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Editorial Results (free)

1. Colin Powell has died of COVID-19 complications, family says -

WASHIINGTON (AP) — Colin Powell, former Joint Chiefs chairman and secretary of state, has died from COVID-19 complications, his family said Monday. He was 84.

In an announcement on social media, the family said Powell had been fully vaccinated.

2. Who’s paying for COVID? All of us -

We are tired. We locked ourselves down in March 2020 and waited almost a year for a lifesaving vaccine. We got our one or two doses (depending on the vaccine brand) as soon as we could. We stayed masked up and social distanced even after our jabs.

3. Texas governor orders ban on private company vaccine mandate -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order Monday to prohibit any entity, including private business, from enforcing a COVID-19 vaccine mandate on workers and called on state lawmakers to pass a similar ban into law.

4. Anti-vaccine chiropractors rising force of misinformation -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The flashy postcard, covered with images of syringes, beckoned people to attend Vax-Con '21 to learn "the uncensored truth" about COVID-19 vaccines.

Participants traveled from around the country to a Wisconsin Dells resort for a sold-out convention that was, in fact, a sea of misinformation and conspiracy theories about vaccines and the pandemic. The featured speaker was the anti-vaccine activist who appeared in the 2020 movie "Plandemic," which pushed false COVID-19 stories into the mainstream. One session after another discussed bogus claims about the health dangers of mask wearing and vaccines.

5. Ex-Facebook employee asks lawmakers to step in. Will they? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Camera lights glare. Outrage thunders from elected representatives. A brave industry whistleblower stands alone and takes the oath behind a table ringed by a photographers' mosh pit.

6. VUMC helps develop first COVID-19 pill -

U.S.-based pharmaceutical giant Merck& Co. is seeking authorization for the first oral antiviral pill to treat COVID-19, after a Vanderbilt University Medical Center clinical trial showed it cut the risk of hospitalization or death in half when given to high-risk people during infection.

7. Events -

Chamber West: On the Road to Transit. An update on transit in Nashville from Steve Bland, CEO of WeGo Public Transit and Faye DiMassimo, senior adviser for transportation and infrastructure for Metro Nashville, on the development of the Hillsboro Transit Center and other changes on the horizon for public transit. Hampton Inn & Suites-Green Hills, 2324 Crestmoor Road, Nashville. Wednesday, 8:30-9:30 a.m. Information

8. Past storms haven't fazed Facebook. Instagram Kids might -

Nineteen-year-old Gigi Painter hopes Facebook's planned "Instagram Kids" never becomes a reality.

Growing up in a small Ohio town, Painter said she and most of her friends created Instagram accounts by lying about their ages years before they turned 13.

9. Milley defends calls to Chinese at end of Trump presidency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The top U.S. military officer told Congress that he knew former President Donald Trump wasn't planning to attack China and that it was his job to reassure the Chinese of this in the phone calls that have triggered outrage from some lawmakers.

10. Racism, climate and divisions top UN agenda as leaders meet -

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Racism, the climate crisis and the world's worsening divisions will take center stage at the United Nations on Wednesday, a day after the U.N. chief issued a grim warning that "we are on the edge of an abyss."

11. Protest for jailed Capitol rioters: Police ready this time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Burned before, Capitol Police say they are taking no chances as they prepare for a Saturday rally at the U.S. Capitol in support of rioters imprisoned after the violent Jan. 6 insurrection.

12. Democrats call oil giants to testify on climate campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Democrats are calling top executives at ExxonMobil and other oil giants to testify at a House hearing as lawmakers investigate what they say is a long-running, industry-wide campaign to spread disinformation about the role of fossil fuels in causing global warming.

13. Biden announces Indo-Pacific alliance with UK, Australia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden announced Wednesday that the United States is forming a new Indo-Pacific security alliance with Britain and Australia that will allow for greater sharing of defense capabilities — including helping equip Australia with nuclear-powered submarines. It's a move that could deepen a growing chasm in U.S.-China relations.

