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Editorial Results (free)

1. SpaceX launches 4 amateurs on private Earth-circling trip -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — SpaceX's first private flight streaked into orbit Wednesday night with two contest winners, a health care worker and their rich sponsor, the most ambitious leap yet in space tourism.

2. Amazon eyes 125K more hires, $18+ per hour average salary -

Amazon wants to hire 125,000 delivery and warehouse workers and said Tuesday that it is paying new hires an average of $18 an hour in a tight job market as more people shop online.

Competition for hourly workers has become fierce, and many companies are offering higher pay, sign-on bonuses and other incentives. Last week, package delivery company UPS promised to handout job offers in 30 minutes after candidates apply for many of the 100,000 holiday workers it plans to hire.

3. In a hot market, companies compete with would-be homeowners -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Soaring home prices and rents are fueling real estate companies' appetite for houses, adding unwelcome competition for many would-be homebuyers.

Residential real estate bought by companies or institutions hit an all-time high of 67,943 properties in the second quarter, according to Redfin, a Seattle-based online brokerage.

4. Vehicle prices remain high as traditional sale season ends -

If this were a normal year, dealers would be kicking off their end-of-model-year vehicle clearance sales. Consumers can often find good deals as dealerships are eager to sell their remaining inventory to make room for next year’s models.

5. Be ready to work for Labor Day bargains this year -

This Labor Day, some Americans will have extra cash on hand for holiday weekend shopping.

Some people padded their savings accounts by staying home during the pandemic. And some set aside the advance payments of the child tax credit they received, says Amna Kirmani, marketing professor at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business.

6. Please adjust your masks to full upright position -

While waiting at Gate C7 at the Nashville airport, a thought occurred to me: Might ours turn out to be one of those “unruly passenger gets duct-taped to the seat” kind of flights?

Such is among the possibilities for air journeys these days, a time when travel of any sort poses potential hazards not even contemplated a couple of short years ago.

7. Home Alone ’21: Where is My Person? -

It was March 2020, and you thought you’d only be staying at home a few weeks. When weeks turned into months you got a little lonely. So you adopted a dog.

Things were going along swimmingly. You played with the dog. You took care of the dog. You walked the dog. You were with the dog 24/7, and it was a glorious thing.

8. New Zealand wages high-stakes effort to halt virus outbreak -

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — By early next week, New Zealanders should know if their government's strict new lockdown is working to stamp out its first coronavirus outbreak in six months.

A successful effort could again make the nation's virus response the envy of the world. A failure could expose flaws in its health system, including a shortage of hospital beds and a slow vaccine rollout.

9. With sales still surging, Best Buy raises prospects for 2021 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy raised its sales outlook for the year after breezing past Wall Street expectations in the second quarter.

The nation's largest consumer electronics chain joined the slew of other major retailers like Walmart, Target and Macy's putting up banner numbers, suggesting that Americans have continued to be spend even as the delta variant spreads.

10. Schweid’s latest book a good look at Nashville’s past -

It’s not true that the first thing I did after buying the new Nashville history book was to flip through looking for the picture I took that appears in it.

That is, it’s not entirely true*

11. Metro Council approves grants to 21 nonprofits -

Metro Council has approved 21 Opportunity Grants to nonprofits working to enhance community safety and reduce violence in Nashville-Davidson County. This is the first round of funding from the $2 million Community Safety Partnership Fund, which Metro Nashville created with Governor’s Grant dollars earlier this year.

12. Win on Sunday, sell on Monday still a goal for automakers -

DETROIT (AP) — Rick Hendrick erased any doubt that marketing in motorsports is still effective when his automotive sales group bought the sponsorship rights through 2023 for NASCAR title contender Kyle Larson.

13. Tennessee says court ruling prohibits new eviction pause -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's court system won't follow a new COVID-19 pandemic eviction moratorium by President Joe Biden's administration, reasoning that a federal appeals court for its region has already decided the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn't have authority to issue pauses on eviction.

14. Biden's new evictions moratorium faces doubts on legality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden may have averted a flood of evictions and solved a growing political problem when his administration  reinstated a temporary ban on evictions because of the COVID-19 crisis.  But he left his lawyers with legal arguments that even he acknowledges might not stand up in court.

15. After rocket ride of growth, Robinhood heads to the market -

NEW YORK (AP) — After a rocket rise where it introduced millions of people to investing and reshaped the brokerage industry, all while racking up a long list of controversies in less than eight years, Robinhood is about to take the leap itself into the stock market.

