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Editorial Results (free)

1. Musk tweet joking about buying Manchester United causes stir -

LONDON (AP) — Elon Musk caused a stir by tweeting that he was buying the English soccer team Manchester United — whose current owners are opposed by many fans — then saying several hours later that it was a joke.

2. ACLU of TN taps new executive director -

The American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee has selected Nashville attorney Kathy Sinback to lead the organization as its new executive director.

Sinback has served as the Davidson County Juvenile Court administrator since 2014. She began her career with the Metropolitan Public Defender’s Office, where she represented youth facing transfer to the adult system. She also served as a senior attorney with the Metropolitan Department of Law.

3. The downside: US strike shows Afghanistan still terror base -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is holding out the CIA operation that killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri as a monumental strike against the global terror network responsible for the Sept. 11 attacks of 2001. But there's a downside, too.

4. Pelosi believed headed to Taiwan, raising tension with China -

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was believed headed for Taiwan on Tuesday on a visit that could significantly escalate tensions with Beijing, which claims the self-ruled island as its own territory.

5. Biden: Killing of al-Qaida leader is long-sought 'justice' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden announced Monday that al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri was killed in a U.S. drone strike in Kabul, an operation he said delivered justice and hopefully "one more measure of closure" to families of the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States.

6. Stites & Harbison adds litigator Murphy -

Ann H. Murphy has joined Stites & Harbison, PLLC in the firm’s Nashville office as part of the business litigation and construction service groups. Her practice focuses on professional liability of architects and engineers, construction defect litigation, construction contract law, professional discipline and commercial litigation.

7. American Airlines earns $476 million on record revenue in 2Q -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines earned $476 million in the second quarter on record revenue from summer travelers and said Thursday that it expects to remain profitable in the third quarter.

It was American's first quarterly profit without government pandemic aid in the COVID-19 era.

8. Aviation faces hurdles to hit goals for cutting emissions -

FARNBOROUGH, England (AP) — Airplanes are a minor contributor to global greenhouse-gas emissions, but their share is sure to grow as more people travel in coming years — and that has the aviation industry facing the prospect of tighter environmental regulations and higher costs.

9. Statewide early voting begins Friday -

Tennessee’s early voting period for the Aug. 4 primaries and general election is scheduled for July 15-30, daily except Sundays.

On the August ballot, Tennessee voters will see primary races for governor, U.S. House, state Senate, state House and the state Executive Committee members for each political party, as well as retention or general elections for judicial offices and other state and local positions.

10. Biden seeks new chapter in troubled Middle East -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will try to reaffirm and recalibrate U.S. relationships in the Middle East during his first trip to the region since taking office, but it won't be easy in a corner of the world that's asking fresh questions about the future of American influence.

11. With US dollar nearly equal to euro, impact is being felt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. dollar has been surging so much that it's nearly equal in value to the euro for the first time in 20 years. That trend, though, threatens to hurt American companies because their goods become more expensive for foreign buyers. If U.S. exports were to weaken as a result, so, too, would the already-slowing U.S. economy.

12. Ben & Jerry's ice cream fight in Israel heats up -

One week after its parent company found a way to get Ben & Jerry's ice cream sold in east Jerusalem and the occupied West Bank, the company known for its stance on social issues almost as much as for its Chunky Monkey ice cream is suing to block that from happening.

13. G-20 meeting may lead to wider divisions over war in Ukraine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Foreign ministers from the world's largest nations are looking to address Russia's war in Ukraine and its impact on global energy and food security when they meet in Indonesia this week. Yet instead of providing unity, the talks may well exacerbate existing divides over the Ukraine conflict.

14. West Coast dockworkers still talking after contract expires -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A contract between shipping companies and 22,000 West Coast dockworkers expired over the weekend. But both sides continued to talk and said they want to avoid a strike that could savage an economy already stressed by soaring inflation and supply chain woes.

15. OPEC+ may not be much help with high oil, gasoline prices -

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil prices are high, and drivers are paying more at the pump. But the OPEC oil cartel and allied producing nations may not be much help as they decide Thursday how much more crude to send to world markets.

