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Editorial Results (free)

1. Poor Americans likely to be hit hardest by new US tariffs -

PHOENIX (AP) — The biggest victims of President Donald Trump's tariffs won't necessarily be Mexicans or Chinese or young urbanites who will have to pay more for avocado toast.

The people likely to pay the steepest price for Trump's attempts to bend Mexico and China to his will are poor Americans, who already live close to the financial edge and could have to pay more for everyday purchases.

2. Walmart ups the delivery game with next day shipping -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is rolling out free next-day delivery on its most popular items, increasing the stakes in the retail shipping wars.

The nation's largest retailer said Tuesday it's been building a network of more efficient e-commerce distribution centers to make that happen. The next-day service will cover 220,000 popular items from diapers and non-perishable food items to toys and electronics. That's nearly double the number of items it carries in its stores.

3. Uber begins trading nearly 7% below its IPO price -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber began trading as a public company at $42 per share Friday, nearly 7% below its initial public offering price on an already volatile day for the markets.

The ride-hailing giant priced shares in the IPO Thursday at $45 each, raising $8.1 billion and giving the company a valuation of $82 billion.

4. Uber reveals strong growth, huge losses ahead of IPO -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Uber is providing a look under the hood of its business in the lead-up to its hotly anticipated debut on the stock market, revealing strong growth but an ongoing struggle to overcome huge losses and repair its reputation.

5. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's claims in his State of Union address -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump laced his State of the Union speech with puffed-up numbers and partial truths Tuesday as he hailed an "economic miracle," warned of human traffickers flooding across the border and appeared to place Afghanistan in the Middle East instead of where it is, Asia.

6. ICE force-feeding detainees on hunger strike -

Federal immigration officials are force-feeding six immigrants through plastic nasal tubes during a hunger strike that's gone on for a month inside a Texas detention facility, The Associated Press has learned.

7. Stites & Harbison welcomes Schwegler -

Michael Schwegler has joined Stites & Harbison’s Real Estate & Banking Service Group as a member of the firm.

Schwegler represents lenders, creditors and businesses in commercial and consumer lending transactions, consumer finance regulation and compliance, real estate, workouts, bankruptcy and commercial litigation matters. He has extensive experience handling commercial lending and real estate transactions.

8. Kroger, Nuro bringing unmanned delivery to customers -

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Deliveries from an Arizona grocery store will soon be arriving with no one behind the wheel.

A fully autonomous vehicle is about to pilot public roads Tuesday with no back up driver, though it will be monitored by humans in another automobile.

9. Free flu shot events planned statewide -

Tennessee’s county health departments are holding special “FightFluTN” events Dec. 5 to provide flu shots at no charge to increase the number of people vaccinated in Tennessee.

The Tennessee Department of Health urges all Tennesseans who have not yet received a flu shot this flu season to get one as soon as possible, as seasonal influenza is spreading across the state.

10. Green Hills is cooking, but don’t call it ‘trendy’ -

Much is being made about the massive 18-story mixed-use development under construction along Hillsboro Pike in Green Hills, with its 300-plus luxury apartments and Oprah Winfrey-connected concept restaurant, and how it is changing the face of the community and worsening traffic woes.

11. Prospect of Native congresswoman galvanizes American Indians -

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico, a state with deep historical ties to American Indians whose images and symbols are rooted in everything from the state flag to town names, has moved closer to electing the first Native American woman to the U.S. House of Representatives.

12. Uber valued at about $62B in new offer to buy company stock -

Three investors are looking to buy stakes in Uber in an offer that values the company at $62 billion.

The ride-hailing giant said Wednesday the investors want to buy up to $600 million worth of the private company's stock. They're offering $40 per share, giving Uber a valuation that's nearly 30 percent above the $48 billion set in a January stock sale.

13. Trump work requirement rewrites health care rules for poor -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rewriting the rules on health care for the poor, the Trump administration said Thursday it will allow states to require "able-bodied" Medicaid recipients to work, a hotly debated first in the program's half-century history.

14. Major shift as Trump opens way for Medicaid work requirement -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a major policy shift that could affect millions of low-income people, the Trump administration said Thursday it is offering a path for states that want to seek work requirements on Medicaid recipients.

15. Pay to rise for millions as 19 states increase minimum wage -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — It will be a happy New Year indeed for millions of the lowest-paid U.S. workers. Nineteen states, including New York and California, will ring in the year with an increase in the minimum wage.

