» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'Amazon' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:47
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:12
Middle Tennessee:278
East Tennessee:12
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Fed reviews ethics polices after prolific trading uncovered -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is reviewing the ethics policies that govern the financial holdings and activities of its senior officials in the wake of recent disclosures that two regional Fed presidents engaged in extensive trading last year.

2. Amazon eyes 125K more hires, $18+ per hour average salary -

Amazon wants to hire 125,000 delivery and warehouse workers and said Tuesday that it is paying new hires an average of $18 an hour in a tight job market as more people shop online.

Competition for hourly workers has become fierce, and many companies are offering higher pay, sign-on bonuses and other incentives. Last week, package delivery company UPS promised to handout job offers in 30 minutes after candidates apply for many of the 100,000 holiday workers it plans to hire.

3. Biden: GOP governors 'cavalier' for resisting vaccine rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden called some Republican governors "cavalier" on Friday for resisting his call for far-reaching new federal coronavirus vaccine requirements he hopes will curb the surging delta variant.

4. Key parts of Biden's plan to confront delta variant surge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has unveiled a new "action plan" plan to confront the COVID-19 surge that's being driven by the spread of the delta variant. It mandates vaccines for federal workers and contractors and certain health care workers, requires employees at companies with 100 or more workers to be vaccinated or tested weekly, lays the groundwork for a booster shot campaign and recommends that large venues require proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test. The plan also makes recommendations on keeping schools open.

5. Sweeping new vaccine mandates for 100 million Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday is announcing sweeping new federal vaccine requirements affecting as many as 100 million Americans in an all-out effort to increase COVID-19 vaccinations and curb the surging delta variant that is killing thousands each week and jeopardizing the nation's economic recovery.

6. Tennessee panel OKs $65M in state incentives for Oracle -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee panel has approved $65 million in state incentives for Oracle Corp. as the company plans to bring 8,500 jobs and an investment topping $1 billion to fast-growing Nashville over the coming decade.

7. Amazon Air cargo comes to Nashville -

The first Amazon Air cargo aircraft arrived at Nashville International Airport last week, beginning daily flights to the airport and adding to the company’s presence in the region.

“This operation reinforces Amazon’s investment in the region and BNA’s vital role in the economic development of the area,” says Doug Kreulen, BNA president and CEO. “We value their commitment and look forward to a strong partnership.”

8. Bradley attorneys appointed to ABA leadership positions -

Seven Bradley Arant Boult Cummings attorneys have been appointed to new leadership roles with the American Bar Association, including Junaid Odubeko, a partner in the firm’s Nashville office.

9. Silicon Valley finds remote work is easier to begin than end -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Technology companies that led the charge into remote work as the pandemic unfurled are confronting a new challenge: how, when and even whether they should bring long-isolated employees back to offices that have been designed for teamwork.

10. Amazon to open 2 cashier-less Whole Foods stores next year -

NEW YORK (AP) — There will be something missing at two Whole Foods stores opening next year: the rows of cashiers.

Amazon, which owns the grocery chain, said Wednesday that it will bring its cashier-less technology to two Whole Foods stores for the first time, letting shoppers grab what they need and leave without having to open their wallets. Cameras and sensors track what's taken off shelves. Items are charged to an Amazon account after customers leave the store with them.

11. No cashiers, please: Futuristic supermarket opens in Mideast -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The Middle East on Monday got its first completely automated cashier-less store, as retail giant Carrefour rolled out its vision for the future of the industry in a cavernous Dubai mall.

12. Tyson Foods workers get paid sick leave; 75% vaccinated -

NEW YORK (AP) — Tyson Foods is offering its front-line workers paid sick leave for the first time, part of an agreement that secured union support for its mandate that all U.S. employees get vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus.

13. US hiring slows as delta variant weakens travel and tourism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers added just 235,000 jobs in August, a surprisingly weak gain after two months of robust hiring and the clearest sign to date that the delta variant's spread has discouraged some people from flying, shopping and eating out.

14. Fired Tennessee vaccine director files federal lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The terminated vaccine director in Tennessee has sued the state and says she wants to clear her name.

Michelle Fiscus was fired after Republican lawmakers objected to her promoting COVID-19 vaccinations for teenagers.

