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Editorial Results (free)

1. 50 years later, musicians still find magic in Beatles ‘Abbey Road’ -

“Sonic fairy dust” is a phrase stuck in my head the last few days as I returned to “Abbey Road.”

It’s an apt assessment that I adopted from one of the folks I interviewed, music masters of various degrees, who generally genuflected while agreeing the album – which has just been released in a remastered/remixed version for its golden anniversary – was “sprinkled with sonic fairy dust.”

2. College Board says it is replacing SAT 'adversity score' -

The company that administers the SAT college admissions test is replacing the so-called adversity score with a tool that will no longer reduce an applicant's background to a single number, an idea the College Board's chief executive now says was a mistake.

3. Trump citizenship plan will face logistical, legal hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After failing to get his citizenship question on the census, President Donald Trump now says his fallback plan will provide an even more accurate count — determining the citizenship of 90 percent of the population "or more." But his plan will likely be limited by logistical hurdles and legal restrictions.

4. Some big farms collecting outsized checks from Trump aid package -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — When President Donald Trump's administration announced a $12 billion aid package for farmers struggling under the financial strain of his trade dispute with China, the payments were capped. But many large farming operations had no trouble finding legal ways around them, records provided to The Associated Press under the Freedom of Information Act show.

5. In Trump aid package for farmers, many blow past caps -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — When President Donald Trump's administration announced a $12 billion aid package for farmers struggling under the financial strain of his trade dispute with China, the payments were capped. But many large farming operations had no trouble finding legal ways around them, records provided to The Associated Press under the Freedom of Information Act show.

6. Hard to recycle religiously in land of agnostics -

There’s good news for Nashville – though not great – on the curbside recycling front, a topic that has become close to my heart in recent years.

During my previous Nashville incarnation in the 1990s, as with my earlier Southern way stations, there was no curbside recycling.

7. Keith Urban, Kacey Musgraves, Dan + Shay win at ACM Awards -

Grammy-winning duo Dan + Shay solidified themselves as the hottest group in country music with multiple wins at the Academy of Country Music Awards, where Keith Urban was named entertainer of the year and Kacey Musgraves won three honors.

8. Day 13: New Congress, same old impasse over Trump's wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The partial government shutdown entered a 13th day Thursday with House Democrats prepared to pass their plan to reopen government and President Donald Trump accusing them of playing politics with an eye on the 2020 election.

9. Talks go nowhere as partial gov't shutdown enters 13th day -

WASHINGTON (AP) — No one budged at President Donald Trump's closed-door meeting with congressional leaders, so the partial government shutdown persisted over his demand for billions of dollars to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico. They'll all try again Friday.

10. AP FACT CHECK: Trump garbles Syria story, poverty record -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is garbling his story about what's going on with the Islamic State group. Has it been defeated or is it still a fighting force? He had it both ways over the course of several days.

11. Apple upstages Amazon in selecting new tech hub locations -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — One tech giant strung dozens of North American cities through a circus-like contest that led mayors and governors to desperately pitch their regions — and offer huge sums of public money — in hopes of landing a gleaming new corporate campus. The other swept in quietly before making its big move.

12. Apple deepens Austin ties, expands operations east and west -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Apple will build a $1 billion campus in Austin, Texas, break ground on smaller locations in Seattle, San Diego and Culver City, California, and over the next three years expand in Pittsburgh, New York and Boulder, Colorado, Boston, and Portland, Oregon.

13. Community Foundation awards $2.72M+ to 453 organizations -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, a charitable organization dedicated to enriching the quality of life in 40 Middle Tennessee counties and beyond, announces $2,726,800 in grants to 453 local nonprofit organizations as part of the 2018 annual grantmaking process.

14. Can Tennessee history spur neighborhood renaissance? -

Leaving the new Tennessee State Museum in the rearview mirror for a few minutes, I decide to dodge off Jefferson Street and try to catch up with the pedestrian who I later discover is a retired chief petty officer. “We ran the Navy,” he tells me, proudly.

15. Legal Aid Society picks Family Law lead attorney -

Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands, Tennessee’s largest non-profit law firm, has promoted Shaina Thompson to family law lead attorney for its Nashville office.

She will help victims of domestic violence gain independence from abusive situations. Beyond Orders of Protection and divorces, this includes helping victims with issues like denial of benefits, food stamps and/or housing.