16. Big business warns Trump against mass deportation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Still grappling with Donald Trump's surprise election, the nation's business community has begun to pressure the president-elect to abandon campaign-trail pledges of mass deportation and other hard-line immigration policies that some large employers fear would hurt the economy.

17. Saudi land purchases fuel debate over US water rights -

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Saudi Arabia's largest dairy company will soon be unable to farm alfalfa in its own parched country to feed its 170,000 cows. So it's turning to an unlikely place to grow the water-chugging crop — the drought-stricken American Southwest.

18. It’s a wonderful family business for Littles -

If, as the classic movie line tells us: “Every time a bell rings, an angel gets his wings,” there are plenty of soaring spirits out there today, at least judging by the George Bailey of Brentwood.

19. From DNA lab to whiskey distiller: A well-laid plan gains steam -

When Bruce Boeko’s company shut down its Nashville operations, he could have parlayed his experience into a similar position elsewhere.

He’d been successful in a small and specialized industry, rising in 20 years from scientist to manager of a DNA laboratory that conducted forensic analysis of biological samples for agencies like the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. It was work he enjoyed in a field he loved.

20. Rocky Top in Nashville: Good for city, bad for Vols -

I can’t help but get fired up for a college football game between Tennessee and Virginia Tech in front of 150,000 people at Bristol Motor Speedway.

Brilliant idea.

Too bad “The Battle of Bristol” won’t happen until Sept. 10, 2016.

21. What better place for an NRA convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

22. Homeless people need libraries, and libraries need them -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Jeffery Bailey spends nearly every day at his public library.

It's not just that he loves books. For the 43-year-old who sleeps in a tent outside a local church, the library is pretty much the only place he can go that won't charge him to provide safety, warmth, useful services and entertainment.

23. AIDS activist takes up a new fight: defending FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As an AIDS activist in the early 1990s, Gregg Gonsalves traveled to Washington to challenge the Food and Drug Administration.

Gonsalves was part of the confrontational group AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, which staged protests outside the FDA's headquarters, disrupted its public meetings and pressured its leaders into speeding up the approval of experimental drugs for patients dying of AIDS.

24. Oil boom and housing bust alter US spending trends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — North Dakotans, enriched by an oil boom, stepped up their spending at triple the national pace in the three years that followed the Great Recession. In Nevada, smacked hard by the housing bust, consumers barely increased their spending.

25. 32 states, including Tennessee, trail US as a whole in job recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Five years after the Great Recession officially ended, most states still haven't regained all the jobs they lost, even though the nation as a whole has.

In May, the overall economy finally recovered all 9 million jobs that vanished in the worst downturn since the 1930s. Another month of solid hiring is expected in the U.S. jobs report for June that will be released Thursday.

26. Pay raises go mainly to those in select industries -

NEW YORK (AP) — If you hope to get a raise that finally feels like one, it helps to work in the right industry.

Historically, at this stage in the economy's recovery, pay would be rising in most sectors. But five years after the Great Recession officially ended, raises remain sharply uneven across industries and, as a whole, have barely kept up with prices. Overall pay has been rising about 2 percent a year, roughly equal to inflation.

27. Health insurers just say no to marijuana coverage -

Patients who use medical marijuana for pain and other chronic symptoms can take an unwanted hit: Insurers don't cover the treatment, which costs as much as $1,000 a month.

Once the drug of choice for hippies and rebellious teens, marijuana in recent years has gained more mainstream acceptance for its ability to boost appetite, dull pain and reduce seizures in everyone from epilepsy to cancer patients.

28. Health insurers just say no to marijuana coverage -

Patients who use medical marijuana for pain and other chronic symptoms can take an unwanted hit: Insurers don't cover the treatment, which costs as much as $1,000 a month.

Once the drug of choice for hippies and rebellious teens, marijuana in recent years has gained more mainstream acceptance for its ability to boost appetite, dull pain and reduce seizures in everyone from epilepsy to cancer patients.

29. Paula Deen to cook for fans at TPAC -

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) - Approaching a year since the Food Network pulled the plug on her TV show, Paula Deen plans to hit the road this summer to cook live for fans.

Five dates have been set so far, including Nashville on August 27 at TPAC's Andrew Jackson Hall.

30. High court ends Oklahoma bid to limit drug abortions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Monday it will leave in place an Oklahoma court ruling that struck down a state law limiting drug-induced abortions.

The justices did not comment in dismissing the state's appeal of last year's ruling by the Oklahoma Supreme Court. That ruling had invalidated a law requiring doctors to administer the drugs in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration protocol.