15. FAA bans Virgin Galactic launches while probing Branson trip -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The Federal Aviation Administration said Thursday that Virgin Galactic cannot launch anyone into space again until an investigation is complete into a mishap that occurred during July's flight with founder Richard Branson.

16. Companies loosen job requirements but challenges remain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Landing a waitressing job or bartending gig at the Lost Dog Cafe in Northern Virginia had never been easy.

"Help Wanted" signs were a rarity, and half the chain's staff stuck around for at least 10 years. The onset of the pandemic made job prospects even worse when Lost Dog had to temporarily shut down indoor dining.

17. Irish watchdog fines WhatsApp $267M after EU privacy probe -

LONDON (AP) — Ireland's privacy watchdog has fined WhatsApp a record 225 million euros ($267 million) after an investigation found it breached stringent European Union data protection rules on transparency about sharing people's data with other Facebook companies.

18. Social media's 70-up 'grandfluencers' debunking aging myths -

NEW YORK (AP) — Joan MacDonald's health was in shambles at age 71. She was overweight and on numerous medications with high cholesterol, rising blood pressure and kidney trouble.

19. USPS has shorted some workers' pay for years, CPI finds -

Nancy Campos' back ached as she loaded more than 100 Amazon packages onto her truck. The 59-year-old grandmother, a mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, had worked 13 days in a row without a lunch break, and now she was delivering on the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday to keep up with a never-ending flow of boxes.

20. S&P 500 ekes out a record as the stock market finishes mixed -

Stocks wound up mixed on Wall Street Monday, with the S&P 500 index managing just enough of a gain to mark another record high.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slipped and small-company stocks fell. Gains for a handful of Big Tech companies were the main driver behind the 0.4% increase in the S&P 500 index, where slightly more stocks fell than rose.

21. Tech companies pledge billions in cybersecurity investments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some of the country's leading technology companies have committed to investing billions of dollars to strengthen cybersecurity defenses and to train skilled workers, the White House announced Wednesday following President Joe Biden's private meeting with top executives.

22. Bone McAllester Norton combines with Spencer Fane -

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC, one of Nashville’s largest law firms, will combine with Spencer Fane, an Am Law 200 ranked law firm with offices in 20 cities nationwide.

The combination will become effective Oct. 1 and position the firms to expand both in terms of size and geography.

23. Biden to tackle cybersecurity with tech, finance leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is meeting Wednesday with top executives from some of the country's leading technology companies and financial institutions as the White House urges the private sector to help toughen cybersecurity defenses against increasingly sophisticated attacks.

24. From CVS to Chevron, FDA decision triggers vaccine mandates -

From Walt Disney World and Chevron to CVS and a Michigan university, a flurry of private and public employers are requiring workers to get vaccinated after the federal government gave full approval to Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine. And the number is certain to grow much higher.

25. Walmart to launch delivery service for other businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart said Tuesday it will start farming out its delivery service, using contract workers, autonomous vehicles and other means to transport rival retailers' products directly to their customers' homes as fast as just a few hours.

26. Hong Kong quarantine exemption for Nicole Kidman draws flak -

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong's granting of a quarantine exemption to Hollywood star and part-time Nashville resident Nicole Kidman is drawing criticism from lawmakers as the city tightens entry restrictions for international travelers to control the coronavirus.

27. Govt sharpens antitrust attack against Facebook with filing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators sharpened their antitrust attack against Facebook on Thursday, filing a revised version of their complaint alleging that the social network giant has abused its market power to suppress competition.

28. Brighter outlook from Macy's, Kohl's after sales bounce back -

NEW YORK (AP) — A return, at least temporarily, to near normalcy is giving a boost two of America's largest department stores hit hard by the pandemic last year.

Macy's and Kohl's raised their projections for 2021 Thursday after easily beating expectations in the just-ended second quarter. Americans are going back to stores again to buy dresses, luggage and other goods that fell to the bottom of the priority list last year when the pandemic struck.

29. New Amazon fulfillment center, 500 jobs headed for Clarksville -

CLARKSVILLE (AP) — A new Amazon fulfillment center is planned for Tennessee, bringing with it 500 full-time jobs, officials said.

The 1 million-square-foot center is being located in Clarksville, Gov. Bill Lee and state and company officials said Wednesday.

30. Dollar General thrives despite ‘retail apocalypse' -

Don’t blink! You might miss the grand opening of another Dollar General store. OK, that’s an exaggeration. But not by much.

