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Editorial Results (free)

1. Accountant testifies Trump claimed decade of huge tax losses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump reported losses on his tax returns every year for a decade, including nearly $700 million in 2009 and $200 million in 2010, his longtime accountant testified Tuesday, confirming long-held suspicions about the former president's tax practices.

2. Boris Johnson, ousted by scandal, eyes comeback as UK leader -

LONDON (AP) — Former British Prime Minister Boris Johnson -- ousted by ethics scandals just three months ago -- jockeyed to make a comeback Friday as one of several contenders seeking to replace Liz Truss, whose rapid downfall threw the country's leadership into disarray at a time of severe economic challenges.

3. Liz Truss promised UK a shakeup — but was forced out instead -

LONDON (AP) — Liz Truss became prime minister on a promise to open a new era of growth by shaking up Britain's economy. But the tumult that resulted was not exactly what she had in mind: Markets recoiled, the pound currency dived, her party revolted — and, in the end, she announced her resignation just 45 days after taking office.

4. IKEA calls 2022 an 'exceptional year' despite challenges -

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Swedish home furnishings giant IKEA said Thursday that despite "unprecedented challenges" caused by the war in Ukraine, supply chain disruptions, increased inflation and lingering fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic, 2022 had been an "exceptional year."

5. UK's Truss stands by 'disruption' agenda despite Tory doubts -

BIRMINGHAM, England (AP) — U.K. Prime Minister Liz Truss pledged Wednesday to ride out the turmoil unleashed by her tax-cutting economic agenda, saying the "disruption" will pay off in a wealthier, more efficient Britain.

6. Ohio GOP House candidate has misrepresented military service -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Campaigning for a northwestern Ohio congressional seat, Republican J.R. Majewski presents himself as an Air Force combat veteran who deployed to Afghanistan after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, once describing "tough" conditions including a lack of running water that forced him to go more than 40 days without a shower.

7. Ohio GOP House candidate misrepresented military service -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Campaigning for Congress in northwestern Ohio, Republican J.R. Majewski presents himself as an Air Force combat veteran who deployed to Afghanistan after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

8. Buffett's firm buys more Apple, Amazon while betting on oil -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Warren Buffett's company bet more on high-tech darling Apple and e-commerce giant Amazon during the second quarter, while also investing billions in old-school oil producers Occidental Petroleum and Chevron.

9. Learning from failures: How Biden scored win on climate plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Over the last year, President Joe Biden watched pieces of his domestic agenda get thrown overboard in an effort to keep it afloat. Free community college, child care funding, expanded preschool — all left behind.

10. Biden: Military say a Pelosi Taiwan trip 'not a good idea' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said on Wednesday that U.S. military officials believe it's "not a good idea" for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to visit Taiwan at the moment.

Biden's comments in an exchange with reporters came a day after the Chinese Foreign Ministry said it would take "resolute and strong measures" should Pelosi proceed with reported plans to visit Taiwan in the coming weeks.

11. Ukraine fears a long war might cause West to lose interest -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — As Russia's invasion of Ukraine grinds into its fourth month, officials in Kyiv have expressed fears that the specter of "war fatigue" could erode the West's resolve to help the country push back Moscow's aggression.

12. China's Russia dealings irk US, but don't breach sanctions -

BEIJING (AP) — China's support for Russia through oil and gas purchases is irking Washington and raising the risk of U.S. retaliation, foreign observers say, though they see no sign Beijing is helping Moscow evade sanctions over its war on Ukraine.

13. Buffett's firm reveals new stakes in Paramount, Citigroup -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Warren Buffett's company on Monday revealed all the investment moves it made in the first quarter, when it spent more than $51 billion on stocks.

But Buffett had already shared the biggest investments with Berkshire Hathaway shareholders at the company's recent annual meeting. That means investors already knew that he had invested heavily in Chevron, Occidental Petroleum and HP Inc. during the quarter, while picking up nearly 4 million more Apple shares and betting that Microsoft's acquisition of Activision Blizzard will go through.

