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Editorial Results (free)

1. Southwest's president retires suddenly; didn't get CEO job -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines President Tom Nealon, who was once seen as a leading candidate for CEO but was passed over this year, has retired.

Southwest said Monday that Nealon, 60, will still serve as an adviser focusing on environmental issues, including plans to reduce carbon emissions. In a statement issued by the airline, Nealon said he was honored to have served Southwest in several jobs, especially president, and looks forward to taking on a strategic role.

2. Strong jobs report sends most stocks, bond yields higher -

Wall Street capped a choppy week of trading Friday with broad gains, which helped push the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average to new highs.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2%, a day after setting another all-time high. Every major index notched a weekly gain after slipping last week.

3. With taxpayers' help, Delta posts $652 million profit in 2Q -

Delta Air Lines is reporting a $652 million profit in the second quarter, helped by hordes of vacation travelers in the U.S. and money from taxpayers, positioning the airline for stronger results once business and international flying recover from the pandemic.

4. Rumsfeld, a cunning leader who oversaw a ruinous Iraq war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Calling Donald H. Rumsfeld energetic was like calling the Pacific wide. When others would rest, he would run. While others sat, he stood. But try as he might, at the pinnacle of his career as defense secretary he could not outmaneuver the ruinous politics of the Iraq war.

5. Boeing will pay $6.6 million to settle FAA allegations -

Federal regulators have imposed $5.4 million in civil penalties against Boeing for violating terms of a $12 million settlement in 2015, and the aircraft maker has agreed to pay another $1.21 million to settle two current enforcement cases.

6. Federal watchdog blasts FAA over certification of Boeing jet -

Federal auditors say U.S. regulators didn't understand a flight-control system that played a role in two deadly crashes of a Boeing jet and must improve their process for certifying new planes.

The Transportation Department's inspector general said in a report released Wednesday that the Federal Aviation Administration hasn't taken enough steps to focus its oversight on high-risk elements of new planes.

7. Airlines close books on rotten 2020 and, so far, 2021 is grim -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines lost $3.1 billion last year, its first full-year loss since Richard Nixon was president and gasoline sold for about 36 cents a gallon with no extra charge for the attendant who cleaned your windshield.

8. Stocks drift to mixed close; S&P 500 ekes out another record -

U.S. stock indexes capped a day of choppy trading with a mixed finish Thursday, though solid gains by technology companies helped lift the S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite to more record highs.

The S&P 500 edged up less than 0.1%. Traders bid up shares in Big Tech stocks, including Apple, Amazon and Facebook. Those gains helped outweigh losses in energy stocks, banks and elsewhere. Stocks in smaller companies, which have led the way higher this year, gave up some of their recent gains.

9. Stocks fall on worries about virus' spread, but pare losses -

Stocks fell on Wall Street Monday, giving back some of their recent gains, as a new, potentially more infectious strain of the coronavirus in the United Kingdom raised worries that the global economy could be in for even more punishment.

10. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's errant final pitches on virus, energy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Making final arguments before Tuesday's election, President Donald Trump asserted the U.S. was shaking off a coronavirus pandemic that is only getting worse, falsely claimed Democrat Joe Biden would lock down the country for years and baselessly alleged that the COVID-19 death count is being inflated by doctors.

11. Stocks fall on Wall Street as coronavirus spreads in Europe -

U.S. stock indexes erased much of their early losses and closed modestly lower Thursday, extending the S&P 500's losing streak to a third day.

The S&P 500 fell 0.2% after having been down 1.4%. Technology, health care and communications stocks accounted for most of the selling, outweighing slight gains in banks and elsewhere in the market.

12. US layoffs still high, but so is skepticism on jobless data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits dipped last week to a still-high 840,000, evidence that layoffs remain elevated seven months into the pandemic recession.

13. Congress takes another run at airline bailout; fate unclear -

House Democrats on Friday proposed a new $28.8 billion bailout for the airline industry after the carriers began furloughs of more than 32,000 workers to cut costs during a pandemic that has devastated air travel.

14. Stocks close mostly higher after a choppy day of trading -

Wall Street capped a choppy day of trading Wednesday with more gains for stocks as investors sized up a mix of company earnings reports and another flare-up in tensions between Washington and Beijing.

