» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'Alphabet' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:5
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:18
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. New step to curb tech giants' power advanced by Senate panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has taken a new step toward reining in the market dominance of Big Tech.

Bipartisan legislation advanced by a Senate panel would bar the dominant online platforms from favoring their own goods and services over those of rivals. It could, for example, prevent Amazon from steering consumers to its own brands and away from competitors' products on its giant e-commerce platform.

2. Lawsuit: Google, Facebook CEOs colluded in online ad sales -

Newly unredacted documents from a state-led antitrust lawsuit against Google accuse the search giant of colluding with rival Facebook to manipulate online advertising sales. The CEOs of both companies were aware of the deal and signed off on it, the lawsuit alleges.

3. Twitter, Meta among tech giants subpoenaed by Jan. 6 panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Months after requesting documents from more than a dozen social platforms, the House committee investigating the Capitol insurrection has issued subpoenas targeting Twitter, Meta, Reddit and YouTube after lawmakers said the companies' initial responses were inadequate.

4. To grandmother's house or no? Omicron disrupts holiday plans -

Dave Fravel and his wife invited several relatives to their Cape Cod home for Christmas to share food, gifts and the togetherness they've longed for during the lonely days of the pandemic. They were also looking forward to a holiday sightseeing trip to New York City.

5. Companies rethink return-to-office plans amid omicron cases -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies of all sizes are rethinking their plans to send workers back to the office as the new omicron variant adds another layer of uncertainty.

Alphabet's Google and the nation's second largest automaker Ford Co. are among those once again delaying their return-to-office plans, while other businesses whose employees have already returned are considering adding extra precautions like requiring masks. Officials in the United Kingdom, Denmark, Norway and Sweden also have asked people in recent days to work from home if they can because of concerns about the variant.

6. New Twitter CEO steps from behind the scenes to high profile -

Newly named Twitter CEO Parag Agrawal has emerged from behind the scenes to take over one of Silicon Valley's highest-profile and politically volatile jobs.

But his prior lack of name recognition coupled with a solid technical background appears to be what some big company backers were looking for to lead Twitter out of its current morass.

7. Facebook Inc.: A look at other corporate rebranding efforts -

NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook Inc. announced Thursday that it is changing its name to Meta Platforms Inc., joining a long list of companies that have tried to rebrand themselves over the years.

The move comes as the company deals with the fallout from the Facebook Papers, a leaked document trove that has revealed the ways Facebook ignored internal reports and warnings of the harms its social network created or magnified across the world.

8. Google ads gain fuels profit for parent company Alphabet -

A continued rebound in digital ad spending at Google drove its parent company's profit up 68% in the third quarter.

Mountain View, California-based Alphabet Inc. said Tuesday that it earned $18.94 billion, or $27.99 per share, in the July-September period. Revenue rose 41% to $65.12 billion.

9. Wall Street sets more records as earnings season gears up -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street ticked further into record heights on Monday, as a better-than-expected profit reporting season gets into higher gear.

The S&P 500 rose 21.58 points, or 0.5%, to 4,566.48 and surpassed its last record set on Thursday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also reached an all-time high after adding 64.13, or 0.2%, to 35,741.15. The Nasdaq composite picked up 136.51, or 0.9%, to 15,226.71..

10. Study says tech firms underreport their carbon footprint -

BERLIN (AP) — Large technology companies such as SAP, IBM and Google are underreporting their greenhouse gas emissions at a time of heightened scrutiny over the role of corporations in driving climate change, a study released Friday claimed.

11. Biden to tackle cybersecurity with tech, finance leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is meeting Wednesday with top executives from some of the country's leading technology companies and financial institutions as the White House urges the private sector to help toughen cybersecurity defenses against increasingly sophisticated attacks.

12. Stocks end mixed after Fed notes progress on the economy -

Stock indexes capped a wobbly day of trading on Wall Street with mixed results Wednesday after the Federal Reserve said it was seeing improvement in the economy, but not enough to start dialing down its support measures.

13. 3 tech giants report combined profits of more than $50B -

Three tech companies — Apple, Microsoft and Google owner Alphabet — reported combined profits of more than $50 billion in the April-June quarter, underscoring their unparalleled influence and success at reshaping the way we live.

14. Ford, Argo AI to deploy autonomous vehicles on Lyft network -

DETROIT (AP) — Ford Motor Co. and a self-driving vehicle company it partly owns will join with the Lyft ride-hailing service to offer autonomous rides on the Lyft network.