14. EU takes major step toward Russian oil ban, new sanctions -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union's top official on Wednesday called on the 27-nation bloc to ban oil imports from Russia and target the country's biggest bank and major broadcasters in a sixth package of sanctions over the war in Ukraine.

15. EXPLAINER: Russia is not a 'most favored nation.' What now? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With Congress voting to suspend normal trade relations with Russia and ban the importation of its oil, President Joe Biden's action to tighten the U.S. squeeze on Russia's economy now can intensify.

16. Russia war ends era of globalization that kept inflation low -

For decades, the free flow of trade across much of the world allowed the richest nations to enjoy easy access to low-priced goods and supplies. It meant solid economies and stable markets.

And for households and businesses, especially in the United States and Europe, it meant an entire generation of ultra-low inflation.

17. Biden is skeptical Russia is scaling back operations in Kyiv -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Tuesday said he wasn't yet convinced that Russia's announcement that it would scale back military operations near the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv will lead to a fundamental shift in the war.

18. Russian war in Ukraine marks 1 month with no end in sight -

Russia's war in Ukraine has killed thousands of people, reduced entire cities to rubble and forced millions to flee their homes. The largest military conflict in Europe since World War II has also upset the international security order and sent dangerous ripples through the global economy.

19. Biden seeks new sanctions, help for Ukrainians in Europe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With Europe facing its most precarious future since World War II, President Joe Biden will huddle with key allies in Brussels and Warsaw this week as they try to prevent Russia's war on Ukraine from spiraling into an even greater catastrophe.

20. White House: Biden to visit Poland on Europe trip this week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has added a stop in Poland to his trip this week to Europe for urgent talks with NATO and European allies, as Russian forces concentrate their fire upon cities and trapped civilians in a nearly month-old invasion of Ukraine.

21. House Dems seek probe of USPS plan for new mail truck fleet -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats on the House Oversight Committee are seeking an investigation into a U.S. Postal Service plan to replace its aging mail trucks with mostly gasoline-powered vehicles.

The plan largely ignores White House calls to replenish the mail-service fleet with electric vehicles and has drawn sharp criticism from the Biden administration, Democratic lawmakers and environmentalists, who say it falls far short of President Joe Biden's goals to address climate change.

22. 'Nothing is taboo': EU mulling new sanctions against Russia -

VERSAILLES, France (AP) — European Union leaders said on Friday they will continue applying pressure on Russia by devising a new set of "massive" sanctions to punish Moscow for its invasion of Ukraine while stepping up military support for Kyiv.

23. US slashes Russia trade status, bans its alcohol, seafood -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden announced Friday the U.S. will dramatically downgrade its trade status with Russia as punishment for its invasion of Ukraine and also ban imports of Russian seafood, alcohol and diamonds.

24. United on Ukraine, EU tackles the devil in details at summit -

VERSAILLES, France (AP) — European Union leaders on Thursday focused on how to help Ukraine in its war with Russia, but the measures discussed are expected to stop short of fulfilling the country's hopes it can soon join the bloc.

25. Russia-Ukraine War: What to know about the war in Ukraine -

Two million people — half of them children — have fled Ukraine since Russia's invasion, according to key U.N. agencies and the International Organization for Migration.

The U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees and UNICEF confirmed the figures as more people headed for the borders. Poland has received more than 1.2 million Ukrainian refugees, the most of any nation.

26. Russia-Ukraine war: Key things to know about the conflict -

Russian and Ukrainian delegations resumed talks on Monday following failed attempts to begin evacuating civilians from besieged Ukrainian cities, including the port city of Mariupol.

After the first two attempts failed over the weekend, Russia announced yet another limited cease-fire that would allow desperate civilians to flee encircled cities through humanitarian corridors, though there was no word as of Monday night that shelling had stopped.

27. Republican 'unforced errors' threaten path to Senate control -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the prospect of a red wave grows, a series of Republican missteps including recruiting stumbles, weak fundraising and intense infighting is threatening the GOP's path to the Senate majority.

28. China calls Russia its chief 'strategic partner' despite war -

BEIJING (AP) — China's foreign minister on Monday called Russia his country's "most important strategic partner" as Beijing continues to refuse to condemn the invasion of Ukraine despite growing pressure from the U.S. and European Union to use its influence to rein Moscow in.