15. Strong demand for virus testing services; snacking surges -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

16. Southwest adds more Nashville flights -

Southwest Airlines has extended its published flight schedule from Oct. 31 through Jan. 4, 2021, adding more flights for Nashville.

New routes include additional leisure travel for the autumn and winter holidays.

17. Airlines increase job cuts as pandemic crushes air travel -

Major airlines on both sides of the Atlantic are cutting even more jobs as they struggle to cope with a plunge in air travel that will leave the airline industry much smaller than it was before the coronavirus pandemic and economic collapse.

18. It keeps getting worse for imperiled airlines -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

19. Housing market chills, layoffs, US cos. dial up virus fight -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

20. Conditions for companies that get virus aid: Room for abuse? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A $500 billion federal aid package for companies and governments hurt by the coronavirus includes rules aimed at ensuring that the taxpayer money is used in ways that would help sustain the economy. But questions are being raised about whether those guardrails will prevent the kinds of abuses that have marked some corporate bailouts of the past.

21. AP FACT CHECK: Trump gets a reality check on coronavirus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For weeks, President Donald Trump carved out a trail of groundless assurances about the coronavirus pandemic as health officials, governors and local officials sounded alarm about what was coming — and already here. That sunlit trail now has hit a wall.

22. Stocks drop, but hold on to weekly gains after a big rally -

Wall Street closed lower Friday but still notched big gains for the week as investors held out hope that a $2 trillion rescue package will cushion businesses and households from the economic devastation being caused by the coronavirus.

23. Spyridon planning ahead for post-virus recovery -

Twenty years ago, Butch Spyridon was aggressively beating the drum for a new convention center in downtown Nashville. The need was there, he said, and during the next few years he and the Nashville Convention & Visitors Bureau (now the Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp.) would work to pull together a growing coalition of business, community and elected leaders that resulted in the new Music City Center’s construction and eventual 2013 opening.

24. Dow has best day since 1933 as Congress nears deal on aid -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average surged to its best day since 1933 as Congress and the White House neared a deal on Tuesday to inject nearly $2 trillion of aid into an economy ravaged by the coronavirus.

25. With billions at stake, banks try to save stunned borrowers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Tarred as villains during the 2008 financial meltdown, banks of all sizes are trying to help out Americans reeling from the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

Banks are scrambling to put into place loan forgiveness and relief programs, working to keep their customers from panicking or falling into financial ruin. They have a vested interest preventing millions of people and businesses from defaulting on hundreds of billions of loans at once, something that would do significant damage to the banks' own finances.

26. US manufacturing might vs virus; drinking at home -

The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy. Here's a look at developments Tuesday as central banks, businesses and workers attempt to navigate a global outbreak that has brought economic activity to a standstill.

27. Senator asks for ethics review of his stock sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., is asking for an ethics review after coming under criticism for selling off as much as $1.7 million in stocks just before the market dropped in February amid coronavirus fears.

28. Layoffs spike in US, Europe as virus shuts businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just a couple of weeks ago, Erika Vega hoped her temp job at a cafeteria would soon become permanent. But instead, the viral outbreak shut down the building where she worked and left her wondering where her next paycheck will come from.

29. Jobless claims jump by 70,000 as virus starts to take hold -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits surged last week by 70,000 to the highest level in more than two years, indicating that the effect of the coronavirus was starting to be felt in rising layoffs in the job market.

30. Jobless claims jump by 70,000 as virus starts to take hold -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits surged last week by 70,000 to the highest level in more than two years, indicating that the effect of the coronavirus was starting to be felt in rising layoffs in the job market.

31. US tells older people to stay home, all ages to avoid crowds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Monday urged all older Americans to stay home and everyone to avoid crowds and eating out at restaurants as part of sweeping guidelines meant to combat an expected surge of coronavirus cases.

32. Market swings and a wave of cancellations as virus spreads -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seven weeks after the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the U.S., the outbreak is now classified as a pandemic and it's doing widespread damage to critical economic sectors of the global economy.

33. Wall Street circuit breakers trip ... markets, crude plunge -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. companies buffeted by supply chain chaos and a growing awareness of the scope of a viral outbreak are facing new threats to begin the week. An oil war between Saudi Arabia and Russia sent the price for a barrel of U.S. crude below $34.