16. Life in Trump's Cabinet: Perks, pestering, power, putdowns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross came in for an Oval Office tongue-lashing after he used a mundane soup can as a TV prop. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis got overruled by President Donald Trump's announcement that a new "Space Force" is in the offing. Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt caught a sharp admonition from Trump to "knock it off" after his ethics problems dominated cable television.

17. Groups sue Ben Carson over delay of anti-segregation rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A group of advocacy organizations filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the Department of Housing and Urban Development and its secretary, Ben Carson, over his decision to delay an Obama-era rule intended to ensure that communities confront and address racial segregation.

18. Nashville's most romantic restaurants for 2018 -

Nashville has a restaurant for every mood. If you're looking for romance on Valentine’s Day or any night of the week, you can’t miss with these.

Restaurants new to the list are designated with an *.

19. Urban will headline New Year’s celebration -

GRAMMY-winner Keith Urban will headline Jack Daniel’s Music City Midnight: New Year’s Eve in Nashville for a second consecutive year.

Urban will lead a diverse lineup that includes CMA New Artist of the Year Maren Morris, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees Cheap Trick, 2017 country music breakout artist Carly Pearce, R&B artist Jonny P and the Fisk Jubilee Singers.

20. Health survey: US uninsured up 3.5M this year; expected to rise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of U.S. adults without health insurance is up nearly 3.5 million this year, as rising premiums and political turmoil over "Obamacare" undermine coverage gains that drove the nation's uninsured rate to a historic low.

21. Dean’s hurdle: Winning over state’s rural voters -

As mayor, Karl Dean helped usher in Nashville’s current boom of economic growth and development. Now, as candidate for governor of Tennessee, Dean wants to bring prosperity to other corners of the state.

22. Farm outreach, from midwifery to foreign aid -

THE FARM – The free and freeing (and sometimes free-wheeling) nature of life on The Farm is perhaps one reason the clumps of flowers have not been removed to make space in Douglas Stevenson’s 50-by-100-foot veggie garden.

23. Finding success in the shifting restaurant business -

Look at the restaurant to your left. Now look at the restaurant to your right. Chances are, one of them won’t be there by 2020.

The restaurant industry has low profit margins and a notoriously high failure rate. And with new eateries opening by the week in Nashville, it’s reasonable to assume some won’t make it past the critical five-year mark.

24. Farmers markets growing in number, hanging around longer -

Watch out now. Those farmers markets that shoppers are increasingly depending on for their produce might not be disappearing altogether as the season changes. At least not anytime soon.

A seeming bumper crop of farmers markets have continued to sprout since the early spring harvests and, at least until the frost covers the pumpkins, there is no slowdown in sight. And the way things are going, it won’t be long before the markets flourish year-round (more on that later).

25. Bringing the mission back home -

Crunching through an almost invisible gap in the fence and onto the rutted “road” of mostly loose gravel, I’m looking forward to meeting up with the produce and life nurturer I first met in a church parking lot on the other side of this very hill.

26. Community supported agriculture provides direct link from farmers to table -

In 2009, all Stephanie Bradshaw wanted to do was get her family back to cleaner eating. Running a business around the pickup and delivery of farm-fresh produce wasn’t in the picture. But it soon would be.

27. Dodging a disaster with Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

28. Solving problems at Brentwood's B&C Hardware, 1 ‘thingamajig’ at a time -

Pushing at the bridge of his spectacles – with lenses that transition from clear to dark depending on the light – the 60-year-old, who likes to ratchet folks’ woes down to the basic nuts and bolts, looks toward the paint counter near the doorway of B&C Ace Hardware.

29. Real Deal Bar-B-Q: A legacy for future generations -

The Vietnam-era Marine chomps into a jumbo bun bursting with barbecued pulled pork he’s nursed to perfection for the generations, literally, at his restaurant just off the Clarksville Highway.

30. Tennessee startups chasing greater opportunities -

When it comes to launching startup companies, Tennessee is best described as “early stage.”

The less than $200 million in venture capital invested in Tennessee businesses in 2014 is a rounding error compared to the $30 billion invested in California. And when the final tally for 2015 comes out later this month, the disparity won’t be much smaller.

31. Emerald ash borer devastates Tennessee forests -

The emerald ash borer is an unassuming little bug, an almost-pretty insect that could fit on the head of a penny with three or four of its brothers.

But these little green pests are weaving a wormy path of destruction through Tennessee’s lumber industry to the tune of $11 billion. That’s a lot of pennies, and a lot of emerald ash borers.