14. Tesla builds 1st store on tribal land, dodges state car laws -

NAMBÉ, N.M. (AP) — Carmaker Tesla has opened a store and repair shop on Native American land for the first time, marking a new approach to its yearslong fight to sell cars directly to consumers and cut car dealerships out of the process.

15. Milley defends calls to Chinese as effort to avoid conflict -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The top U.S. military officer on Wednesday defended the phone calls he made to his Chinese counterpart in the turbulent final months of Donald Trump's presidency, saying the conversations were intended to convey "reassurance" to the Chinese military and were in line with his responsibilities as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

16. Bradley attorneys appointed to ABA leadership positions -

Seven Bradley Arant Boult Cummings attorneys have been appointed to new leadership roles with the American Bar Association, including Junaid Odubeko, a partner in the firm’s Nashville office.

17. How 9/11 changed air travel: more security, less privacy -

DALLAS (AP) — Ask anyone old enough to remember travel before Sept. 11, 2001, and you're likely to get a gauzy recollection of what flying was like.

There was security screening, but it wasn't anywhere near as intrusive. There were no long checkpoint lines. Passengers and their families could walk right to the gate together, postponing goodbye hugs until the last possible moment. Overall, an airport experience meant far less stress.

18. Arizona man who wore horns in riot pleads guilty to felony -

PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona man who sported face paint, no shirt and a furry hat with horns when he joined the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 pleaded guilty Friday to a felony charge and wants to be released from jail while he awaits sentencing.

19. Democrats promote Cheney to vice chairwoman of Jan. 6 panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats have promoted Republican Rep. Liz Cheney to vice chairwoman of a committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, placing her in a leadership spot on the panel as some Republicans are threatening to oust her from the GOP conference for participating.

20. Hardaway: NIL rules help him recruit top class at Memphis -

Penny Hardaway believes the new name, image and likeness rules helped him land another top recruiting class at Memphis.

21. Kabul airport attack kills 60 Afghans, 12 US troops -

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Two suicide bombers and gunmen attacked crowds of Afghans flocking to Kabul's airport Thursday, transforming a scene of desperation into one of horror in the waning days of an airlift for those fleeing the Taliban takeover. At least 60 Afghans and 12 U.S. troops were killed, Afghan and U.S. officials said.

22. House panel probing 1/6 riot seeks host of Trump-era records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee investigating the January insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is demanding a trove of records from federal intelligence and law enforcement agencies, showing the sweep of the lawmakers' review of the deadly attack by a mob of Donald Trump supporters.

23. Bone McAllester Norton combines with Spencer Fane -

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC, one of Nashville’s largest law firms, will combine with Spencer Fane, an Am Law 200 ranked law firm with offices in 20 cities nationwide.

The combination will become effective Oct. 1 and position the firms to expand both in terms of size and geography.

24. Pentagon: US troops must get their COVID-19 vaccines ASAP -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Military troops must immediately begin to get the COVID-19 vaccine, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said in a memo Wednesday, ordering service leaders to "impose ambitious timelines for implementation."

25. 'Bracing for the worst' in Florida's COVID-19 hot zone -

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — As quickly as one COVID patient is discharged, another waits for a bed in northeast Florida, the hot zone of the state's latest surge. But the patients at Baptist Health's five hospitals across Jacksonville are younger and getting sick from the virus faster than people did last summer.

26. Discovery CEO vows fight to keep $3B Polish media investment -

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — A top Discovery Inc. executive said Friday that the U.S.-owned company will fight hard to keep control of a television network it owns in Poland, a $3 billion investment that is threatened by a new media bill that passed in parliament this week.

27. US turns to social media influencers to boost vaccine rates -

DENVER (AP) — As a police sergeant in a rural town, Carlos Cornejo isn't the prototypical social media influencer. But his Spanish-language Facebook page with 650,000 followers was exactly what Colorado leaders were looking for as they recruited residents to try to persuade the most vaccine-hesitant.