34. Virus ripples through travel, energy, financial markets -

The economic affects of the coronavirus have preceded the spread of the virus itself, with financial markets swinging wildly, companies closing offices or asking employees work from home in affected areas, and throttling air travel across the globe. Following is a brief look at how things are changing in the economy and the workplace today as the outbreak widens.

35. Virus ripples through travel, energy, financial markets -

An industry group says the spreading coronavirus could cost airlines as much as $113 billion in lost revenue. That figure, released Thursday, is four times the number released just two weeks ago by the The International Air Transport Association, which is imploring governments for assistance. The group says the industry urgently needs help from governments in waiving some requirements and fees.

36. Dow drops 879, bonds soar on fears virus will stunt economy -

Stocksfell sharplyagain on Wall Street Tuesday, piling on losses a day after the market's biggest drop in two years as fears spread that the growing virus outbreak will put the brakes on the global economy.

37. Virus impact: Airlines extend flights suspensions -

BEIJING (AP) — Airlines are extending their suspension of flights to mainland China, while more retailers are putting an estimate on the economic damage they expect to incur from the virus outbreak in China.

38. Virus impact: Airlines extend flights suspensions -

BEIJING (AP) — Airlines are extending their suspension of flights to mainland China, while more retailers are putting an estimate on the economic damage they expect to incur from the virus outbreak in China.

39. US declares emergency, new entry restrictions due to virus -

Washington (AP) — The United States on Friday declared a public health emergency because of a new virus that hit China and has spread to other nations.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar also announced that President Donald Trump will temporarily bar entry to the U.S. of foreign nationals believed to be a risk of transmitting the virus. The new restrictions begin Sunday afternoon.

40. US advises no travel to China, where virus deaths top 200 -

BEIJING (AP) — The U.S. advised against all travel to China as the number of cases of a worrying new virus spiked more than tenfold in a week, including the highest death toll in a 24-hour period reported Friday.

41. Stocks post modest gains at end of a wobbly day of trading -

Major U.S. stock indexes finished higher Thursday after a late burst of buying led by technology and financial companies reversed an early slide.

News of a spike in the number of confirmed cases and fatalities from a virus outbreak in China put investors in a selling mood for most of the day, overshadowing a batch of mostly solid company earnings reports.

42. Stocks tumble as virus fears spark sell-off; Dow falls 453 -

U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday, sending the Dow Jones Industrial Average down by more than 450 points, as investors grappled with fresh worries about the spread of a new virus in China that threatens global economic growth.

43. US stocks close lower amid jitters over virus outbreak -

Banks led a slide in U.S. stocks Tuesday as a virus outbreak in China rattled global markets, prompting investors to shift assets into bonds and defensive sector companies.

The sell-off snapped a three-day winning streak by the S&P 500. The benchmark index ended last week at an all-time high.

44. Stocks cling to tiny gains as investors parse trade signals -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mixed Tuesday, shedding most of their gains from earlier in the day, after a published report revealed that an interim trade deal between the U.S. and China does not remove tariffs on Chinese goods.

45. Stocks eke out gains after a mixed set of earnings reports -

U.S. stock indexes eked out tiny gains Wednesday following a wobbly day of trading as investors reviewed another set of mixed quarterly report cards from big companies.

Some of the companies' earnings topped analysts' expectations. Others put traders in a selling mood after warning that the slowing global economy and trade tensions are hitting their profits.

46. US stock indexes close lower on mixed company earnings -

A choppy day of trading on Wall Street ended Tuesday with stocks closing lower after a technology sector-led sell-off strengthened toward the end of the day.

That late-afternoon burst of selling erased modest gains for the market, which was coming off two weeks of gains.

47. Stocks end lower; S&P 500 notches 2nd straight weekly gain -

The S&P 500 index closed out an uneven week of trading on Wall Street with its second straight weekly gain, even though stock indexes ended lower Friday.

Technology companies led the slide, which erased the major U.S. indexes' gains from the day before. Communication services, industrials and health care stocks also fell, outweighing gains in real estate companies, banks and elsewhere in the market.

48. Stocks slide over disappointing earnings reports -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks retreated from record highs on Wall Street Thursday as large companies delivered weak earnings and disappointing forecasts.

The daylong slide marked a turnaround from Wednesday, when a series of solid earnings helped push major indexes to records. This is one of the busiest weeks in the latest round of corporate earnings. The market has been volatile since reports started trickling in last week.