16. A dozen years after last minimum wage hike, is $15 new norm? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The signs and banners are dotted along suburban commercial strips and hanging in shop windows and restaurants, evidence of a new desperation among America's service-industry employers: "Now Hiring, $15 an hour."

17. As employers struggle to fill jobs, teens come to the rescue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The owners of restaurants, amusement parks and retail shops, many of them desperate for workers, are sounding an unusual note of gratitude this summer:

Thank goodness for teenagers.

18. US plans to make airlines refund fees if bags are delayed -

The Transportation Department will propose that airlines be required to refund fees on checked baggage if the bags aren't delivered to passengers quickly enough.

The proposal, if made final after a lengthy regulation-writing process, would also require prompt refunds for fees on extras such as internet access if the airline fails to provide the service during the flight.

19. Drop that top: The best convertibles for 2021 -

If last summer was all about hunkering down, staying safe and social distancing, 2021’s sunshine season will see us reconnecting with friends and getting back out into the world. What better way to embark on new adventures than in a convertible?

20. Rory Gamble, who led UAW through scandal, pandemic, retires -

DETROIT (AP) — Rory Gamble, a former Ford Motor Co. factory worker who led the United Auto Workers through one of the most turbulent periods in its history, is retiring effective June 30 after nearly a half-century of union membership.

21. Inflation poses new challenge for pandemic-weary businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small businesses that endured shutdowns and lower revenue during the COVID-19 outbreak now must contend with another crisis: spiking prices for goods and services that squeeze profits and force many owners to pass the increases along to customers.

22. May retail sales fell 1.3% as Americans spend less on goods -

NEW YORK (AP) — Retail sales fell in May, dragged down by a decline in auto sales and a shift by Americans to spend more on vacations and other services instead of goods.

Total sales dropped a seasonal adjusted 1.3% in May from the month before, the U.S. Commerce Department said Tuesday. Wall Street analysts expected a smaller decline of 0.5%.

23. Novavax: Large study finds COVID-19 shot about 90% effective -

Vaccine maker Novavax said Monday its COVID-19 shot was highly effective against the disease and also protected against variants in a large study in the U.S. and Mexico, potentially offering the world yet another weapon against the virus at a time when developing countries are desperate for doses.

24. G-7 nations gather to pledge 1B vaccine doses for world -

CARBIS BAY, England (AP) — Leaders from the Group of Seven industrialized nations are set to commit at their summit to sharing at least 1 billion coronavirus shots with struggling countries around the world — half the doses coming from the U.S. and 100 million from the U.K.

25. Sales pitch summer? Dems aim to showcase virus relief effort -

MAIDENS, Va. (AP) — When Sherry Brockenbrough and her family opened a distillery on a leafy vista overlooking the James River on March 5, 2020, the coronavirus still seemed like a distant threat.

But in the coming weeks, Hill Top Distillery faced the kind of barriers few businesses could survive and almost none had prepared for. By the thousands, restaurants, breweries and distilleries across the country would largely shutter.

26. Bruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for more -

NEW YORK (AP) — After feeling the thrill of victory early this year by singlehandedly causing GameStop's stock to soar — only to get crushed when it quickly crashed back to earth — armies of smaller-pocketed and novice investors are back for more.

27. Amazon to hold Prime Day over 2 days in June -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Wednesday that it will hold its annual Prime Day over two days in June this year, the earliest it has ever held the sales event.

Typically, Amazon holds Prime Day in July. Amazon has said it was holding it earlier due to the Olympics, which starts next month and take people's attention away. Last year, Amazon postponed Prime Day to October because of the pandemic and used the sales event to kickoff holiday shopping early.

28. Gibson Garage opens June 9 with concert -

Gibson, the iconic, American instrument brand based in Nashville, is debuting the Gibson Garage, which it bills as the “ultimate guitar experience.”

The 8,000-square-foot shop will officially open to the public June 9 at historic Cummins Station, located on 209 10th Avenue South.

29. Missing the moment: Virtual reality's breakout still elusive -

NEW YORK (AP) — Virtual reality — computer generated 3D environments that can range from startlingly realistic to abstract wonderlands — has been on the cusp of wide acceptance for years without ever really taking off.

30. With AMC shares up 1,100% in 2021, company sells shares -

The movie theater chain AMC is raising $230.5 million through an 8.5 million share sale, cashing in on the meme stock frenzy that has sent its stock price up more than 1,100% this year.