29. Russia-Ukraine War: What to know on Russia's war in Ukraine -

Russia's invasion of Ukraine entered its 12th day following what Ukrainian authorities described as increased shelling of encircled cities and another failed attempt to start evacuating hundreds of thousands of civilians from the besieged areas, including the southern port of Mariupol.

30. China seeks to unify public in support for Russia -

SINGAPORE (AP) — As the West condemns Russia, President Vladimir Putin has vocal supporters in China, where the ruling Communist Party tells its people they are fellow targets of U.S.-led harassment.

31. US hits Putin allies, press secretary with new sanctions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration ordered new sanctions blocking Russian business oligarchs and others in President Vladimir Putin's inner circle on Thursday in response to Russian forces' fierce pummeling of Ukraine.

32. Some Russian oligarchs speak out, cautiously, against war -

There have been social media messages calling for peace, an image of a murdered Russian opposition figure, a newspaper editorial demanding President Vladimir Putin "stop this war."

As Russian forces pound Ukraine's cities, the sentiments might not be surprising. Their source is — they come from rich Russians, including billionaires close to the Kremlin.

33. NATO chief sees no need to change nuclear alert level -

LASK AIR BASE, Poland (AP) — NATO's chief said Tuesday that, despite Russia's threats about nuclear weapons, the alliance sees no need to change its own nuclear weapons alert level.

The alliance's secretary-general, Jens Stoltenberg, spoke to The Associated Press following talks on European security with Polish President Andrzej Duda at an air base in Lask, central Poland, where NATO's Polish and U.S. fighter jets F-15 and F-16 are based.

34. With sanctions, Russian Sberbank faces 'failure' in Europe -

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Faced with a rush of people withdrawing money, Sberbank and the Russian bank's subsidiaries in southeastern and central Europe are facing closures or takeovers following international sanctions imposed on Moscow for its invasion of Ukraine.

35. With sanctions, Russian Sberbank faces 'failure' in Europe -

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — Faced with a rush of people withdrawing money, Sberbank and the Russian bank's subsidiaries in southeastern and central Europe are facing closures or takeovers following international sanctions imposed on Moscow for its invasion of Ukraine.

36. NATO leaders agree to bolster eastern forces after invasion -

BRUSSELS (AP) — U.S. President Joe Biden and his NATO counterparts agreed Friday to reassure member countries on the alliance's eastern flank by sending parts of the organization's response force to help protect them following Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

37. Ukraine invasion: What to know as Russian forces target Kyiv -

NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — Invading Russian forces closed in on Ukraine's capital Friday, in an apparent encircling movement after a barrage of airstrikes on cities and military bases around the country.

38. Biden hits Russia with sanctions, shifts troops to Germany -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden hit back Thursday against Russia's invasion of Ukraine, unleashing robust new sanctions, ordering the deployment of thousands of additional troops to NATO ally Germany and declaring that America would stand up to Russia's Vladimir Putin.

39. EU finance chiefs grapple with economic fallout from attack -

BRUSSELS (AP) — After the political outrage against Russia comes the economic reckoning.

Finance ministers of the 19 countries that use the euro gathered Friday in Paris to weigh the economic fallout of Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the resulting European Union sanctions. The EU, and allies like the U.S., are trying to starve Russia of international capital and key industrial technologies.

40. Congress backs Biden on Russia sanctions, clamors for more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With rare but fragile alignment, the U.S. Congress is largely backing President Joe Biden's decision to confront Russia with potentially escalating sanctions for the crisis in Ukraine as lawmakers brace for perhaps the most daunting foreign policy crisis the nation has faced in a generation.

41. World leaders move to slap sanctions on the Kremlin -

BRUSSELS (AP) — World leaders Thursday condemned Russia's invasion of Ukraine as "barbaric" and moved to slap unprecedented economic sanctions on Moscow and those close to President Vladimir Putin.