49. S&P 500 ekes out gain, enough to extend winning streak -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes took a round trip Monday, erasing their early-morning losses to end the day close to where they started.

The S&P 500 eked out a small gain, enough to prolong its winning streak to eight days, its longest in a year and a half. But the Dow Jones Industrial Average ended lower due to another big loss for Boeing.

50. US stocks end moderately higher; S&P 500 on 5-day win streak -

Stocks recovered from a late-afternoon bout of selling on Wall Street to finish modestly higher Wednesday, giving the benchmark S&P 500 its fifth straight gain.

Technology stocks powered much of the rally, led by chipmakers. Retailers, homebuilders and hotel operators were among the big gainers. Energy companies, consumer goods makers and industrial stocks took the heaviest losses.

51. Before meeting Kim, Trump oversees big Vietnamese plane deal -

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — President Donald Trump and Vietnamese President Nguyen Phu Trong presided over the signing of several trade deals in Hanoi on Wednesday, including agreements to sell the booming Southeast Asian country 110 Boeing planes worth billions of dollars.

52. TSA screener sick-outs hit 10 percent over holiday weekend -

The percentage of TSA airport screeners missing work has hit 10 percent as the partial government shutdown stretches into its fifth week.

The Transportation Security Administration said Monday that Sunday's absence rate compared to 3.1 percent on the comparable Sunday a year ago.

53. What air travelers should know about the government shutdown -

DALLAS (AP) — The partial government shutdown is starting to affect air travel. Over the weekend, some airports had long lines at checkpoints, apparently caused by a rising number of security officers calling in sick while they are not getting paid.

54. Songwriters get special week, contest -

Nashville’s storied Bluebird Café lauded the designation of the last full week in February as “Tennessee Songwriters Week,’’ and will help promote it by sponsoring a statewide contest for songwriters.

55. Stocks dip as oil prices and energy companies fall sharply -

NEW YORK (AP) — Energy companies and oil prices took their worst losses in months Friday on reports OPEC countries plan to produce more oil soon. Stock indexes finished an indecisive week with small losses.

56. Airline new to Nashville under fire after '60 Minutes' safety report -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Allegiant Air shares continue to fall in the aftermath of a news report that is raising serious safety questions about the low-cost carrier.

Allegiant is defending its safety and says the report by CBS News' "60 Minutes" tells a "false narrative" about the airline. Investors, however, fear that the negative publicity will cause travelers to avoid Allegiant, which has a fleet including many older planes that typically require more maintenance.

57. Bass, Berry & Sims names new practice leadership -

Bass, Berry & Sims PLC has appointed Kevin H. Douglas to serve as chair of the firm’s Corporate & Securities Practice Group.

In this role, Douglas will work closely with firm management and with the more than 100 corporate attorneys and staff across the firm’s four offices to develop goals and implement initiatives for the department that are in line with the firm’s overall strategy.

58. Stocks rise after strong forecasts from Wal-Mart, airlines -

NEW YORK (AP) — A big jump for Wal-Mart helped the Dow Jones industrial average set a record Tuesday, while gains for other retailers and airlines sent other stock indexes higher as well.

Airlines rose following strong forecasts from American and United. Utilities and smaller companies also climbed, while banks edged higher as investors prepared for the financial sector to start reporting its third-quarter results in a few days. Wal-Mart notched its biggest gain in almost a year and a half after the company said it expects its digital sales to rise 40 percent in its next fiscal year. It also plans to buy back $20 billion in stock over two years.

59. Soaring airline stocks help lift Wall Street to new heights -

NEW YORK (AP) — Airline and automaker stocks took off on Tuesday and helped U.S. indexes push a bit further into record territory. Trading was again quiet overall, with only modest moves for bond yields, commodities and other markets.

60. Harvey could have deep impact on Texas oil, US economy -

Massive flooding caused by Harvey along Texas' refinery-rich coast could have long-standing and far-reaching consequences for the state's oil and gas industry and the larger U.S. economy. The storm's remnants left much of Houston underwater on Sunday, and the National Weather Service says it's not over yet: Some parts of Houston and its suburbs could end up with as much as 50 inches (1.3 meters) of rain.

