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Editorial Results (free)

1. Capella Healthcare names corporate compliance officer -

Capella Healthcare has announced the appointment of Angie L. Mulder as corporate compliance officer.

With more than 20 years of leadership experience in health care, Mulder began her career at Ernst & Young, where she was primarily assigned to health care audit clients, including HealthTrust. She then held various financial and audit roles for Symphony Home Care and HCA.

2. AOL to feed more video, news to Microsoft's MSN -

NEW YORK (AP) — AOL will provide Microsoft's MSN with more video and additional news stories from popular sites such as The Huffington Post and TechCrunch in an expansion of a deal aimed at selling more digital advertising.

3. Tone down distractions while seeking new job -

When it comes to job seeking, sometimes less is more. Everything we do – from the clothes we wear to our resumes to our social media accounts – says something about us. These things are pieces of our personal brands.

4. Investors fret Yahoo's future, stock dips -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo's stock fell Monday as investors grappled with uncertainty about the Internet company's future in the wake of last week's record-setting Wall Street debut by the Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba.

5. Lessons learned from millennials -

Much of the research about employment suggests older workers are waiting longer to retire. This means many seasoned professionals are also still job searching. And, many of those are struggling to find their way.

6. 21st Century Fox abandons pursuit of Time Warner -

Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox is abandoning its attempt to take over Time Warner in a proposed deal that would have combined two of the world's biggest media companies.

The about-face announced Tuesday comes three weeks after Time Warner Inc. revealed that it had rejected 21st Century Fox's unsolicited $76 billion buyout offer.

7. Volume of encrypted email rising amid spying fears -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The volume of email cloaked in encryption technology is rapidly rising as Google, Yahoo, Facebook and other major Internet companies try to shield their users' online communications from government spies and other snoops.

8. Negatives aside, AOL CEO posts positive results -

NEW YORK (AP) — You've got gaffes.

AOL chief executive Tim Armstrong isn't one to mince words. Over the weekend, he apologized for insensitive comments and backtracked from an unpopular plan to pay matching 401(k) retirement contributions in a lump sum at the end of the year. Armstrong had previously defended the proposal by citing the high cost care for two "distressed babies" born to employee families.

9. Bye bye, bile? Websites try to nix nasty comments -

NEW YORK (AP) — Mix blatant bigotry with poor spelling. Add a dash of ALL CAPS. Top it off with a violent threat. And there you have it: A recipe for the worst of online comments, scourge of the Internet.

10. Tech giants call for controls on government snooping -

LONDON (AP) — Major technology companies, stung by poor publicity for having helped the U.S. government access personal data, on Monday issued an open letter to President Barack Obama asking for tighter controls on surveillance.

11. Builders of Obama's health website saw red flags -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Crammed into conference rooms with pizza for dinner, some programmers building the Obama administration's showcase health insurance website were growing increasingly stressed. Some worked past 10 p.m., energy drinks in hand. Others rewrote computer code over and over to meet what they considered last-minute requests for changes from the government or other contractors.

12. AOL's Patch local news site to lay off up to 500 -

NEW YORK (AP) — AOL Inc. is laying off up to half the workforce at its Patch local news sites and shuttering or consolidating roughly 150 of the 900 sites while looking for partners for others.

13. NSA revelations reframe digital life for some -

In Louisiana, the wife of a former soldier is scaling back on Facebook posts and considering unfriending old acquaintances, worried an innocuous joke or long-lost associate might one day land her in a government probe.

14. Temporary jobs becoming a permanent fixture in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring is exploding in the one corner of the U.S. economy where few want to be hired: Temporary work.

From Wal-Mart to General Motors to PepsiCo, companies are increasingly turning to temps and to a much larger universe of freelancers, contract workers and consultants. Combined, these workers number nearly 17 million people who have only tenuous ties to the companies that pay them — about 12 percent of everyone with a job.

15. US declassifies phone program details after uproar -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Moving to tamp down a public uproar spurred by the disclosure of two secret surveillance programs, the nation's top intelligence official is declassifying key details about one of the programs while insisting the efforts were legal, limited in scope and necessary to detect terrorist threats.

16. Is Big Data turning government into 'Big Brother?' -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — With every phone call they make and every Web excursion they take, people are leaving a digital trail of revealing data that can be tracked by profit-seeking companies and terrorist-hunting government officials.

