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Editorial Results (free)

1. How 9/11 changed air travel: more security, less privacy -

DALLAS (AP) — Ask anyone old enough to remember travel before Sept. 11, 2001, and you're likely to get a gauzy recollection of what flying was like.

There was security screening, but it wasn't anywhere near as intrusive. There were no long checkpoint lines. Passengers and their families could walk right to the gate together, postponing goodbye hugs until the last possible moment. Overall, an airport experience meant far less stress.

2. Kabul airport attack kills 60 Afghans, 12 US troops -

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Two suicide bombers and gunmen attacked crowds of Afghans flocking to Kabul's airport Thursday, transforming a scene of desperation into one of horror in the waning days of an airlift for those fleeing the Taliban takeover. At least 60 Afghans and 12 U.S. troops were killed, Afghan and U.S. officials said.

3. Airlines cite concerns about fuel shortages at some airports -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — The fuel needle is moving closer to "empty" at some U.S. airports.

American Airlines says it's running into fuel shortages at some smaller and mid-size airports, and in some cases the airline will add refueling stops or fly fuel into locations where the supply is tight.

4. Southwest, American post 2Q profits as air travel picks up -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines and Southwest Airlines both posted second-quarter profits on Thursday thanks to generous federal pandemic relief that covers most of their labor costs.

The reports on Thursday underscored the progress that airlines are making in rebuilding after the coronavirus crushed air travel — and how much farther they must go to fully recover.

5. Biden signs competition order targeting big business -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order on Friday targeting what he labeled anticompetitive practices in tech, health care and other parts of the economy, declaring it would fortify an American ideal "that true capitalism depends on fair and open competition."

6. Rental assistance falls victim to politics, bureaucracy -

Before the pandemic hit, Jacqueline Bartley, a mother of two girls and a boy, had a comfortable life. Then the 41-year-old lost her job at American Airlines, quickly spent her savings and found herself months behind on the $1,350-a-month home she rented. Until then she had never missed a rent payment.

7. As passengers return to air travel, bad behavior skyrockets -

Air travel can be difficult in the best of times, with cramped planes, screaming babies, flight delays and short tempers.

Throw in a pandemic, and the anxiety level can rise quickly.

That has led to confrontations with flight attendants and other unruly behavior, including occasional fights that get captured and replayed endlessly on social media.

8. Cabinet secretaries launch roadshow to sell the Biden plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Marty Walsh remembers what it was like when a Cabinet secretary would come to town.

"It really is a big deal. They give you the dates, and you just clear your schedule," said Walsh, a former mayor of Boston.

9. Despite business warnings, GOP moves ahead with voting bills -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Republican lawmakers around the country are pressing ahead with efforts to tighten voting laws, despite growing warnings from business leaders that the measures could harm democracy and the economic climate.

10. Continental Europe could allow US tourists back this summer -

BRUSSELS (AP) — American tourists could soon be visiting continental Europe again, more than a year after the European Union restricted travel to the 27-nation bloc to a bare minimum to contain the coronavirus.

11. American Airlines posts $1.25 billion loss, delays new jets -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines said Thursday that it lost $1.25 billion in the first quarter and continued to slash costs, including delaying delivery of new jets as it waits for air travel to recover from the pandemic.

12. A jab on the job: Companies, unions offer COVID-19 vaccines -

Marie Watson wanted to be among the first in line when she and other essential workers became eligible for the coronavirus vaccine — and with good reason.

13. Study finds that blocking seats on planes reduces virus risk -

A new study says leaving middle seats open could give airline passengers more protection from the virus that causes COVID-19.

Researchers said the risk of passengers being exposed to the virus from an infected person on the plane could be reduced by 23% to 57% if middle seats are empty, compared with a full flight.

14. Open your door and say ‘Ahhhh’ -

Jacob Melnychuk grew up in San Jose, California, where he occasionally skipped science class at Leland High School to surf.

“I was a terrible high school student,” he admits.