28. Progressives see blueprint for next fights in eviction win -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The rare clash this week between the Biden administration and congressional Democrats over a lapsed eviction moratorium could become a blueprint for even larger fights that lie ahead.

29. Social media stars: A glance at Olympians who went big -

TOKYO (AP) — At the Tokyo Games, athletes have taken to social media in trailblazing ways — with high-profile results. Several Olympians from niche sports introduced themselves to America through viral videos, with TikTok the preferred platform.

30. Analysis: Delta variant upends politicians' COVID calculus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's administration drew up a strategy to contain one coronavirus strain, then another showed up that's much more contagious.

This week — a month late — Biden met his goal of 70% of U.S. adults having received at least one COVID-19 shot. Originally conceived as an affirmation of American resiliency to coincide with Independence Day, the belated milestone offered little to celebrate. Driven by the delta variant, new cases are averaging more than 70,000 a day, above the peak last summer when no vaccines were available. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is drawing criticism from experts in the medical and scientific community for its off-and-on masking recommendations.

31. Marchetti receives national recognition -

L. Gino Marchetti, Jr., managing partner of Taylor, Pigue, Marchetti and Blair PLLC, was recently presented the Richard Boyette Award from the National Foundation for Judicial Excellence for outstanding contributions to the foundation.

32. Ron Popeil, the sizzle of American ingenuity, personified, dies at 86 -

Come, young ones: Gather around the glow of the smartphone's screen for a tale of a distant time when we watched TV on big boxy machines, and switched channels when we were bored.

There were commercials — several of them — between the segments of TV shows. What's more, in the distant era before streaming, you had to watch them all — or, if you had time, run to the kitchen or the bathroom. You couldn't pause, or fast forward, or take the screen with you.

33. California, NYC to workers: Get vaccine or face weekly tests -

California and New York City announced Monday that they would require all government employees to get the coronavirus vaccine or face weekly COVID-19 testing, and the Department of Veterans Affairs became the first major federal agency to require health care workers to receive the shot.

34. Texas, Oklahoma talk to SEC about joining league -

The last time Texas got a wandering eye for another conference it fueled a series of realignments in college sports that nearly killed the Big 12.

Texas is once again exploring free agency, stealing the headlines at the Southeastern Conference media days and cranking up speculation about another round of conference shuffling. And the Longhorns aren't alone in looking around.

35. Olympics, pandemic and politics: There's no separating them -

TOKYO (AP) — Over and over, year after year, the stewards of the Olympics say it: The Games aren't supposed to be political. But how do you avoid politics when you're trying to pull off an event of this complexity during a lethal and protracted pandemic?

36. 50-year war on drugs imprisoned millions of Black Americans -

Landscaping was hardly his lifelong dream. As a teenager, Alton Lucas believed basketball or music would pluck him out of North Carolina and take him around the world. In the late 1980s, he was the right-hand man to his musical best friend, Youtha Anthony Fowler, who many hip hop and R&B heads know as DJ Nabs.

37. Trump inaugural committee head accused of being UAE agent -

NEW YORK (AP) — The chair of former President Donald Trump's 2017 inaugural committee was arrested Tuesday on charges alleging he conspired to influence Trump's foreign policy positions to benefit the United Arab Emirates and commit crimes striking "at the very heart of our democracy."

38. Complaint alleges group funneled data from RNC to lawmakers -

Washington (AP) — A prominent conservative group funneled valuable information about Republican voters between the Republican National Committee and state lawmakers, a move that violated its nonpartisan status and tax law, according to a whistleblower complaint filed Tuesday with the Internal Revenue Service.

39. AP source: Biden looks to increase staffing of Cuba embassy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Monday ordered the State Department to create a working group to review U.S. remittance policy to ensure that money that Cuban Americans send home makes it directly into the hands of their families without the regime taking a cut.