32. Will Pinkston loves a good fight -

Bulldog or bully. Metro School Board member Will Pinkston draws both labels as Nashville debates education issues and elects its top leaders.

Most pointedly, charter schools proponents call him everything from a “monopolist” to combative to polarizing, while supporters say he has passion for the community and education, as well as the willingness to challenge people intent on “dismantling” traditional public schools.

33. Early bird Pendley gets the best produce -

Chef Edgar Pendley says he burns “a lot of diesel making sure we got good produce” for the folks in the 12South neighborhood, as well as those who may stop to purchase tomatoes, sweet corn, okra and even his own homemade bacon and sausage on their way home from work.

34. Rekindling the flame that was Jefferson Street -

Lorenzo Washington pushes “pause” on his conversation so he doesn’t have to compete with the scream of a fire engine as it roars past his Jefferson Street recording empire and into the barbecue-flavored haze of this steamy, storm-threatened mid-summer’s day.

35. Nashville Music City Center abuzz with 100,000 bees on roof -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Nashville's Music City Center is now home to 100,000 bees as part of the venue's sustainability initiative.

Multiple news outlets report the convention center announced Monday it has added four hives of European honeybees to the green roof.

36. Leaving a life they love at Farmers’ Market -

Charles Hardy needs help loading a huge piece of his life: a massive white refrigerator that was part of the Nashville Farmers’ Market home he’s leaving – likely for good – after almost a half-century.

37. Meaning of 4 words at center of high court health law fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court next week hears a challenge to President Barack Obama's health care overhaul that hinges on just four words in the massive law that seeks to dramatically reduce the ranks of the uninsured. The argument threatens subsidies that help make insurance affordable to consumers in about three dozen states.

38. Nashville’s most romantic restaurants -

Romance means something different for everyone, but most people can agree that if there is low lighting, soft music, a charming companion and something delicious to eat, you’ve already got the makings of one outstanding evening.

39. Immigrants find room to grow in Nashville's public gardens -

With the growing season wrapped up for winter and the temperature hovering at 45 degrees on a recent Sunday, the community garden off Wedgewood Avenue looked to be draped in a brown afghan with just a few patches of green peeking through.

40. Have yourself a Music City Christmas: What to see, do in Nashville this holiday season -

In years past, Carl Haley has offered his Grand Avenue transportation passengers the customary Christmas lights tour packages – about the same as other tours in Nashville – with a cruise by Opryland and a trip to a few choice, heavily decorated neighborhoods.

41. UT architecture students help design Nashville’s future -

Nashville may be a city on the rise, attracting new residents by the droves. But it’s also a laboratory for students at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s College of Architecture and Design, where they are designing the communities of the future in partnership with the Nashville Civic Design Center.

42. US wealth gap putting the squeeze on state revenue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Income inequality is taking a toll on state governments.

The widening gap between the wealthiest Americans and everyone else has been matched by a slowdown in state tax revenue, according to a report being released Monday by Standard & Poor's.

43. Republicans, Democrats embrace budget gimmick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If there's anything that can unite Democrats and Republicans in the partisan swamp of Capitol Hill, it's free money.

The latest example of free money in Washington is a retread proposal called "pension smoothing" that raises money but doesn't increase anyone's taxes. To some people's way of thinking, that's a win-win situation. But others say lose-lose is more like it, arguing that it's budget fakery at its worst and that it could undermine pension security for millions of workers.

44. More Americans see middle class status slipping -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sense of belonging to the middle class occupies a cherished place in America. It conjures images of self-sufficient people with stable jobs and pleasant homes working toward prosperity.

45. US stocks end slightly lower for a second day -

Without any big economic news or blowout company earnings to respond to, investors found little to get excited about Tuesday and sent the stock market lower for the second day in a row.

A few companies grabbed headlines for posting poor quarterly results or consummating long-running merger talks Tuesday. But the broader market barely budged for much of the day, then closed slightly lower. Investors didn't see enough that they liked to drive up a market that hit three record highs last week.

46. Lawmakers put finishing touches on spending bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Funding for implementing the new health care law and other sticking points remain, but negotiators reported significant progress Tuesday on a $1.1 trillion spending bill to fund the government through September.

47. Murfreesboro shop provides competition for Europe’s finest hams -

Flipping through pages of the Tienda catalog of hand-crafted and artisanal Spanish foods, Bob Woods’ head snapped around.