But he also had a genuine sense of community, which rallied around the family of Pat Tillman, a fellow Leland graduate, after the Army Ranger was killed in Afghanistan in 2004. Tillman’s family was a staple in their community, and it was upsetting to Melnychuk to see how the military handled his death.

15. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

16. A Biden edge in COVID-19 bill: Dems reluctant to wound him -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic leaders have a potent dynamic on their side as Congress preps for its first votes on the party's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill: Would any Democrat dare cast the vote that scuttles new President Joe Biden's leadoff initiative?

17. Airlines push White House to reject testing for US flights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Leaders of several major U.S. airlines met online Friday with White House officials to press their case against requiring coronavirus tests for passengers on domestic flights, saying it would undermine the already fragile industry.

18. EXPLAINER: Why GameStop's stock surge is shaking Wall Street -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's not just you. What's going on with GameStop's stock doesn't make sense to a lot of people.

The struggling video game retailer's stock has been making stupefying moves this month, wild enough to raise concerns from professional investors on Wall Street to the hallways of regulators and the White House in Washington.

19. Airlines close books on rotten 2020 and, so far, 2021 is grim -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines lost $3.1 billion last year, its first full-year loss since Richard Nixon was president and gasoline sold for about 36 cents a gallon with no extra charge for the attendant who cleaned your windshield.

20. Trading sites restrict stock trading in GameStop, other cos. -

NEW YORK (AP) — Robinhood and other online trading platforms are moving to restrict trading in GameStop and other stocks that have soared recently due to rabid buying by smaller investors.

GameStop stock has rocketed from below $20 earlier this month to more than $400 early Thursday as a volunteer army of investors on social media challenged big institutions who had placed market bets that the stock would fall. The stock fell, however, to around $240 after sliding more than 30% in midday trading.

21. American Airlines lost $8.9 billion in a year of pandemic -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines lost $2.2 billion in the fourth quarter as people stayed put in the pandemic, sending the carrier's revenue plunging by nearly two-thirds from the same period a year ago.

22. Seven credit card perks to prioritize in the new year -

As you lay the groundwork for 2021 financial resolutions, take inventory of your credit cards to see if they’re still in line with your goals and priorities.

With the pandemic upending spending patterns, possibly for the foreseeable future, an audit of the benefits and costs of your cards can reveal which ones are getting the job done and saving you money, which ones are a drag on your finances – and what features you might want to look for in a new card. Here are some credit card features to prioritize.

23. Late stumble leaves S&P 500 just short of a record high -

U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Thursday after a late stumble pulled the S&P 500 just short of its third straight all-time high.

The benchmark index slipped 0.1% after spending much of the day higher. It's on track for its second weekly gain as Wall Street continues to coast following its rocket ride last month powered by hopes for coming COVID-19 vaccines. The Nasdaq composite set a record high for the second straight day. Treasury yields mostly declined, a reversal from earlier in the week.

24. Frost Brown Todd names Cote member -

New Frost Brown Todd member Jennifer Cote brings more than 15 years’ experience advising employers on employee benefit plans with a focus on employee stock ownership plans and executive compensation.

25. Future of business travel unclear as virus upends work life -

Brian Contreras represents the worst fears of the lucrative business travel industry.

A partner account executive at a U.S. tech firm, Contreras was used to traveling frequently for his company. But nine months into the pandemic, he and thousands of others are working from home and dialing into video conferences instead of boarding planes.

26. American, Southwest, Alaska add to airline loss parade in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in additional losses as the pandemic chokes off air travel, but a recent uptick in passengers, however modest, has provided some hope.

27. American, Southwest add to parade of airline losses in 3Q -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are piling up billions of dollars in losses as the pandemic causes a massive drop in air travel.

American Airlines on Thursday reported a loss of $2.4 billion and Southwest Airlines lost $1.16 billion in the third quarter, typically a very strong period of air travel that includes most of the summer vacation season.

28. Delta posts $5.4 billion 3Q loss as pandemic hammers travel -

The summer travel season was even worse than expected for Delta Air Lines, which said Tuesday that it lost $5.4 billion in the third quarter as people hunkered down at home during the pandemic.