Theaters and other beleaguered industries like restaurants and concert venues are anticipating the return of crowds over the next few months with the massive U.S. vaccination effort ongoing.

31. Shoppers go back to stores, but retailers face challenges -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans are going back to one of their favorite pastimes: store shopping.

With more people getting vaccinated and dropping their face masks, retailers from Walmart to Macy's are seeing an eager return to their stores after more than a year of their customers migrating online during the pandemic.

32. Amazon to buy MGM, studio behind James Bond and 'Shark Tank' -

NEW YORK (AP) — Online shopping giant Amazon is buying MGM, the movie and TV studio behind James Bond, "Legally Blonde" and "Shark Tank," with the hopes of filling its video streaming service with more stuff to watch.

33. Chip shortage: Fewer choices, higher car prices -

The pandemic appears to be receding in the U.S. and the economy recovering, yet car shoppers heading back to car dealerships are in for a surprise: There are fewer vehicles to choose from and those that are available are more expensive.

34. Judge digs into Apple app store policies as Epic trial ends -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — The judge who will decide a case challenging Apple's stranglehold on its iPhone app store indicated on Monday she would like to promote more competition but without dismantling a commission system that reaps billions of dollars for the technology powerhouse.

35. Sotomayor: Americans need to take critical look at policing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As communities nationwide are re-examining law enforcement practices, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor says Americans should think critically about how they want police to interact with citizens.

36. Nervous workers struggle to adjust to new mask policies -

NEW YORK (AP) — An abrupt relaxation of mask policies has left workers at some retail and grocery stores reeling as they try to sort out what the new environment means for their own safety and relationship with customers.

37. 2021 Ford Bronco Sport vs. the Subaru Forester -

The launch of Ford’s Bronco, its highly anticipated Jeep Wrangler-like SUV, won’t likely happen until late this year. But there already is a Bronco-badged alternative at dealer lots: the 2021 Ford Bronco Sport. It’s related to Ford’s Escape crossover SUV but has more squared-off bodywork and enhanced off-roading capabilities.

38. Nissan showcases 2022 Pathfinder -

The newly redesigned 2022 Nissan Pathfinder has begun rolling off the assembly line at the company’s Smyrna assembly plant.

“Start of production of the new Pathfinder marks another major milestone in our Nissan NEXT momentum story,” says Jeff Younginer, vice president, Nissan Smyrna Vehicle Assembly Plant. “The Smyrna plant team is thrilled to put the newest version of this iconic vehicle on the road for customers.”

39. Vote? Not yet. Invest? Yes. Fidelity launches teen accounts -

NEW YORK (AP) — Looking to draw in the next generation of investors, Fidelity Investments is launching a new type of account for teenagers to save, spend and invest their money.

The account is for 13- to 17-year-olds, and it will allow them to deposit cash, have a debit card and trade stocks and funds. The teens can make their own trades through a simplified experience on Fidelity's mobile app, with zero account fees or minimum balances, though the youth account requires a parent or guardian to have their own Fidelity account as well.

40. Inside one network cashing in on vaccine disinformation -

The couple in the website videos could be hawking any number of products.

"You're going to love owning the platinum package," Charlene Bollinger tells viewers, as a picture of a DVD set, booklets and other products flashes on screen. Her husband, Ty, promises a "director's cut edition," and over 100 hours of additional footage.

41. Record April sales obliterate April 2020’s record sales -

Buyers and Realtors alike are lamenting the paucity of real estate inventory in the area. With enormous demand and many homes receiving more than 30 offers – many for hundreds of thousands of dollars more than over list price – April sales numbers are staggering.

42. Poll: Government should help Americans age at home -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of Americans agree that government should help people fulfill a widely held aspiration to age in their own homes, not institutional settings, a new poll finds.

There's a surprising level of bipartisan agreement on some proposals that could help make that happen, according to the late March survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Still, Republicans lag Democrats in support of some policies, including the most far-reaching idea: Only 42% of Republicans favor a government long-term care insurance program for all Americans, compared with 78% of Democrats. Overall, 60% of the public supports that approach.

43. 5 smart ways to use your tax return on a car -

Tax season will be coming to a close later than usual this year due to the May 17 extended deadline. Until that time, you might hear advertisements from car dealerships urging you to bring in your refund or pandemic stimulus check to buy a new car. Given that the average tax refund issued in 2020 was $2,741, the IRS reports, it is a solid amount that people often use to make major purchases.

