-private partnership focused on supporting the development of high-growth companies in Tennessee. Doeg was recently elected vice chairman by LaunchTN’s board of directors. Randy Boyd, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic & Community Development, is its chairman.

39. US stocks rise, shaking off tech slump, after Fed stands pat -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rose Wednesday after the Federal Reserve left its key interest rate unchanged, as investors expected. Energy companies climbed again as the price of oil came close to a six-month high. Technology stocks were battered following weak results from Apple and Twitter.

40. Slide in energy companies moves US stocks modestly lower -

Major U.S. stock indexes moved lower in afternoon trading Tuesday, on course for their third drop in a row. Energy stocks led the decline as a slide in oil prices accelerated. Investors were weighing the latest batch of company earnings news and looking ahead to the beginning on Wednesday of two days of testimony before Congress by Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen. European markets fell following steep losses in Japan.

41. Nashville Public Library selects Meacham for honor -

Acclaimed presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning Nashvillian Jon Meacham will receive the 2015 Nashville Public Library Literary Award and will join Nashville’s own American history buff and country performer Tim McGraw for a free public lecture and conversation on Dec. 7.

42. Kachnic to chair VUMC Radiation Oncology -

Vanderbilt University Medical Center announces that Lisa Kachnic, M.D., has been named professor and chair of the Vanderbilt Department of Radiation Oncology.

Previously, she was professor and chair of Radiation Oncology and associate director of Multidisciplinary Cancer Research at Boston University School of Medicine and chief of Radiation Oncology at Boston Medical Center.

43. AP analysis: Companies 'adjust' profits more in their favor -

NEW YORK (AP) — Those record profits that companies are reporting may not be all they're cracked up to be.

As the stock market climbs ever higher, professional investors are warning that companies are presenting misleading versions of their results that ignore a wide variety of normal costs of running a business to make it seem like they're doing better than they really are.

44. Baker Storey McDonald adds industry veteran -

Commercial real estate veteran Tom Frye, who spent the last 14 years as managing director of CBRE before retiring last year, has joined Baker Storey McDonald Properties, Inc.

Baker Storey McDonald focuses in retail and restaurants. Clients include Pier One, Old Navy, and Michaels, and grocery chain Sprouts. Frye’s focus will be uncovering development opportunities as well as urban retail; capitalizing on the ground floor spaces available in many of the new office and apartment buildings.

45. ACLU sues for airport 'behavior detection' program records -

NEW YORK (AP) — A civil rights group sued the federal government Thursday to try to force it to turn over information about airport "behavior detection" programs designed to spot passengers who are potential threats, saying they lead to discrimination.

46. Polls: Employers still prioritize health coverage -

Employers squeezed by years of rising medical costs and pressure from the health care overhaul are still making employee health insurance a priority, but that coverage may grow skimpier in the coming years.

47. Behm is campaign chair for Legal Aid Society -

Margaret Behm, principal at Dodson, Parker, Behm and Capparella, P.C., will serve as the 2015 campaign chair of the Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands’ Campaign for Equal Justice.

48. Stocks move higher on Wall Street; Sonic gains -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks got a lift Tuesday as health care companies bounced back after a heavy sell-off.

Biotechnology stocks in the Standard & Poor's 500 index rose for the first time in five days after a sharp sell-off that prompted by concern over costs of the drugs they make. Merck and Boston Scientific were among the companies that rose.

49. Study: Later retirement may help prevent dementia -

BOSTON (AP) — New research boosts the "use it or lose it" theory about brainpower and staying mentally sharp. People who delay retirement have less risk of developing Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia, a study of nearly half a million people in France found.

50. Roberts promoted to president, CEO of DVL -

DVL Public Relations & Advertising has promoted Ronald Roberts to president and chief executive officer.

DVL Chairman John Van Mol announced the move and said Roberts will be responsible for strategic direction, management and oversight of all agency operations and delivering on DVL’s brand promise to provide creative excellence, service and value to its clients.

51. FirstBank president adds CEO to nameplate -

FirstBank’s board of directors has appointed Chris Holmes chief executive officer, one year after naming him president of the third-largest bank headquartered in Tennessee.

52. Stocks wobble after Amex earnings, jobless claims -

NEW YORK (AP) — A mixed batch of earnings and economic reports kept the stock market wavering between small gains and losses Thursday. Google plunged nearly 10 percent after releasing a weak earnings report hours ahead of schedule.

53. Small study: Drug may help stabilize Alzheimer's -

For the first time, researchers are reporting that a treatment might help stabilize Alzheimer's disease for as much as three years, although the evidence is weak and in only four patients.

The drug is Gammagard, made by Baxter International Inc. Doctors say that four patients who have been receiving the highest dose for three years showed no decline on memory and cognition tests. A dozen others on different doses or shorter treatment times didn't fare as well.

54. GOP plays offense in medical device tax fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For Republicans, it's an irresistible trifecta: A bill that gives them an election-season chance to say they're fighting to protect jobs and cut taxes, even as it erodes financing for President Barack Obama's health care overhaul they despise.

55. Dow sinks 3 percent as Europe uncertainty deepens -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones industrial average dropped more than 350 points Wednesday after Italy's borrowing costs soared and talks collapsed in Greece on forming a new government.

The euro dropped 2 percent against the dollar and Treasury yields sank below 2 percent as money moved money out of Europe and traders bought U.S. government bonds. Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and other large banks were hit hard on worries over their ability to handle a financial crisis brought on by trouble in Europe.

56. Nashville-based Guidant to pay $9.25M in false claims settlement -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The U.S. Justice Department said Monday that a medical device manufacturer has agreed to pay $9.25 million in a false claims settlement.

Guidant LLC, a subsidiary of Boston Scientific Corp. in Natick, Mass., allegedly promoted the longevity and reliability of its pacemakers and defibrillators to physicians in an effort to persuade them to purchase Guidant products over competing devices.

57. Wiseman Ashworth expands Nashville, Memphis offices -

Wiseman Ashworth Law Group has opened an office in Memphis and will double the size of its office in Nashville.

The firm’s Nashville office, located in the Nashville City Center will increase from 5,000 to 10,000 square feet. The firm will occupy one half of the City Center’s 8th floor. Construction work is underway and is expected to be completed by October 1. In addition to office space for the firm’s staff of six attorneys plus support staff, the expanded office space will include several conference rooms and a Mediation Center. At Nashville City Center, Richard Fletcher was the landlord agent for Parmenter Nashville City Center, LLC. Tracy M. Speake, Managing Partner, Paradigm Realty Advisors, LLC, represented Wiseman Ashworth Law Group.