Delta officials pushed back their timetable for breaking even, from year-end to next spring, as their previous expectation that COVID-19 would be contained proved too rosy. The airline's shares fell almost 3% on Tuesday.

29. US layoffs still high, but so is skepticism on jobless data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits dipped last week to a still-high 840,000, evidence that layoffs remain elevated seven months into the pandemic recession.

30. Stocks rise as Trump tweets on stimulus keep market spinning -

Stocks closed broadly higher on Wall Street Wednesday after President Donald Trump appeared to backtrack on his decision to halt talks on another rescue effort for the economy.

The S&P 500 climbed 1.7% after Trump sent a series of tweets late Tuesday saying he's open to sending out $1,200 payments to Americans, as well as limited programs to prop up the airline industry and small businesses.

31. Jobless claims fall to 881,000 but layoffs remain elevated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of laid-off Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell to a still-elevated 881,000 last week, evidence that the viral pandemic keeps forcing many businesses to slash jobs.

32. US jobless claims fall to 881,000, layoffs remain elevated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of laid-off Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell to a still-elevated 881,000 last week, evidence that the viral pandemic keeps forcing many businesses to slash jobs.

33. AP FACT CHECK: Trump distorts record; BLM falsely accused -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump claimed accomplishments he didn't earn on the pandemic, energy and veterans at a Republican convention finale that also heard Black Lives Matter baselessly accused of coordinating violent protests across the country.

34. White House is mulling options to prevent airline furloughs -

The White House is considering whether it can take action to prevent thousands of job losses in the airline industry a month before the election if it cannot reach a deal with Congress on a broader package of additional pandemic relief.

35. US stocks join global rally amid COVID treatment hopes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks plowed higher on Wall Street Monday, as hopes for a COVID-19 treatment and vaccine had investors looking ahead to the possibility of a healthier economy that has shed the virus.

36. American Airlines considering cutting flights to many smaller cities -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines is planning to drop flights to up to 30 smaller U.S. cities if a federal requirement to continue those flights expires at the end of next month, an airline executive familiar with the matter said Thursday.

37. GOP senators support more money for airlines to pay workers -

A group of 16 Republican senators has endorsed giving more money to airlines to avoid layoffs right before the November election, giving a boost to a lobbying effort by airlines and their unions.

The GOP senators did not specify an amount on Wednesday, but a proposal by several airline unions would give the hard-hit aviation industry $32 billion, including $25 billion for passenger airlines.

38. Stocks rise on vaccine hopes; S&P 500 back within 5% of high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Markets worldwide rallied on rising hopes for a COVID-19 vaccine Wednesday, and the S&P 500 climbed back to where it was a few days after it set its record early this year.

39. Wall Street stocks claw back a chunk of last week's losses -

Stocks shrugged off a wobbly start to finish solidly higher on Wall Street Monday, as the market clawed back half its losses from last week.

The S&P 500 rose 1.5% after having been down 0.3%. The market rallied after a much healthier-than-expected report on the housing market put investors in a buying mood. Technology, industrial and communications stocks accounted for much of the market's broad gains. European stocks also closed higher. Treasury yields were mixed and oil prices rose.

40. American Airlines will book flights to full capacity -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines will start booking flights to full capacity next week, ending any effort to promote social distancing on its planes while the United States sets records for new reported cases of the coronavirus.

41. Stocks end mostly lower, even as Nasdaq tops 10,000 points -

Stocks closed a choppy day on Wall Street with broad losses Wednesday, despite fresh assurances from the Federal Reserve that it would keep interest rates low through 2022 and would continue buying bonds to help markets function smoothly.

42. Wall Street hits the brakes after strong, weekslong rally -

Wall Street hit the brakes Tuesday, a day after its remarkable, weekslong rally brought the S&P 500 back to positive for the year and the Nasdaq to a record high.