In the 14 years since an investment group purchased the family owned business and took it public again two years later, the Goodlettsville-based chain has added nearly 10,000 stores to boast more retail locations than any other company in the United States – quickly closing on 18,000 stores in 46 states.

31. Americans spent less in July as COVID-19 cases surged -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans cut back on their spending last month as a surge in COVID-19 cases kept people away from stores.

Retail sales fell a seasonal adjusted 1.1% in July from the month before, the U.S. Commerce Department said Tuesday. It was a much larger drop than the 0.3% decline Wall Street analysts had expected.

32. Strong jobs report sends most stocks, bond yields higher -

Wall Street capped a choppy week of trading Friday with broad gains, which helped push the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average to new highs.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2%, a day after setting another all-time high. Every major index notched a weekly gain after slipping last week.

33. Amazon pushes back return to office to January due to COVID -

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon has pushed back its return-to-office date for tech and corporate workers until January as COVID-19 cases surge nationally due to the more contagious delta variant.

Unlike its Seattle-area rival Microsoft and other tech giants, Amazon will not mandate employees receive the COVID-19 vaccine before they return to the office. Instead, the company said Thursday that unvaccinated employees will be required to wear masks in the office.

34. Nashville’s future is up in the air -

Developer Tony Giarratana could be considered a visionary when it comes to Nashville’s growth and development potential, seeing the possibility of what could be built downtown and building it.

35. Tyson Foods, Microsoft to require vaccination for US workers -

ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Tyson Foods will require all of its U.S. employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19, becoming one of the first major employers of front-line workers to do so amid a resurgence of the virus.

36. Union: NLRB officer recommends new vote for Amazon workers -

The union that tried — and failed — to organize Amazon warehouse workers in Bessemer, Alabama may get a do-over.

The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union on Monday said that a hearing officer for the National Labor Relations Board has recommended that the vote by workers in April to overwhelmingly reject the union be set aside and that another vote be held in its place. The hearing officer determined that Amazon violated labor law, according to the union.

37. Wall Street stumbles at the close of another strong month -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes fell Friday, with much of the downward weight coming from a stumble for high-flying Amazon.

The S&P 500 lost 23.89, or 0.5%, to 4,395.26. But it nevertheless wrapped up its sixth straight month of gains, its longest such streak since 2018, and it's still within 0.6% of its record high set on Monday.

38. Amazon delivers a mixed bag of 2Q results, shares slide -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon on Thursday turned in a mixed bag of results for its fiscal second quarter, coming up short of Wall Street expectations in revenue but beating on profits.

During the three-month period ended June 30, the Seattle-based company reported profit of $7.78 billion, or $15.12 per share compared to $5.24 billion, or $10.30 a share, during the year-ago period. Revenue jumped 27% to $113.08 billion.

39. Wall Street pushes broadly higher after two days of losses -

Stocks on Wall Street bounced back from a two-day slide Thursday, placing the S&P 500 on pace for its second straight weekly gain.

The S&P 500 index rose 0.4%, powered by broad gains. About 77% of the stocks in the benchmark index closed higher. Technology stocks and banks made some of the biggest gains, along with a wide range of retailers and other consumer-oriented companies. Only communication services stocks and real estate companies fell.

40. 3 tech giants report combined profits of more than $50B -

Three tech companies — Apple, Microsoft and Google owner Alphabet — reported combined profits of more than $50 billion in the April-June quarter, underscoring their unparalleled influence and success at reshaping the way we live.

41. Delivery apps expand reach to meet customer demands -

Spurred by skyrocketing consumer demand during the pandemic, restaurant delivery companies like DoorDash and Uber Eats are rapidly expanding their services to grocers, convenience stores, pharmacies, pet stores and even department stores.

42. EXPLAINER: Employers have legal right to mandate COVID shots -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The state of California. New York City. Hospitals and nursing homes. Colleges and universities. Employers are putting COVID-19 vaccine requirements into place and it's getting attention. But what happens if workers refuse?

43. A dozen years after last minimum wage hike, is $15 new norm? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The signs and banners are dotted along suburban commercial strips and hanging in shop windows and restaurants, evidence of a new desperation among America's service-industry employers: "Now Hiring, $15 an hour."

44. Bitcoin jumps on speculation that Amazon considering crypto -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bitcoin's price surged again Monday after speculation that Amazon may be entering the cryptocurrency sector after it posted a job seeking a "digital currency and blockchain product lead."