16. $30B from Russian oligarchs frozen under REPO seizure effort -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A multinational task force designed to seize Russian oligarchs' wealth has blocked and frozen $30 billion in sanctioned individuals' property and funds in its first 100 days in operation, the Treasury Department reported Wednesday.

17. EXPLAINER: How a G-7 ban on Russian gold would work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Russia appears to have defaulted on its foreign debt for the first time since the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, and the U.S. and its allies are taking aim at the former Soviet Union's second largest export industry after energy — gold.

18. EXPLAINER: What's the impact of a Russian debt default? -

Russia is poised to default on its foreign debt for the first time since the Bolshevik Revolution more than a century ago, further alienating the country from the global financial system following sanctions imposed over its war in Ukraine.

19. Companies weigh in on proposed SEC climate disclosure rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Securities and Exchange Commission moved closer Friday to a final rule that would dramatically alter what public companies tell shareholders about climate change — both the risks it poses to their operations and their own contributions to the problem.

20. Flight cancellations create a bad travel day across the US -

Airlines canceled more than 1,500 flights in the U.S. on Thursday, one of the worst days yet for travel as the peak summer vacation season heats up.

At LaGuardia Airport in New York, more than one-third of all flights were scrubbed, and more than one-fourth of flights were dropped at nearby Newark Liberty airport in New Jersey, according to tracking service FlightAware.

21. Legal Aid Society picks Nashville managing attorney -

Legal Aid Society, Tennessee’s largest legal nonprofit, has hired Jordan Stringer as managing attorney and director of its Volunteer Lawyers Program.

As managing attorney, Stringer will supervise staff members, oversee administrative functions for the Nashville office, work closely with other management team members to coordinate client services and assist in oversight and quality assurance systems. Stringer will also serve as director of the Volunteer Lawyers Program, developing strategic initiatives and managing staff to support pro bono lawyers helping clients across 48 counties in Middle Tennessee.

22. Bucolic Ukraine forest is site of mass grave exhumation -

BUCHA, Ukraine (AP) — The lush green beauty of a pine forest with singing birds contrasted with the violent deaths of newly discovered victims of Russia's war in Ukraine, as workers exhumed bodies from another mass grave near the town of Bucha on Kyiv's outskirts.

23. UN report: Ukraine war is increasing suffering of millions -

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The ripple effects of the war in Ukraine are increasing the suffering of millions of people by escalating food and energy prices and worsening a financial crisis, coming on top of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change, a U.N. report said Wednesday.

24. US sees heightened extremist threat heading into midterms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A looming Supreme Court decision on abortion, an increase of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border and the midterm elections are potential triggers for extremist violence over the next six months, the Department of Homeland Security said Tuesday.

25. China's Russia dealings irk US, but don't breach sanctions -

BEIJING (AP) — China's support for Russia through oil and gas purchases is irking Washington and raising the risk of U.S. retaliation, foreign observers say, though they see no sign Beijing is helping Moscow evade sanctions over its war on Ukraine.

26. Biden signs policing order on anniversary of Floyd's death -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order Wednesday to improve accountability in policing —a meaningful but limited action on the second anniversary of George Floyd's death that reflected the challenges in addressing racism, excessive use of force and public safety when Congress is deadlocked on stronger measures.

27. Bradley adds health care attorney Setterlund -

Eric Setterlund has joined Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP in the firm’s health care and cybersecurity and privacy practice groups.

Setterlund previously served as the privacy and data counsel and the interim chief privacy officer for BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee. During his time at BCBST, he provided strategic leadership on privacy, security and technology matters, as well as enterprise data sharing initiatives, digitization efforts and member outreach campaigns.

28. US to end Russia's ability to pay international investors -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. will close the last avenue for Russia to pay its billions in debt back to international investors on Wednesday, making a Russian default on its debts for the first time since the Bolshevik Revolution all but inevitable.

29. Biden forest plan stirs dispute over what counts as "old" -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — President Joe Biden's order to protect the nation's oldest forests against climate change, wildfires and other problems devastating vast woodlands is raising a simple yet vexing question: When does a forest grow old?

30. House approves bill to take aim at gasoline 'price gouging' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A closely divided House approved legislation Thursday to crack down on alleged price gouging by oil companies and other energy producers as prices at the pump continue to soar.