17. Tech firms find new home in Germantown -

Julie May has come a long way from teaching people how to use the internet back in 1995, working out of Joe Dougherty’s Bean Central cyber-coffee shop.

Today, her company, Bytes of Knowledge (b:ok), is a 22-employee professional services firm that provides a variety of tech support, app design, infrastructure tools and more to support small and mid-sized businesses, offering a breadth and depth of IT knowledge a fledgling entrepreneur or mid-size business might not have.

18. Dow average holds on to 15,000 with a small gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones industrial average held above 15,000 a day after it closed above the landmark level for the first time.

With no major economic releases due out Wednesday, investors focused on company earnings as reporting for the first quarter draws to a close.

19. YouTube: The battle with TV is already over -

NEW YORK (AP) — YouTube vs. TV? YouTube says the battle — if there ever was one — is over.

In a flashy presentation to advertisers Wednesday night, Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt declined to forecast that Internet video will displace television watching. Instead he declared: "That's already happened."

20. As Facebook matures, is it losing its edge? -

NEW YORK (AP) — To see what Facebook has become, look no further than the Hutzler 571 Banana Slicer.

Sometime last year, people began sharing tongue-in-cheek online reviews of the banana-shaped piece of yellow plastic with their Facebook friends. Then those friends shared with their friends. Soon, after Amazon paid to promote it, posts featuring the $3.49 utensil were appearing in even more Facebook feeds.

21. Groupon fires CEO, still faces underlying problems -

NEW YORK (AP) — Now that Groupon has gotten rid of its quirky founder and CEO, the chief question is whether the company's underlying online deals business is promising enough to reverse its falling stock price, declining revenue growth and waning consumer interest.

22. Events -

24th annual Nashville Lawn & Garden Show. The theme for this year’s show is “Jardins du Soleil,” French for “Gardens of the Sun,” and will feature gardens of internationally inspired designs. The show also offers the opportunity to hear free presentations by horticultural, landscape design and gardening experts. This year’s featured speaker is Frédéric Nancel, operations and events director for the Chateau de Chantilly near Paris, France. Thursday-Saturday, 10-8 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tennessee State Fairgrounds. Information: nashvillelawnandgardenshow.com.

23. Microsoft's Outlook takes aim at Google's Gmail -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Microsoft is so confident it has the Internet's best email service that it is about to spend at least $30 million to send its message across the U.S.

The barrage begins Tuesday when Microsoft's twist on email, Outlook.com, escalates an assault on rival services from Google Inc., Yahoo Inc., AOL Inc. and a long list of Internet service providers.

24. S&P 500 hits five-year high, extends rally -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Standard and Poor's 500 edged up to a five-year high Friday, extending a rally that started in January.

The S&P 500 rose 8.54 points to 1,517.93, closing 0.3 percent up for the week. The index is at its highest since November 2007 and has advanced for six weeks, the longest streak of gains since August.

25. Obama decides not to extend term of jobs council -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is letting his jobs council expire, cutting off one source of input from business leaders while unemployment remains stubbornly high.

Obama formed the Council on Jobs and Competitiveness in January 2011, when unemployment was about 9 percent. It's now 7.8 percent, though more than 12 million people are out of work.

26. Martha Stewart downsizes magazines, to cut jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia Inc. is downsizing its magazines and will cut publishing jobs as it increasingly focuses on online video and other digital content.

27. Microsoft, NBC dissolve MSNBC.com joint venture -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Microsoft is pulling out of the joint venture that owned MSNBC.com, freeing the world's largest software maker to build its own online news service.

28. SEC questioned Facebook about Zynga, mobile -

NEW YORK (AP) — New documents show that federal regulators wanted to know more about Facebook's mobile users and the company's relationship with the online game company Zynga in the months leading to Facebook's initial public offering of stock.

29. AOL to sell over 800 patents to Microsoft -

NEW YORK (AP) — AOL says it has agreed to sell 800 of its patents and their related applications to Microsoft and grant it a license for its remaining patents for a total about $1.06 billion in cash.

30. Apple's next hot release: The dividend check -

NEW YORK (AP) — Apple made computers sexy. Can it do the same for the musty old dividend?