40. The long, 'surreal' days of the runaway Texas legislators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sheltered in a downtown D.C. hotel, the Democratic lawmakers who left Texas to block a restrictive voting bill are living a life of stress and scrutiny.

After bolting the state Monday in order to sabotage the bill by denying a quorum in the Texas House of Representatives, the more than 50 state legislators find themselves balancing a punishing schedule of political lobbying, outside work and family obligations, all under a national spotlight.

41. China says US measures on Xinjiang threaten global trade -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government rejected U.S. accusations of forced labor in Xinjiang and accused Washington on Thursday of hurting global trade after lawmakers endorsed import curbs and American companies were warned they face legal risks if they do business with the region.

42. Bone McAllester Norton adds Meredith in Sumner -

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC has hired Brandon Meredith, a University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law alumnus, as the firm’s newest attorney at its Sumner County office. Meredith joins Bone McAllester Norton with 13 years of legal experience at Phillips and Ingrum in Gallatin.

43. Cuba, Haiti stir fresh political pressures for US president -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They are two tiny Caribbean states whose intractable problems have vexed U.S. presidents for decades. Now, Haiti and Cuba are suddenly posing a growing challenge for President Joe Biden that could have political ramifications for him in the battleground state of Florida.

44. With taxpayers' help, Delta posts $652 million profit in 2Q -

Delta Air Lines is reporting a $652 million profit in the second quarter, helped by hordes of vacation travelers in the U.S. and money from taxpayers, positioning the airline for stronger results once business and international flying recover from the pandemic.

45. QAnon has receded from social media – but it's just hiding -

On the face of it, you might think that the QAnon conspiracy has largely disappeared from big social media sites. But that's not quite the case.

True, you're much less likely to find popular QAnon catchphrases like "great awakening," "the storm" or "trust the plan" on Facebook these days. Facebook and Twitter have removed tens of thousands of accounts dedicated to the baseless conspiracy theory, which depicts former President Donald Trump as a hero fighting a secret battle against a sect of devil-worshipping pedophiles who dominate Hollywood, big business, the media and government.

46. Waller adds 6 to Nashville corporate practice -

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP has made several hires to strengthen the firm’s corporate practice in Nashville. They are:

• Matt Bryson, an associate who represents private companies and financial sponsors in mergers, acquisitions, divestitures and other investment, financing and exit transactions. Bryson previously was a member of the corporate team in Dentons’ Atlanta office.

47. Nissan Foundation gives $697K to 28 nonprofits -

The Nissan Foundation has announced it is awarding $697,000 in grants to 28 nonprofit organizations for its 2021 grant cycle at metro areas where Nissan has an operational presence. Eight Nashville area agencies will benefit.

48. House panel pushes legislation targeting Big Tech's power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House panel pushed ahead Wednesday with ambitious legislation that could curb the market power of tech giants Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple and force them to sever their dominant platforms from their other lines of business.

49. As passengers return to air travel, bad behavior skyrockets -

Air travel can be difficult in the best of times, with cramped planes, screaming babies, flight delays and short tempers.

Throw in a pandemic, and the anxiety level can rise quickly.

That has led to confrontations with flight attendants and other unruly behavior, including occasional fights that get captured and replayed endlessly on social media.

50. How Big Tech created a data 'treasure trove' for police -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — When U.S. law enforcement officials need to cast a wide net for information, they're increasingly turning to the vast digital ponds of personal data created by Big Tech companies via the devices and online services that have hooked billions of people around the world.

51. Why are Olympics going on despite public, medical warnings? -

TOKYO (AP) — Public sentiment in Japan has been generally opposed to holding the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, partly based on fears the coronavirus will spike as almost 100,000 people — athletes and others — enter for both events.

52. Biden trip takeaways: Respect, optimism, some skepticism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's first overseas trip put his diplomatic and negotiating philosophy on display, as he rallied traditional U.S. democratic allies to confront new and old challenges and offered an often rosy take on the possibilities of cooperation with Russian President Vladimir Putin after a one-on-one summit.