45. Black lawmaker hopes Nashville highway project can right an old wrong -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Harold Love Jr. raised his voice over the blare of traffic from the interstate above as he stood near the spot where his family's home was razed to rubble a half-century ago. Love recounted the fight his father put up in the 1960s, before he was born, to reroute the highway he was sure would stifle and isolate Nashville's Black community.

46. AP-NORC poll: Parties split on some infrastructure proposals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The overwhelming majority of Americans -- about 8 in 10 -- favor plans to increase funding for roads, bridges and ports and for pipes that supply drinking water. But that's about as far as Democrats and Republicans intersect on infrastructure, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

47. Grant selected for TN Supreme Court board -

Charles K. Grant, a shareholder in the Nashville office of Baker Donelson, has been appointed by the Supreme Court of Tennessee to serve on its Board of Professional Responsibility.

Grant is a veteran litigator who has tried more than 50 jury trials to verdict in both federal and state courts, and represented numerous clients in mediation and arbitration proceedings across more than a dozen states.

48. Events -

Mayor Randall Hutto. Meet with Mayor Randall Hutto. Lebanon Wilson County Chamber of Commerce, 149 Public Square. Wednesday, 1-2 p.m. Information: Wilson County Courthouse, 615 444-1383.

THURSDAY, JULY 29

Multi-Employer Hiring Event

American Job Center hosts a multi-employer hiring event featuring Amazon, Bojangles, Department of Corrections, DPR Construction, Silver Angles and Rich’s. American Job Center, 1598 Greenlea Boulevard, Gallatin. 9 a.m.-noon. Information

49. Bezos' comments on workers after spaceflight draws rebuke -

NEW YORK (AP) — The world's richest man wanted to say thanks to the people who made his brief trip into space Tuesday possible.

But for some, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos' expression of gratitude went over like a lead rocket.

50. Netflix confirms move into video games as its growth slows -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix reported its worst slowdown in subscriber growth in eight years as people emerge from their pandemic cocoons. So it's adding a new attraction to its marquee: Video games.

51. Jeff Bezos blasts into space on own rocket: 'Best day ever!' -

VAN HORN, Texas (AP) — Jeff Bezos blasted into space Tuesday on his rocket company's first flight with people on board, becoming the second billionaire in just over a week to ride his own spacecraft.

52. Stocks end a wobbly week lower, breaking 3-week win streak -

Stocks ended a wobbly week broadly lower, with much of Friday's loss attributable to weakness in big technology companies like Apple and Amazon.

The S&P 500 index fell 0.8% and marked its first weekly loss after three weeks of gains.

53. Video games coming to Netflix? Latest hiring offers a clue -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Netflix has hired veteran video game executive Mike Verdu, signaling the video streaming service is poised to expand into another fertile field of entertainment.

Verdu's addition as Netflix's vice president of game development, confirmed Thursday, comes as the company seeks to sustain the momentum it gathered last year when people turned to the video streaming service to get through lockdowns imposed during the pandemic.

54. Microsoft says it blocked spying on rights activists, others -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Microsoft said Thursday it has blocked tools developed by an Israeli hacker-for-hire company that were used to spy on more than 100 people around the world, including politicians, human rights activists, journalists, academics and political dissidents.

55. Fired Tennessee vaccine official received dog muzzle in mail -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's former top vaccination official received a dog muzzle in the mail a few days before she was fired this week in what she has said was an attempt to use her as a scapegoat to appease lawmakers, a newspaper reported.

56. Bezos' Blue Origin gets OK to send him, 3 others to space -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Jeff Bezos' rocket company has gotten government approval to launch people into space, himself included.

The Amazon founder will climb atop his New Shepard rocket next Tuesday in West Texas, joined by his brother, an 82-year-old female aviation pioneer and a $28 million auction winner. It will be the first launch with passengers for Blue Origin, which like Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic plans to start flying paying customers in the months ahead.

57. EU puts on hold digital levy plans in face of US criticism -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union has put on hold work on plans for a digital levy for the moment to concentrate on finalizing the historic tax decision endorsed by the Group of 20 nations over the weekend, officials said Monday.

58. Biden signs competition order targeting big business -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order on Friday targeting what he labeled anticompetitive practices in tech, health care and other parts of the economy, declaring it would fortify an American ideal "that true capitalism depends on fair and open competition."