Issuing a regular payment to your stockholders after years of just amassing cash used to be an admission that your company has run out of creative ideas to grow profits.

31. Report: Tablets helping improve news consumption -

NEW YORK (AP) — Mobile technology appears to be increasing the public appetite for news but it's far from clear whether the news industry will profit from that, a study issued Monday concluded.

The Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism, in its annual state of the news media report, found encouraging signs within the 27 percent of Americans who say they get news on their smartphones or tablets.

32. Limbaugh advertisers keep heading for the exits -

More of Rush Limbaugh's advertisers say they are dropping his program after the conservative talk show host's derogatory comments about a Georgetown law student.

On Monday, AOL Inc. and Tax Resolution Services Co. were the eighth and ninth companies to say that they will suspend advertising on Limbaugh's program, one of the most popular radio shows in the country.

33. GE to hire 5,000 veterans over next 5 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — General Electric Co. plans to hire 5,000 veterans over the next five years and invest $580 million to expand its aviation business.

34. Events -

Deadline for Urban Land Institute awards. The Urban Land Institute (ULI) Nashville is accepting applications through Friday for its 4th Annual Excellence in Development Awards. All use types of development projects completed between 2004-present from the private, public and nonprofit sectors are eligible. Entries will be judged based on criteria that support ULI’s commitment to best practices in the use of land and leadership in creating sustainable communities. Information: nashville.uli.org.

35. Wikipedia editors question site's blackout -

NEW YORK (AP) — Can the world live without Wikipedia for a day? The shutdown of one of the Internet's most-visited sites is not sitting well with some of its volunteer editors, who say the protest of anti-piracy legislation could threaten the credibility of their work.

36. Events -

Book Writing Boot Camp. Author Carol Batey leads this Sunday workshop for aspiring authors at Symmetry, 212 Louise Avenue, 12:30-4 p.m. The class seeks to unlock a writer’s potential and is for writers who want to increase spirituality in their writing projects. Fee: $30. Information: 485-4548, carol37076@aol.com.

37. Events -

What will the Jury Think? The American Association for Justice (AAJ) presents a seminar for attorneys who want to develop a case’s trial story and then test it before three focus groups. The seminar, which runs through Saturday, is being led by Nashville attorney Phillip H. Miller, past president of the Tennessee Association for Justice (TAJ) and held at the Sheraton Downtown. Information: justice.org/caseplus.

38. Events -

Fall Leadership Breakfast. Guy Kawasaki, former chief evangelist at Apple and author of 10 books, including Enchantment, Reality Check, The Art of the Start, Rules for Revolutionaries, How to Drive Your Competition Crazy, Selling the Dream, and The Macintosh Way, will speak at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce’s Fall Leadership Breakfast on the “benefits of treating every company as a startup.” Belmont University’s Curb Event Center, 1900 Belmont Blvd. Information: nashvillechamber.org, 743-3115.

39. Events -

The Hermitage, home of President Andrew Jackson, presents its annual haunted after-hours tours most tonight. The lantern-led tour, open to 15 guests (ages 10 and older) at a time, run about 90 minutes, covering the mansion, garden, cabin and cemetery area, and offer a uniquely spooky look at the 1,120-acre national historic landmark. 7 p.m. Information: thehermitage.com/events, 889-2941, ext 243.

40. Events -

19th annual “Haunted Trails of Horror” at the Franklin Recreation Complex. 6:30-9 p.m. today. This family event is not for the faint of heart, and parents should know their child’s spook factor before participating. Admission: $5 (cash only); free for children 3 and younger. Information: 790-5719, wcparksandrec.com.

41. Google going 'gangbusters' as 3Q wows investors -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Mounting worries about another global recession haven't shaken Google.

The online search and advertising leader's third-quarter earnings, released Thursday, are the latest reminder of how Google's position as the Internet's dominant gateway has spawned a business that endures economic turbulence better than most companies.

42. Becoming a team player is vital to career success -

A major fundamental component of a successful career is knowing how to work well with a team. Often during job interviews a hiring manager may ask you about your experience working with others on a project and may even ask you to provide a detailed example.

43. Huffington Post to launch French portal -

The Huffington Post is launching a website in France, the latest move by the news and opinion portal to expand to markets outside the U.S.