15. Tennessee, dozens others target Google's app store in antitrust suit -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Dozens of states are taking aim at Google in an escalating legal offensive on Big Tech.

This time, attorneys general for 36 states and the District of Columbia have filed a lawsuit targeting Google's Play store, where consumers download apps designed for the Android software that powers most of the world's smartphones.

16. Self-driving car pioneer Waymo gets $2.5B to fuel ambitions -

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — Waymo, the self-driving car pioneer spun off from Google, isn't allowing a recent wave of executive departures to detour its plans to expand its robotic taxi service.

The Mountain View, California, company made that clear Wednesday by announcing it has raised another $2.5 billion from a group of investors ranging from venture capital firms such as Andreessen Horowitz to a major car dealer, AutoNation.

17. Ford CEO says US needs to regulate automated driving systems -

DETROIT (AP) — The CEO of America's second-largest auto company is calling for the federal government to set standards for fully or partially automated vehicles to tighten the safety of electronic driving systems.

18. Cool tech, crazy turns: A reporter's take on driverless cars -

CHANDLER, Ariz. (AP) — The annoyed shopper paced around and knocked on the windows of a minivan blocking him from leaving his Costco parking spot. He didn't seem to notice, or care, that there was no one inside.

19. Around the world in eating daze with Gigamunch -

The question to my wife has become part of the weekly routine: Where are we going next Monday night?

The answer, most recently, was the Philippines. Previous answers have included Brazil, South Africa, Laos and Nepal. Next week it will be Persia, the week after that, Ethiopia.

20. Biden's corporate tax plan takes aim at income inequality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From John Kennedy to Ronald Reagan to Donald Trump, American presidents have taken aim at corporate America's tax-avoidance schemes before — and mostly missed.

21. Girl Scout cookies take flight in Virginia drone deliveries -

Missing out on Thin Mints in the pandemic? A Google affiliate is using drones to deliver Girl Scout cookies to people's doorsteps in a Virginia community.

The town of Christiansburg has been a testing ground for commercial delivery drones operated by Wing, a subsidiary of Google's corporate parent Alphabet.

22. Lawmakers call YouTube Kids a 'wasteland of vapid' content -

A House subcommittee is investigating YouTube Kids, saying the Google-owned video feeds children inappropriate material in "a wasteland of vapid, consumerist content" so it can serve them ads.

The inquiry comes despite Google agreeing to pay $170 million in 2019 to settle allegations that YouTube collected personal data on children without their parents' consent.

23. CEO of Google's self-driving car spinoff steps down from job -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — The executive who steered the transformation of Google's self-driving car project into a separate company worth billions of dollars is stepping down after more than five years on the job.

24. EXPLAINER: What's up between Google, Facebook and Australia? -

BEIJING (AP) — For two decades, global news outlets have complained internet companies are getting rich at their expense, selling advertising linked to their reports without sharing revenue.

Now, Australia is joining France and other governments in pushing Google, Facebook and other internet giants to pay. That might channel more money to a news industry that is cutting coverage as revenue shrinks. But it also sets up a clash with some of the tech industry's biggest names.

25. Facebook blocks Australians from accessing news on platform -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Facebook announced Thursday it has blocked Australians from viewing and sharing news on the platform because of proposed laws in the country to make digital giants pay for journalism.

26. Australia to amend laws to make Google and Facebook pay -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia's government said on Tuesday it will amend draft laws that would make Google and Facebook pay for news to clarify that publishers would be paid in lump sums rather than per click on news article links.

27. Major Australian media company strikes Google news pay deal -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Seven West Media has become the largest Australian news media business to strike a deal with Google to pay for journalism in a partnership announced Monday before the nation's Parliament considers draft laws to force digital giants to pay for news.

28. Australian leader has 'constructive' talk with Google boss -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The Australian prime minister said he had a "constructive" meeting on Thursday with the head of Google after the tech giant threatened to remove its search engine from Australia over plans to make digital platforms pay for news.

29. Major stock indexes end with modest gains on Wall Street -

Stocks closed modestly higher on Wall Street Wednesday as investors turn their focus to some strong earnings reports from Big Tech companies and hopes for getting more economic stimulus passed in Washington.

30. Jeff Bezos, Amazon's founder, will step down as CEO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Jeff Bezos, who founded Amazon and turned into an online shopping behemoth, is stepping down as the company's CEO, a role he's had for nearly 30 years.