61. US stock indexes tick higher as oil's dismal week eases -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes ticked higher in morning trading Thursday after the price of oil stabilized, at least for now.

This week has been dominated by oil's tumbling price, which dropped on Wednesday to its lowest level since last summer, and how much it will affect the broader market.

62. Bond yields rise, stocks push to records as economy cruises -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks and bond yields punched higher Wednesday, and U.S. indexes set records again, following more encouraging news on the U.S. economy.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 11.67 points, or 0.5 percent, to 2,349.25. It's the seventh straight gain for the index and its longest winning streak in three and a half years.  The Dow Jones industrial average rose 107.45 points, or 0.5 percent, to 20,611.86. The Nasdaq composite rose 36.87, or 0.6 percent, to 5,819.44. Seven stocks rose on the New York Stock Exchange for every five that fell.

63. AP FACT CHECK: Trump claims on travel ban misleading, wrong -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the face of widespread criticism, President Donald Trump has staunchly defended his order temporarily banning refugees and nearly all citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries. But in a statement Sunday and tweets Monday, Trump misstated the facts multiple times.

64. AP FACT CHECK: Trump claims on travel ban misleading, wrong -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the face of widespread criticism, President Donald Trump has staunchly defended his order temporarily banning refugees and nearly all citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries. But in a statement Sunday and tweets Monday, Trump misstated the facts multiple times.

65. US stocks slip; real estate falls and banks climb -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks dodged bigger losses and finished barely lower on Wednesday. Health care companies fell and Apple pulled technology companies down, but banks rose.

Earlier in the day, stocks had appeared to be headed for a second day of notable losses, but they recovered some of that lost ground in late trading. Weak earnings for major companies hurt real estate investment trusts and health care companies. Tech stocks slid as investors were unimpressed with Apple's latest results. Banks continued to report strong earnings and Boeing boosted industrial companies.

66. Police trying to determine what caused JFK airport gun calls -

NEW YORK (AP) — Police were investigating what caused people to report hearing gunshots at Kennedy Airport on Sunday night, triggering a series of evacuations and some panic among travelers spooked by the heavy police response.

67. Stock indexes listless, remain close to record levels -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes were listless in midday trading Thursday after the European Central Bank held interest rates at record lows and a series of U.S. companies reported mixed earnings.

68. US stocks rise in early trading after solid earnings reports -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are rising to new highs in early trading Thursday after solid earnings reports from several companies. Banks and industrial companies gained the most. The British pound surged while the country's main stock index faltered after the Bank of England held off on cutting interest rates.

69. Cheap gas fueling expanded Thanksgiving travel day -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — An expanded version of America's annual Thanksgiving travel saga has begun with gas prices low and terrorism fears high.

An estimated 46.9 million Americans are expected to take a car, plane, bus or train at least 50 miles from home over the long holiday weekend, according to the motoring organization AAA. That would be an increase of more than 300,000 people over last year, and the most travelers since 2007.

70. More Thanksgiving travelers; don't get stuck at the airport -

NEW YORK (AP) — A stronger economy and lower gas prices mean Thanksgiving travelers can expect more congested highways this year.

During the long holiday weekend, 46.9 million Americans are expected to go 50 miles or more from home, the highest number since 2007, according to travel agency and car lobbying group AAA. That would be a 0.6 percent increase over last year and the seventh straight year of growth.

71. Cheaper fuel has airlines soaring to record profits -

DALLAS (AP) — For airlines, the record profits keep coming, thanks to cheaper jet fuel.

Like motorists, airlines have been saving money at the pump since oil prices began plunging last summer. Even with a recent increase, the spot price of jet fuel is down 40 percent since September. Airlines are getting such a price break that profits are surging even though their revenue is flat or declining.

72. A small victory for fliers: summer domestic fares fall $2.01 -

After years of steadily-rising airfare, travelers this summer can expect a tiny bit of relief — $2.01 in savings to be exact.

The average roundtrip domestic ticket this summer, including taxes, now stands at $454, down less than a percent from last summer. Vacationers to Europe will fare better with the average ticket down 3 percent to $1,619, about $50 less than last summer.

73. Long tarmac delays at US airports spiked in February -

There was a surge in long tarmac delays at the nation's airports in February, including several during a snow storm in Dallas.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that 16 domestic flights were stuck on the ground for more than three hours and eight international flights were delayed more than four hours in February. Federal rules prohibit airlines from holding planes on the tarmac that long, and the department could issue fines.