The Huffington Post Media Group said Monday that it will launch Le Huffington Post in a partnership with publisher Le Monde Group and media holding company Les Nouvelles Editions Independantes before the end of the year.

44. Quality resume opens doors, improves pay -

You have only a few tools to help you land a good job, one being a resume. Not having the right one can cost you.

There are different approaches you can use to create a resume.

First, you can do it yourself. If you are a good writer this may be a good option. But don’t try and do it without research.

45. Negotiating pay, perks can be tricky business -

One of the more difficult issues facing job seekers is how to negotiate a compensation package after a position has been offered. There is little room for discussion with some employers, while others are open to some give and take. Understanding negotiations can prevent the process from becoming a barrier between you and the job you want.

46. Keeping skills current makes you marketable -

Keeping up with the latest trends and developments in your field is more important than ever during these difficult economic times, especially if you are looking for a job.

Managers want their new hires to be on top of what is happening within their area of expertise. They want to feel comfortable their employees are the most knowledgeable and, thus, capable of keeping them ahead of the competition.

47. Drop the tie? Not if you want to look professional -

Seems some businessmen are abandoning ties. I think it is a mistake. The look of no tie and open collar looks unprofessional and reduces confidence. It looks like something is missing – which may be your image.

48. Knowing what to spotlight is key to good resume -

When writing your resume, selecting the best examples of what you have done in your experiences and career and placing them in a short, concise space takes a lot of time and thought.

Second guessing your selections is a frequent result. So, what are some of the better ways to choose your very best activities and accomplishments?

49. Unprecented times call for unprecedented tactics -

There are small businesses that could use boosting, and unemployed talent on the sidelines. Seems like a natural match except nobody knows who can do what and: a) employers don’t have the working capital to experiment with new hires; b) job hunters do not know where the openings are to apply to; or c) both parties are looking but don’t like what they see. Folks also are worn down from job hunting.

50. Be ready, you might be fired any day now -

You’re an excellent employee with great performance reviews and always on time. The new boss calls you in to his office with a supervisor sitting in a chair next to the one reserved for you. You sit down.

51. When offered a choice, go with resume instead of application -

When applying for a position, job seekers often are presented with the choice of an application and submitting a resume. Having an option might seem like a great opportunity, but really it is an opportunity to make the wrong decision.

52. A little creativity can go a long way in workplace -

Use your creativity to get a new job or a better position with your present employer.

Not everyone has the ability to be creative at work. If you are one of the lucky individuals who have some form of creativity, don’t assume that everyone else has the same attribute. And don’t assume that those around you at work have the same creative ability.

53. Get ‘motivated’ to write a resume that stands above others -

When writing your resume, consider that many other candidates applying for the same job might be making similar claims and using the same words you are.

Instead of being another applicant that just fits the job profile, try to be a little smarter. Revitalize your application with a review-and-improve effort of your resume when you apply for your next position. Make sure you stand out.

54. Want to live at the beach? Train for job to match locale -

Where you want to live should influence the type of career and industry you are considering.

Certain jobs tend to be located in specific cities and regions of the country. Other jobs can be found throughout the country in urban and non-urban locations. The ease of finding a job you desire can be quite specific to the occupation or industry you select for a career.

55. Pick up that phone! Internet, snail mail not always enough -

The Internet is the way to look for a job and converse with hiring managers. To deal with employers, you need only send them an e-resume and converse with them through e-mail. Correct? Wrong! Don’t forget the phone.

56. Adapting to change no longer an option -

In the 1970s, a book titled Future Shock described a world of rapid change with consequential impact on everyone and everything. That world is now here in ways the author could never have imagined.

57. Overqualified? What can I do? -

In today’s employment market, employers can be extremely picky in selecting job applicants to interview. If you appear on paper to be overqualified for an available position, many recruiters and hiring managers might not give you any consideration.

58. Don’t let excuses get in the way of your job search -

What’s easier, doing all the things necessary to find a new job or making excuses?

People become their own worst enemy without knowing it, setting barriers before and during a job search. They have no time to write or thoroughly proofread a good resume, to include a cover letter, to network or call potential contacts. The list is endless, but the result is the same.

59. Environmental awards to Tidwell, Forest Hills, Ward -

Ann Tidwell is the recipient of the 2011 Friends of Radnor Lake Environmental Award.