He'll be replaced in the fall by Andy Jassy, who runs Amazon's cloud-computing business. Bezos, 57, will then become the company's executive chair.

31. Google antes up $2.6M to settle pay, job discrimination case -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Google will pay $2.6 million to more than 5,500 employees and past job applicants to resolve allegations that the internet giant discriminated against female engineers and Asians in California and Washington state.

32. A new COVID-19 challenge: Mutations rise along with cases -

The race against the virus that causes COVID-19 has taken a new turn: Mutations are rapidly popping up, and the longer it takes to vaccinate people, the more likely it is that a variant that can elude current tests, treatments and vaccines could emerge.

33. Google muscles up with Fitbit deal amid antitrust concerns -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Google has completed its $2.1 billion acquisition of fitness-gadget maker Fitbit, a deal that could help the internet company grow even stronger while U.S. government regulators pursue an antitrust case aimed at undermining its power.

34. High-flying Tesla stock takes a hit on 1st day in S&P 500 -

DETROIT (AP) — In the middle of last year, Tesla's losses were piling up, sales weren't enough to cover expenses and big debt payments loomed. The situation was so bad that one influential Wall Street analyst raised the possibility that Tesla wouldn't be able to pay its bills and would have to be restructured financially.

35. EXPLAINER: Are new coronavirus strains cause for concern? -

Reports from Britain and South Africa of new coronavirus strains that seem to spread more easily are causing alarm, but virus experts say it's unclear if that's the case or whether they pose any concern for vaccines or cause more severe disease.

36. States making bold new legal claims in 2 Google lawsuits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a wave of antitrust actions surges against Google and Facebook, states in two lawsuits are stretching beyond the cases made by federal competition enforcers to level bold new claims. The states are taking new legal approaches as they join the widening siege against the two once seemingly untouchable behemoths.

37. Tennessee among states filing anti-trust lawsuit against Google -

DENVER (AP) — Dozens of states filed an anti-trust lawsuit against Google on Thursday, alleging that the search giant has an illegal monopoly over the online search market that hurts consumers and advertisers.

38. US safety agency seeks input on autonomous vehicle rules -

DETROIT (AP) — The U.S. government's road safety agency is asking for public comment on how it should regulate safe deployment of self-driving vehicles.

Seeking public comment is an early step in drawing up possible regulations, but that process takes years and could be changed by the incoming administration of President-elect Joe Biden.

39. Tech losses drive Wall Street down again, ending grim week -

Wall Street closed out another punishing week Friday with the S&P 500 posting its first back-to-back monthly loss since the pandemic first gripped the economy in March.

The S&P 500 dropped 1.2% and ended the week with a 5.6% loss, its worst in seven months. Sharp drops in big technology stocks drove much of the selling, reflecting worries that expectations built too high for some of the market's biggest stars, including Apple and Amazon. Investors have bid up shares in those and other Big Tech companies this year, anticipating they would deliver strong profits, but their latest results and uncertain outlooks left traders wanting.

40. Tech giants report higher profits - some more than others -

Five technology giants are reporting earnings Thursday, providing the latest indication of whether they are rebounding from an economic slowdown earlier this year.

The results come a day after the CEOs of Facebook, Google and Twitter testified before the Senate Commerce Committee, rebuffing accusations of anti-conservative bias and promising to aggressively defend their platforms from being used to sow chaos in next week's election.

41. Stocks have their worst day in a month as virus cases surge -

U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday, deepening last week's losses, as a troubling increase in coronavirus counts put investors in a selling mood. The skid came as doubts mount on Wall Street that Washington will come through with more stimulus for the economy before Election Day.

42. U.S. antitrust case against Google mirrors Microsoft battle -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's legal assault on Google actually feels like a blast from the past.

The U.S. Justice Department filed an equally high-profile case against a technology giant in 1998, accusing it of leveraging a monopoly position to lock customers into its products so they wouldn't be tempted by potentially superior options from smaller rivals.

43. 5 takeaways from the government's lawsuit against Google -

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The Justice Department's lawsuit against Google alleging antitrust violations marks the government's most significant attempt to protect competition since its groundbreaking case against Microsoft more than 20 years ago. The lawsuit claims Google has abused its dominance in online search and advertising to stifle competition and harm consumers.

44. Justice Dept. to file landmark antitrust case against Google -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department on Tuesday sued Google for antitrust violations, alleging that it abused its dominance in online search and advertising to stifle competition and harm consumers.