31. Preconceived notions about bond girl Leah Hulan? Forget ’em. -

Much like the captivating Watson’s pool girl of yesteryear, Leah Hulan has created a beguiling persona of her own on the Middle Tennessee advertising scene.

In TV commercials and on billboards, she’s the easy-to-recognize face of Grumpy’s Bail Bonds, almost forcing the viewer to ask: “What’s such a beautiful, alluring woman have to do with making bail, and surely she’s not Grumpy?’’

32. Boehner offers debt extension; WH says likely OK -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing a fresh deadline, House Speaker John Boehner said Thursday that Republicans would vote to extend the government's ability to borrow money for six weeks — but only if President Barack Obama first agrees to fresh negotiations on spending cuts. Under the Republican plan, the partial government shutdown would continue in the meantime.

33. 40 AGs urge tight regulation of e-cigarettes -

BOSTON (AP) — Forty attorneys general, including Tennessee's Bob Cooper, sent a letter to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday urging the agency to meet its own deadline and regulate electronic cigarettes in the same way it regulates tobacco products.

34. GOP moderates push back on tea party spending cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Midway between the 2012 and 2014 election campaigns, moderate Republican conservatives are beginning to foment a revolt of their own — a backlash to anti-spending tea party shrillness as budget cuts begin to significantly shrink defense and domestic programs.

35. Opponents of supermarket wine decry referendums -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Opponents of a proposal to allow communities to hold referendums on whether to allow wine to be sold in grocery stores argued Monday that the votes could do more harm than good.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee heard from opponents and supporters during a nearly two-hour meeting. The measure would leave it to voters in cities and counties to decide whether to expand wine sales beyond liquor stores.

36. Obama, business groups differ on minimum wage plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama says raising the minimum wage to $9 an hour and tying future increases to inflation will boost the incomes of millions living in poverty and spur job growth by pouring more money into the economy. But business groups are not so sure.

37. 2 winning Powerball tickets sold in Arizona, Missouri -

DEARBORN, Mo. (AP) — The search is on for the country's newest multimillionaires, the holders of two tickets that matched all six numbers to claim a record $588 million Powerball jackpot.

Lottery officials said Thursday that the winning tickets matching all six numbers were sold at a convenience store in suburban Phoenix and a gas station just off Interstate 29 in a small northwestern Missouri town. Neither ticket holder had come forward.

38. Has US economy bottomed out? Census suggests yes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is showing signs of finally bottoming out: Americans are on the move again after record numbers had stayed put, more young adults are leaving their parents' homes to take a chance with college or the job market, once-sharp declines in births are leveling off and poverty is slowing.

39. Taco Bell enters crowded breakfast arena -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Yo quiero Taco Bell breakfast burrito!

The Mexican-style fast-food chain that's best remembered for a 1990s ad in which a Chihuahua proclaimed "I want Taco Bell" in Spanish, introduced a breakfast menu Thursday at nearly 800 restaurants in 14 states.

40. Obama to take on economy in State of the Union -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Addressing a divided nation amid a determined GOP campaign to take his job, President Barack Obama is preparing to issue a populist cry for economic fairness as he aims to corral the sympathies of middle-class voters 10 months before Election Day.

41. Census shows 1 in 2 people are poor or low-income -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Squeezed by rising living costs, a record number of Americans — nearly 1 in 2 — have fallen into poverty or are scraping by on earnings that classify them as low income.

The latest census data depict a middle class that's shrinking as unemployment stays high and the government's safety net frays. The new numbers follow years of stagnating wages for the middle class that have hurt millions of workers and families.

42. Clean your plate? With these portions? -

I read an article this morning that stated getting rid of belly fat is as easy as eating whole grains. Diet drinks and artificial sweeteners add inches to the waist also. Well, today, I am adding something else to that list: the amount of food we eat.

43. Census: Recession taking toll on young adults -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it the recession's lost generation.

In record-setting numbers, young adults struggling to find work are shunning long-distance moves to live with Mom and Dad, delaying marriage and buying fewer homes, often raising kids out of wedlock. They suffer from the highest unemployment since World War II and risk living in poverty more than others — nearly 1 in 5.

44. Obama, Biden plan debt session with Senate Dems -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At least they're still talking. While President Barack Obama and congressional Republican leaders have publicly dug in their heels on critical debt-limit negotiations, Obama's spokesman said Tuesday the president and Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell will continue discussions.