59. G20 ministers take up plan to deter cross-border tax dodging -

A sweeping effort to deter cross-border tax dodges by multinational companies that have cost governments billions tops the agenda as finance ministers from the world's major economies meet in Venice.

60. Billionaire Blastoff: Rich riding own rockets into space -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Two billionaires are putting everything on the line this month to ride their own rockets into space.

It's intended to be a flashy confidence boost for customers seeking their own short joyrides.

61. Free samples are back at Costco, but with safety in mind -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Pat Curry spotted bite-sized wood-fire rotisserie chicken with portabella mushroom at her local Costco in early June, she felt "giddy." After a 14-month hiatus, free samples were back.

62. Tennessee, dozens others target Google's app store in antitrust suit -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Dozens of states are taking aim at Google in an escalating legal offensive on Big Tech.

This time, attorneys general for 36 states and the District of Columbia have filed a lawsuit targeting Google's Play store, where consumers download apps designed for the Android software that powers most of the world's smartphones.

63. Waller adds 6 to Nashville corporate practice -

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP has made several hires to strengthen the firm’s corporate practice in Nashville. They are:

• Matt Bryson, an associate who represents private companies and financial sponsors in mergers, acquisitions, divestitures and other investment, financing and exit transactions. Bryson previously was a member of the corporate team in Dentons’ Atlanta office.

64. Pentagon cancels disputed JEDI cloud contract with Microsoft -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon said Tuesday it canceled a disputed cloud-computing contract with Microsoft that could eventually have been worth $10 billion. It will instead pursue a deal with both Microsoft and Amazon and possibly other cloud service providers.

65. Amazon begins new chapter as Bezos hands over CEO role -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon founder Jeff Bezos stepped down as CEO on Monday, handing over the reins as the company navigates the challenges of a world fighting to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic.

Andy Jassy, who ran Amazon's cloud-computing business, replaced Bezos, a change the company announced in February.

66. EXPLAINER: Deterring tax avoidance by global companies -

A broad swathe of countries have agreed on a major overhaul of how they tax the world's biggest companies when they do business across borders.

It's an attempt to better cope with a world where globalization and an increasingly digital economy mean that profits can move easily from one jurisdiction to another. The agreement was sealed Thursday among 130 countries in talks overseen by the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, though there are still details to work out and hurdles to clear before it can take effect in 2023.

67. Subsidizing spokes: Amazon to reimburse bicycling employees -

ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — First, Amazon embraced the banana stand. Now it's embracing the banana seat.

The tech company, which famously offered a free banana stand at its Seattle headquarters, is adding a new commuter benefit for its employees to encourage bicycling to work.

68. 130 countries back deal on global minimum tax for companies -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Some 130 countries have agreed on a global minimum tax backed by U.S. President Joe Biden as part of a worldwide effort to keep multinational firms from dodging taxes by shifting their profits to countries with low rates.

69. Amazon says its carbon footprint grew 19% last year -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Wednesday that its carbon footprint grew 19% last year as it rushed to deliver a surge of online orders during the pandemic.

The online shopping behemoth said activities tied to its businesses emitted 60.64 million metric tons of carbon dioxide last year — the equivalent of burning through 140 million barrels of oil. Amazon's carbon footprint has risen every year since 2018, when it first disclosed its carbon footprint, something employees had pushed the company to do.

70. Amazon asks for FTC head to step aside from antitrust probes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amazon is asking that the new head of the Federal Trade Commission step aside from antitrust investigations into the e-commerce giant, contending that her past public criticism of the company's market power makes it impossible for her to be impartial.

71. Break them up? 5 ways Congress is trying to rein in Big Tech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Groundbreaking legislation is advancing in Congress that would curb the market power of tech giants Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple and could force them to untie their dominant platforms from their other lines of business. Hostility toward Big Tech has grown in recent years with the belief that its size and swagger have stifled competition, limited consumer choice and raised prices.

72. UK watchdog probes Amazon, Google for fake reviews of goods -

LONDON (AP) — U.K. regulators said on Friday that they're investigating Google and Amazon over concerns the online giants aren't doing enough to stop fake reviews of products and services on their platforms.

73. The Teamsters have a new mission: Unionize Amazon workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — One of the nation's largest union is aiming to unionize Amazon workers.