45. GM to run robot cars in San Francisco without human backups -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors' Cruise autonomous vehicle unit says it will pull the human backup drivers from its vehicles in San Francisco by the end of the year.

Cruise CEO Dan Ammann said in a statement that the company got a permit Thursday from California's Department of Motor Vehicles to let the cars travel on their own.

46. Google parent agrees to $310M misconduct lawsuit settlement -

NEW YORK (AP) — Google's parent company has reached a $310 million settlement in a shareholder lawsuit over its treatment of allegations of executives' sexual misconduct.

Alphabet Inc. said Friday that it will prohibit severance packages for anyone fired for misconduct or is the subject of a sexual misconduct investigation. A special team will investigate any allegations against executives and report to the board's audit committee.

47. Justice Dept. expected to file antitrust action vs. Google -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is expected to bring an antitrust action against Google in coming weeks, focusing on its dominance in online search and whether it was used to stifle competition and hurt consumers, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press Thursday.

48. DOJ nearing antitrust action on Google; Trump eyes tech curb -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the Trump administration moves toward antitrust action against search giant Google, it's campaigning to enlist support from sympathetic state attorneys general across the country.

49. US stocks fall as market decline extends for third week -

Wall Street capped another turbulent week of trading Friday with a broad slide in stocks that left the S&P 500 with its third-straight weekly loss.

The S&P 500 fell 1.1%, led once again by a sell-off in technology companies, with Apple, Amazon and Alphabet weighing particularly on the market. Technology stocks and other companies that powered the market's strong comeback this year have suddenly lost momentum this month amid worries that they have become too expensive.

50. Are Medicare Advantage plans worth the risk? -

About 1 in 3 people 65 and older in the U.S. enroll in Medicare Advantage, the private insurance alternative to traditional Medicare. It’s not hard to see why: Medicare Advantage plans often cover things Medicare doesn’t, and most people don’t pay extra for it.

51. Google exec on hot seat in Congress over advertising power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate panel put a top Google executive on the defensive Tuesday over the company's powerful position in online advertising as some lawmakers look hopefully toward an expected antitrust case against the tech giant by the Trump administration.

52. Michigan plans dedicated road lanes for autonomous vehicles -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The state of Michigan and some private partners are taking steps toward building or assigning dedicated lanes for automated vehicles on a 40-mile stretch of highway between Detroit and Ann Arbor.

53. Amid the pandemic, Big Tech reports mixed earnings -

Big Tech companies reported mixed quarterly earnings on Thursday, a day after their top executives faced a tough congressional grilling over their market power and alleged monopolistic practices.

The staggering economic fallout caused by the coronavirus pandemic was reflected in reports released Thursday from Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Google's corporate parent, Alphabet.

54. Wall Street rallies as Fed keeps rates pinned at record low -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied on Wednesday, and the S&P 500 climbed 1.2% for its best day in two weeks after the Federal Reserve kept the accelerator floored on its support for the economy.

55. US is expected to report a record-breaking economic plunge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Having endured what was surely a record-shattering slump last quarter, the U.S. economy faces a dim outlook as a resurgent coronavirus intensifies doubts about any sustained recovery the rest of the year.

56. 4 Big Tech CEOs getting heat from Congress on competition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four Big Tech CEOs — Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Sundar Pichai of Google and Tim Cook of Apple — are set to answer for their companies' practices before Congress as a House panel caps its yearlong investigation of market dominance in the industry.

57. Google to keep most of its employees at home until July 2021 -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Google has decided that most of its 200,000 employees and contractors should work from home through next June, a sobering assessment of the pandemic's potential staying power from the company providing the answers for the world's most trusted internet search engine.

58. Driver free but virus fee? Robo-car firms hit new speed bump -

DETROIT (AP) — The latest challenge for the autonomous vehicle industry: How to assure passengers that the car they are getting in is virus free, even if it doesn't have a driver.

Widespread use of autonomous vehicles already had been delayed by a March 2018 fatal crash involving an Uber test vehicle in Tempe, Arizona, forcing the industry to pause to make sure its vehicles are safe.

59. Study: Autonomous vehicles won't make roads completely safe -

DETROIT (AP) — A new study says that while autonomous vehicle technology has great promise to reduce crashes, it may not be able to prevent all mishaps caused by human error.