44. Beautiful house, but how fast is the internet? -

Rachel Pinkstaff left California looking for a place with more affordable home prices and less government intrusion. She found what she was looking for in fast-growing Thompson’s Station in southern Williamson County.

45. eBay auction of Japanese internment art pulled after protest -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The auction of a series of sketches purportedly drawn by an artist at the Japanese internment camp at Manzanar was canceled Tuesday after groups protested it was offensive and immoral to profit off the misery of incarcerated people.

46. 'We failed the test' of COVID-19, says human rights champion -

PARIS (AP) — Agnès Callamard is best known for her investigation into the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and has made a career uncovering extrajudicial killings.

The French human rights expert's focus on rights abuses is taking on new dimensions as she assumes leadership of Amnesty International and turns her attention to what she says is one of the world's most pressing issues — vaccine equity to end the coronavirus pandemic, which has eroded freedoms globally.

47. Recovering from COVID-19? Here’s how to handle the financial hit -

Testing and vaccination for the coronavirus is free thanks to laws passed last year. Treatment isn’t, however, and may be about to get more expensive.

A new vaccine is in production, millions of doses are being administered daily and President Joe Biden says there will be enough vaccines for all U.S. adults by the end of May. That’s great news. But there’s still a risk of getting COVID-19 and facing medical bills.

48. VW plans brand-name change to 'Voltswagen' in US -

DETROIT (AP) — Volkswagen plans to change its brand name in the United States to "Voltswagen" as its shifts its production increasingly toward electric vehicles and tries to distance itself from an emissions cheating scandal.

49. A late slide, led by Big Tech, leaves US stock indexes lower -

A late-afternoon burst of selling on Wall Street erased an early gain for stocks Wednesday, pulling the market further below the all-time high it reached just a week ago.

The S&P 500 dropped 0.5% after having been up 0.8% in the early going. Technology and communication services companies accounted for the heaviest selling, outweighing gains in financial, energy and industrial stocks. Bond yields mostly fell after rising earlier this week.

50. Biden to talk up health insurance cost cuts in visit to Ohio -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will showcase health insurance cost cuts in a speech in Ohio on Tuesday during what may be the best time for Democrats to talk up the Affordable Care Act since it became law.

51. Overstimulated? Stocks soar 75% in historic 12-month run -

NEW YORK (AP) — It was one year ago that the terrifying free fall for the stock market suddenly ended, ushering in one of its greatest runs.

On March 23, 2020, the S&P 500 fell 2.9%. In all, the index dropped nearly 34% in about a month, wiping out three years' worth of gains for the market.

52. How to sell a car safely during a pandemic -

Selling a car privately has long been a way for people to potentially get more money for their vehicle compared to trading it in to a dealership. But it’s always been a laborious process.

You need to photograph your car from all angles, create ads, take calls and texts from strangers and then meet them so they can test-drive your car and complete the deal.

53. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

54. The early bird gets nothing without an above-list offer -

The Nashville-area real estate market is hotter than hot, as anyone involved can attest. And heading south on I-65, a reasonable solution in markets past, offers no relief.

In all of Williamson County, there were some 18 houses on the market Friday in the $550,000-$800,000 price range, with several of those entering the market Friday. These properties were in Brentwood, Nolensville, Franklin and all points between those municipalities.

55. Big comfort in GLS, Escalade, Navigator -

Among luxury SUVs, the Cadillac Escalade has long made no apologies about being big and brash. Now Cadillac has redesigned the Escalade for 2021 with a new look and an infusion of new technology. Do these updates make it the best large luxury SUV you can buy?

56. Common sense caves in fight with ‘God-given liberty’ -

They’re relatively rare, thank goodness, which makes them stand out even more: People in the grocery store, pharmacy or wherever who refuse to even pretend to wear masks.

I’m not talking about the folks with a mask below their nose, whether by ignorance or passive aggression. They occupy a separate, slightly lesser, category of human scourge.

57. Target powers through pandemic; sales growth explodes in 2020 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target will plow $4 billion into its business each year for the next several years to redo its stores and add new ones as well as speed up its delivery network, as the discounter aims to keep up with increasingly demanding shoppers shaped by the pandemic.