42. NATO vows to defend its entire territory after Russia attack -

BRUSSELS (AP) — NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg warned Thursday that the military alliance would defend every inch of its territory should Russia attack a member country, as he slammed Moscow for launching a brutal act of war on Ukraine.

43. Russia attacks Ukraine; peace in Europe 'shattered' -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russia launched a full-scale invasion of Ukraine on Thursday, unleashing airstrikes on cities and military bases and sending troops and tanks from multiple directions in a move that could rewrite the world's geopolitical landscape. Ukraine's government pleaded for help as civilians piled into trains and cars to flee.

44. Putin weighs his next move after recognizing Ukraine rebels -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin has raised the stakes in the Ukraine standoff by recognizing the independence of rebel regions in the country's east, and a key question now is whether he will stop at that or try to move deeper into Ukraine.

45. EXPLAINER: A look at toughest US sanctions facing Putin -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the White House calling Russian deployments in eastern Ukraine an invasion, it's expected to follow up with tough sanctions. President Joe Biden has made clear the United States intends to deploy sweeping financial penalties, not American troops, to hit Russia over President Vladimir Putin's moves against Ukraine.

46. European companies' Russian ties could make sanctions tough -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe is contemplating sanctions against Russia if it invades Ukraine — and the work is far from simple.

Sanctions would seek to maximize the pain for the Kremlin, its key banks and energy companies but also avoid jeopardizing the continent's Russian-dependent energy supplies or inflicting too much damage on European companies with strong ties to Russia, including German industrial manufacturer Siemens AG, Italian tiremaker Pirelli and automakers like Volkswagen and Mercedes-Benz.

47. AP FACT CHECK: Biden takes half-steps on electric vehicles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Eager to show benefits from his policies, President Joe Biden is overstating the number of electric vehicle charging stations that would be built with his infrastructure law and claiming a speedy shift to electric in the federal fleet that isn't so.

48. EXPLAINER: What are US options for sanctions against Putin? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The financial options being considered to punish President Vladimir Putin if Russia invades Ukraine range from the sweeping to the acutely personal — from cutting Russia off from U.S. dollars and international banking to slapping sanctions on a former Olympic gymnast reported to be Putin's girlfriend.

49. Russia accuses West of plotting 'provocations' in Ukraine -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia accused the West on Thursday of plotting "provocations" in Ukraine and disguising its alleged intentions by fomenting concerns about Moscow planning aggressive military action in the neighboring country.

50. Bank of America slashes fees for account overdrafts -

NEW YORK (AP) — Bank of America slashed the amount it charges customers when they spend more than they have in their accounts and plans to eliminate entirely its fees for bounced checks.

It's the latest move by the nation's biggest banks to roll back the overdraft fees they long charged customers, fees that often amount to hundreds of dollars a year for frequent overdraft users.

51. Trump maintains grip on GOP despite violent insurrection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a raging band of his supporters scaled walls, smashed windows, used flagpoles to beat police and breached the U.S. Capitol in a bid to overturn a free and fair election, Donald Trump's excommunication from the Republican Party seemed a near certainty, his name tarnished beyond repair.

52. Banks slowly reconsider overdraft fees, amid public pressure -

NEW YORK (AP) — The banking industry appears to have overdone it on overdraft fees.

After decades of raking in billions of dollars from mostly poor Americans short of cash in their accounts, the biggest banks — under pressure from lawmakers and regulators — are slowly decreasing their reliance on the widely unpopular practice.

53. Biden scales back $2T plan: free community college unlikely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scaling down his ambitious domestic agenda, President Joe Biden has described a more limited vision to Democratic lawmakers of his $2 trillion package for addressing climate change and expanding social services.

54. Trump files lawsuit to keep Jan. 6 documents from Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump on Monday sought to block the release of documents related to the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection to a House committee investigating the attack, challenging President Joe Biden's initial decision to waive executive privilege.

55. Biden aims to enlist allies in tackling climate, COVID, more -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Joe Biden planned to use his first address before the U.N. General Assembly to reassure other nations of American leadership on the global stage and call on allies to move quickly and cooperatively to address the festering issues of the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change and human rights abuses.