The benchmark index fell 0.8%, its largest loss in almost three weeks, as traders cashed in on some of the market's recent gains. Financial, industrial and health care stocks led the slide. Technology companies were among the gainers, helping to push the Nasdaq to another all-time high.

43. Rising US job losses stir fears of lasting economic damage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus crisis threw at least 2.1 million Americans out of work last week despite the gradual reopening of businesses around the country, stoking fears Thursday that the scourge is doing deep and potentially long-lasting damage to the U.S. economy.

44. Job losses continue to mount in US despite reopenings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus crisis threw at least 2.1 million Americans out of work last week despite the gradual reopening of businesses around the country, stoking fears Thursday that the scourge is doing deep and potentially long-lasting damage to the U.S. economy.

45. Stocks shake off an early loss and end higher, led by tech -

Stocks shook off an early stumble and scratched out small gains on Wall Street Monday, as the market's momentum slows following its best month in decades.

The S&P 500 added 0.4% and narrowly avoided what would have been its first three-day losing streak in nearly two months. The Dow eked out a 0.1% gain, while the Nasdaq rose 1.2%.

46. American Airlines posts $2.2 billion loss during pandemic -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines reported a staggering loss of $2.24 billion for the first quarter, when the coronavirus pandemic triggered a sharp drop in air travel.

The airline said Thursday that revenue fell 19% while costs continued to rise even as the virus spread.

47. American Airlines posts $2.2 billion loss during pandemic -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines reported a staggering loss of $2.24 billion for the first quarter, when the coronavirus pandemic triggered a sharp drop in air travel.

The airline's revenue fell 19% while costs continued to rise even as the virus spread.

48. Skeletal flights for airlines; economic signals flash red -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

49. Panic grocery buying slows; iPhone sales plummeted in March -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

50. Consumers get some breaks, but layoffs keep coming -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

51. After virus fades, service industries may be changed forever -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For years, personal trainer Amanda Tikalsky didn't have to worry much about her job. The U.S. economy's record-breaking 11-year expansion offered security to service workers like her.

52. Outbreak: bankruptcies, layoffs, quiet skies and empty rails -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments on Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

53. Business fallout: National bills coming due, with risk; consumers see it -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Thursday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

54. Congress locks Trump oversight into $2.2 trillion package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared that "I'll be the oversight" as lawmakers were in the final days of drafting what became a $2.2 trillion rescue plan for American businesses. In the end, Congress ensured that won't be the case.

55. Dow has best day since 1933 as Congress nears deal on aid -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average surged to its best day since 1933 as Congress and the White House neared a deal on Tuesday to inject nearly $2 trillion of aid into an economy ravaged by the coronavirus.

56. US manufacturing might vs virus; drinking at home -

The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy. Here's a look at developments Tuesday as central banks, businesses and workers attempt to navigate a global outbreak that has brought economic activity to a standstill.

57. Monday: Big layoffs, bigger hirings; Dollar General adding 50,000 -

The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy.

Following are business developments Monday related to the outbreak as governments attempt to stabilize their economies, companies struggle to cope and millions of people face job losses and disruptions in supplies of goods and in services.

58. Business Fallout: Airlines fear failure, delivery in demand -

Business Fallout: Airlines fear failure, delivery in demand

It was less than 11 weeks ago that the first cases of pneumonia were detected in Wuhan, China. The speed at which what would soon be named COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, knocked the global economy askew is unparalleled in our lifetimes.

59. New US home construction dips again in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Construction of new homes fell again in February, but not as much as the previous month. Those declines follow a December surge which had pushed home construction to the highest level in 13 years.

60. White House seeks $850B economic stimulus amid virus crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is proposing a roughly $850 billion economic rescue package Tuesday amid the coronaviru s outbreak, a sweeping stimulus for businesses and taxpayers unseen since the Great Recession of 2008.

61. Hit by virus, US airlines seek aid far exceeding post-9/11 -

With each day that the coronavirus outbreak spreads and claims more lives, the damage to global airlines rises too. U.S. carriers on Monday put a price tag on their pain: They asked the federal government for more than $50 billion in rescue aid.