74. Facebook blames internal glitch for hourlong global outage -

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Facebook said the outage that made its social media sites inaccessible worldwide for about an hour Tuesday was self-inflicted.

Users of PCs and Facebook's mobile app reported they lost access in Asia, the United States, Australia and the U.K. Facebook-owned Instagram was also inaccessible.

75. Thanksgiving getaway: 46.3 million to hit the road -

NEW YORK (AP) — The good news for Thanksgiving travelers: the price of gas is at five-year lows. The bad news: a lot more people will be on the road.

During the long holiday weekend, 46.3 million Americans are expected to go 50 miles or more from home, the highest number since 2007, according to travel agency and car lobbying group AAA. That would be a 4.2 percent increase over last year.

76. Cost of Thanksgiving is going up, but not by much -

Giving thanks will be a little costlier this year, but — and here's something you can be truly thankful for — it probably won't empty your wallet.

The price for putting Thanksgiving dinner on the table for 10 people is expected to rise slightly this year, clocking in at $49.41. That's 37 cents higher than in 2013. For that, you can blame dairy products, coffee and that all-important marshmallow-topped sweet potato casserole, according to the annual informal survey of consumer grocery prices performed by the American Farm Bureau Federation.

77. G-20 leaders agree on $2 trillion boost to growth -

BRISBANE, Australia (AP) — Under pressure to jolt the lethargic world economy back to life, leaders of G-20 nations on Sunday finalized a plan to boost global GDP by more than $2 trillion over five years. The fanfare, however, was overshadowed by tensions between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Western leaders.

78. Tuesday? Sunday? What’s best day for airline prices? -

For years I’ve been asked: “What’s the best day to book airfare.”

And for years, I’ve answered Tuesday.

The general consensus is that buying airfare on Tuesdays in the early afternoon offers the best chance for snagging the cheapest fares. Airlines typically announce sales on Monday evenings, and competitors have usually responded by 1 p.m. on Tuesdays with price markdowns.

79. US airlines running behind schedule so far in 2014 -

More U.S. flights arrived late in June than the month before, continuing a string of poor performances by the nation's airlines.

The government says that in the first six months of the year, the rate of late flights was the highest since 2008 and cancelations were the highest since 2000.

80. Hawaiian Airlines keeps top spot in on-time list -

The Associated Press

Here are the government's rankings of the leading airlines and their on-time performance in May. Some airlines, including Spirit and Allegiant, are not included because they operate fewer flights. The federal government counts a flight as on-time if it arrives within 14 minutes of schedule.

81. Alcoa helps lift market after 2 days of declines -

NEW YORK (AP) — Corporate earnings season got off to a positive start Wednesday, helping lift the stock market after two days of declines.

The market opened higher and remained modestly higher throughout the day. Stocks climbed further after the Federal Reserve released minutes from its latest policy meeting in June.

82. Stocks slip in afternoon trading; oil prices surge -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks edged lower in afternoon trading on Thursday after a report showed that retail sales rose less than forecast in May. A separate report showed that more Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week. The price of oil surged amid renewed violence in Iraq.

83. Airfares continue to rise, up 12 percent since '09 -

NEW YORK (AP) — The price of flying continues to climb, with the average domestic roundtrip ticket, including tax, reaching $363.42 last year, up more than $7 from the prior year.

The 2 percent increase outpaced inflation, which stood at 1.5 percent for the year, and represents the fourth consecutive year fliers have faced price hikes.

84. Airfares continue to rise, up 12 percent since '09 -

NEW YORK (AP) — The price of flying continues to climb, with the average domestic roundtrip ticket, including tax, reaching $363.42 last year, up more than $7 from the prior year.

The 2 percent increase outpaced inflation, which stood at 1.5 percent for the year, and represents the fourth consecutive year fliers have faced price hikes.

85. Stock market creeps higher as Treasury yield rise -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes edged higher in afternoon trading Tuesday, led by gains in technology companies and banks.

A rise in Treasury yields lifted financial companies, as higher interest rates could help them generate better profit margins. Growth-oriented sectors like industrial and technology companies gained on signs that Europe is poised to emerge from recession. That helped offset declines in homebuilders and other stocks that are sensitive to rising borrowing costs.