56. Fed likely to signal a coming pullback in economic support -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is expected this week to send its clearest signal yet that it will start reining in its ultra-low-interest rate policies later this year, a first step toward unwinding the extraordinary support it's given the economy since the pandemic struck 18 months ago.

57. Merkel prepares to step down with legacy of tackling crises -

BERLIN (AP) — Angela Merkel will leave office as one of modern Germany's longest-serving leaders and a global diplomatic heavyweight, with a legacy defined by her management of a succession of crises that shook a fragile Europe rather than any grand visions for her own country.

58. US hits 17 nations for not combating human trafficking -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration on Thursday designated 17 countries as not doing enough to combat human trafficking and warned them of potential U.S. sanctions. The administration also called out several U.S. allies and friends, including Israel, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal and Turkey, for backsliding in their efforts.

59. Ally Bank ends all overdraft fees, first large bank to do so -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ally Financial is ending overdraft fees entirely on all of its bank products, the company said Wednesday, being the first large bank to end overdraft fees across its entire business.

60. NCAA reaches a key moment as transgender laws multiply -

The NCAA has reached a delicate moment: It must decide whether to punish states that have passed laws limiting the participation of transgender athletes by barring them from hosting its softball and baseball tournaments.

61. Few in GOP rush to defend Gaetz amid sex trafficking probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The political peril for conservative Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz deepened Friday as the often outlandish Trump-styled provocateur appeared politically isolated amid a federal sex-trafficking investigation.

62. Educational Media moving to Nashville -

Educational Media Foundation, parent company to K-LOVE and Air1 radio networks, AccessMore podcasts and WTA Media, plans to move its global headquarters in Nashville.

EMF has been growing its Tennessee presence over the last several years. It recently expanded its studio, from which the K-LOVE morning show and Air1 programs now broadcast, and its promotions, AccessMore podcasting, live events and WTA Media teams have offices in the area already. Members of EMF’s content division will begin moving into the existing offices and temporary space this summer.

63. Over the Cumberland, around the world -

Josef Newgarden has a very simple explanation for why Nashville seemingly has become the center of the motor sports universe.

Or more fittingly, as Newgarden suggests, on center stage in Music City.

64. Trump-McConnell feud threatens Republicans' path to power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump is escalating a political war within his own party that could undermine the Republican push to fight President Joe Biden's agenda and ultimately return the party to power.

65. Ready or not, sports is back in a big way -

In less than three weeks, the Southeastern Conference men’s basketball tournament will be in full swing at Bridgestone Arena. Probably. Maybe.

The tournament format is set, television times have been announced and the Metro Public Health Department has been busy reviewing plans submitted by the SEC to stage its showcase event March 10-14.

66. Pentagon rethinking how to array forces to focus on China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration faces a conundrum as it rethinks the positioning of military forces around the world: How to focus more on China and Russia without retreating from longstanding Mideast threats — and to make this shift with potentially leaner Pentagon budgets.

67. Biden picks Chopra, Gensler for financial oversight roles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is set to nominate Rohit Chopra as the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, tapping a progressive ally of Sen. Elizabeth Warren to helm the agency whose creation she championed.

68. World watches US chaos with shock, dismay and some mockery -

PARIS (AP) — As the world watched American institutions shaken to the core by an angry mob, officials and ordinary citizens wondered: How fragile is democracy, and how much stress could their own political systems withstand?

69. A look at the 29 people Trump pardoned or gave commutations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law's father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

70. Congress stuck, McConnell resists state aid in COVID-19 deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An emerging $900 billion COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers has all but collapsed after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republican senators won't support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal.

71. Stocks close a blistering week, even as uncertainty lingers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street took a breather Friday after a blistering rally that gave the market its biggest weekly gain since April and indicated investors see plenty of benefits from more gridlock in Washington.

72. S2 Cognition claims better athlete evaluation -

Nashville-based S2 Cognition officials say the company can measure and quantify the previously unseen characteristics of the brain that separate elite athletes from the rest of the pack.