53. Biden elevates energetic critic of Big Tech as top regulator -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Tuesday installed an energetic critic of Big Tech as a top federal regulator at a time when the industry is under intense pressure from Congress, regulators and state attorneys general.

54. Media consumers may be reaching limit of streaming services -

A British research company may have discovered a magic number for American media consumers — and it's seven.

That's seven streaming services, paid or free, that consumers are willing to subscribe to before the hassle of keeping track of log-ins and passwords just becomes too much, said Maria Rua Aguete, senior research director at the London-based media consultancy OMDIA.

55. Cabinet secretaries launch roadshow to sell the Biden plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Marty Walsh remembers what it was like when a Cabinet secretary would come to town.

"It really is a big deal. They give you the dates, and you just clear your schedule," said Walsh, a former mayor of Boston.

56. Bruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for more -

NEW YORK (AP) — After feeling the thrill of victory early this year by singlehandedly causing GameStop's stock to soar — only to get crushed when it quickly crashed back to earth — armies of smaller-pocketed and novice investors are back for more.

57. Bass names Blackshear to executive committee -

Bass, Berry & Sims has appointed Lillian M. Blackshear from the firm’s Nashville office to its executive committee.

The seven-member committee includes attorneys from the firm’s Memphis, Nashville and Washington, D.C., offices. Members oversee strategic priorities of the firm, including client service, diversity and inclusion, growth and pro bono initiatives.

58. Talk of Trump 2024 run builds as legal pressure intensifies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump was calling into yet another friendly radio show when he was asked, as he often is, whether he's planning a comeback bid for the White House. "We need you," conservative commentator Dan Bongino told the former president.

59. National Enquirer owner fined for illegal Trump campaign aid -

A federal election watchdog fined the publisher of the National Enquirer $187,500 for squelching the story of a former Playboy model who claimed she'd had an affair with former President Donald Trump.

60. Yes. Tokyo Olympics are 'a go' despite opposition, pandemic -

TOKYO (AP) — Will the postponed Tokyo Olympics open despite rising opposition and the pandemic?

The answer is almost certainly "yes."

Senior International Olympic Committee member Richard Pound was emphatic in an interview with a British newspaper.

61. Gibson Garage opens June 9 with concert -

Gibson, the iconic, American instrument brand based in Nashville, is debuting the Gibson Garage, which it bills as the “ultimate guitar experience.”

The 8,000-square-foot shop will officially open to the public June 9 at historic Cummins Station, located on 209 10th Avenue South.

62. Nashville family donates $2.5M to Fisk University -

Fisk University has received its single-largest gift since the school’s inception in 1866, the donation coming from a Nashville family.

The $2.5 million gift from Amy and Frank Garrison will be utilized for the establishment of an Endowed Chair in recognition of Diane Nash at Fisk’s John Lewis Center for Social Justice and as an endowed scholarship fund.

63. Florida law seeks to rein in large social media companies -

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill on Monday that seeks to punish social media platforms that remove "conservative ideas" from their sites, though it is not clear if it would pass constitutional muster because it might violate the First Amendment.

64. Bradley names Jacques Nashville managing partner -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has named Lauren B. Jacques managing partner of the firm’s Nashville office. She succeeds Lela M. Hollabaugh, who has served as the Nashville office managing partner since 2015. Hollabaugh will continue as a litigation partner in the Nashville office.

65. GOP purged Cheney for 'unity,' but Trump bent on retribution -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican leaders insisted that purging Trump critic Rep. Liz Cheney from their ranks was necessary to unify the party ahead of next year's midterm elections.

But former President Donald Trump, who celebrated Cheney's ouster by calling her a "bitter, horrible human being," has made clear he has no interest in putting the hostilities behind him as he continues to seek vengeance and lie about the 2020 election.