62. Officials seek $750 billion in economic aid to thwart virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With an urgency unseen since the Great Recession, Congress is rushing to develop a sweeping economic lifeline for American households and businesses suddenly capsized by the coronavirus outbreak.

63. Senate Democrats seek $750B for new coronavirus aid package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats are proposing a new coronavirus aid package, with at least $750 billion to boost hospital capacity, unemployment insurance and other direct aid for American households, businesses and the health care industry.

64. US airlines seek billions in aid as outbreak cripples travel -

U.S. airlines are asking the federal government for grants, loans and tax relief that could easily top $50 billion to help them recover from a sharp downturn in travel due to the new coronavirus.

Airlines for America, the trade group representing the carriers, disclosed its request for financial help on Monday, just as more airlines around the world were announcing ever-deeper cuts in service and, in some cases, layoffs.

65. Virus seizes markets; it's no longer business as usual -

Global markets and businesses big and small opened the week to a landscape seemingly altered by the coronavirus pandemic. National retail chains have closed all stores. Banks are taking steps to keep cash on hand, lots of it. Markets in Asia, Europe and the U.S. are plunging. Following is a quick look at how the outbreak is impacting the financial and business sector, as well as millions of workers and customers.

66. Q&A: New travel ban shakes up airlines, passengers -

Airlines and travelers are still sorting out the new travel ban that President Donald Trump announced late Wednesday that bars most foreign visitors coming to the U.S. from continental Europe for 30 days.

67. Market swings and a wave of cancellations as virus spreads -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the outbreak is now classified as a pandemic and it's doing widespread damage to critical economic sectors of the global economy.

68. Economic toll of virus goes global and hits close to home -

Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the spread of the virus that causes the disease has done widespread damage to critical economic sectors in the country.

Airlines are cutting capacity, people are working from home, major public events that raise millions of dollars for local communities have been cancelled, including this year's St. Patrick's Day parade in Boston. The Associated Press is publishing a running tally of the affects of the coronavirus on people, businesses, and the economy.

69. Airlines slash flights, freeze hiring as virus cuts travel -

Airlines are slashing flights and freezing hiring as they experience a sharp drop in bookings and a rise in cancellations in the face of the spreading coronavirus.

Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly says the outbreak might do more damage to airlines than the terror attacks of 2001 did. An industry trade group has issued the same warning.

70. Virus fears grip markets again; stocks and bond yields slide -

NEW YORK (AP) — Fear dominated financial markets again on Thursday, and stocks fell sharply on worries about the fast-spreading virus outbreak. It's the latest shudder in Wall Street's most volatile week in more than eight years.

71. Virus ripples through travel, energy, financial markets -

The economic affects of the coronavirus have preceded the spread of the virus itself, with financial markets swinging wildly, companies closing offices or asking employees work from home in affected areas, and throttling air travel across the globe. Following is a brief look at how things are changing in the economy and the workplace today as the outbreak widens.

72. Virus concerns: What to know if you're planning a trip -

The fast-spreading coronavirus is forcing travelers to reconsider their trips.

As of Wednesday, the virus has sickened more than 94,000 people and 3,200 have died. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding all nonessential travel to China, Iran, South Korea and Italy, and says older adults or those with chronic medical conditions should postpone travel to Japan.

73. Companies adjust policies as virus scrambles travel plans -

The fast-spreading coronavirus is forcing travelers to reconsider their trips.

As of Tuesday, the virus has sickened more than 92,000 people and 3,100 have died. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding all nonessential travel to China, Iran, South Korea and Italy, and says older adults or those with chronic medical conditions should postpone travel to Japan.

74. Delta reduces flights to Korea as virus outbreak spreads -

Delta Air Lines is reducing flights to South Korea while Hawaiian Airlines will suspend them entirely, as airlines deal with growing concern about the spread of the new virus beyond China.