Co-founded by cognitive neuroscientists Brandon Ally and Scott Wylie, S2 Cognition is a science-meets-tech-meets-sports startup with just a 5-year history. Both Ally and Wylie are former college athletes and previously research and clinical colleagues at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

73. IPOs head for banner year on stock market's strength -

Companies that cater to the "new normal" of working and shopping from home are rushing to go public.

2020 could turn out to be the best year for the IPO market in two decades. Newly public companies have piggybacked on the broader stock market, which made a soaring recovery in spring and summer after COVID-19 and the ensuing lockdowns derailed the longest bull run in history.

74. US stocks closing lower after Fed rate decision -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street Wednesday after a rally following the Federal Reserve's latest interest rate policy update faded in the final hour of trading.

The S&P 500 fell 0.5% after having been up 0.6% following the 2 p.m. Eastern time Fed announcement. The central bank signaled it will keep interest rates near zero into 2023 and issued a slightly less dire outlook for economic growth and unemployment this year.

75. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's torrent of falsehoods, Biden missteps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Playing defense on his handling of the coronavirus, President Donald Trump is letting the falsehoods fly.

Over the weekend, he railed against cases of voting fraud that didn't exist, asserted that COVID-19 was "rounding a corner" despite what his top health advisers say and blasted Joe Biden for supposed positions on energy and health care that his Democratic rival doesn't hold.

76. Pence aide: NBA protests over Kenosha are 'absurd and silly' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence's chief of staff said Thursday that NBA protests over the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, are "absurd and silly" when compared with the league's relative silence about human rights violations in China, where U.S. pro basketball has a large audience.

77. Emergency postal aid stalls as WH rejects House-passed bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Help for the U.S. Postal Service landed in stalemate Sunday as the White House dismissed an emergency funding bill aimed at shoring up the agency before the November elections as "going nowhere" and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged senators to act quickly.

78. Postmaster: No pre-election return of mail boxes, equipment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pressed by senators, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy said Friday he was unaware of recent mail operation changes until they sparked a public uproar. But he also said he has no plans to restore mailboxes or high-speed sorting machines that have been removed.

79. Bannon's Chinese host an irritant to Communist Party -

BEIJING (AP) — The self-exiled Chinese tycoon on whose 150-foot (45-meter) yacht President Donald Trump's former chief strategist, Steve Bannon, was arrested is a high-profile irritant to the ruling Communist Party.

80. Pelosi says postmaster has no plans to restore mail cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday that President Donald Trump's postmaster general has no intention of restoring mail equipment or funding overtime hours he cut, despite public outcry that operational changes are undermining service before the November election.

81. Postal Service halts some operational changes after outcry -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing public pressure and state lawsuits, the Postmaster general announced Tuesday he is halting some operational changes to mail delivery that critics warned were causing widespread delays and could disrupt voting in the November election.

82. Senator launches investigation into Postal Service delays -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Democratic senator said Thursday he is launching an investigation into changes at the U.S. Postal Service that are causing delays in mail deliveries across the country just as big volume increases are expected for mail-in election voting.

83. Elizabeth Warren's new role: Key Joe Biden policy adviser -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden accused Elizabeth Warren last year of holding an "angry, unyielding viewpoint." She embraced that label and slammed Biden as "naive" for thinking he could work with Republicans as president. She warned Democrats against picking a "Washington insider" and pointedly refused to endorse Biden until weeks after exiting the race.

84. Democrats fail to override Trump veto on student loan policy -

House Democrats on Friday failed to override President Donald Trump's veto of a measure that would have reversed the Education Department's tough policy on loan forgiveness for students misled by for-profit colleges.

85. Pick for top NY prosecutor won't withdraw from Trump matters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's pick to be the top federal prosecutor in Manhattan won't say whether he would withdraw from overseeing matters related to Trump in his current job, as Securities and Exchange Commission chairman, or if confirmed as U.S. attorney.

86. Pompeo meets Chinese officials amid Bolton book revelations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo urged China to reveal all it knows about the coronavirus outbreak in a meeting with a top Chinese official in Hawaii on Wednesday as new revelations about President Donald Trump and China rocked Washington.