Representatives from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a union that represents 1.4 million workers, voted on Thursday to make organizing Amazon workers a priority. That means it will create a division focused on Amazon and set aside money for the effort.

74. BuzzFeed to become a publicly traded company -

NEW YORK (AP) — Digital media company BuzzFeed is setting its sights on growth. It plans to become a publicly traded company with an implied value of $1.5 billion through a merger with a special purpose acquisition company.

75. Amazon announces plans to build solar farm in Mississippi -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Amazon has announced plans to build a solar farm in Mississippi and in at least 10 other states, including Arkansas and Pennsylvania.

The project is part of a company launch of new renewable energy projects throughout the U.S., Canada, Finland, and Spain, according to a news release. Amazon officials say they plan to decarbonize business operations and reach net-zero carbon by 2040.

76. Teamsters aims to step up efforts to unionize Amazon workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a union that represents 1.4 million delivery workers, is setting its sights on Amazon.

On Thursday, it will vote on whether to make organizing Amazon workers its main priority. The Teamsters accuse the nation's second-largest private employer of exploiting employees by paying them low wages, pushing them to work at fast speeds and offering no job security.

77. Nashville’s July 4 event to be nation’s largest -

This year’s free Let Freedom Sing! Music City July 4th event is projected to draw record crowds to Downtown Nashville.

“Following conversations with other cities regarding major July 4th events across the U.S., it’s safe to say that Nashville will have the largest live Independence Day celebration in the country this year,” says Julie Heckman, executive director of the American Pyrotechnics Association.

78. Are sports fans tuning out? -

Remember the panic of 2020 when live sports disappeared from our TV screens? March Madness? Gone. NBA? Multiple delays, game played in a “bubble” and a season that ended four months later than normal. Major league baseball? Reduced to 60 games beginning in late July and then played with cardboard cutouts of fans filling otherwise empty seats.

79. House panel pushes legislation targeting Big Tech's power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House panel pushed ahead Wednesday with ambitious legislation that could curb the market power of tech giants Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple and force them to sever their dominant platforms from their other lines of business.

80. How Big Tech created a data 'treasure trove' for police -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — When U.S. law enforcement officials need to cast a wide net for information, they're increasingly turning to the vast digital ponds of personal data created by Big Tech companies via the devices and online services that have hooked billions of people around the world.

81. Wall Street snaps back following worst week since February -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rebounded on Wall Street Monday and clawed back most of their sharp loss from last week. The S&P 500 snapped 1.4% higher as the initial jolt passed from the Federal Reserve's reminder that it will eventually offer less help for markets. Oil producers, banks and other companies that were hit particularly hard last week made the biggest gains. High-growth tech stocks lagged. Shorter-term yields fell, and longer-term yields rose in another reversal from last week's initial reaction to the Fed's saying it may raise rates twice by late 2023.

82. Amazon allots $300 million for housing near mass transit -

ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Amazon is providing $300 million in low-interest loans to support housing located near mass transit in the Washington, D.C., area and the Seattle and Nashville, Tennessee, regions.

83. Biden elevates energetic critic of Big Tech as top regulator -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Tuesday installed an energetic critic of Big Tech as a top federal regulator at a time when the industry is under intense pressure from Congress, regulators and state attorneys general.

84. Media consumers may be reaching limit of streaming services -

A British research company may have discovered a magic number for American media consumers — and it's seven.

That's seven streaming services, paid or free, that consumers are willing to subscribe to before the hassle of keeping track of log-ins and passwords just becomes too much, said Maria Rua Aguete, senior research director at the London-based media consultancy OMDIA.

85. Want a job? Employers say: Talk to the computer -

A day after her interview for a part-time job at Target last year, Dana Anthony got an email informing her she didn't make the cut.

86. Biden administration pushes plan to combat domestic terror -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration says it will enhance its analysis of threats from domestic terrorists, including the sharing of intelligence within law enforcement agencies, and will work with tech companies to eliminate terrorist content online as part of a nationwide strategy to combat domestic terrorism.

87. EXPLAINER: Curbing tax avoidance by multinational companies -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — How can governments keep multinational companies from avoiding taxes by shifting profits to subsidiaries in low-tax countries?

Years of international discussion over the issue gathered momentum after U.S. President Joe Biden proposed a global minimum corporate tax rate of at least 15% and possibly higher. The Biden proposal has found support among the Group of Seven wealthy democracies, raising the prospect that a new approach to international taxation might be reached this year.