A bill backed by House Democrats would give President Joe Biden authority to declare an energy emergency that would make it unlawful to increase gasoline and home energy fuel prices in an "excessive" or exploitative manner. The bill directs the Federal Trade Commission to punish companies that engage in price gouging.

31. Biden has an eye on China as he heads to South Korea, Japan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden embarked Thursday on a six-day trip to South Korea and Japan aiming to build rapport with the two nations' leaders while also sending an unmistakable message to China: Russia's faltering invasion of Ukraine should give Beijing pause about its own saber-rattling in the Pacific.

32. US Soccer equalizes pay in milestone with women, men -

The U.S. Soccer Federation reached milestone agreements to pay its men's and women's teams equally, making the American national governing body the first in the sport to promise both sexes matching money.

33. US, banks unveil plan to ease food crisis from Russia's war -

BONN, Germany (AP) — The U.S., several global development banks and other groups unveiled a multi-billion dollar plan Wednesday meant to address a worldwide food security crisis exacerbated by Russia's war in Ukraine.

34. More than 60 feared dead in bombing of Ukrainian school -

ZAPORIZHZHIA, Ukraine (AP) — More than 60 people were feared dead Sunday after a Russian bomb flattened a school being used as a shelter, Ukrainian officials said, while Moscow's forces pressed their attack on defenders inside Mariupol's steel plant in an apparent race to capture the city ahead of Russia's Victory Day holiday.

35. Rising interest rates in US will hinder foreign economies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the Federal Reserve raises interest rates — as it did Wednesday — the impact doesn't stop with U.S. homebuyers paying more for mortgages or Main Street business owners facing costlier bank loans.

36. DHS disinformation board's work, plans remain a mystery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — There is little credible information about the new Disinformation Governance Board.

And that has made it an instant target for criticism.

The board, part of the Department of Homeland Security, was announced last week. But DHS has released few details on how the board will function and what powers it will have.

37. Heritage Foundation to open history center -

The Heritage Foundation of Williamson County plans to establish The History & Culture Center of Williamson County in the former McConnell House building in Downtown Franklin.

The historic building will be transformed into Williamson County’s first state-of-the-art, interactive exhibition space dedicated to telling its comprehensive countywide history.

38. California subpoenas ExxonMobil in probe of plastics waste -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's attorney general on Thursday subpoenaed ExxonMobil as part of what he called a first-of-its-kind broader investigation into the petroleum industry for its alleged role in causing a global plastic pollution crisis.

39. This Earth Day, Biden faces 'headwinds' on climate agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One year ago, Joe Biden marked his first Earth Day as president by convening world leaders for a virtual summit on global warming that even Russian President Vladimir Putin and China's Xi Jinping attended. Biden used the moment to nearly double the United States' goal for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, vaulting the country to the front lines in the fight against climate change.

40. Baker Donelson elects 3 Nashville shareholders -

Baker Donelson has elected 11 new shareholders across the firm, including Bert Chollet, Andrew J. Droke and Ryan M. Richards of the Nashville office.

Chollet, a member of Baker Donelson’s construction group, provides clients in all areas of the construction industry with a full range of services in connection with projects throughout the U.S. and abroad.

41. China looks to learn from Russian failures in Ukraine -

BANGKOK (AP) — With its ground troops forced to pull back in Ukraine and regroup, and its Black Sea flagship sunk, Russia's military failings are mounting. No country is paying closer attention than China to how a smaller and outgunned force has badly bloodied what was thought to be one of the world's most powerful armies.

42. EXPLAINER: What happens in the post-mask world of travel? -

DALLAS (AP) — A ruling by a federal judge has ended — at least for now — the requirement that people wear masks on planes and public transportation, and there is plenty of confusion about the new, post-mask world of travel.

43. Cheers, fear as judge strikes down U.S. transit mask mandate -

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge's decision to strike down a national mask mandate was met with cheers on some airplanes but also concern about whether it's really time to end one of the most visible vestiges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

44. Biden: Russia war is genocide, trying to 'wipe out' Ukraine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden now says Russia's war in Ukraine amounts to genocide, accusing President Vladimir Putin of trying to "wipe out the idea of even being a Ukrainian."