Delta said Wednesday that it will suspend flights between Seoul and Minneapolis after Saturday and running through April 30. Delta also said it will reduce flights from Seoul to Atlanta, Detroit and Seattle to five times a week. The airline said last fall that it was operating about 28 flights per week on those routes.

75. Dow drops over 1,000 as outbreak threatens global economy -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slumped more than 1,000 points Monday in the worst day for the stock market in two years as investors worry that the spread of a viral outbreak that began in China will weaken global economic growth.

76. US stocks edge mostly lower after China virus cases spike -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street Thursday as investors turned cautious following a surge in cases of a new virus in China that threatens to crimp economic growth and hurt businesses worldwide.

The modest losses snapped a three-day streak of record highs for the S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite. The selling marked only the second day this month that the market has declined.

77. US stocks extend gains as investors focus on latest earnings -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Tuesday, led by health care companies, retailers and banks.

The modest gains nudged the S&P 500 and Nasdaq to all-time highs for the second straight day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished essentially flat.

78. Companies offer rebuke of Tennessee's anti-LGBT adoption law -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Almost three dozen big companies and more than 100 small businesses in Tennessee on Wednesday predicted economic backlash from a newly enacted state adoption law and other proposals that target LGBT people, with one company saying plans to add jobs in Nashville are "in doubt" over the legislation.

79. Hyundai halts Korea output as China outbreak fallout spreads -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hyundai Motors is suspending production in South Korea, a sign that the economic fallout from China's viral outbreak is spreading.

For other companies bracing for losses from coronavirus, the damage has so far been delayed, thanks to a stroke of timing: The outbreak hit just when Chinese factories and many businesses were closed anyway to let workers travel home for the week-long Lunar New Year holiday .

80. Clock is ticking for companies that depend on China imports -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For companies bracing for losses from China's viral outbreak, the damage has so far been delayed, thanks to a stroke of timing: The outbreak hit just when Chinese factories and many businesses were closed anyway to let workers travel home for the week-long Lunar New Year holiday .

81. American Airlines pilots sue to halt flights to China -

DALLAS (AP) — The pilots' union at American Airlines sued to block the carrier from flying to China and told members not to operate flight there because of the spreading coronavirus outbreak.

The Allied Pilots Association, which represents American's 15,000 pilots, filed the lawsuit Thursday in state district court in Dallas. The union cited the declaration by international health experts that the virus is a public health emergency.

82. More airlines drop flights to China as deadly virus spreads -

BANGKOK (AP) — British Airways halted all flights to China and American Airlines suspended Los Angeles flights to and from Shanghai and Beijing as efforts to contain a new and deadly virus intensifies.

83. Stocks tumble as virus fears spark sell-off; Dow falls 453 -

U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday, sending the Dow Jones Industrial Average down by more than 450 points, as investors grappled with fresh worries about the spread of a new virus in China that threatens global economic growth.

84. Grounded Boeing jet holds back profits, growth at airlines -

DALLAS (AP) — The three big U.S. airlines that own Boeing 737 Max jets don't expect the grounded plane back in their fleets until after the peak summer travel season, and that promises to lead to thousands more canceled flights and higher costs well into another year.

85. US blames Iran for Ukrainian jetliner downing, pledges probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. promised "appropriate action" Friday in response to its assessment that an Iranian missile was responsible for downing a Ukrainian jetliner that crashed outside Tehran, as the Iranian government denied playing a role in the killing of all 176 people on board.

86. Stocks eke out gains after a mixed set of earnings reports -

U.S. stock indexes eked out tiny gains Wednesday following a wobbly day of trading as investors reviewed another set of mixed quarterly report cards from big companies.

Some of the companies' earnings topped analysts' expectations. Others put traders in a selling mood after warning that the slowing global economy and trade tensions are hitting their profits.

87. US stock indexes close lower on mixed company earnings -

A choppy day of trading on Wall Street ended Tuesday with stocks closing lower after a technology sector-led sell-off strengthened toward the end of the day.

That late-afternoon burst of selling erased modest gains for the market, which was coming off two weeks of gains.