Tidwell was an early organizer in the campaign to “Save Radnor Lake!” in 1972 and has remained active in the group that became Friends of Radnor Lake, serving as its president for six years.

60. Follow-up letter vital to making good impression -

The importance of a follow up letter should not be overlooked as part of the job hunting and interviewing process.

Of all the post-interview methods, it is usually the best way to keep your name in front of the hiring manager. It also is a way to make a good impression while others are not taking the time or putting forth the effort. For a position you really want, don’t make the mistake of not sending an appropriate letter unless another way is obviously preferred by the hiring manager.

61. Lobbying career offers chance to make difference -

If you are not happy with the state of the country or your own community and want to make a difference in determining the direction of future legislation, take a look at a career as a lobbyist.

These highly-skilled professionals spend their time trying to influence opinion and legislation on a particular subject. The influence these individuals make can be seen in all facets and at all levels of government.

62. Organizations, clubs are great search resources -

There are thousands of professional associations, clubs, societies and trade organizations that keep up with and communicate directly or indirectly employment information pertaining to their field or industry.

63. Ambulance duty just one aspect of being an EMT -

Recent floods and tornados in and around Middle Tennessee have created an increased interest in public safety careers. Besides police and firefighter positions, emergency medial technicians (EMTs) are a big part of this public safety network.

64. Choosing correct references is vital -

One element of the hiring process almost every job seeker faces is determining how and whom to select for references. With a tight job market, don’t take this lightly.

Some employers request references up front, along with your resume. Most will request references later, which also serves as a clue that you are likely at the top of their list for an available position.

65. Love animals? Make a career of it -

If you like caring for and being around animals, there are a number of occupations available for consideration. One of the good things about the industry is that it is expected to continue to grow in the coming decades.

66. Temporary position might be the solution -

Due to the problematic conditions of today’s economy, many laid-off employees and graduates are facing the decision of whether to take a temporary position or to continue looking for a fulltime job. What should they do?

67. Make your case for a raise with research, right attitude -

You are likely to hold many positions during your career. You also will receive many raises. But like most people, you probably don’t know how to ask for a raise or the best compensation package.

68. More jobs seen for new grads -

The job market for upcoming college and high school graduates is still tight but getting better.

Employers throughout the U.S. have indicated they expect to hire 19.3 percent more college graduates than they did last year, according to a report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers. And the hiring of new high school graduates should experience a similar increase.

69. Take advantage of outplacement services -

In today’s uncertain work environment, the likelihood of employees having to lay off employees is common. Many employees being laid off often experience confusion, disorientation and anger. The question they most often ask themselves is, “What do I do now?” And the question that employers often ask themselves is, “What can I do to help the employee or employees I am letting go?”

70. Finding mentor can help career -

Getting promoted at any organization can be a challenging endeavor. Often it appears people who have continued to move up are receiving a helping hand. They often are – from a mentor.

Most people promoted have abilities recognized by management. But getting recognized by management is often the most difficult part of the promotion process. If your family doesn’t own the company, one of the best ways to become recognized is to have a manager at a higher level that supports and guides you through the organizational culture.

71. Bet on medicine for job growth -

If you’re looking for a career in a growing industry – especially in the Nashville area – take a look at medicine.

The U. S. Department of Labor predicts the enormous sector will have more occupations with job growth than any other, adding an estimated 2.5 million-plus jobs to the U. S economy in the next 10 years. The good news is Nashville is considered a mecca for the industry.

72. Internships offer key advantages -

Gaining an advantage over the competition is important in business. It also is also important in obtaining a job. Whether you are looking for a first-time job a new employer, working as an intern can help you land a job with an employer of choice.

73. Choosing growth industries, jobs -

The industry where your job is positioned and the occupation that becomes your life’s work will have a big impact on almost every facet of your life. Careful consideration should be given to placing yourself in the right position.

74. Curriculum vitae is not a resume -

Some occupations require the use of the curriculum vitae instead of a resume. It is important to understand the difference and when to use one approach instead of the other.

Curriculum vitae also are referred to as a CV. Some people mistakenly use the phrase interchangeably with resume. They are similar but not the same. A CV is a comprehensive biographical statement that should not be used in the U.S. unless required by the employer or recipient.