Auto safety experts say humans cause about 94% of U.S. crashes, but the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety study says computer-controlled robocars will only stop about one-third of them.

60. CEO pay has topped $12.3M. Can it keep rising post-pandemic? -

The typical pay package for CEOs at the biggest U.S. companies topped $12.3 million last year, and the gap between the boss and their workforces widened further, according to AP's annual survey of executive compensation.

61. Uber loses $2.9 billion, offloads bike and scooter business -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber lost $2.9 billion in the first quarter as its overseas investments were hammered by the coronavirus pandemic, but the company is looking to its growing food delivery business as well as aggressive cost-cutting to ease the pain.

62. Stocks charge higher on hopes for progress in fighting virus -

Stocks around the world whipped higher Wednesday, riding a wave of optimism on encouraging data about a possible treatment for COVID-19.

The upswell of hope was so strong that investors completely sidestepped a report showing the outbreak drove the U.S. economy to its worst quarterly performance since the Great Recession. The S&P 500 vaulted 2.7% higher and extended a rally that's brought the U.S. stock market to the brink of its best month in 45 years.

63. Stocks up worldwide as governments eye reopening economies -

With governments making moves toward letting businesses reopen, stocks rallied worldwide on Monday to kick off a busy week for markets.

From Rome, Georgia, to Rome, Italy, companies are watching as politicians detail plans to ease up on restrictions that were meant to slow the coronavirus pandemic but also erased businesses and jobs. Retail chains, cruise lines and other businesses whose profits hinge on people stepping outside their homes jumped to some of Monday's biggest gains. The S&P 500 climbed 1.5%.

64. Questions swirl as Fed meets amid deepening economic crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve has largely calmed turbulent financial markets. Yet a far tougher task remains: Helping rescue an economy and job market that appear to be free-falling into the worst catastrophe since the Great Depression.

65. Federal Reserve launches 3rd emergency lending program -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve announced that it will establish an emergency lending facility to help unclog a short-term credit market that has been disrupted by the viral outbreak.

The Fed said late Wednesday that it will lend money to banks that purchase financial assets from money market mutual funds, including short-term IOUs known as commercial paper.

66. A look at some of the hardest hit sectors in the S&P 500 -

Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the outbreak is now classified as a pandemic and it's doing widespread damage to critical economic sectors of the global economy. Airlines are dropping routes because people are not flying, workers are staying home, public events that raise millions of dollars for local communities have been canceled and oil prices have sunk to near $30 a barrel. Here's a look at some of the hardest hit sectors in the S&P 500, and how far they've fallen in the past 30 days.

67. The mighty bull market falls victim to a tiny virus -

NEW YORK (AP) — In the end, the mighty bull was slayed by a tiny virus.

The longest bull market in U.S. history can now be said to have lasted almost 11 years and rewarded investors with a return of 529% based on the performance of the S&P 500, including dividends.

68. US stocks extend gains as investors focus on latest earnings -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Tuesday, led by health care companies, retailers and banks.

The modest gains nudged the S&P 500 and Nasdaq to all-time highs for the second straight day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished essentially flat.

69. US regulators probing 5 tech companies' acquisitions to 2010 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal regulators are ramping up their investigation of the market dominance of giant tech companies, demanding detailed information on five companies' acquisitions of smaller firms back to 2010.

70. Tech stocks lead indexes broadly higher, Nasdaq sets record -

Technology companies led a broad rally on Wall Street Tuesday that drove the Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 400 points higher and gave the S&P 500 its best day in more than five months.

71. Tech, communications stocks push US indexes to more records -

Wall Street capped a milestone-setting week Friday with a few more as modest gains nudged the major stock indexes to all-time highs.

The benchmark S&P 500 index also notched its second-straight weekly gain.

72. Gold climbs on war worries; US stocks shake off early loss -

NEW YORK (AP) — Gold touched its highest price in nearly seven years Monday as investors sought safety amid worries that rising U.S.-Iran tensions could lead to war.

Stocks in Asia and Europe retreated as dollars flowed out of riskier investments, but the U.S. market shook off its morning losses to grind out a modest gain. After dropping 0.6% as soon as trading opened, the S&P 500 pushed steadily higher through the day and ended up recovering half its sharp loss from Friday.

73. Google co-founders step aside as antitrust scrutiny heats up -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google's co-founders are relinquishing their executive positions just as state and federal regulators, not to mention the Department of Justice and Congress, are taking a keen interest in possible abuse of its privacy practices and market power.