87. How to learn from, not live in, a mistake -

“I feel like such an idiot.” It’s something I’ve said more than once as I crumble in the face of a money mistake.

I recently called myself the i-word as I revealed to my husband that I hadn’t checked my cash flow in a few months or contributed to my Roth IRA for 2019, even though he assumed I had.

88. Stocks drop as coronavirus crunches the job market, economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market's first reaction to Friday's stunningly bad jobs report was to take it in stride. But Wall Street slid through the day as investors looked ahead to the likelihood that even worse numbers are on the way.

89. Congressional rescue talks churn as viral crisis expands -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top-level negotiations between Congress and the White House churned late into the night over a now nearly $2 trillion economic rescue package, as the coronavirus crisis deepened, the nation shut down and the first U.S. senator tested positive for the disease.

90. Dow drops more than 900 points, ending worst week since 2008 -

Wall Street ended the week the same way it began: in full retreat from the coronavirus.

Stocks fell sharply and the price of oil sank Friday as federal and state governments moved to shut down bigger and bigger swaths of the nation's economy in the hope of limiting the spread of the outbreak.

91. 'Bigger than any one of us': Biden, Sanders tackle pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders sought in the Democratic debate to cast themselves as best-positioned to lead the nation through a global pandemic, uniting in their criticism of President Donald Trump's response to the fast-moving coronavirus but diverging in how they would confront the spiraling public health and economic crisis.

92. Oil price dives as OPEC, Russia fail to agree on output cut -

VIENNA (AP) — OPEC and key ally Russia failed to agree Friday on a cut to oil production that would have contained the plunge in the price of crude caused by the new coronavirus  outbreak's massive disruption to world business.

93. Trump says 2 justices should sit out cases, but they decide -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A month before the Supreme Court takes up cases over his tax returns and financial records, President Donald Trump on Tuesday made the unusual suggestion that two liberal justices should not take part in those or any other cases involving him or his administration.

94. Waller elects 10 partners from Nashville office -

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP has elected 14 new partners, including 10 in Nashville. New Nashville partners are:

Lida Alsobrooks, who provides counsel to real estate developers, property management companies, property owners and investment firms. Alsobrooks is a graduate of Kenyon College and earned her J.D. from the University of Tennessee College of Law.

95. Judiciary panel to take reins on Trump impeachment inquiry -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee is moving to the forefront of President Donald Trump's impeachment inquiry, starting with a hearing Wednesday to examine the "high crimes and misdemeanors" set out in the Constitution.

96. Coal giant Murray Energy seeks bankruptcy protection -

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A major U.S. coal mining company is seeking bankruptcy protection, despite a flurry of regulatory breaks that its CEO pushed for — and received — from the Trump administration.

97. Trump shifts tone on Turkey in effort to halt Syria invasion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a span of 24 hours, President Donald Trump moved from threatening to obliterate Turkey's economy if it invades Syria to inviting its president to visit the White House.

But Trump did not back away Tuesday from a plan to withdraw American troops from Syria as he tried to persuade Turkey not to invade the country and attack the U.S.-allied Kurds — a needle-threading strategy that has angered Republican and Democratic lawmakers and confused U.S. allies.

98. What's next now that Pelosi has launched impeachment inquiry -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Now that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has launched an official impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, what's next?

In some ways, the investigations of the Trump administration won't look too different from those underway in the House, but now they'll have a focus on the Ukraine situation and an urgency to act.

99. Iran envoy: 'All-out war' to result if hit for Saudi attack -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Any attack on Iran by the U.S. or Saudi Arabia will spark an "all-out war," Tehran's top diplomat warned Thursday, raising the stakes as Washington and Riyadh weigh a response to a drone-and-missile strike on the kingdom's oil industry that shook global energy markets.

100. What the Fed's rate cut means for you -

The Federal Reserve has cut its benchmark interest rate again, big news for the U.S. economy but something that will likely have a muted impact on Americans' personal finances, experts say.

That's because the reduction doesn't offset the increases of recent years. And as the key rate creeps closer to zero, financial institutions are less eager to pass borrowing benefits along. Lower rates could also further dampen the perks of savings.