66. Victoria's Secret to be spun off a year after sale failed -

A year after an agreement to sell Victoria's Secret fell apart as the pandemic emptied malls nationwide, the chain will be spun off by its owner to become a separate company.

L Brands, based in Columbus, Ohio, has been shopping the struggling chain elsewhere since the collapse of that deal and said it had held talks with a number of potential buyers, but it appears it could not come to an agreement on price.

67. Job market for new grads: Much hiring but much competition -

After a painful year of joblessness, the future has finally brightened for Alycia St. Germain, a 22-year-old college senior at the University of Minnesota.

Having lost a part-time gig at Barnes and Noble last March as the viral pandemic tore through the U.S. economy, she was left unemployed like tens of millions of other Americans. But now, St. Germain has a job lined up — with benefits — even before graduation and in her chosen field of developmental psychology. A family friend established a new child-care center in St. Paul, and St. Germain landed a job as an assistant in the infant room.

68. In booting Cheney, 'My Kevin' leads GOP back to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Kevin McCarthy is leading his party to an inflection point, preparing to dump Rep. Liz Cheney from the No. 3 House leadership position and transform what's left of the party of Lincoln more decisively into the party of Trump.

69. Florida gov signs GOP voting law critics call 'un-American' -

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a sweeping elections bill into law Thursday that he and other Republicans said would place guardrails against fraud, even as they acknowledged there were no serious signs of voting irregularities last November. Democrats and voter rights advocates said the partisan move will make it harder for some voters to cast ballots.

70. Republicans promote pandemic relief they voted against -

NEW YORK (AP) — Rep. Nicole Malliotakis, R-N.Y., said it pained her to vote against the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan.

But in the weeks that followed, the first-term Republican issued a news release celebrating more than $3.7 million from the package that went to community health centers in her district as one of her "achievements." She said she prided herself on "bringing federal funding to the district and back into the pockets of taxpayers."

71. Flurry of diplomatic contacts fuel Iran deal speculation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A flurry of diplomatic contacts and reports of major progress suggest that indirect talks between the U.S. and Iran may be nearing an agreement. That's despite efforts by U.S. officials to play down chances of an imminent deal that would bring Washington and Tehran back into compliance with the 2015 nuclear deal.

72. Baker Donelson elects 2 Nashville shareholders -

Baker Donelson has elected 11 new shareholders across the firm, including Evan L. Clark and Michaela D. Poizner in the Nashville office.

Clark is a member of the firm’s Financial Services Transactions practice group and the Long Term Care Transactions team. He is counsel to lenders and borrowers in U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-insured long-term care, seniors housing and multifamily loans throughout the United States ranging from large scale, multi-state portfolio transactions to single-asset deals.

73. Student's Snapchat profanity leads to high court speech case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fourteen-year-old Brandi Levy was having that kind of day where she just wanted to scream. So she did, in a profanity-laced posting on Snapchat that has, improbably, ended up before the Supreme Court in the most significant case on student speech in more than 50 years.

74. Stites & Harbison raises ABA Health ranking -

The American Bar Association Health Law Section has ranked Stites & Harbison, PLLC sixth in its eighth annual Regional Law Firm Recognition List for the South region for 2020.

The firm improved its ranking by one spot from the previous year’s listing, now having been honored seven consecutive times to the Top 10 list. Stites & Harbison’s Health Care Practice Group draws on the firm’s many years of experience to assist professionals, providers and suppliers in all aspects of the expanding health care industry.

75. EU proposes rules for high-risk artificial intelligence uses -

LONDON (AP) — European Union officials unveiled proposals Wednesday for reining in high-risk uses of artificial intelligence such as live facial scanning that could threaten people's safety or rights.

76. Supreme Court asked to give access to secretive court's work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Civil liberties groups are asking the Supreme Court to give the public access to opinions of the secretive court that reviews bulk email collection, warrantless internet searches and other government surveillance programs.