74. Matchbox Cars, coloring book, Magic make Toy Hall of Fame -

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) — Matchbox Cars, the coloring book and the collectible card game Magic: The Gathering were inducted Thursday into the National Toy Hall of Fame, recognized for an enduring appeal that keeps them on store shelves today.

75. Google buys Fitbit for $2.1B, enters crowded wearables field -

Fitbit is being acquired by Google's parent company for about $2.1 billion, a deal that enables the search-engine company to leap into the hotly competitive market for smartwatches and health and fitness trackers.

76. US stocks cap wobbly day of trading with modest losses -

Technology companies led stocks lower on Wall Street Tuesday as a wobbly day of trading ended with modest losses for the market.

Health care stocks jumped on stronger-than-expected reports from drugmakers, but losses by internet and media companies held the market in check following a mixed report from Google's parent.

77. Stocks post gains on solid earnings, US-China trade optimism -

The S&P 500 closed just short of an all-time high Friday as investors welcomed solid company earnings reports and an encouraging update on trade talks between the U.S. and China.

Technology, communications services and financial stocks powered the rally. The index ended within 0.1% of its record set July 26. It also notched its third straight weekly gain.

78. US stocks notch solid gains as job report allays worries -

Wall Street ended a choppy week of trading with a broad rally that drove the Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 370 points higher.

The gains Friday also gave the S&P 500 index its best day in seven weeks, though the benchmark index still finished with its third straight weekly loss.

79. UPS gets government approval to become a drone airline -

DALLAS (AP) — UPS has won government approval to operate a nationwide fleet of drones, which will let the company expand deliveries on hospital campuses and move it one step closer to making deliveries to consumers.

80. Walgreens, Google affiliate to launch drone delivery test -

Walgreens and a Google affiliate are testing drone deliveries that can put drugstore products on customer doorsteps minutes after being ordered.

Snacks like Goldfish Crackers or gummy bears as well as aspirin for sick kids will be delivered starting next month in Christiansburg, Virginia, by a 10-pound (4.5-kilogram) drone flying as fast as 70 miles (113 kilometers) per hour, the companies said Thursday.

81. Big Tech faces a new set of foes: nearly all 50 US states -

Big tech companies have long rebuffed attempts by the U.S. federal government to scrutinize or scale back their market power. Now they face a scrappy new coalition as well: prosecutors from nearly all 50 states.

82. GM hires Google to make infotainment system more like phones -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors is hiring Google to run key parts of its dashboard infotainment system, admitting that the tech firm can do a better job.

GM says research shows customers want technology embedded in their vehicle, and they want it to match how their smartphones operate.

83. YouTube to pay $170M fine after violating kids' privacy law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Google's video site YouTube has been fined $170 million to settle allegations it collected children's personal data without their parents' consent.

The Federal Trade Commission fined Google $136 million and the company will pay an additional $34 million to New York state to resolve similar allegations.

84. Huawei unveils phone system that could replace Android -

BEIJING (AP) — Huawei on Friday unveiled a smartphone operating system that it said can replace Google's Android, adding to the Chinese tech giant's efforts to insulate itself against U.S. sanctions.

85. US stocks return to records following strong earnings -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks pushed to record heights Friday following strong profit reports from Google's parent company, Twitter and other big corporations.

Companies are nearly midway through earnings reporting season, and results have generally been better than the dismal expectations that analysts had coming into it. A government report on Friday also showed that U.S. economic growth slowed in the spring, but it was still better than economists expected.

86. Optimism over trade sends US stocks sharply higher -

Potentially encouraging news on trade and interest rates put Wall Street in a buying mood Tuesday, driving the  market to solid gains and sending the Dow Jones Industrial Average 350 points higher.

87. US stocks notch gains, snap short losing streak -

Gains in energy and internet companies helped drive stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday, snapping a two-day losing streak for the market in an otherwise choppy week of trading.

The gains were initially fueled by rising oil prices, which boosted energy companies following a suspected attack on two oil tankers in the strategic Strait of Hormuz. The sector sustained its gains as a mix of media, internet and consumer-oriented companies took the lead in pushing every major index higher. Small company stocks rose more than the rest of the market.

88. US stock market notches best week since late November -

Wall Street turned the page on a painful May in the stock market by notching its best week since late November.

Stocks climbed for a fourth consecutive day Friday, capping a week of gains that reversed most of the losses in May, when President Donald Trump's tariff threats escalated trade wars with China and Mexico.