"Yes, I called it genocide," he told reporters in Iowa on Tuesday shortly before boarding Air Force One to return to Washington. "It's become clearer and clearer."

45. Mask rule for planes and trains still up in the air -

DALLAS (AP) — The federal requirement to wear face masks on airplanes and public transportation is scheduled to expire next week, and airline executives and Republican lawmakers are urging the Biden administration to let the mandate die.

46. Russian retreat reveals destruction as Ukraine asks for help -

CHERNIHIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian troops retreating from this northern Ukrainian city left behind crushed buildings, streets littered with destroyed cars and residents in dire need of food and other aid — images that added fuel to Kyiv's calls Thursday for more Western help to halt Moscow's next offensive.

47. Bird flu's grisly question: how to kill millions of poultry -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The spread of a bird flu that is deadly to poultry raises the grisly question of how farms manage to quickly kill and dispose of millions of chickens and turkeys.

It's a chore that farms across the country are increasingly facing as the number of poultry killed in the past two months has climbed to more than 24 million, with outbreaks reported nearly every day. Some farms have had to kill more than 5 million chickens at a single site with a goal of destroying the birds within 24 hours to limit the spread of the disease and prevent animals from suffering.

48. Lyft, Spin partner, scoot into Nashville -

Lyft and Spin have announced a partnership to bring Spin scooters to the Lyft app in 60 U.S. markets, including Nashville.

More cities are launching over the coming months.

This integration further positions Lyft as the go-to transportation platform as riders have new, cost-effective and more sustainable ways to get from point A to point B. This exclusive partnership creates a seamless experience: riders can simply rent and pay for Spin scooters in the Lyft app without needing to download another app or add new payment information.

49. COVID outbreak 'extremely grim' as Shanghai extends lockdown -

BEIJING (AP) — The COVID-19 outbreak in China's largest metropolis of Shanghai remains "extremely grim" amid an ongoing lockdown confining around 26 million people to their homes, a city official said Tuesday.

50. Health Care Council aids Ukraine, Poland -

The Nashville Health Care Council has joined the humanitarian relief effort launched in Tennessee by former U.S. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist and Russell Street Ventures Founder and CEO Brad Smith to support Ukraine and Poland with medical supplies and equipment.

51. Bradley adds Chaloner to intellectual property group -

Aaron Chaloner has joined Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP as a senior attorney in the Intellectual Property Practice Group.

Chaloner focuses his practice on patent prosecution in the life science and biotechnology industry. He is experienced in all stages of intellectual property prosecution and provides strategic counsel to his clients regarding copyright, trademark, patent and trade secret concerns.

52. 60 miles from Ukraine, Biden sees refugee crisis in Poland -

RZESZOW, Poland (AP) — Just 60 miles from Ukraine, President Joe Biden saluted Poland on Friday for giving refuge to more than 2 million refugees who have fled Russia's invasion,; then he met with humanitarian experts on the ground about what will be needed to mitigate the growing suffering.

53. Putin's war in Ukraine nearing possibly more dangerous phase -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Vladimir Putin's war in Ukraine is approaching a new, potentially more dangerous phase after a month of fighting has left Russian forces stalled by an outnumbered foe. He is left with stark choices — how and where to replenish his spent ground forces, whether to attack the flow of Western arms to Ukrainian defenders, and at what cost he might escalate or widen the war.

54. EXPLAINER: How the US and allies can freeze Russian gold -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. and its allies said Thursday they're moving to block financial transactions with Russia's Central Bank that involve gold, aiming to further restrict the country's ability to use its international reserves because of Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine. Putin has been building his gold stockpile since 2014.

55. Biden seeks new sanctions, help for Ukrainians in Europe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With Europe facing its most precarious future since World War II, President Joe Biden will huddle with key allies in Brussels and Warsaw this week as they try to prevent Russia's war on Ukraine from spiraling into an even greater catastrophe.

56. Russian businesses in US face backlash from war in Ukraine -

NEW YORK (AP) — They're pouring out vodka, boycotting Russian restaurants and even leaving threatening voicemail messages at Russian businesses.

Angered by the deadly violence and the humanitarian crisis resulting from Russia's war on Ukraine, some Americans are taking it out on Russian businesses and brands in the U.S. — or anything that sounds Russian.