The owner of the G&W Hamery in Murfreesboro, Woods came across Iberico and Serrano hams, the classic cured, uncooked hams of Spain, sliced thin and served like prosciutto.

48. Award-winning restaurants across the country find G&W Hamery’s Tennessee prosciutto simply irresistible -

New Year’s Eve day at G&W Hamery in Murfreesboro is a busy, busy day, but probably in a very different way than anyone else’s New Year’s Eve day.

While other people are buying liquor and cooking black-eyed peas, Hamery owner Bob Woods is rounding up young people to unload 30,000 pounds of pork from a tractor trailer at his Lytle Street shop, which once housed his uncle’s veterinary clinic.

49. Milk money: Farm bill could hinge on dairy vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Approval of a massive farm bill — and the cost of a gallon of milk — could hinge on a proposed new dairy program the House is expected to vote on this week.

An overhaul of dairy policy and a new insurance program for dairy farmers included in the farm bill have passionately divided farm-state lawmakers. Most importantly, it has caused a rift between House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and the top Democrat on the House Agriculture Committee, Rep. Collin Peterson of Minnesota.

50. Will smart machines create a world without work? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They seem right out of a Hollywood fantasy, and they are: Cars that drive themselves have appeared in movies like "I, Robot" and the television show "Knight Rider."

Now, three years after Google invented one, automated cars could be on their way to a freeway near you. In the U.S., California and other states are rewriting the rules of the road to make way for driverless cars. Just one problem: What happens to the millions of people who make a living driving cars and trucks — jobs that always have seemed sheltered from the onslaught of technology?

51. A bumper crop of farmers markets -

As fertile as Middle Tennessee is, it used to be a bit of a challenge to find fresh fruits and vegetables. At the height of summer, it was easier to swing by the grocery than head to the countryside in search of a produce stand.

52. Number of US farmers markets surges -

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — As demand for locally grown fruits and vegetables has increased, so too has the number of urban farmers markets sprouting up across the nation.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture will announce Friday that the number of direct-sales markets has increased 9.6 percent in the past year, with California and New York leading the way.

53. Study: Candidates' plans lead to huge deficits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Huge tax cuts in the budget plans of Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum would produce the kinds of trillion-dollar-plus deficits that the GOP candidates are blaming on President Barack Obama.

54. Backyard chicken bill moves forward in Nashville -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A bill that would allow urban residents in Nashville to keep chickens in their backyards has moved a step closer to approval after a colorful public hearing in which supporters donned yellow hats and shirts and presented the council members with Peeps marshmallow candies.

55. Study: Cain tax plan raises taxes on 84 percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Herman Cain's 9-9-9 tax plan would raise taxes on 84 percent of U.S. households, according to an independent analysis released Tuesday, contradicting claims by the Republican presidential candidate that most Americans would see a tax cut.

56. The next deficit deal: There's a rough road ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special panel's goal is lofty: concoct a deal both parties will embrace to slash federal deficits by a mammoth $1.5 trillion or more over the next decade.

Yet from the moment House and Senate leaders appoint the 12 members until the 2012 elections, hurricane-force political pressures are going to make it tough to produce anything substantial.

57. Tree-trimming practices hated but effective -

If you haven’t been a victim yourself, chances are you know someone who has. And while it’s not criminal, many Davidson Country residents view Nashville Electric Services’ tree-trimming practices as a crime against nature.

58. Finding a profit in a charitable endeavor -

The Nashville Mobile Market operates as a 501c3, but it’s “very much a business,” says executive director Alexandra “Alex” Arnold.

Organized and operated by Vanderbilt students from various disciplines – business majors, medical students, public health majors and humanities students all are involved – the 28-foot, food-laden trailer hauled by a university pickup was seeded with a $65,000 grant from the Frist Foundation.

59. Healthy choices -

With a nod and a bright smile, Chandlér Bradley, 63, glances up from the cashier’s table at The Nashville Mobile Market.

“This is good,” he says of the portable business that on this day has rolled into the courtyard in the shadows of Gernert public housing development – the high rise and cottages at 12th Avenue South and Edgehill – in the heart of the city’s food desert.

60. Simple idea leads to Belle Meade garden -

As the Director of Food Service for Park Manor, an independent senior living community in Belle Meade, 24-year-old Brandon Frohne puts a lot of care into the meals he creates. With a culinary background that includes stints at Nick and Rudy’s, The Palm Terrace and training at the Culinary Institute of America, quality has always been the key ingredient.