58. Best Buy cut 5,000 jobs even as sales soared during pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy said Thursday that it laid off 5,000 full-time store workers earlier this month, even as the company's sales soared during the pandemic as homebound people bought laptops, TVs and other gadgets.

59. Costco to raise starting hourly wage to $16, end hazard pay -

NEW YORK (AP) — Costco will increase its starting wage to $16 an hour, surpassing most of its main competitors.

Costco CEO Craig Jelinek announced the increase Thursday at a Senate Budget Committee hearing, led by Sen. Bernie Sanders, to examine wages at major companies. Jelinek said the starting wage for Costco employees would rise to $16 next week, up from $15 the company instituted two year ago.

60. Gains for bank stocks help lead major US indexes higher -

Stocks shook off a weak start and closed broadly higher Wednesday, nudging the Dow Jones Industrial Average to another all-time high.

The S&P 500 rose 1.1% after having been down 0.6% in the early going. Gains in financial, technology and industrial stocks powered the comeback. Utilities fell.

61. Three smart methods for getting out of your car lease -

Lacie Romano, a Los Angeles resident, is stuck paying for a vehicle she no longer needs. Like many Americans, her situation has been upended by the pandemic.

“I leased a 2019 Lexus NX 300 before the pandemic started but I’m only driving it a couple of times a week now,” Romano says. “I really like my Lexus but it’s hard to justify the monthly payments.”

62. UN to rich nations: Don't undermine COVAX vaccine program -

BERLIN (AP) — The head of the World Health Organization pleaded with rich countries on Monday to check before ordering additional COVID-19 vaccine shots for themselves whether that undermines efforts to get vaccine shots to poorer nations.

63. Investing ABCs: Teaching your kids about money and markets -

The recent stock market mania over the video game company GameStop, which this week was scrutinized by Congress, has provided a teachable moment for kids.

The Associated Press talked to a few parents and financial experts for their tips on talking with kids about investing and the often confusing behavior of financial markets. Here's a summary of what they had to say.

64. Biden's $15 wage proposal: Job killer or a boon for workers? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's effort to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour could provide a welcome opportunity for someone like Cristian Cardona, a 21-year-old fast food worker. Cardona would love to earn enough to afford to move out of his parents' house in Orlando, Florida, and maybe scrape together money for college.

65. Battle of the bigs: Chevrolet Tahoe vs. Ford Expedition -

The Chevrolet Tahoe and the Ford Expedition are by far the most popular large SUVs in terms of sales. They offer big-time capability and utility, even if it comes at the expense of fuel efficiency and comfort compared to more carlike crossover SUVs.

66. Music City real estate still singing the same hit song -

January sales numbers have been released by the Greater Nashville Realtors, and it’s the same old story despite the new year: Sales are strong with 2,745 closings representing a 4% increase compared to January 2020.

67. Is COVID-19 the death of shaking hands? -

On March 8, 2020, the 8:45 morning service at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Franklin was unfolding as it did every Sunday. Just after the Prayers of the People, the rector offered The Peace. “May the peace of the Lord be always with you,” Father Rusty McCown said to the congregation. “And also with you,” they responded.

68. Family of novice investor who killed himself sue Robinhood -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The family of a novice stock trader who killed himself after mistakenly believing he lost more than $700,000 are suing Robinhood Financial, claiming the popular stock-trading platform's business practices "directly" led to their son's death.

69. 5 challenges awaiting Amazon's new CEO -

NEW YORK (AP) — In 1995, few could imagine that the modest online bookstore built by Jeff Bezos would turn into a $1.7 trillion behemoth that sells everything from diapers to sofas, produces movies, owns a grocery chain and provides cloud computing services to businesses all over the globe.

70. Selling out or seeing the future? -

When much-honored songwriter, publisher, producer, Music Row Renaissance Man Craig Wiseman is asked about the ongoing flurry of big-name artists like Bob Dylan and Neil Young selling their song catalogs, there is wonder mixed with mirth in his voice.

71. GameStop's stupefying stock rise doesn't hide its reality -

NEW YORK (AP) — Behind GameStop's stock surge is the grim reality of its prospects: The video game retailer is floundering even as the industry around it is booming.

GameStop has been swept up in a battle between big-moneyed hedge funds betting against it and small investors trying to prop it up. That has caused GameStop's share price to soar despite the shaky financials underneath.

72. Agriculture secretary nominee Vilsack endorses biofuels push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tom Vilsack, President Joe Biden's nominee for secretary of agriculture, pledged Tuesday to focus on climate change initiatives and work to address racial inequities in agricultural assistance programs.