88. Stocks end lower; S&P 500 notches 2nd straight weekly gain -

The S&P 500 index closed out an uneven week of trading on Wall Street with its second straight weekly gain, even though stock indexes ended lower Friday.

Technology companies led the slide, which erased the major U.S. indexes' gains from the day before. Communication services, industrials and health care stocks also fell, outweighing gains in real estate companies, banks and elsewhere in the market.

89. US stock indexes edge up as oil gives up half of its spurt -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes ticked closer to record heights on Tuesday, but the modest moves belied plenty of churning underneath.

Oil prices and energy stocks slumped to give back nearly half of their huge gains from a day earlier. Rising prices for technology stocks and companies that sell to consumers, though, more than made up for those losses. Treasury yields fell a second straight day as the Federal Reserve opened a two-day meeting on interest rates, where investors expect it to announce a cut for the second time in as many months.

90. US stocks close lower as spike in crude oil rattles market -

Airlines, cruise lines and other companies in fuel-dependent industries dragged U.S. stocks lower Monday after an attack on Saudi Arabia's biggest oil processing facility sent crude prices soaring.

91. US blames Iran for Saudi strike; big hit for oil prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. tried to build its case Monday that Iran was behind the fiery weekend attack on key Saudi Arabian oil facilities that raised new war worries and sent energy prices soaring. Iran denied responsibility, while President Donald Trump said the United States was "locked and loaded" to respond if necessary.

92. Dow surges 326 points on hopes for US-China trade talks -

Stocks finished with broad gains on Wall Street Thursday, driving the Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 300 points higher.

The buying spree gave the market its second straight gain after a wobbly start to the week. The S&P 500 is now on track for its first weekly gain in five weeks.

93. American expects grounded jet to cut profit by $400M -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines said Thursday that the long grounding of Boeing 737 Max jets will cut its pretax earnings for 2019 by about $400 million, including $175 million in the second quarter.

94. American expects grounded jet to cut profit by $400 million -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — American Airlines said Thursday that the long grounding of Boeing 737 Max jets will cut its pretax earnings for 2019 by about $400 million, including $175 million in the second quarter.

95. Big business to Supreme Court: Defend LGBTQ people from bias -

NEW YORK (AP) — More than 200 corporations, including many of America' best-known companies, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

96. Banks, tech stocks drag market to 2nd straight loss -

Stocks closed modestly lower on Wall Street Wednesday, handing the market its second straight loss.

Banks and technology companies accounted for much of the slide as investors shifted money into U.S. bonds, precious metals and other holdings considered safe havens after more than a week of aggressive buying.

97. Tech companies lead US stocks broadly higher; oil slumps -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street for the second straight day Wednesday, extending Tuesday's strong gains as investors bet an interest rate cut could be ahead.

Technology, industrial and health care companies accounted for much of the broad gains, which were tempered by a slide in energy stocks following a 3.4% plunge in the price of U.S. crude oil.

98. US, China appear to brace for long haul in trade dispute -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With negotiations on hold and tariffs piling up, the United States and China appear to be bracing for a prolonged standoff over trade.

Beijing is airing Korean War movies (antagonist: America) to arouse patriotic feelings in the Chinese public and offering tax cuts to software and chip companies as U.S. export controls threaten Chinese tech companies.

99. US stocks close lower, ending 8-day win streak for S&P 500 -

Industrial companies led a broad slide in stocks on Wall Street Tuesday, ending the benchmark S&P 500's eight-day winning streak.

The sell-off came as traders weighed growing trade tensions between the U.S. and the European Union, and a report forecasting dimmer global economic growth this year.

100. American Airlines extends Max-caused cancellations to June 5 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American Airlines is extending by over a month its cancellations of about 90 daily flights as the troubled 737 Max plane remains grounded by regulators.

American said Sunday it is extending the cancellations through June 5 from the earlier timeframe of April 24. The airline acknowledged in a statement that the prolonged cancellations could bring disruption for some travelers.