89. Google to acquire data firm Looker for $2.6 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Google is acquiring data analytics firm Looker for $2.6 billion cash in an effort to expand its Google Cloud business.

The company says Looker will give its cloud-computing customers more ways to use their data. The companies were already working together and share about 350 customers including Buzzfeed, Hearst and Yahoo! The deal is expected to close later this year.

90. Google to acquire data firm Looker for $2.6 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Google is acquiring data analytics firm Looker for $2.6 billion cash in an effort to expand its Google Cloud business.

The company says Looker will give its cloud-computing customers more ways to use their data. The companies were already working together and share about 350 customers including Buzzfeed, Hearst and Yahoo! The deal is expected to close later this year.

91. Congress launches Big Tech antitrust probe -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The federal government may be warming up its antitrust enforcement machine and pointing it at Big Tech.

On Monday, the House Judiciary Committee announced a sweeping antitrust probe of unspecified technology companies . In a statement, it promised "a top-to-bottom review of the market power held by giant tech platforms," which would be the first such Congress has ever undertaken.

92. US stock indexes end mixed; Nasdaq slumps on big tech slide -

Major U.S. stock indexes ended mostly lower Monday amid signs that the Trump administration is laying the groundwork to ratchet up scrutiny on some of the market's biggest names: Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Google.

93. Waymo bringing self-driving trucks to Phoenix area freeways -

PHOENIX (AP) — Google's self-driving vehicle division says it's bringing autonomous trucks to the Phoenix area.

Waymo announced Wednesday that its self-driving tractor-trailers will start driving on freeways this week and will expand to more routes over time.

94. Waymo bringing self-driving trucks to Phoenix area freeways -

PHOENIX (AP) — Google's self-driving vehicle division says it's bringing autonomous trucks to the Phoenix area.

Waymo announced Wednesday that its fully self-driving tractor-trailers will start driving on freeways this week and will expand to more routes over time.

95. US stocks close lower, on track for 1st monthly loss of 2019 -

Another round of selling gripped Wall Street on Wednesday as nervous investors fled health care, technology and other high-risk stocks in favor of the safety of bonds.

The broad sell-off, which lost some momentum in the last hour of trading, keeps the market on track for its fourth consecutive weekly loss and its first monthly drop this year.

96. CEOs get $800,000 pay raise, leaving workers further behind -

NEW YORK (AP) — Did you get a 7% raise last year? Congratulations, yours was in line with what CEOs at the biggest companies got. But for chief executives, that 7% was roughly $800,000.

Pay for CEOs at S&P 500 companies rose to a median of $12 million last year, including salary, stock and other compensation, according to data analyzed by Equilar for The Associated Press. The eight-figure packages continue to rise as companies tie more of their CEOs' pay to their stock prices, which are still near record levels, and as profits hit an all-time high last year due to lower tax bills and a still-growing economy.

97. Stocks close lower as chipmakers slump -

Chipmakers and other technology companies pulled U.S. stocks lower Monday, extending the market's losses into another week.

The U.S. decision to ban technology sales to China's Huawei hammered the tech sector, particularly chipmakers. About one-third of Huawei's suppliers are American chipmakers and investors are worried that the action against Huawei could crimp sales for companies with revenue heavily tied to China.

98. Huawei could be stripped of Google services after US ban -

Huawei could lose its grip on the No. 2 ranking in worldwide cellphone sales after Google announced it would comply with U.S. government restrictions meant to punish the Chinese tech powerhouse.

The Trump administration move, which effectively bars U.S. firms from selling components and software to Huawei, ups the ante in a trade war between Washington and Beijing that partly reflects a struggle for global economic and technological dominance.

99. US stocks extend gains after recovering from early slide -

Stocks reversed an early slide on Wall Street and finished broadly higher Wednesday, giving the market its second straight gain in a week of bumpy trading.

Big technology and communications companies, including Microsoft, Apple and Google parent Alphabet, led the rally as the market shrugged off an initial stumble. Banks took heavy losses following a sharp drop in bond yields.

100. Uber, Lyft losses keep competitors at bay -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A fare war between Uber and Lyft has led to billions of dollars in losses for both ride-hailing companies as they fight for passengers and drivers.

But in one way it has been good for investors who snatched up the newly public companies' stock: The losses have scared off the competition, giving the leaders a duopoly in almost every American city.