86. Parent of American Airlines posts $220M profit -

The parent of American Airlines is reporting a $220 million profit for the second quarter as its cost-cutting from its bankruptcy reorganization kicked in.

It's the first time in six years that the airline has had a profit during the April-June quarter. During the same period last year, it lost $241 million, mostly because of bankruptcy-related expenses.

87. Accelerent Nashville selects Minucci to leadership post -

Accelerent, a national partnership-driven business development platform, has tapped Steve Minucci as the leader of the company’s recently launched Nashville market.

88. American Airlines trims 1Q loss as labor costs fall -

DALLAS (AP) — The parent of American Airlines is reporting a smaller loss for the first quarter than a year ago on slightly higher revenue and much lower labor costs.

AMR Corp. said Thursday that it lost $341 million, compared with a loss of $1.66 billion a year earlier.

89. Home Depot leads Dow average higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — A jump in home sales and strong earnings from Home Depot helped the Dow claw back more than half of its losses from Monday. Improving consumer confidence also brought back buyers to the market.

90. Apple's sales slowdown tugs Nasdaq index lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — A sharp drop in Apple's stock is pulling the Nasdaq down with it after the tech giant predicted weaker sales. Other market indexes were mixed.

Apple sank $61.08 to $452.93. With iPhone sales hitting a plateau and no new products to introduce, Apple said sales would likely increase just 7 percent in the current quarter. That's a let-down for a company that has regularly posted growth rates above 50 percent.

91. US stocks rise as tech, industrial earns roll in -

Strong earnings reports from big U.S. companies helped push the Dow Jones industrial average to its eighth gain in nine sessions Tuesday.

DuPont, Verizon and Travelers Cos., three of the 30 stocks that make up the Dow, closed higher after reporting their financial results for the final quarter of 2012.

92. Stocks fade, extending a weeklong slump -

NEW YORK (AP) — A weak showing in home sales and more disappointing earnings reports are sending stocks lower on Wall Street, extending a weeklong slide.

Stocks had started out higher early Thursday following a strong profit report from Procter & Gamble, but indexes started to weaken in late morning trading after a realtor group said that the pace of home purchase contracts was leveling off.

93. Labor strife threatens American Airlines schedule -

DALLAS (AP) — With American Airlines canceling dozens of flights every day, passengers with fall travel plans are confronting an inconvenient question: Should they avoid the nation's third-largest carrier because labor strife might cause delays and cancelations?

94. DVL partner named 2012 silver medalist -

Nelson Eddy, partner and creative director at DVL Public Relations & Advertising, has been named Silver Medalist for 2012 by the Nashville chapter of the American Advertising Federation.

95. Apple's blowout quarter propels Nasdaq to big gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Nasdaq composite index shot 2 percent higher Wednesday, powered by a surge in Apple. The iPhone maker's stock climbed $50 after the company once again blew past Wall Street's profit forecasts.

96. Stocks drop on mixed news on profits, economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — A slew of U.S. companies announced big profits Thursday, but investors spooked about the economy sold stocks anyway.

Investors shifted between buying and selling early Thursday, then stuck with selling after deciding that strong earnings results weren't enough to make up for weak reports on jobs, housing and manufacturing.

97. Dow approaches highest level since 2008 crisis -

The Dow Jones industrial average rose above its highest closing price since the financial crisis Thursday morning but the rally quickly fizzled, leaving stocks slightly lower in afternoon trading.

Solid news on factory orders and strong earnings from U.S. manufacturers highlighted the economy's growing momentum before the market opened. The Dow and broader indexes turned negative after weaker reports on home sales and future economic growth were released in the late morning.

98. Stocks close higher on Fed promise of low rates -

The stock market bounced to its highest close since last spring Wednesday after the Federal Reserve pledged to keep interest rates near zero for almost three more years.

99. Stocks open higher as unemployment claims decline -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rose in midday trading Thursday after a decline in applications for unemployment benefits and strong earnings reports from Bank of America and Morgan Stanley.

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 35 points to 12,613 shortly after noon.

100. Southwest posts 4Q income of $131 million -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines is making money on more traffic and higher ticket prices, producing a 15 percent jump in revenue. And the airline says bookings for January and the rest of the winter look strong.