57. US expels another Chinese phone carrier on security grounds -

BEIJING (AP) — Washington has expelled another state-owned Chinese phone carrier from the U.S. market over national security concerns amid rising tension with Beijing.

The Federal Communications Commission revoked authorization for Pacific Networks Corp. to provide domestic and international service under an order issued Wednesday.

58. Russia invasion upends Olympic 'neutrality' — if it existed -

The International Olympic Committee has always been political, from the sheikhs and royals in its membership to a seat at the United Nations to pushing for peace talks between the Koreas. But Russia's invasion of Ukraine three weeks ago exposed its irreconcilable claims of "political neutrality."

59. How will COVID end? Experts look to past epidemics for clues -

NEW YORK (AP) — Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, most of the world has seen a dramatic improvement in infections, hospitalizations and death rates in recent weeks, signaling the crisis appears to be winding down. But how will it end? Past epidemics may provide clues.

60. US VP Harris embraces call for war crimes probe of Russia -

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris on Thursday embraced calls for an international war crimes investigation of Russia over its invasion of Ukraine, citing the "atrocities" of bombing civilians, including a maternity hospital.

61. Weaver, Scalzo to lead Waller’s health care team -

Jennifer Weaver and Eric Scalzo have been named leaders of Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP’s health care industry team, which includes more than 200 attorneys advising health care providers and investors across the country.

62. Russia snubs UN court hearings in case brought by Ukraine -

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Ukraine pleaded with the United Nations' top court Monday to order Russia to halt its devastating invasion, saying Moscow is already committing widespread war crimes and "resorting to tactics reminiscent of medieval siege warfare" in its 12-day-old military onslaught.

63. Report: American whiskey exports starting to rebound -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — American whiskey exports, battered by tariffs and the COVID-19 pandemic, started rebounding in 2021, but distillers have more ground to make up to fully recover, an industry group said.

64. Tennessee GOP leaders shy from attacks on librarians -

NASHVILLE (AP) — GOP legislative leaders on Thursday maintained that parents need more transparency on what students are being exposed to inside Tennessee's public schools, but a handful conceded the arguments recently used to condemn teachers and libraries had crossed a line.

65. Tennessee's school librarians face criticism in fight over book scrutiny -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Amid a national spike in book challenges and bans, school librarians across Tennessee are quickly becoming the target of scorn and skepticism from Republican lawmakers and parents pushing for more oversight on what materials are provided to children.

66. Ukraine war upends Biden's agenda on energy, climate change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Russian troops move deeper into Ukraine, President Joe Biden is taking steps to rein in rising energy costs even if those moves run counter to his agenda for addressing climate change.

67. Attorney, teacher joins GSRM Law -

The law firm of Gullett Sanford Robinson & Martin PLLC bas brought M. Clark Spoden into the firm as a partner in the firm’s litigation section.

His practice is focused on the representation of companies in contract, employment, environmental, administrative law, construction, business tort, noncompetition, intellectual property, wrongful death and personal injury cases.

68. Some Russian oligarchs speak out, cautiously, against war -

There have been social media messages calling for peace, an image of a murdered Russian opposition figure, a newspaper editorial demanding President Vladimir Putin "stop this war."

As Russian forces pound Ukraine's cities, the sentiments might not be surprising. Their source is — they come from rich Russians, including billionaires close to the Kremlin.

69. Biden's high court choice defies expectations on labor cases -

DETROIT (AP) — Labor unions and worker advocates have applauded President Joe Biden's nomination of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson for the Supreme Court. Yet a look back at Jackson's decisions in cases involving business and labor suggest that she won't always rule as they want or expect her to.

70. EXPLAINER: A look at toughest US sanctions facing Putin -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the White House calling Russian deployments in eastern Ukraine an invasion, it's expected to follow up with tough sanctions. President Joe Biden has made clear the United States intends to deploy sweeping financial penalties, not American troops, to hit Russia over President Vladimir Putin's moves against Ukraine.

71. Sportsbooks pick a winner in Tennessee -

With Super Bowl LVI fast approaching, you might be surprised by the number of friends and co-workers who are talking about bets they’ve placed via one of Tennessee’s nine legal online sportsbooks.