77. Supply chain expert joins Lipscomb program -

Lipscomb University’s College of Business, recognized across Tennessee and nationally as a leader in business education, has appointed international supply chain expert and U.S. Army veteran Hannah Stolze as director of its Center for Transformative Sales & Supply Chain Leadership and associate professor of supply chain management.

78. Selena Gomez and J.Lo headline vax concert for poor nations -

NEW YORK (AP) — Backed by an international concert hosted by Selena Gomez and headlined by Jennifer Lopez, Global Citizen is unveiling an ambitious campaign to help medical workers in the world's poorest countries quickly receive COVID-19 vaccines.

79. 'Clear the Capitol,' Pence pleaded, timeline of riot shows -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From a secure room in the Capitol on Jan. 6, as rioters pummeled police and vandalized the building, Vice President Mike Pence tried to assert control. In an urgent phone call to the acting defense secretary, he issued a startling demand.

80. 'New strategy': Politicians in crisis refuse calls to resign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The mere whiff of a scandal once unraveled political careers with stunning speed. Not anymore.

Suddenly embroiled in a federal sex trafficking investigation, Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida has denied the allegations, rebuffed suggestions that he resign and sent fundraising appeals that portray him as a victim of a "smear campaign." He's expected to make a high-profile appearance Friday at former President Donald Trump's Doral golf club in Miami.

81. NEC announces Amazon as supporting partner -

The Nashville Entrepreneur Center, a nonprofit dedicated to supporting entrepreneurs and business leaders, has announced Amazon as a new supporting partner.

Amazon will provide philanthropic support that fuels the EC’s work of equipping entrepreneurs and innovators, at all stages of the business lifecycle, with the critical resources they need to create, launch and grow businesses.

82. Charting a crossover hit -

Whenever proponents of the proposed National Museum of African American Music would hit a snag, they could take solace by looking south from their hoped-for home at Fifth Avenue and Broadway.

There they’d see the rippling contours of the Music City Center, another ambitious effort that took more than two decades to move from concept to reality. And then they’d go back to the business of fundraising, working with developers and other partners, working with the artifact collection and building local and national awareness on their march toward a museum.

83. Viral thoughts: Why COVID-19 conspiracy theories persist -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Daniel Roberts hadn't had a vaccination since he was 6. No boosters, no tetanus shots. His parents taught him inoculations were dangerous, and when the coronavirus arrived, they called it a hoax. The vaccine, they said, was the real threat.

84. Latest attack pushes US Capitol Police further toward crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Capitol Police are struggling. One officer was killed and another injured when a driver slammed into them at a barricade Friday afternoon. The attack comes after officers were overrun and injured when a violent mob of Trump supporters overran the Capitol on Jan. 6, breaking through insufficient barriers and pushing their way to within steps of lawmakers. One officer died and another killed himself.

85. Biden launches community corps to boost COVID vaccinations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeking to overcome vaccine hesitancy, the Biden administration is unveiling a coalition of community, religious and celebrity partners to promote COVID-19 shots.

The Department of Health and Human Services' "We Can Do This" campaign features television and social media ads, but it also relies on a community corps of public health, athletic, faith and other groups to spread the word about the safety and efficacy of the three approved vaccines. The campaign comes amid worries that reluctance to get vaccinated will delay the nation's recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

86. Educational Media moving to Nashville -

Educational Media Foundation, parent company to K-LOVE and Air1 radio networks, AccessMore podcasts and WTA Media, plans to move its global headquarters in Nashville.

EMF has been growing its Tennessee presence over the last several years. It recently expanded its studio, from which the K-LOVE morning show and Air1 programs now broadcast, and its promotions, AccessMore podcasting, live events and WTA Media teams have offices in the area already. Members of EMF’s content division will begin moving into the existing offices and temporary space this summer.

87. News Corp. buys Houghton Mifflin Harcourt books division -

NEW YORK (AP) — Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. is buying Houghton Mifflin Harcourt's book-publishing division, with titles by J.R.R. Tolkien and the Curious George children's series, for $349 million.