88. Own an Echo? Amazon may be helping itself to your bandwidth -

NEW YORK (AP) — Do you own an Amazon smart device? If so, odds are good that the company is already sharing your internet connection with your neighbors unless you've specifically told it not to.

89. EXPLAINER: Just how vulnerable is the internet? -

BOSTON (AP) — An outage at a little-known firm that speeds up access to websites knocked a lot of top internet destinations offline on Tuesday, disrupting business and leisure for untold millions globally. The problem was quickly resolved. The company, Fastly, blamed a configuration error in its technology.

90. ProPublica: Many of the uber-rich pay next to no income tax -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The rich really are different from you and me: They're better at dodging the tax collector.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos paid no income tax in 2007 and 2011. Tesla founder Elon Musk's income tax bill was zero in 2018. And financier George Soros went three straight years without paying federal income tax, according to a report Tuesday from the nonprofit investigative journalism organization ProPublica.

91. EXPLAINER: 5 key takeaways from the May jobs report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The American economy delivered 559,000 added jobs in May.

In ordinary times, that would amount to a blockbuster burst of hiring for one month, and the response would be an outpouring of cheers.

92. EXPLAINER: Curbing tax avoidance by multinational companies -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — How can governments keep multinational companies from avoiding taxes by shifting their profits to low-tax countries?

For nearly a decade, nations have grappled with that question, seeking to deter companies from legally avoiding tax by resorting to so-called tax havens — typically small countries that entice companies with low or zero taxes, even though the firms do little actual business there.

93. US adds 559K jobs as firms still struggle to fill positions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added a modest 559,000 jobs in May, an improvement from April's sluggish gain but still evidence that many companies are struggling to find enough workers as the economy rapidly recovers from the pandemic recession.

94. Stocks end lower on Wall Street; AMC sinks after stock sale -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street, led by more declines in big technology companies and putting the S&P 500 in the red for the week.

The benchmark index gave up 0.4% Thursday, weighed down by losses in Apple, Amazon and other tech heavyweights.

95. Biden tax proposal in focus at Group of 7 ministers' meeting -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — U.S. President Joe Biden's proposals for deterring tax avoidance by multinational companies will be a major theme Friday when finance ministers from the Group of Seven wealthy democracies start talks on economic cooperation in London.

96. Amazon to hold Prime Day over 2 days in June -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Wednesday that it will hold its annual Prime Day over two days in June this year, the earliest it has ever held the sales event.

Typically, Amazon holds Prime Day in July. Amazon has said it was holding it earlier due to the Olympics, which starts next month and take people's attention away. Last year, Amazon postponed Prime Day to October because of the pandemic and used the sales event to kickoff holiday shopping early.

97. Pot users welcome: Amazon won't test jobseekers for cannabis -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Tuesday that it will stop testing jobseekers for marijuana.

The company, the second-largest private employer in the U.S. behind Walmart, is making the change as states legalize cannabis or introduce laws banning employers from testing for it.

98. Germany welcomes EU tax transparency deal for big companies -

BERLIN (AP) — Germany's finance minister on Wednesday welcomed an agreement requiring large companies in the European Union to reveal how much tax they paid in which country.

The deal late Tuesday between representatives of the EU's 27 nations and the European Parliament ends five years of haggling over country-by-country reporting rules for corporations with total consolidated revenue of more than 750 million euros (currently about $917 million) across more than one country in each of the past two consecutive financial years.

99. Indie bookstores avoid the worst — so far — from pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — Through the first year of the pandemic, the country's independent booksellers have — so far — avoided disaster.

On Thursday, the American Booksellers Association told The Associated Press that membership increased from 1,635 to 1,701 since May 2020, the additions a combination of brand-new stores and existing stores that had not been part of the independents' trade group. While association CEO Allison K. Hill and others had feared that hundreds of stores could go out of business during the 2020-21 holiday season, the ABA has tallied only 14 closings in 2021 so far, along with more than 70 last year.

100. Bezos says will pass baton to new Amazon CEO on July 5 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has picked a date to step down as CEO.

Bezos, who grew Amazon from an internet bookstore to an online shopping behemoth, said Wednesday that Amazon executive Andy Jassy will take over the CEO role on July 5.