72. China's pandemic Olympics begins with lockdown and boycotts -

BEIJING (AP) — The country where the coronavirus outbreak emerged two years ago launched a locked-down Winter Olympics on Friday, proudly projecting its might on the most global of stages even as some Western governments mounted a diplomatic boycott over the way China treats millions of its own people.

73. Doeg elected to Baker Donelson board -

Bruce C. Doeg has been elected a member of Baker Donelson’s board of directors by the firm’s shareholders.

Doeg, a shareholder in the firm’s Nashville office and co-chair of the Firm’s Privacy and Technology Center of Excellence, concentrates his practice in the area of business law with an emphasis on rapidly changing industries, including technology, digital health and life sciences.

74. US unveils changes to attract foreign science, tech students -

The Biden administration on Friday announced policy changes to attract international students specializing in science, technology, engineering and math — part of the broader effort to make the U.S. economy more competitive.

75. Climate, COVID, China: Takeaways from online Davos event -

GENEVA (AP) — Government and business leaders have urged cooperation on the world's biggest issues — climate change, the coronavirus pandemic and the economic recovery — at the World Economic Forum's virtual gathering.

76. Fed study on digital currency leans toward role for banks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve on Thursday released a highly anticipated report on central bank digital currencies that suggested it is leaning toward having banks and other financial firms, rather than the Fed itself, manage digital accounts for customers.

77. American Airlines reports $931 million fourth-quarter loss -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines lost $931 million in the fourth quarter and the omicron variant of COVID-19 is delaying its recovery from nearly two years of pandemic.

First-quarter revenue is expected to be down about 20% to 22% compared with the first quarter of 2019, and it will fly slightly less than it did two years ago, the airline said Thursday.

78. Biden nominates 3 for Fed board, including first Black woman -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Friday announced the nominations of three people for the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors, including Sarah Bloom Raskin, a former Fed and Treasury official, for the top regulatory slot and Lisa Cook, who would be the first Black woman to serve on the Fed's board.

79. It’ll be your best vacation ever! -

The two words that sum up travel in 2022 are “cautiously optimistic.’’ To be sure, travel is one of the top priorities for many of the pandemic weary. An Expedia report on 2022 travel trends found that more than 68% of American travelers are planning a big trip for their first foray out, whether it be travel to a foreign country or upgrading to luxury accommodations in the United States.

80. Indigenous news outlets, nonprofits drive deeper coverage -

PHOENIX (AP) — Kiowa tribal member Tristan Ahtone remembers just getting started in journalism over a decade ago and pitching ideas on Indigenous topics. His bosses would say things like: "We ran a Native story earlier this year. Do we need another one?"

81. EXPLAINER: Why was holiday-season flying such a nightmare? -

A forecast of better weather means that the worst may finally be over for tens of thousands of air travelers who were grounded by flight cancellations that skyrocketed over the New Year's Day weekend.

82. COVID-19 variant disrupts holiday travel but not shopping -

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — The latest COVID-19 variant is upending holiday plans for tens of thousands of travelers — but it didn't do much damage to holiday shopping.

Airlines canceled hundreds more flights Sunday, citing staffing problems tied to COVID-19, as the nation's travel woes extended beyond Christmas, with no clear indication when normal schedules would resume.

83. To grandmother's house or no? Omicron disrupts holiday plans -

Dave Fravel and his wife invited several relatives to their Cape Cod home for Christmas to share food, gifts and the togetherness they've longed for during the lonely days of the pandemic. They were also looking forward to a holiday sightseeing trip to New York City.

84. NLRB to review order blocking Nissan plant small union vote -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A federal labor board is reviewing a decision by one of its regional officials to deny a union from trying to organize fewer than 100 of the thousands of employees at Nissan's auto assembly plant in Tennessee.

85. Johnson named president of Nashville Bar Association -

Nashville Metropolitan Chief Public Defender Martesha L. Johnson has been named 2022 president of the Nashville Bar Association. The Nashville native has served as assistant public defender for nine years before becoming the first African American and second woman to be elected to her current role, where she has been for three years.