88. Dominion Voting sues Fox for $1.6B over 2020 election claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dominion Voting Systems filed a $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against Fox News on Friday, arguing the cable news giant, in an effort to boost faltering ratings, falsely claimed that the voting company had rigged the 2020 election.

89. Biden leaves door open for Senate change to pass agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden at his first news conference Thursday left the door open to pushing for fundamental changes in Senate procedures to muscle key elements of his agenda such as immigration and voting rights past firm Republican opposition "if there's complete lockdown and chaos."

90. Biden doubles goal of COVID vaccines to 200 million doses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden opened his first formal news conference Thursday with a nod toward the improving picture on battling the coronavirus, doubling his original goal by pledging that the nation will administer 200 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines by the end of his first 100 days in office.

91. Biden taps VP Harris to lead response to border challenges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has tapped Vice President Kamala Harris to lead the White House effort to tackle the migration challenge at the U.S. southern border.

Biden made the announcement as he and Harris met at the White House on Wednesday with Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandra Mayorkas and other immigration advisers to discuss the increase in migrants, including many unaccompanied minors, arriving at the border in recent weeks.

92. Growing number of Southern Baptist women question roles -

Emily Snook is the daughter of a Southern Baptist pastor. She met her husband, also a pastor, while they attended a Southern Baptist university

Yet the 39-year-old Oklahoma woman now finds herself wondering if it's time to leave the nation's largest Protestant denomination, in part because of practices and attitudes that limit women's roles.

93. Turner Construction honored for Nashville projects -

Turner Construction Company’s work on the ThreeThirtyThree project and Nashville General Hospital COVID-19 Unit project, both in Nashville, have earned the company national Excellence in Construction Eagle Awards, presented during the recent American Builders and Contractors Convention in Grapevine, Texas.

94. Biden readies for 1st news conference, White House tradition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He'd led allied armies in the defeat of Nazi Germany only to find himself, a decade later, a tad intimidated before the cameras in an echoey room of the Old Executive Office Building, ready to make history again.

95. Biden aims to prevent border crossings from swamping agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is scrambling to manage a growing humanitarian and political challenge at the U.S.-Mexico border that threatens to overshadow its ambitious legislative agenda.

96. Who deserves credit? Biden leans into pandemic politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In President Joe Biden's war against the coronavirus, former President Donald Trump hardly exists.

The Democratic president ignored Trump in his first prime-time address to the nation, aside from a brief indirect jab. It was the same when Biden kicked off a national tour in Pennsylvania on Tuesday to promote the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan. Now, as his administration is on the cusp of delivering on his promise of administering 100 million doses of vaccine in his first 100 days, Biden is in no rush to share the credit.

97. Japan raises tariffs on US beef after hitting import limit -

TOKYO (AP) — Imported American beef in Japan has proved so popular it's topped the annual limits called "safeguards," and the U.S. Meat Export Federation on Thursday urged Tokyo to raise the threshold.

98. Pinnacle adds Frazee as financial adviser -

Nashville commercial real estate lender Michael Frazee has joined Pinnacle Financial Partners as a financial adviser, based at the firm’s Symphony Place headquarters office. Frazee is part of commercial real estate manager Tyler Muesch’s Nashville team.

99. Biden signs big virus aid bill before speech to nation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Marking a year of loss and disruption, President Joe Biden on Thursday signed into law the $1.9 trillion relief package that he said will help the U.S. defeat the coronavirus and nurse the economy back to health. Some checks to Americans could begin arriving this weekend.

100. Want to read the 6 doomed Seusses? Go to the library -

The news that six books by Dr. Seuss are being pulled from publication brought predictably negative responses in my social media feed:

“I resent book banning!” “Who’s allowing this Counterculture to make all these preposterous decisions?” “Sounds like 1930s Nazi Germany.”