73. US boosting vaccine deliveries amid complaints of shortages -

Answering growing frustration over vaccine shortages, President Joe Biden announced that the U.S. is ramping up deliveries to hard-pressed states over the next three weeks and expects to provide enough doses to vaccinate 300 million Americans by the end of the summer or early fall.

74. Smaller investors face down hedge funds, as GameStop soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — A head-scratching David and Goliath story is playing out on Wall Street over the stock price of a money-losing videogame retailer.

An army of smaller-pocketed, optimistic investors is throwing dollars and buy orders at the stock of GameStop — in direct opposition to a group of wealthy investors who are counting on the stock price to plunge.

75. U.S. retail sales fell in December for 3rd straight month -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans cut back on spending in December for the third-straight month as a surge in virus cases kept people away from stores during the critical holiday shopping season.

The U.S. Commerce Department said Friday that retail sales fell a seasonally adjusted 0.7% in December from the month before, a decline Wall Street analysts weren't expecting. Sales also fell in October and November, even as retailers tried to get people shopping for Christmas gifts early by offering deals before Halloween.

76. Target continues to thrive in whirlwind retail environment -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target's strong sales streak extended through a pandemic-shrouded holiday season after a hard push online and an increased effort to provide alternatives to customers who are trying to minimize risk.

77. Chunky bootmaker Dr. Martens to sell shares to public -

LONDON (AP) — The maker of Dr. Martens boots, the chunky-soled footwear once championed by rebellious young people but now favored by celebrities like Rihanna, plans to sell shares to the public as the existing owners seek to profit from growth of the iconic brand.

78. Byrd elected partner at Adams and Reese -

Adams and Reese has elected six attorneys across the firm to partnerships, including Clayton Byrd of Nashville.

Byrd heads the firm’s Tennessee alcoholic beverage practice, representing clients across the state and the U.S. with matters involving every aspect of alcoholic beverages, from manufacture and sale to licensing. Byrd represents the interests of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers and other businesses with regard to state and federal liquor licensing and regulatory matters.

79. After top staff exodus, Texas AG seeks $43M for Google suit -

DALLAS (AP) — The mass exodus of Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton's top staff over accusations of bribery against their former boss has left the Republican seeking $43 million in public funds to replace some of them with outside lawyers to lead a high-profile antitrust lawsuit against Google.

80. How young drivers can steer clear of costly car insurance -

Insurance costs for drivers in their early 20s can be staggering. After teenagers, young adults have some of the highest car insurance rates in the country.

In fact, the average car insurance rate for drivers 20 to 25 years old is about $2,200 a year for full coverage, a 2020 NerdWallet analysis of the top five insurers in the nation reveals. That’s about $700 more per year than the average rate for a 40-year-old driver.

81. Tony Rice, master bluegrass guitarist, dies at 69 -

Tony Rice, the master bluegrass picker who drew fans worldwide for the chance to hear the quick, fluid sounds he conjured from his storied Martin D-28 guitar, has died at age 69.

82. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

83. Consumer relief: COVID bill to end 'surprise' medical bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — People with private health insurance will see the nasty shock of "surprise" medical bills virtually gone, thanks to the coronavirus compromise passed by Congress.

The charges that can run from hundreds to tens of thousands of dollars come from doctors and hospitals that are outside the network of a patient's health insurance plan. It's estimated that about 1 in 5 emergency visits and 1 in 6 inpatient admissions will trigger a surprise bill.

84. High-flying Tesla stock takes a hit on 1st day in S&P 500 -

DETROIT (AP) — In the middle of last year, Tesla's losses were piling up, sales weren't enough to cover expenses and big debt payments loomed. The situation was so bad that one influential Wall Street analyst raised the possibility that Tesla wouldn't be able to pay its bills and would have to be restructured financially.

85. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

86. Retail sales fell 1.1% in November, biggest drop in 7 months -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans held back on spending during the start of the holiday shopping season, a troubling sign for retailers and the state of the U.S. economy.

U.S. retail sales fell a seasonally adjusted 1.1% in November, according to the U.S. Commerce Department. It was the biggest drop in seven months, and a steeper decline than Wall Street analysts had expected.

87. How to spot fake shopping sites and avoid being scammed -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ben Black bought what he thought was a well-priced drone online. But the drone never showed up, the site stopped responding to his emails and he never got his $100 back.