86. CFMT awards more than $2.6M in local grants -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, a charitable organization dedicated to enriching the quality of life in Middle Tennessee and beyond, announces $2,664,888 in grants to 439 local nonprofit organizations as part of the 2021 annual grantmaking process.

87. Omicron casts a new shadow over economy's pandemic recovery -

Just as Americans and Europeans were eagerly awaiting their most normal holiday season in a couple of years, the omicron variant has unleashed a fresh round of fear and uncertainty — for travelers, shoppers, party-goers and their economies as a whole.

88. Supply shortages and emboldened workers: A changed economy -

Employees at a fast-food restaurant in Sacramento, California, exasperated over working in stifling heat for low wages, demanded more pay and a new air conditioner — and got both.

Customer orders poured in to an Italian auto supplier, which struggled to get hold of enough supplies of everything from plastic to microchips to meet the demand.

89. Garlington is new CFO at Centerstone -

Centerstone, a not-for-profit health system specializing in mental health and substance use disorder services, has selected Andy Garlington as the new chief financial officer.

Garlington will manage Centerstone’s revenues of more than $295 million and lead a finance team of 225 professionals.

90. How a Kennedy built an anti-vaccine juggernaut amid COVID-19 -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Robert F. Kennedy Jr. strode onto the stage at a Southern California church, radiating Kennedy confidence and surveying the standing ovation crowd with his piercing blue Bobby Kennedy eyes. Then, he launched into an anti-vaccine rant. Democrats "drank the Kool-Aid," he told people assembled for a far right conference, branded as standing for "health and freedom."

91. Can democracy still deliver? Biden convening global summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is convening global leaders Thursday to pledge strong new commitments to democracy, even as the U.S. itself is facing some of the gravest threats in years to its democratic traditions and institutions at home.

92. Hong Kong loses shine amid tough coronavirus restrictions -

HONG KONG (AP) — The bustling, cosmopolitan business hub of Hong Kong may be losing its shine among foreign companies and expatriates with its stringent anti-pandemic rules requiring up to 21 days of quarantine for new arrivals.

93. American CEO Parker becomes latest airline chief to exit -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines CEO Doug Parker will retire in March and be replaced by its current president, Robert Isom, as the airline seeks to rebuild after massive losses caused by the pandemic.

94. Belmont entrepreneur program ranked No. 30 -

Belmont University’s Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Program has been ranked No. 30 overall on the 16th annual “Top 50 Undergraduate Schools for Entrepreneurship” list.

Belmont was also ranked No. 6 in the Southeast and continues to be the only program in Tennessee to be included in the Top 50 recognized schools.

95. Many environmentalists back Biden's move to tap oil reserve -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats and climate activists generally supported President Joe Biden's decision to release a record 50 million barrels of oil from America's strategic reserve, even as the move appeared to contradict his long-term vision of combating climate change.

96. LifePoint Health launches 25m Health incubator -

LifePoint Health has announced a joint venture with New York-based venture studio 25madison and Apollo Global Management that will be seeded initially with $20 million to launch 25m Health, a first-of-its-kind health tech startup incubator in Nashville.

97. Efforts to cut car, plane and ship emissions get small boost -

GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — Several countries and companies announced plans Wednesday to stop selling cars that run on gasoline or diesel over the next two decades, as part of efforts to clamp down on a significant source of planet-warming emissions.

98. Colin Powell remembered as a model for future generations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Colin L. Powell, the trailblazing soldier-diplomat who rose from humble beginnings to become the first Black secretary of state, was remembered by family and friends Friday as a principled man of humility and grace whose decorated record of leadership can serve as a model for generations to come.

99. OPEC+ keeps cautious oil production despite Biden pressure -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — OPEC and allied oil-producing countries rebuffed pressure from U.S. President Joe Biden to pump significantly more oil and lower gasoline prices for American drivers, deciding Thursday to stick with their plan for cautious monthly increases even as prices surge and the global economy is thirsty for fuel.

100. US-China tensions evident as Biden heads to twin summits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For nine months under President Joe Biden, the U.S. has pursued a diplomatic strategy that could be characterized as about China, without China.

On security, trade, climate and COVID-19, the Biden White House has tried to reorient the focus of the U.S. and its allies toward the strategic challenges posed by a rising China — all while there has been little direct engagement between the two rivals.