He was scammed.

88. All-wheel-drive SUV alternatives for winter -

Winter is coming, as is the unpleasantness of driving on wet, snowy or icy roads. A vehicle with all-wheel drive can help maximize traction in these conditions.

With four wheels being powered instead of two, you’ll have a better chance of avoiding spinning your vehicle’s wheels and getting stuck.

89. Retailers urge shoppers to buy early amid shipping crunch -

NEW YORK (AP) — A number of retailers, including J.C. Penney, Lowe's and Kohl's, are telling shoppers they need to place their online orders soon or else pay expedited shipping fees if they want to get their packages delivered in time for the holidays.

90. Apple unveils headphones that cost twice as much as AirPods -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Apple has one more thing for the holiday shopping season: over-the-ear, wireless headphones that will test how much people are willing to splurge on for high-quality sound.

91. Margin for error gone as Titans chase AFC South title -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans have lost their margin for error chasing the franchise's first AFC South title since 2008.

Their slow start in losing 41-35 to Cleveland dropped them into a tie with Indianapolis, though Tennessee (8-4) still has the divisional tiebreaker with a 3-1 record.

92. Will the US ever have a national COVID-19 testing strategy? -

NEW YORK (AP) — As the coronavirus epidemic worsens, U.S. health experts hope Joe Biden's administration will put in place something Donald Trump's has not — a comprehensive national testing strategy.

93. Early winter car deals might not be as bountiful -

Once a novel concept in dealership marketing, Black Friday car deals have become as common as the TV deals at your local big-box store. While the savings on new cars aren’t that dramatic – no 70% off fire sales here – they do generally make mid to late November a good time to buy a car.

94. Stocks slip, but S&P 500 still logs best month since April -

Stocks pulled back slightly from their record levels Monday as Wall Street put a quiet coda on one of its most rocking months in decades.

The S&P 500 fell 0.5%, but the benchmark index still clocked a surge of 10.8% for the month, it's biggest monthly gain since April. The Dow Jones Industrial Average, which has far less impact on 401(k) accounts than the S&P 500 does, had its best month since 1987.

95. Holiday trends to watch: Adult Play-Doh; stores that ship -

NEW YORK (AP) — The pandemic is turning this into a holiday shopping season like no other.

Toy companies are targeting stuck-at-home grown-ups with latte-smelling Play-Doh and Legos that turn into Warhols. Those who added a puppy to their family during the pandemic will see tons of gift options for their new furry friend. And with more people shopping online, stores are doing double duty as shipping centers to try to get gifts to doorsteps as fast as possible.

96. Lights, camera, sell: Retailers want you to watch and shop -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Jenna Powell gets in front of a camera, she can sell $10,000 worth of sparkly dresses and tie-dye hoodies in 40 minutes.

Powell, whose three Jennaration shops in Alabama were closed at the start of the pandemic, has put all her focus on selling through live videos, broadcasting live several times a week to 400 people who watch on Facebook or her store's app. She puts on clothes from her shop, spins for the camera and tries to get viewers to buy.

97. The pandemic is changing Hollywood, maybe forever -

NEW YORK (AP) — "No New 'Movies' Till Influenza Ends" blared a New York Times headline on Oct. 10, 1918, while the deadly second wave of the Spanish Flu was unfolding.

A century later, during another pandemic, movies — quotes no longer necessary — are again facing a critical juncture. But it's not because new films haven't been coming out. By streaming service, video-on-demand, virtual theater or actual theater, a steady diet of films have been released under COVID-19 every week. The Times has reviewed more than 460 new movies since mid-March.

98. Best Buy reports 3Q results that exceed Wall Street views -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy Co. reported fiscal third-quarter results that blew through analysts' expectations as the nation's largest consumer electronics retailer enjoyed surging demand for items like home theater and appliances that help people learn, cook, work and connect in their homes during the pandemic.

99. Conquer Black Friday from the comfort of your couch -

‘Twas days before Black Friday when all around the country, shoppers were gearing up for a day full of shopping.

OK, so maybe you haven’t exactly been gearing up for the day after Thanksgiving. Maybe you haven’t done any research at all.

100. Financially troubled startup helped power Trump campaign -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — President Donald Trump's 2020 reelection campaign was powered by a cell phone app that allowed staff to monitor the movements of his millions of supporters, and offered intimate access to their social networks.